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Sample records for accurate equilibrium structure

  1. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  2. Extending the molecular size in accurate quantum-chemical calculations: the equilibrium structure and spectroscopic properties of uracil.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo

    2011-04-21

    The equilibrium structure of uracil has been investigated using both theoretical and experimental data. With respect to the former, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level in conjunction with a triple-zeta basis set have been carried out. Extrapolation to the basis set limit, performed employing the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and inclusion of core-correlation and diffuse-function corrections have also been considered. Based on the available rotational constants for various isotopic species together with corresponding computed vibrational corrections, the semi-experimental equilibrium structure of uracil has been determined for the first time. Theoretical and semi-experimental structures have been found in remarkably good agreement, thus pointing out the limitations of previous experimental determinations. Molecular and spectroscopic properties of uracil have then been studied by means of the composite computational approach introduced for the molecular structure evaluation. Among the results achieved, we mention the revision of the dipole moment. On the whole, it has been proved that the computational procedure presented is able to provide parameters with the proper accuracy to support experimental investigations of large molecules of biological interest.

  3. Accurate Equilibrium Structures for trans-HEXATRIENE by the Mixed Estimation Method and for the Three Isomers of Octatetraene from Theory; Structural Consequences of Electron Delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Demaison, Jean; Groner, Peter; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Vogt, Natalja

    2015-06-01

    An accurate equilibrium structure of trans-hexatriene has been determined by the mixed estimation method with rotational constants from 8 deuterium and carbon isotopologues and high-level quantum chemical calculations. In the mixed estimation method bond parameters are fit concurrently to moments of inertia of various isotopologues and to theoretical bond parameters, each data set carrying appropriate uncertainties. The accuracy of this structure is 0.001 Å and 0.1°. Structures of similar accuracy have been computed for the cis,cis, trans,trans, and cis,trans isomers of octatetraene at the CCSD(T) level with a basis set of wCVQZ(ae) quality adjusted in accord with the experience gained with trans-hexatriene. The structures are compared with butadiene and with cis-hexatriene to show how increasing the length of the chain in polyenes leads to increased blurring of the difference between single and double bonds in the carbon chain. In trans-hexatriene r(“C_1=C_2") = 1.339 Å and r(“C_3=C_4") = 1.346 Å compared to 1.338 Å for the “double" bond in butadiene; r(“C_2-C_3") = 1.449 Å compared to 1.454 Å for the “single" bond in butadiene. “Double" bonds increase in length; “single" bonds decrease in length.

  4. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  5. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  6. ON THE EQUILIBRIUM STRUCTURE OF SIMPLE LIQUIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    It is shown that the repulsive (not merely the positive) portion of the Lennard - Jones potential quantitatively dominates the equilibrium structure of...the Lennard - Jones liquid. A simple and accurate approximation for the radial distribution function at high densities is presented.

  7. On equilibrium structures of the water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Császár, Attila G.; Czakó, Gábor; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Szalay, Viktor; Shirin, Sergei V.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.

    2005-06-01

    Equilibrium structures are fundamental entities in molecular sciences. They can be inferred from experimental data by complicated inverse procedures which often rely on several assumptions, including the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Theory provides a direct route to equilibrium geometries. A recent high-quality ab initio semiglobal adiabatic potential-energy surface (PES) of the electronic ground state of water, reported by Polyansky et al. [Polyansky et al.Science 299, 539 (2003)] and called CVRQD here, is analyzed in this respect. The equilibrium geometries resulting from this direct route are deemed to be of higher accuracy than those that can be determined by analyzing experimental data. Detailed investigation of the effect of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation suggests that the concept of an isotope-independent equilibrium structure holds to about 3×10-5Å and 0.02° for water. The mass-independent [Born-Oppenheimer (BO)] equilibrium bond length and bond angle on the ground electronic state PES of water is reBO=0.95782Å and θeBO=104.485°, respectively. The related mass-dependent (adiabatic) equilibrium bond length and bond angle of H2O16 is read=0.95785Å and θead=104.500°, respectively, while those of D2O16 are read=0.95783Å and θead=104.490°. Pure ab initio prediction of J =1 and 2 rotational levels on the vibrational ground state by the CVRQD PESs is accurate to better than 0.002cm-1 for all isotopologs of water considered. Elaborate adjustment of the CVRQD PESs to reproduce all observed rovibrational transitions to better than 0.05cm-1 (or the lower ones to better than 0.0035cm-1) does not result in noticeable changes in the adiabatic equilibrium structure parameters. The expectation values of the ground vibrational state rotational constants of the water isotopologs, computed in the Eckart frame using the CVRQD PESs and atomic masses, deviate from the experimentally measured ones only marginally, especially for A0 and B0. The

  8. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  9. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  10. The geometry of structural equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine’s reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine’s description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves.

  11. A time-accurate implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    A new time accurate coupled solution procedure for solving the chemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers is described. The scheme is shown to be very efficient and robust for flows with velocities ranging from M less than or equal to 10(exp -10) to supersonic speeds.

  12. Raoult’s law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    The humidity surrounding a sample is an important variable in scientific experiments. Biological samples in particular require not just a humid atmosphere but often a relative humidity (RH) that is in equilibrium with a stabilizing solution required to maintain the sample in the same state during measurements. The controlled dehydration of macromolecular crystals can lead to significant increases in crystal order, leading to higher diffraction quality. Devices that can accurately control the humidity surrounding crystals while monitoring diffraction have led to this technique being increasingly adopted, as the experiments become easier and more reproducible. Matching the RH to the mother liquor is the first step in allowing the stable mounting of a crystal. In previous work [Wheeler, Russi, Bowler & Bowler (2012). Acta Cryst. F68, 111–114], the equilibrium RHs were measured for a range of concentrations of the most commonly used precipitants in macromolecular crystallography and it was shown how these related to Raoult’s law for the equilibrium vapour pressure of water above a solution. However, a discrepancy between the measured values and those predicted by theory could not be explained. Here, a more precise humidity control device has been used to determine equilibrium RH points. The new results are in agreement with Raoult’s law. A simple argument in statistical mechanics is also presented, demonstrating that the equilibrium vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution: Raoult’s law. The same argument can be extended to the case where the solvent and solute molecules are of different sizes, as is the case with polymers. The results provide a framework for the correct maintenance of the RH surrounding a sample. PMID:28381983

  13. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, David R; Bowler, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    The humidity surrounding a sample is an important variable in scientific experiments. Biological samples in particular require not just a humid atmosphere but often a relative humidity (RH) that is in equilibrium with a stabilizing solution required to maintain the sample in the same state during measurements. The controlled dehydration of macromolecular crystals can lead to significant increases in crystal order, leading to higher diffraction quality. Devices that can accurately control the humidity surrounding crystals while monitoring diffraction have led to this technique being increasingly adopted, as the experiments become easier and more reproducible. Matching the RH to the mother liquor is the first step in allowing the stable mounting of a crystal. In previous work [Wheeler, Russi, Bowler & Bowler (2012). Acta Cryst. F68, 111-114], the equilibrium RHs were measured for a range of concentrations of the most commonly used precipitants in macromolecular crystallography and it was shown how these related to Raoult's law for the equilibrium vapour pressure of water above a solution. However, a discrepancy between the measured values and those predicted by theory could not be explained. Here, a more precise humidity control device has been used to determine equilibrium RH points. The new results are in agreement with Raoult's law. A simple argument in statistical mechanics is also presented, demonstrating that the equilibrium vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution: Raoult's law. The same argument can be extended to the case where the solvent and solute molecules are of different sizes, as is the case with polymers. The results provide a framework for the correct maintenance of the RH surrounding a sample.

  14. Structural design using equilibrium programming formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to increasingly larger structural optimization problems are desired. However, computational resources are strained to meet this need. New methods will be required to solve increasingly larger problems. The present approaches to solving large-scale problems involve approximations for the constraints of structural optimization problems and/or decomposition of the problem into multiple subproblems that can be solved in parallel. An area of game theory, equilibrium programming (also known as noncooperative game theory), can be used to unify these existing approaches from a theoretical point of view (considering the existence and optimality of solutions), and be used as a framework for the development of new methods for solving large-scale optimization problems. Equilibrium programming theory is described, and existing design techniques such as fully stressed design and constraint approximations are shown to fit within its framework. Two new structural design formulations are also derived. The first new formulation is another approximation technique which is a general updating scheme for the sensitivity derivatives of design constraints. The second new formulation uses a substructure-based decomposition of the structure for analysis and sensitivity calculations. Significant computational benefits of the new formulations compared with a conventional method are demonstrated.

  15. A time-accurate algorithm for chemical non-equilibrium viscous flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J.-S.; Chen, K.-H.; Choi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A time-accurate, coupled solution procedure is described for the chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers. This method employs the strong conservation form of the governing equations, but uses primitive variables as unknowns. Real gas properties and equilibrium chemistry are considered. Numerical tests include steady convergent-divergent nozzle flows with air dissociation/recombination chemistry, dump combustor flows with n-pentane-air chemistry, nonreacting flow in a model double annular combustor, and nonreacting unsteady driven cavity flows. Numerical results for both the steady and unsteady flows demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the present algorithm for Mach numbers ranging from the incompressible limit to supersonic speeds.

  16. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R

    2017-02-28

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Czz(t)=Re⟨σz(0)σz(t)⟩, we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  17. Equilibrium Structure of Tantalum Oxygen Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgic, S. Sentürk; Caliskan, M.

    2007-04-01

    We determine a refined model for the interionic interactions in TaOn clusters by an analysis of data on their molecular structures. The potential energy function of an ionic cluster we adopt is based on the interionic force model proposed by Akdeniz and Tosi. The microscopic model used for Tantalum oxygen clusters incorporates the Born Model of cohesion and shell model for vibrational motions and crystal defects. Electron shell deformability is described through the effective valences, the electric and overlap polarizabilities of the oxygens, the electric polarizability of the tantalum ions. The two different overlap repulsive energy form have been tested. The molecular structure of clusters in equilibrium have been shown. It has been found in a good agreement for the bond lengths and bond angles by comparing with those obtained by chemical structure calculations and experimental data Thus the applicability of interionic model is tested for transition metal oxide clusters.

  18. Quasilinear Evidence for the Equilibrium Structure of BeOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaritolo, Kyle; Merrit, Jermey M.; Heaven, Michael C.

    2013-06-01

    The hydroxides of Ca, Sr and Ba are known to be linear molecules, while MgOH is quasilinear. High-level ab initio calculations for BeOH predict a bent equilibrium structure with a bond angle of 140.9°, indicating a significant contribution of covalency to the bonding. However, experimental confirmation of the bent structure is lacking. IR and ESR spectra for matrix-isolated BeOH have been interpreted under the assumption of a linear equilibrium structure. Low resolution electronic spectra have been reported for gas phase BeOH and BeOD, but they have not been analyzed. In the present study we have used resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization, with mass resolved ion detection, and laser induced fluorescence to observe the near UV rovibronic v'-0 bending progression of BeOH and BeOD. Rotationally resolved data have been obtained, which yield rotational constants of the ground and excited states, along with evidence of spin-rotation coupling. Theoretical collaboration with Per Jensen of Bergische Universität Wuppertal revealed the need for the inclusion of large amplitude motion within the Hamiltonian operator to accurately simulate observed spectra. Inclusion of large amplitude motions indicates BeOH/OD is quasilinear in its ground state. A. Antic-Jovanovic, V. Bojovic, D. Pesic, J. Chem. Phys. 211988 (757)

  19. Toroidal figures of equilibrium from a second-order accurate, accelerated SCF method with subgrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Hersant, F.

    2017-02-01

    We compute the structure of a self-gravitating torus with polytropic equation of state (EOS) rotating in an imposed centrifugal potential. The Poisson solver is based on isotropic multigrid with optimal covering factor (fluid section-to-grid area ratio). We work at second order in the grid resolution for both finite difference and quadrature schemes. For soft EOS (i.e. polytropic index n ≥ 1), the underlying second order is naturally recovered for boundary values and any other integrated quantity sensitive to the mass density (mass, angular momentum, volume, virial parameter, etc.), i.e. errors vary with the number N of nodes per direction as ˜1/N2. This is, however, not observed for purely geometrical quantities (surface area, meridional section area, volume), unless a subgrid approach is considered (i.e. boundary detection). Equilibrium sequences are also much better described, especially close to critical rotation. Yet another technical effort is required for hard EOS (n < 1), due to infinite mass density gradients at the fluid surface. We fix the problem by using kernel splitting. Finally, we propose an accelerated version of the self-consistent field (SCF) algorithm based on a node-by-node pre-conditioning of the mass density at each step. The computing time is reduced by a factor of 2 typically, regardless of the polytropic index. There is a priori no obstacle to applying these results and techniques to ellipsoidal configurations and even to 3D configurations.

  20. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vanderborght, Jan; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is, the water content and pressure head are not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state behind the front. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macropores. Since flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the porous medium, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be directly linked to structural properties of the material. A critical question is how to define averaged state variables at the larger scale. We propose a novel approach based on flux-weighted averaging of pressure head, and compare its performance to alternative methods for averaging. Further, we suggest some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be related to morphological characteristics of infiltration fronts in quantitative terms. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We demonstrate our approach using numerical case studies for infiltration into two-dimensional heterogeneous media using three different structure models with distinct differences in connectivity. Our results indicate that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic structures that are elongated in the direction of flow enforce it. We observe a good agreement between front morphology and effective hydraulic non-equilibrium. A detailed comparison of averaged state variables with results from an upscaled model that includes hydraulic non-equilibrium outlines potential improvements in the description of non-equilibrium dynamics

  1. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that

  2. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vogel, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flowpaths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that this

  3. Semiexperimental equilibrium structures for building blocks of organic and biological molecules: the B2PLYP route.

    PubMed

    Penocchio, Emanuele; Piccardo, Matteo; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-10-13

    The B2PLYP double hybrid functional, coupled with the correlation-consistent triple-ζ cc-pVTZ (VTZ) basis set, has been validated in the framework of the semiexperimental (SE) approach for deriving accurate equilibrium structures of molecules containing up to 15 atoms. A systematic comparison between new B2PLYP/VTZ results and several equilibrium SE structures previously determined at other levels, in particular B3LYP/SNSD and CCSD(T) with various basis sets, has put in evidence the accuracy and the remarkable stability of such model chemistry for both equilibrium structures and vibrational corrections. New SE equilibrium structures for phenylacetylene, pyruvic acid, peroxyformic acid, and phenyl radical are discussed and compared with literature data. Particular attention has been devoted to the discussion of systems for which lack of sufficient experimental data prevents a complete SE determination. In order to obtain an accurate equilibrium SE structure for these situations, the so-called templating molecule approach is discussed and generalized with respect to our previous work. Important applications are those involving biological building blocks, like uracil and thiouracil. In addition, for more general situations the linear regression approach has been proposed and validated.

  4. Determination of the experimental equilibrium structure of solid nitromethane using path-integral molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Habershon, Scott; Morrison, Carole A.; Rankin, David W. H.

    2010-03-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations with an empirical interaction potential have been used to determine the experimental equilibrium structure of solid nitromethane at 4.2 and 15 K. By comparing the time-averaged molecular structure determined in a PIMD simulation to the calculated minimum-energy (zero-temperature) molecular structure, we have derived structural corrections that describe the effects of thermal motion. These corrections were subsequently used to determine the equilibrium structure of nitromethane from the experimental time-averaged structure. We find that the corrections to the intramolecular and intermolecular bond distances, as well as to the torsion angles, are quite significant, particularly for those atoms participating in the anharmonic motion of the methyl group. Our results demonstrate that simple harmonic models of thermal motion may not be sufficiently accurate, even at low temperatures, while molecular simulations employing more realistic potential-energy surfaces can provide important insight into the role and magnitude of anharmonic atomic motions.

  5. Accurate treatment of interface roughness in nanoscale DG MOSFETs using non-equilibrium Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, James; Kaya, Savas

    2004-11-01

    In the sub-50-nm scale, the aggressive scaling of MOSFETs is expected to culminate in dual-gate (DG) architectures on SOI substrates. DG MOSFETs are widely accepted to be the ultimate design that silicon can deliver in terms of on and off currents. So far, the design efforts on these novel structures have concentrated on ideal geometries and doping profiles. However, at nanometer scale, devices fabricated with lithography and etching techniques cannot deliver perfect reproductions of the ideal design and suffer significantly from fluctuation effects associated with random doping and interfaces. While the former is less important in undoped, thin-body architecture, the interface roughness is a crucial factor in DG MOSFET performance, as indicated by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  6. Deformation of the benzene ring upon fluorination: equilibrium structures of all fluorobenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Császár, Attila G.

    2013-07-01

    Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure (r BO e) estimates are reported for benzene and all 12 possible fluorobenzenes, based on geometry optimizations performed at the coupled cluster level of electronic structure theory including single and double excitations augmented by a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and Gaussian basis sets of at least triple zeta quality. Furthermore, accurate semiexperimental equilibrium (r SE e) structures are determined for C6H6, C6H5F, and 1,2- and 1,3-difluorobenzene. They are obtained through a least-squares structural refinement procedure based on equilibrium rotational constants of as many isotopologues as feasible, determined by correcting experimental vibrationally averaged ground-state rotational constants with computed ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants and electronic g-factors, and using a few structural constraints based on the best r BO e estimates. The r BO e and r SE e equilibrium structures are in excellent agreement with each other for the four semirigid molecules but in almost all cases they differ significantly from previously determined equilibrium structure estimates based on rotational spectroscopy or gas electron diffraction. The nature of deformations of the benzene ring induced by a single fluorine substitution can be characterized as follows: (a) the strongest effect is the pushing of the ipso carbon atom toward the ring center resulting in a deformation at the ipso [by +2.7(1)°] and ortho [-1.7(1)°] CCC angles, (b) a simultaneous decrease in the ortho CC bond length of the benzene ring by 0.009 Å and (c) a decrease of all the CH bond lengths. Additivity relations concerning the F substitution effects are obtained based on the equilibrium structures of all possible fluorobenzenes.

  7. Mapping methods for computationally efficient and accurate structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Mapping methods are developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes. The mapping methods consist of: (1) deterministic structural analyses with fine (convergent) finite element meshes, (2) probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes, (3) the relationship between the probabilistic structural responses from the coarse and fine finite element meshes, and (4) a probabilistic mapping. The results show that the scatter of the probabilistic structural responses and structural reliability can be accurately predicted using a coarse finite element model with proper mapping methods. Therefore, large structures can be analyzed probabilistically using finite element methods.

  8. ON THE EQUILIBRIUM STRUCTURE AND THERMODYNAMICS OF SIMPLE LIQUIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The equilibrium structure and thermodynamics of a simple liquid is discussed. The particular system considered in our calculations is the Lennard ... Jones liquid in which the intermolecular interaction is the pairwise additive 6- 12 potential. The potential is separated into two parts, a reference

  9. EFFECT OF SOLAR CHROMOSPHERIC NEUTRALS ON EQUILIBRIUM FIELD STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Arber, T. D.; Botha, G. J. J.; Brady, C. S. E-mail: G.J.J.Botha@warwick.ac.u

    2009-11-10

    Solar coronal equilibrium fields are often constructed by nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation from photospheric magnetograms. It is well known that the photospheric field is not force-free and the correct lower boundary for NLFFF construction ought to be the top of the chromosphere. To compensate for this, pre-filtering algorithms are often applied to the photospheric data to remove the non-force-free components. Such pre-filtering models, while physically constrained, do not address the mechanisms that may be responsible for the field becoming force-free. The chromospheric field can change through, for example, field expansion due to gravitational stratification, reconnection, or flux emergence. In this paper, we study and quantify the effect of the chromospheric neutrals on equilibrium field structures. It is shown that, depending on the degree to which the photospheric field is not force-free, the chromosphere will change the structure of the equilibrium field. This is quantified to give an estimate of the change in alpha profiles one might expect due to neutrals in the chromosphere. Simple scaling of the decay time of non-force-free components of the magnetic field due to chromospheric neutrals is also derived. This is used to quantify the rate at which, or equivalent at which height, the chromosphere is expected to become force-free.

  10. FragBag, an accurate representation of protein structure, retrieves structural neighbors from the entire PDB quickly and accurately.

    PubMed

    Budowski-Tal, Inbal; Nov, Yuval; Kolodny, Rachel

    2010-02-23

    Fast identification of protein structures that are similar to a specified query structure in the entire Protein Data Bank (PDB) is fundamental in structure and function prediction. We present FragBag: An ultrafast and accurate method for comparing protein structures. We describe a protein structure by the collection of its overlapping short contiguous backbone segments, and discretize this set using a library of fragments. Then, we succinctly represent the protein as a "bags-of-fragments"-a vector that counts the number of occurrences of each fragment-and measure the similarity between two structures by the similarity between their vectors. Our representation has two additional benefits: (i) it can be used to construct an inverted index, for implementing a fast structural search engine of the entire PDB, and (ii) one can specify a structure as a collection of substructures, without combining them into a single structure; this is valuable for structure prediction, when there are reliable predictions only of parts of the protein. We use receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to quantify the success of FragBag in identifying neighbor candidate sets in a dataset of over 2,900 structures. The gold standard is the set of neighbors found by six state of the art structural aligners. Our best FragBag library finds more accurate candidate sets than the three other filter methods: The SGM, PRIDE, and a method by Zotenko et al. More interestingly, FragBag performs on a par with the computationally expensive, yet highly trusted structural aligners STRUCTAL and CE.

  11. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Hajdin, Christine E.; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified. PMID:23503844

  12. Accurate Classification of RNA Structures Using Topological Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kejie; Gribskov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    While RNAs are well known to possess complex structures, functionally similar RNAs often have little sequence similarity. While the exact size and spacing of base-paired regions vary, functionally similar RNAs have pronounced similarity in the arrangement, or topology, of base-paired stems. Furthermore, predicted RNA structures often lack pseudoknots (a crucial aspect of biological activity), and are only partially correct, or incomplete. A topological approach addresses all of these difficulties. In this work we describe each RNA structure as a graph that can be converted to a topological spectrum (RNA fingerprint). The set of subgraphs in an RNA structure, its RNA fingerprint, can be compared with the fingerprints of other RNA structures to identify and correctly classify functionally related RNAs. Topologically similar RNAs can be identified even when a large fraction, up to 30%, of the stems are omitted, indicating that highly accurate structures are not necessary. We investigate the performance of the RNA fingerprint approach on a set of eight highly curated RNA families, with diverse sizes and functions, containing pseudoknots, and with little sequence similarity–an especially difficult test set. In spite of the difficult test set, the RNA fingerprint approach is very successful (ROC AUC > 0.95). Due to the inclusion of pseudoknots, the RNA fingerprint approach both covers a wider range of possible structures than methods based only on secondary structure, and its tolerance for incomplete structures suggests that it can be applied even to predicted structures. Source code is freely available at https://github.rcac.purdue.edu/mgribsko/XIOS_RNA_fingerprint. PMID:27755571

  13. Hydrostatic equilibrium and stellar structure in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.; Odintsov, S. D.; Stabile, A.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the hydrostatic equilibrium of stellar structure by taking into account the modified Lane-Emden equation coming out from f(R) gravity. Such an equation is obtained in a metric approach by considering the Newtonian limit of f(R) gravity, which gives rise to a modified Poisson equation, and then introducing a relation between pressure and density with polytropic index n. The modified equation results an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f(R){yields}R, becomes the standard Lane-Emden equation. We find the radial profiles of the gravitational potential by solving for some values of n. The comparison of solutions with those coming from general relativity shows that they are compatible and physically relevant.

  14. Financial Structure and Economic Welfare: Applied General Equilibrium Development Economics

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This review provides a common framework for researchers thinking about the next generation of micro-founded macro models of growth, inequality, and financial deepening, as well as direction for policy makers targeting microfinance programs to alleviate poverty. Topics include treatment of financial structure general equilibrium models: testing for as-if-complete markets or other financial underpinnings; examining dual-sector models with both a perfectly intermediated sector and a sector in financial autarky, as well as a second generation of these models that embeds information problems and other obstacles to trade; designing surveys to capture measures of income, investment/savings, and flow of funds; and aggregating individuals and households to the level of network, village, or national economy. The review concludes with new directions that overcome conceptual and computational limitations. PMID:21037939

  15. Efficient and accurate determination of lattice-vacancy diffusion coefficients via non equilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiovanni, D. G.; Hellman, O.; Alling, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    We revisit the color-diffusion algorithm [Aeberhard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 095901 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.095901] in non equilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics (NE-AIMD) and propose a simple efficient approach for the estimation of monovacancy jump rates in crystalline solids at temperatures well below melting. Color-diffusion applied to monovacancy migration entails that one lattice atom (colored atom) is accelerated toward the neighboring defect site by an external constant force F. Considering bcc molybdenum between 1000 and 2800 K as a model system, NE-AIMD results show that the colored-atom jump rate kNE increases exponentially with the force intensity F , up to F values far beyond the linear-fitting regime employed previously. Using a simple model, we derive an analytical expression which reproduces the observed kNE(F ) dependence on F . Equilibrium rates extrapolated by NE-AIMD results are in excellent agreement with those of unconstrained dynamics. The gain in computational efficiency achieved with our approach increases rapidly with decreasing temperatures and reaches a factor of 4 orders of magnitude at the lowest temperature considered in the present study.

  16. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: New Thermodynamic Measurements and Model Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin; Qafoku, Odeta; Xia, Yuanxian; Wang, Zheming; MacLean, Graham

    2003-03-27

    Developing accurate thermodynamic models for predicting the chemistry of the high-level waste tanks at Hanford is an extremely daunting challenge in electrolyte and radionuclide chemistry. These challenges stem from the extremely high ionic strength of the tank waste supernatants, presence of chelating agents in selected tanks, wide temperature range in processing conditions and the presence of important actinide species in multiple oxidation states. This presentation summarizes progress made to date in developing accurate models for these tank waste solutions, how these data are being used at Hanford and the important challenges that remain. New thermodynamic measurements on Sr and actinide complexation with specific chelating agents (EDTA, HEDTA and gluconate) will also be presented.

  17. [The accuracy of rapid equilibrium assumption in steady-state enzyme kinetics is the function of equilibrium segment structure and properties].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy of the rapid equilibrium assumption in the steady-state enzyme kinetics was obtained for an arbitrary mechanism of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This evaluation depends only on the structure and properties of the equilibrium segment, but doesn't depend on the structure and properties of the rest (stationary part) of the kinetic scheme. The smaller the values of the edges leaving equilibrium segment in relation to values of the edges within the equilibrium segment, the higher the accuracy of determination of intermediate concentrations and reaction velocity in a case of the rapid equilibrium assumption.

  18. Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structures for the Equatorial Conformers of N-Methylpiperidone and Tropinone by the Mixed Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C.; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, H. D.

    2012-06-01

    N-methylpiperidone and tropinone, which contain a structural motif found in numerous alkaloids, are too large for determining an accurate equilibrium structure either by ab initio methods or by experiment. However, the ground state rotational constants of the parent species and of all isotopologues with a substituted heavy atom (13C, 15N, 18O) are known from microwave spectroscopy. These constants have been corrected for the rovibrational contribution calculated from an ab initio cubic force field. These semiexperimental equilibrium rotational constants have been supplemented by carefully chosen structural parameters from medium level ab initio calculations. In the mixed estimation method, the two sets of data have been used in a weighted least-squares fit to determine a reliable equilibrium structure for both molecules. This work shows that it is possible to determine reliable equilibrium structures for large molecules (34 degrees of freedom in the case of tropinone). The method could be applied without too much difficulty to still larger molecules. L. Evangelisti, A. Lesarri, M. K. Jahn, E. J. Cocinero, W. Caminati, J.-U. Grabow J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 9545-9551 (2011) E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño PCCP 12, 6076-6083 (2010)

  19. Accurate protein structure modeling using sparse NMR data and homologous structure information.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James M; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Liu, Gaohua; Rossi, Paolo; Tang, Yuefeng; Mills, Jeffrey L; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    While information from homologous structures plays a central role in X-ray structure determination by molecular replacement, such information is rarely used in NMR structure determination because it can be incorrect, both locally and globally, when evolutionary relationships are inferred incorrectly or there has been considerable evolutionary structural divergence. Here we describe a method that allows robust modeling of protein structures of up to 225 residues by combining (1)H(N), (13)C, and (15)N backbone and (13)Cβ chemical shift data, distance restraints derived from homologous structures, and a physically realistic all-atom energy function. Accurate models are distinguished from inaccurate models generated using incorrect sequence alignments by requiring that (i) the all-atom energies of models generated using the restraints are lower than models generated in unrestrained calculations and (ii) the low-energy structures converge to within 2.0 Å backbone rmsd over 75% of the protein. Benchmark calculations on known structures and blind targets show that the method can accurately model protein structures, even with very remote homology information, to a backbone rmsd of 1.2-1.9 Å relative to the conventional determined NMR ensembles and of 0.9-1.6 Å relative to X-ray structures for well-defined regions of the protein structures. This approach facilitates the accurate modeling of protein structures using backbone chemical shift data without need for side-chain resonance assignments and extensive analysis of NOESY cross-peak assignments.

  20. Mapping methods for computationally efficient and accurate structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Mapping methods are developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes. The mapping methods consist of the following: (1) deterministic structural analyses with fine (convergent) finite element meshes; (2) probabilistic structural analyses with coarse finite element meshes; (3) the relationship between the probabilistic structural responses from the coarse and fine finite element meshes; and (4) a probabilistic mapping. The results show that the scatter in the probabilistic structural responses and structural reliability can be efficiently predicted using a coarse finite element model and proper mapping methods with good accuracy. Therefore, large structures can be efficiently analyzed probabilistically using finite element methods.

  1. The anharmonic force field and equilibrium molecular structure of ketene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Allan L. L.; Allen, Wesley D.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    1995-06-01

    be problematic. From high-precision empirical rotational constants of six isotopomers and the theoretical anharmonic force field, the equilibrium structure of ketene is derived: re(C=O)=1.160 30(29) Å, re(C=C)=1.312 12(30) Å, re(C-H)=1.075 76(7) Å, and θe(H-C-H)=121.781(12)°. A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis shows that the unusually large methylene angle is attributable to extensive in-plane π delocalization.

  2. Mapping methods for computationally efficient and accurate structural reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of mesh coarseness in the structural reliability is evaluated. The objectives are to describe the alternatives and to demonstrate their effectiveness. The results show that special mapping methods can be developed by using: (1) deterministic structural responses from a fine (convergent) finite element mesh; (2) probabilistic distributions of structural responses from a coarse finite element mesh; (3) the relationship between the probabilistic structural responses from the coarse and fine finite element meshes; and (4) probabilistic mapping. The structural responses from different finite element meshes are highly correlated.

  3. Accurate NMR structures through minimization of an extended hybrid energy.

    PubMed

    Nilges, Michael; Bernard, Aymeric; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Malliavin, Thérèse; Habeck, Michael; Rieping, Wolfgang

    2008-09-10

    The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X-ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications-for example, in homology modeling.

  4. A Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure of cis-Hexatriene from Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.; Chen, Yihui; Fuson, Hannah A.; Tian, Hengfeng; Besien, Herman Van; Rudolph, H. D.; Demaison, Jean

    2013-06-01

    Ground state rotational constants for a full set of carbon and deuterium isotopologues of cis-hexatriene, which has a dipole moment of only 0.05 D, have been determined by MW spectroscopy. Ground state rotational constants were converted into equilibrium rotational constants with spectroscopic alphas computed from force constants found with an MP2/cc-pVTZ model. Corrections for electronic contributions were applied. Despite the availability of a full set of rotational constants for a suite of isotopologues, an accurate structure was not accessible. The mixed estimation method, in which high-quality bond parameters computed by quantum chemistry with appropriate uncertainties were fit simultaneously with the moments of inertia, was applied. A structure good to 0.001 {Å} was the result. The structural parameters reflect an increase in pi-electron delocalization compared to butadiene. R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, A. Lesarri, J. L. Neill, S. Shipman, R. A. Holmes, M. C. Leyden, N. C. Craig J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 1864-1868 (2009). N. C. Craig, Y. Chen, H. A. Fuson, H. Tian, H. van Besien, A. R. Conrad, M. J. Tubergen, H. D. Rudolph, J. Demaison, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, in press.

  5. Fast and accurate determination of the relative binding affinities of small compounds to HIV-1 protease using non-equilibrium work.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-12-05

    The fast pulling ligand (FPL) out of binding cavity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate and low CPU demand method for the determination of the relative binding affinities of a large number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors. In this approach, the ligand is pulled out of the binding cavity of the protein using external harmonic forces, and the work of pulling force corresponds to the relative binding affinity of HIV-1 PR inhibitor. The correlation coefficient between the pulling work and the experimental binding free energy of R=-0.95 shows that FPL results are in good agreement with experiment. It is thus easier to rank the binding affinities of HIV-1 PR inhibitors, that have similar binding affinities because the mean error bar of pulling work amounts to δW=7%. The nature of binding is discovered using the FPL approach. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A computationally efficient and accurate numerical representation of thermodynamic properties of steam and water for computations of non-equilibrium condensing steam flow in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubý, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical modeling of the non-equilibrium condensing transonic steam flow in the complex 3D geometry of a steam turbine is a demanding problem both concerning the physical concepts and the required computational power. Available accurate formulations of steam properties IAPWS-95 and IAPWS-IF97 require much computation time. For this reason, the modelers often accept the unrealistic ideal-gas behavior. Here we present a computation scheme based on a piecewise, thermodynamically consistent representation of the IAPWS-95 formulation. Density and internal energy are chosen as independent variables to avoid variable transformations and iterations. On the contrary to the previous Tabular Taylor Series Expansion Method, the pressure and temperature are continuous functions of the independent variables, which is a desirable property for the solution of the differential equations of the mass, energy, and momentum conservation for both phases.

  7. Fast and accurate automatic structure prediction with HHpred.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Andrea; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Söding, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Automated protein structure prediction is becoming a mainstream tool for biological research. This has been fueled by steady improvements of publicly available automated servers over the last decade, in particular their ability to build good homology models for an increasing number of targets by reliably detecting and aligning more and more remotely homologous templates. Here, we describe the three fully automated versions of the HHpred server that participated in the community-wide blind protein structure prediction competition CASP8. What makes HHpred unique is the combination of usability, short response times (typically under 15 min) and a model accuracy that is competitive with those of the best servers in CASP8.

  8. Semi-experimental equilibrium structure determinations by employing B3LYP/SNSD anharmonic force fields: validation and application to semirigid organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Matteo; Penocchio, Emanuele; Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-03-12

    This work aims at extending the semi-experimental (SE) approach for deriving accurate equilibrium structures to large molecular systems of organic and biological interest. SE equilibrium structures are derived by a least-squares fit of the structural parameters to the experimental ground-state rotational constants of several isotopic species corrected by vibrational contributions computed by quantum mechanical (QM) methods. A systematic benchmark study on 21 small molecules (CCse set) is carried out to evaluate the performance of hybrid density functionals (in particular B3LYP) in the derivation of vibrational corrections to rotational constants. The resulting SE equilibrium structures show a very good agreement with the corresponding geometries obtained employing post-Hartree-Fock vibrational corrections. The use of B3LYP in conjunction with the double-ζ SNSD basis set strongly reduces the computational costs, thus allowing for the evaluation of accurate SE equilibrium structures for medium-sized molecular systems. On these grounds, an additional set of 26 SE equilibrium structures including the most common organic moieties has been set up by collecting the most accurate geometries available in the literature together with new determinations from the present work. The overall set of 47 SE equilibrium structures determined using B3LYP/SNSD vibrational corrections (B3se set) provides a high quality benchmark for validating the structural predictions of other experimental and/or computational approaches. Finally, we present a new strategy (referred to as the template approach) to deal with the cases for which it is not possible to fit all geometrical parameters due to the lack of experimental data.

  9. A semi-analytical approach for calculating the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Thompson, L.; Li, G.

    2016-12-01

    A semi-analytical model for determining the equilibrium configuration and the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. By taking advantage of the symmetry characteristics, a CNT structure is represented by five independent variables. A line search optimization procedure is employed to determine the equilibrium values of these variables by minimizing the potential energy. With the equilibrium configuration obtained, the semi-analytical model enables an efficient calculation of the RBM frequency of the CNTs. The radius and radial breathing mode frequency results obtained from the semi-analytical approach are compared with those from molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio calculations. The results demonstrate that the semi-analytical approach offers an efficient and accurate way to determine the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of CNTs.

  10. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J

    2016-09-14

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  11. Predicting the equilibrium protein folding pathway: structure-based analysis of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Hilser, V J; Freire, E

    1997-02-01

    The equilibrium folding pathway of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) has been approximated using a statistical thermodynamic formalism that utilizes the high-resolution structure of the native state as a template to generate a large ensemble of partially folded states. Close to 400,000 different states ranging from the native to the completely unfolded states were included in the analysis. The probability of each state was estimated using an empirical structural parametrization of the folding energetics. It is shown that this formalism predicts accurately the stability of the protein, the cooperativity of the folding/unfolding transition observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) or urea denaturation and the thermodynamic parameters for unfolding. More importantly, this formalism provides a quantitative account of the experimental hydrogen exchange protection factors measured under native conditions for SNase. These results suggest that the computer-generated distribution of states approximates well the ensemble of conformations existing in solution. Furthermore, this formalism represents the first model capable of quantitatively predicting within a unified framework the probability distribution of states seen under native conditions and its change upon unfolding.

  12. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  13. Accurate structures and binding energies for small water clusters: The water trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, I.M.; Seidl, E.T.; Janssen, C.L.

    1999-05-01

    The global minimum on the water trimer potential energy surface has been investigated by means of second-order Mo/ller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory employing the series of correlation-consistent basis sets aug-cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, Q, 5, 6), the largest of which contains 1329 basis functions. Definitive predictions are made for the binding energy and equilibrium structure, and improved values are presented for the harmonic vibrational frequencies. A value of 15.82{plus_minus}0.05 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} is advanced for the infinite basis set frozen core MP2 binding energy, obtained by extrapolation of MP2 correlation energies computed at the aug-cc-pVQZ MP2 geometry. Inclusion of core correlation, using the aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set, has been found to increase the binding energy by 0.08 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, and after consideration of core correlation and higher-order correlation effects, the classical binding energy for the water trimer is estimated to be 15.9{plus_minus}0.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}. A zero-point vibrational correction of {minus}5.43 kcal mol{sup {minus}1} has been computed from aug-cc-pVTZ MP2 harmonic vibrational frequencies. The accuracy of different computational schemes for obtaining the binding energies of the water dimer and trimer has been investigated, and computationally feasible methods are suggested for obtaining accurate structures and binding energies for larger water clusters.{copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Equilibrium structures of anisometric, quadrupolar particles confined to a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Antlanger, Moritz; Mazars, Martial; Klapp, Sabine H L; Kahl, Gerhard

    2016-02-21

    We investigate the structural properties of a two-dimensional system of ellipsoidal particles carrying a linear quadrupole moment in their center. These particles represent a simple model for a variety of uncharged, non-polar conjugated organic molecules. Using optimization tools based on ideas of evolutionary algorithms, we first examine the ground state structures as we vary the aspect ratio of the particles and the pressure. Interestingly, we find, besides the intuitively expected T-like configurations, a variety of complex structures, characterized with up to three different particle orientations. In an effort to explore the impact of thermal fluctuations, we perform constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations within a range of rather low temperatures. We observe that ground state structures formed by particles with a large aspect ratio are in particular suited to withstand fluctuations up to rather high temperatures. Our comprehensive investigations allow for a deeper understanding of molecular or colloidal monolayer arrangements under the influence of a typical electrostatic interaction on a coarse-grained level.

  15. Natural modes of oscillation of rotating flexible structures about nontrivial equilibrium. [spacecraft stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Juang, J.-N.

    1976-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the vibrational characteristics of rotating flexible structures in the neighborhood of steady rotation. It is assumed that the structure undergoes deformations during the steady rotation, so that the equilibrium is nontrivial. The object of the paper is to formulate the eigenvalue problem associated with small oscillations of the structure about the nontrivial equilibrium and to develop efficient methods to compute the system natural frequencies and modal vectors. A numerical example showing the procedure for the calculation of spacecraft modes is presented.

  16. Non-equilibrium dynamics and structure of interfacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-07-01

    Stimulated by recent experiments [C.-Y. Ruan et al. Science 304, (2004) 81], we have performed molecular dynamics and ab initio structural studies of the laser-induced heating and restructuring processes of nanometer-scale ice on a substrate of chlorine terminated Si(1 1 1). Starting from proton disordered cubic ice configurations the thin film behavior has been characterized at several temperatures up to the melting point. The surface induces order with crystallization in the Ic lattice, but with void amorphous regions. The structure changes on the ultrashort time scale and restructures by heat dissipation depending on the relaxation time and final temperature. Our results show the general behavior observed experimentally, thus providing the nature of forces in the atomic-scale description of interfacial ice.

  17. DNA viewed as an out-of-equilibrium structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provata, A.; Nicolis, C.; Nicolis, G.

    2014-05-01

    The complexity of the primary structure of human DNA is explored using methods from nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, dynamical systems theory, and information theory. A collection of statistical analyses is performed on the DNA data and the results are compared with sequences derived from different stochastic processes. The use of χ2 tests shows that DNA can not be described as a low order Markov chain of order up to r =6. Although detailed balance seems to hold at the level of a binary alphabet, it fails when all four base pairs are considered, suggesting spatial asymmetry and irreversibility. Furthermore, the block entropy does not increase linearly with the block size, reflecting the long-range nature of the correlations in the human genomic sequences. To probe locally the spatial structure of the chain, we study the exit distances from a specific symbol, the distribution of recurrence distances, and the Hurst exponent, all of which show power law tails and long-range characteristics. These results suggest that human DNA can be viewed as a nonequilibrium structure maintained in its state through interactions with a constantly changing environment. Based solely on the exit distance distribution accounting for the nonequilibrium statistics and using the Monte Carlo rejection sampling method, we construct a model DNA sequence. This method allows us to keep both long- and short-range statistical characteristics of the native DNA data. The model sequence presents the same characteristic exponents as the natural DNA but fails to capture spatial correlations and point-to-point details.

  18. Semiexperimental equilibrium structure of the lower energy conformer of glycidol by the mixed estimation method.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Conrad, Andrew R; Tubergen, Michael J; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2012-09-13

    Rotational constants were determined for (18)O-substituted isotopologues of the lower energy conformer of glycidol, which has an intramolecular inner hydrogen bond from the hydroxyl group to the oxirane ring oxygen. Rotational constants were previously determined for the (13)C and the OD species. These rotational constants have been corrected with the rovibrational constants calculated from an ab initio cubic force field. The derived semiexperimental equilibrium rotational constants have been supplemented by carefully chosen structural parameters, including those for hydrogen atoms, from medium level ab initio calculations. The combined data have been used in a weighted least-squares fit to determine an equilibrium structure for the glycidol H-bond inner conformer. This work shows that the mixed estimation method allows us to determine a complete and reliable equilibrium structure for large molecules, even when the rotational constants of a number of isotopologues are unavailable.

  19. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    DOE PAGES

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; ...

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as themore » radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusion/τloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in (L, E) space

  20. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as the radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusionloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in

  1. Accurate inference of subtle population structure (and other genetic discontinuities) using principal coordinates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate inference of genetic discontinuities between populations is an essential component of intraspecific biodiversity and evolution studies, as well as associative genetics. The most widely used methods to infer population structure are model based, Bayesian MCMC procedures that minimize Hardy...

  2. Ultrafast diffraction and structural dynamics: The nature of complex molecules far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Chong-Yu; Lobastov, Vladimir A.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Goodson, Boyd M.; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of molecular structures at or near their equilibrium configurations have long provided information on their geometry in terms of bond distances and angles. Far-from-equilibrium structures are relatively unknown—especially for complex systems—and generally, neither their dynamics nor their average geometries can be extrapolated from equilibrium values. For such nonequilibrium structures, vibrational amplitudes and bond distances play a central role in phenomena such as energy redistribution and chemical reactivity. Ultrafast electron diffraction, which was developed to study transient molecular structures, provides a direct method for probing the nature of complex molecules far from equilibrium. Here we present our ultrafast electron diffraction observations of transient structures for two cyclic hydrocarbons. At high internal energies of ≈4 eV, these molecules display markedly different behavior. For 1,3,5-cycloheptatriene, excitation results in the formation of hot ground-state structures with bond distances similar to those of the initial structure, but with nearly three times the average vibrational amplitude. Energy is redistributed within 5 ps, but with a negative temperature characterizing the nonequilibrium population. In contrast, the ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene is shown to result in hot structures with a C—C bond distance of over 1.7 Å, which is 0.2 Å away from any expected equilibrium value. Even up to 400 ps, energy remains trapped in large-amplitude motions comprised of torsion and asymmetric stretching. These studies promise a new direction for studying structural dynamics in nonequilibrium complex systems. PMID:11404473

  3. Understanding atom transfer radical polymerization: effect of ligand and initiator structures on the equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Kwak, Yungwan; Braunecker, Wade; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V; Coote, Michelle L; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-08-13

    Equilibrium constants in Cu-based atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were determined for a wide range of ligands and initiators in acetonitrile at 22 degrees C. The ATRP equilibrium constants obtained vary over 7 orders of magnitude and strongly depend on the ligand and initiator structures. The activities of the Cu(I)/ligand complexes are highest for tetradentate ligands, lower for tridentate ligands, and lowest for bidentate ligands. Complexes with tripodal and bridged ligands (Me6TREN and bridged cyclam) tend to be more active than those with the corresponding linear ligands. The equilibrium constants are largest for tertiary alkyl halides and smallest for primary alkyl halides. The activities of alkyl bromides are several times larger than those of the analogous alkyl chlorides. The equilibrium constants are largest for the nitrile derivatives, followed by those for the benzyl derivatives and the corresponding esters. Other equilibrium constants that are not readily measurable were extrapolated from the values for the reference ligands and initiators. Excellent correlations of the equilibrium constants with the Cu(II/I) redox potentials and the carbon-halogen bond dissociation energies were observed.

  4. Self-consistent phonons: An accurate and practical method to account for anharmonic effects in equilibrium properties of general classical or quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sandra E.; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    The self-consistent phonons (SCP) method is a practical approach for computing structural and dynamical properties of a general quantum or classical many-body system while incorporating anharmonic effects. However, a convincing demonstration of the accuracy of SCP and its advantages over the standard harmonic approximation is still lacking. Here we apply SCP to classical Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters and compare with numerically exact results. The close agreement between the two reveals that SCP accurately describes structural properties of the classical LJ clusters from zero-temperature (where the method is exact) up to the temperatures at which the chosen cluster conformation becomes unstable. Given the similarities between thermal and quantum fluctuations, both physically and within the SCP ansatz, the accuracy of classical SCP over a range of temperatures suggests that quantum SCP is also accurate over a range of quantum de Boer parameter Λ = ℏ / (σ√{ mε }) , which describes the degree of quantum character of the system.

  5. Comparison of the experimental, semi-experimental and ab initio equilibrium structures of acetylene: influence of relativisitic effects and of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections.

    PubMed

    Liévin, J; Demaison, J; Herman, M; Fayt, A; Puzzarini, C

    2011-02-14

    The equilibrium structure of acetylene (also named ethyne) has been reinvestigated to resolve the small discrepancies noted between different determinations. The size of the system as well as the large amount of available experimental data provides the quite unique opportunity to check the magnitude and relevance of various contributions to equilibrium structure as well as to verify the accuracy of experimental results. With respect to pure theoretical investigation, quantum-chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level have been employed together with extrapolation to the basis set limit, consideration of higher excitations in the cluster operator, inclusion of core correlation effects as well as relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections. In particular, it is found that the extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, the inclusion of higher excitations in the electronic-correlation treatment and the relativistic corrections are of the same order of magnitude. It also appears that a basis set as large as a core-valence quintuple-zeta set is required for accurately accounting for the inner-shell correlation contribution. From a pure experimental point of view, the equilibrium structure has been determined using very accurate rotational constants recently obtained by a "global analysis" (that is to say that all non-negligible interactions are explicitly included in the Hamiltonian matrix) of rovibrational spectra. Finally, a semi-experimental equilibrium structure (where the equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from the experimental ground state rotational constants and computed rovibrational corrections) has been obtained from the available experimental ground-state rotational constants for ten isotopic species corrected for computed vibrational corrections. Such a determination led to the revision of the ground-state rotational constants of two isotopologues, thus showing that structural determination is a good method to identify

  6. Precise equilibrium structure determination of hydrazoic acid (HN{sub 3}) by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-09-14

    The millimeter-wave spectrum of hydrazoic acid (HN{sub 3}) was analyzed in the frequency region of 235-450 GHz. Transitions from a total of 14 isotopologues were observed and fit using the A-reduced or S-reduced Hamiltonian. Coupled-cluster calculations were performed to obtain a theoretical geometry, as well as rotation-vibration interaction corrections. These calculated vibration-rotation correction terms were applied to the experimental rotational constants to obtain mixed theoretical/experimental equilibrium rotational constants (A{sub e}, B{sub e}, and C{sub e}). These equilibrium rotational constants were then used to obtain an equilibrium (R{sub e}) structure using a least-squares fitting routine. The R{sub e} structural parameters are consistent with a previously published R{sub s} structure, largely falling within the uncertainty limits of that R{sub s} structure. The present R{sub e} geometric parameters of HN{sub 3} are determined with exceptionally high accuracy, as a consequence of the large number of isotopologues measured experimentally and the sophisticated (coupled-cluster theoretical treatment (CCSD(T))/ANO2) of the vibration-rotation interactions. The R{sub e} structure exhibits remarkable agreement with the CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z predicted structure, validating both the accuracy of the ab initio method and the claimed uncertainties of the theoretical/experimental structure determination.

  7. Accurate measurements of vadose zone fluxes using automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters: A synopsis of results from the Spydia research facility, New Zealand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhling, Thomas; Barkle, Greg; Stenger, Roland; Moorhead, Brian; Wall, Aaron; Clague, Juliet

    2014-05-01

    Automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters (AETLs) are arguably the most accurate method to measure unsaturated water and contaminant fluxes below the root zone at the scale of up to 1 m². The AETL technique utilizes a porous sintered stainless-steel plate to provide a comparatively large sampling area with a continuously controlled vacuum that is in "equilibrium" with the surrounding vadose zone matric pressure to ensure measured fluxes represent those under undisturbed conditions. This novel lysimeter technique was used at an intensive research site for investigations of contaminant pathways from the land surface to the groundwater on a sheep and beef farm under pastoral land use in the Tutaeuaua subcatchment, New Zealand. The Spydia research facility was constructed in 2005 and was fully operational between 2006 and 2011. Extending from a central access caisson, 15 separately controlled AETLs with 0.2 m² surface area were installed at five depths between 0.4 m and 5.1 m into the undisturbed volcanic vadose zone materials. The unique setup of the facility ensured minimum interference of the experimental equipment and external factors with the measurements. Over the period of more than five years, a comprehensive data set was collected at each of the 15 AETL locations which comprises of time series of soil water flux, pressure head, volumetric water contents, and soil temperature. The soil water was regularly analysed for EC, pH, dissolved carbon, various nitrogen compounds (including nitrate, ammonia, and organic N), phosphorus, bromide, chloride, sulphate, silica, and a range of other major ions, as well as for various metals. Climate data was measured directly at the site (rainfall) and a climate station at 500m distance. The shallow groundwater was sampled at three different depths directly from the Spydia caisson and at various observation wells surrounding the facility. Two tracer experiments were conducted at the site in 2009 and 2010. In the 2009

  8. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  9. Relationship between local structure and relaxation in out-of-equilibrium glassy systems

    PubMed Central

    Cubuk, Ekin D.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Liu, Andrea J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical glass transition is typically taken to be the temperature at which a glassy liquid is no longer able to equilibrate on experimental timescales. Consequently, the physical properties of these systems just above or below the dynamical glass transition, such as viscosity, can change by many orders of magnitude over long periods of time following external perturbation. During this progress toward equilibrium, glassy systems exhibit a history dependence that has complicated their study. In previous work, we bridged the gap between structure and dynamics in glassy liquids above their dynamical glass transition temperatures by introducing a scalar field called “softness,” a quantity obtained using machine-learning methods. Softness is designed to capture the hidden patterns in relative particle positions that correlate strongly with dynamical rearrangements of particle positions. Here we show that the out-of-equilibrium behavior of a model glass-forming system can be understood in terms of softness. To do this we first demonstrate that the evolution of behavior following a temperature quench is a primarily structural phenomenon: The structure changes considerably, but the relationship between structure and dynamics remains invariant. We then show that the relaxation time can be robustly computed from structure as quantified by softness, with the same relation holding both in equilibrium and as the system ages. Together, these results show that the history dependence of the relaxation time in glasses requires knowledge only of the softness in addition to the usual state variables. PMID:28028217

  10. Relationship between local structure and relaxation in out-of-equilibrium glassy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenholz, Samuel S.; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Liu, Andrea J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical glass transition is typically taken to be the temperature at which a glassy liquid is no longer able to equilibrate on experimental timescales. Consequently, the physical properties of these systems just above or below the dynamical glass transition, such as viscosity, can change by many orders of magnitude over long periods of time following external perturbation. During this progress toward equilibrium, glassy systems exhibit a history dependence that has complicated their study. In previous work, we bridged the gap between structure and dynamics in glassy liquids above their dynamical glass transition temperatures by introducing a scalar field called “softness,” a quantity obtained using machine-learning methods. Softness is designed to capture the hidden patterns in relative particle positions that correlate strongly with dynamical rearrangements of particle positions. Here we show that the out-of-equilibrium behavior of a model glass-forming system can be understood in terms of softness. To do this we first demonstrate that the evolution of behavior following a temperature quench is a primarily structural phenomenon: The structure changes considerably, but the relationship between structure and dynamics remains invariant. We then show that the relaxation time can be robustly computed from structure as quantified by softness, with the same relation holding both in equilibrium and as the system ages. Together, these results show that the history dependence of the relaxation time in glasses requires knowledge only of the softness in addition to the usual state variables.

  11. Bottom-up coarse-grained models that accurately describe the structure, pressure, and compressibility of molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Nicholas J. H.; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    The present work investigates the capability of bottom-up coarse-graining (CG) methods for accurately modeling both structural and thermodynamic properties of all-atom (AA) models for molecular liquids. In particular, we consider 1, 2, and 3-site CG models for heptane, as well as 1 and 3-site CG models for toluene. For each model, we employ the multiscale coarse-graining method to determine interaction potentials that optimally approximate the configuration dependence of the many-body potential of mean force (PMF). We employ a previously developed “pressure-matching” variational principle to determine a volume-dependent contribution to the potential, U{sub V}(V), that approximates the volume-dependence of the PMF. We demonstrate that the resulting CG models describe AA density fluctuations with qualitative, but not quantitative, accuracy. Accordingly, we develop a self-consistent approach for further optimizing U{sub V}, such that the CG models accurately reproduce the equilibrium density, compressibility, and average pressure of the AA models, although the CG models still significantly underestimate the atomic pressure fluctuations. Additionally, by comparing this array of models that accurately describe the structure and thermodynamic pressure of heptane and toluene at a range of different resolutions, we investigate the impact of bottom-up coarse-graining upon thermodynamic properties. In particular, we demonstrate that U{sub V} accounts for the reduced cohesion in the CG models. Finally, we observe that bottom-up coarse-graining introduces subtle correlations between the resolution, the cohesive energy density, and the “simplicity” of the model.

  12. Accurate Prediction of One-Dimensional Protein Structure Features Using SPINE-X.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of protein secondary structure and other one-dimensional structure features is essential for accurate sequence alignment, three-dimensional structure modeling, and function prediction. SPINE-X is a software package to predict secondary structure as well as accessible surface area and dihedral angles ϕ and ψ. For secondary structure SPINE-X achieves an accuracy of between 81 and 84 % depending on the dataset and choice of tests. The Pearson correlation coefficient for accessible surface area prediction is 0.75 and the mean absolute error from the ϕ and ψ dihedral angles are 20(∘) and 33(∘), respectively. The source code and a Linux executables for SPINE-X are available from Research and Information Systems at http://mamiris.com .

  13. Ribosomes in the balance: structural equilibrium ensures translational fidelity and proper gene expression.

    PubMed

    Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2014-12-01

    At equilibrium, empty ribosomes freely transit between the rotated and un-rotated states. In the cell, the binding of two translation elongation factors to the same general region of the ribosome stabilizes one state over the other. These stabilized states are resolved by expenditure of energy in the form of GTP hydrolysis. A prior study employing mutants of a late assembling peripheral ribosomal protein suggested that ribosome rotational status determines its affinity for elongation factors, and hence translational fidelity and gene expression. Here, mutants of the early assembling integral ribosomal protein uL2 are used to test the generality of this hypothesis. rRNA structure probing analyses reveal that mutations in the uL2 B7b bridge region shift the equilibrium toward the rotated state, propagating rRNA structural changes to all of the functional centers of ribosome. Structural disequilibrium unbalances ribosome biochemically: rotated ribosomes favor binding of the eEF2 translocase and disfavor that of the elongation ternary complex. This manifests as specific translational fidelity defects, impacting the expression of genes involved in telomere maintenance. A model is presented describing how cyclic intersubunit rotation ensures the unidirectionality of translational elongation, and how perturbation of rotational equilibrium affects specific aspects of translational fidelity and cellular gene expression.

  14. How relevant are assembled equilibrium samples in understanding structure formation during lipid digestion?

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie; Salentinig, Stefan; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-10-01

    Lipid-based formulations are gaining interest for use as drug delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drug compounds. During digestion, the lipolysis products self-assemble with endogenous surfactants in the gastrointestinal tract to form colloidal structures, enabling enhanced drug solubilisation. Although earlier studies in the literature focus on assembled equilibrium systems, little is known about structure formation under dynamic lipolysis conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the likely colloidal structure formation in the small intestine after the ingestion of lipids, under equilibrium and dynamic conditions. The structural aspects were studied using small angle X-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering, and were found to depend on lipid composition, lipid chain length, prandial state and emulsification. Incorporation of phospholipids and lipolysis products into bile salt micelles resulted in swelling of the structure. At insufficient bile salt concentrations, a co-existing lamellar phase was observed, due to a reduction in the solubilisation capacity for lipolysis products. Emulsification accelerated the rate of lipolysis and structure formation.

  15. Design and structure of an equilibrium protein folding intermediate: a hint into dynamical regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ayuso-Tejedor, Sara; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Bueno, Marta; Campos, Luis A; Abián, Olga; Bernadó, Pau; Sancho, Javier; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2010-07-23

    Partly unfolded protein conformations close to the native state may play important roles in protein function and in protein misfolding. Structural analyses of such conformations which are essential for their fully physicochemical understanding are complicated by their characteristic low populations at equilibrium. We stabilize here with a single mutation the equilibrium intermediate of apoflavodoxin thermal unfolding and determine its solution structure by NMR. It consists of a large native region identical with that observed in the X-ray structure of the wild-type protein plus an unfolded region. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis indicates that the calculated ensemble of structures is consistent with the actual degree of expansion of the intermediate. The unfolded region encompasses discontinuous sequence segments that cluster in the 3D structure of the native protein forming the FMN cofactor binding loops and the binding site of a variety of partner proteins. Analysis of the apoflavodoxin inner interfaces reveals that those becoming destabilized in the intermediate are more polar than other inner interfaces of the protein. Natively folded proteins contain hydrophobic cores formed by the packing of hydrophobic surfaces, while natively unfolded proteins are rich in polar residues. The structure of the apoflavodoxin thermal intermediate suggests that the regions of natively folded proteins that are easily responsive to thermal activation may contain cores of intermediate hydrophobicity.

  16. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  17. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-03

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy.

  18. More accurate determination of the quantity of ice crystallized at low cooling rates in the glycerol and 1,2-propanediol aqueous solutions: comparison with equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Boutron, P

    1984-04-01

    It is generally assumed that when cells are cooled at rates close to those corresponding to the maximum of survival, once supercooling has ceased, above the eutectic melting temperature the extracellular ice is in equilibrium with the residual solution. This did not seem evident to us due to the difficulty of ice crystallization in cryoprotective solutions. The maximum quantities of ice crystallized in glycerol and 1,2-propanediol solutions have been calculated from the area of the solidification and fusion peaks obtained with a Perkin-Elmer DSC-2 differential scanning calorimeter. The accuracy has been improved by several corrections: better defined baseline, thermal variation of the heat of fusion of the ice, heat of solution of the water from its melting with the residual solution. More ice crystallizes in the glycerol than in the 1,2-propanediol solutions, of which the amorphous residue contains about 40 to 55% 1,2-propanediol. The equilibrium values are unknown in the presence of 1,2-propanediol. With glycerol, in our experiments, the maximum is first lower than the equilibrium but approaches it as the concentration increases. It is not completely determined by the colligative properties of the solutes.

  19. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  20. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers.

    PubMed

    Nap, R J; Tagliazucchi, M; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads

  1. Gas-Liquid Interfacial Non-Equilibrium Plasmas for Structure Controlled Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas generated in liquid or in contact with liquid have attracted much attention as a novel reactive field in the nano-bio material creation because the brand-new chemical and biological reactions are yielded at the gas-liquid interface, which are induced by the physical actions of the non-equilibrium plasmas. In this study, first, size- and structure-controlled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) covered with DNA are synthesized using a pulse-driven gas-liquid interfacial discharge plasma (GLIDP) for the application to next-generation drug delivery systems. The size and assembly of the AuNPs are found to be easily controlled by changing the plasma parameters and DNA concentration in the liquid. On the other hand, the mono-dispersed, small-sized, and interval-controlled AuNPs are synthesized by using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a template, where the CNTs are functionalized by the ion and radical irradiation in non-equilibrium plasmas. These new materials are now widely applied to the solar cell, optical devices, and so on. Second, highly-ordered periodic structures of the AuNPs are formed by transcribing the periodic plasma structure to the surface of the liquid, where the spatially selective synthesis of the AuNPs is realized. This phenomenon is well explained by the reduction and oxidation effects of the radicals which are generated by the non-equilibrium plasma irradiation to the liquid and resultant dissociation of the liquid. In addition, it is attempted to form nano- or micro-scale periodic structures of the AuNPs based on the self-organizing behavior of turbulent plasmas generated by the nonlinear development of plasma fluctuations at the gas-liquid interface.

  2. The equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of Bi nanolines on clean and hydrogenated Si(001) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miwa, R H; Macleod, J M; McLean, A B; Srivastava, G P

    2005-10-01

    The equilibrium geometry, electronic structure and energetic stability of Bi nanolines on clean and hydrogenated Si(001) surfaces have been examined by means of ab initio total energy calculations and scanning tunnelling microscopy. For the Bi nanolines on a clean Si surface the two most plausible structural models, the Miki or M model (Miki et al 1999 Phys. Rev. B 59 14868) and the Haiku or H model (Owen et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 226104), have been examined in detail. The results of the total energy calculations support the stability of the H model over the M model, in agreement with previous theoretical results. For Bi nanolines on the hydrogenated Si(001) surface, we find that an atomic configuration derived from the H model is also more stable than an atomic configuration derived from the M model. However, the energetically less stable (M) model exhibits better agreement with experimental measurements for equilibrium geometry. The electronic structures of the H and M models are very similar. Both models exhibit a semiconducting character, with the highest occupied Bi-derived bands lying at approximately 0.5 eV below the valence band maximum. Simulated and experimental STM images confirm that at a low negative bias the Bi lines exhibit an 'antiwire' property for both structural models.

  3. The equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of Bi nanolines on clean and hydrogenated Si(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, R. H.; MacLeod, J. M.; McLean, A. B.; Srivastava, G. P.

    2005-10-01

    The equilibrium geometry, electronic structure and energetic stability of Bi nanolines on clean and hydrogenated Si(001) surfaces have been examined by means of ab initio total energy calculations and scanning tunnelling microscopy. For the Bi nanolines on a clean Si surface the two most plausible structural models, the Miki or M model (Miki et al 1999 Phys. Rev. B 59 14868) and the Haiku or H model (Owen et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 226104), have been examined in detail. The results of the total energy calculations support the stability of the H model over the M model, in agreement with previous theoretical results. For Bi nanolines on the hydrogenated Si(001) surface, we find that an atomic configuration derived from the H model is also more stable than an atomic configuration derived from the M model. However, the energetically less stable (M) model exhibits better agreement with experimental measurements for equilibrium geometry. The electronic structures of the H and M models are very similar. Both models exhibit a semiconducting character, with the highest occupied Bi-derived bands lying at ~0.5 eV below the valence band maximum. Simulated and experimental STM images confirm that at a low negative bias the Bi lines exhibit an 'antiwire' property for both structural models.

  4. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J; Brewster, Aaron S; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Bogan, Michael J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Adams, Paul D; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2014-05-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  5. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-04

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  6. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  7. Intrinsic surface reaction equilibrium constants of structurally charged amphoteric hydrotalcite-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wan-Guo; Song, Shu E

    2004-01-15

    The relative equations among intrinsic surface reaction equilibrium constants (K in 1-pK model, K(a1)(int) and K(a2)(int) in 2-pK model, and *K(Na)(int) and *K(Cl)(int) in inert electrolyte chemical binding model), points of zero charge (PZC), and structural charge density (sigma(st)) for amphoteric solids with structural charge were established to investigate the effects of sigma(st) on intrinsic equilibrium constants and PZC. The intrinsic equilibrium constants of HTlc with general formulas [(Zn,Mg)(1-x)Al(x)(OH)(2)](Cl,OH)(x) and [Mg(1-x)(Fe,Al)(x)(OH)(2)](Cl,OH)(x) were evaluated. The following main conclusions were obtained. For amphoteric solids with structural charge, a point of zero net charge (PZNC) independent of electrolyte concentration (c) exists. A common intersection point (CIP) should appear among the acid-base titration curves at different c, and the pH at the CIP is pH(PZNC). The pK, pK(a1)(int), and pK(a2)(int) may be expressed as a function of pH(PZNC) and sigma(st), and these intrinsic equilibrium constants can be directly calculated from pH(PZNC) and sigma(st). The inert electrolyte chemical binding does not exist for amphoteric surfaces with structural charge. PZNC is not equal to the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) when sigma(st) not equal 0. pH(PZNC) > pH(PZNPC) when sigma(st)>0; pH(PZNC) < pH(PZNPC) when sigma(st)<0; and pH(PZNC) = pH(PZNPC) only when sigma(st)=0. With increasing c, the difference between pH(PZNC) and pH(PZNPC) decreases; i.e., pH(PZNPC) moves forward to pH(PZNC) with increasing c. For the HTlc samples studied, with increasing x, the pH(PZNC) and the pK(a1)(int) and pK(a2)(int) decrease, and the pK increases. These results can be explained on the basis of the affinity of metal cations for H(+) or OH(-) and the electrostatic interaction between the charging surface and H(+) or OH(-).

  8. SCAN: An Efficient Density Functional Yielding Accurate Structures and Energies of Diversely-Bonded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei

    The accuracy and computational efficiency of the widely used Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) are limited by the approximation to its exchange-correlation energy Exc. The earliest local density approximation (LDA) overestimates the strengths of all bonds near equilibrium (even the vdW bonds). By adding the electron density gradient to model Exc, generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) generally soften the bonds to give robust and overall more accurate descriptions, except for the vdW interaction which is largely lost. Further improvement for covalent, ionic, and hydrogen bonds can be obtained by the computationally more expensive hybrid GGAs, which mix GGAs with the nonlocal exact exchange. Meta-GGAs are still semilocal in computation and thus efficient. Compared to GGAs, they add the kinetic energy density that enables them to recognize and accordingly treat different bonds, which no LDA or GGA can. We show here that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-GGA improves significantly over LDA and the standard Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA for geometries and energies of diversely-bonded materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen, and vdW bonds) at comparable efficiency. Often SCAN matches or improves upon the accuracy of a hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. This work has been supported by NSF under DMR-1305135 and CNS-09-58854, and by DOE BES EFRC CCDM under DE-SC0012575.

  9. Deducting the temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium far below the nominal Tg by aging the decoupled conductivity relaxation to equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowska, Z; Ngai, K L; Paluch, M

    2014-05-07

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy we investigate the changes in the conductivity relaxation times τσ observed during the physical aging of the protic ionic conductor carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate (CP). Due to the large decoupling of ion diffusion from host molecule reorientation, the ion conductivity relaxation time τσ(Tage,tage) can be directly measured at temperatures Tage below Tg for exceedingly long aging times tage till τσ(Tage,tage) has reached the equilibrium value τσ(eq)(Tage). The dependence of τσ(Tage,tage) on tage is well described by the stretched exponential function, τσ(Tage, tage) = Aexp[-((tage)/(τage(Tage)))(β)] + τσ(eq)(Tage), where β is a constant and τage(Tage) can be taken as the structural α-relaxation time of the equilibrium liquid at T = Tage. The value of τσ(eq)(Tage) obtained after 63 days long annealing of CP, deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHσ) dependence of τσ(T) determined from data taken above Tg and extrapolated down to Tage. Concurrently, τage(Tage) also deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHα) dependence. The results help to answer the longstanding question of whether the VFTH dependence of τσ(T) as well as the structural α-relaxation time τα(T) holds or not in the equilibrium liquid state far below Tg.

  10. Deducting the temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium far below the nominal Tg by aging the decoupled conductivity relaxation to equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2014-05-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy we investigate the changes in the conductivity relaxation times τσ observed during the physical aging of the protic ionic conductor carvedilol dihydrogen phosphate (CP). Due to the large decoupling of ion diffusion from host molecule reorientation, the ion conductivity relaxation time τσ(Tage,tage) can be directly measured at temperatures Tage below Tg for exceedingly long aging times tage till τσ(Tage,tage) has reached the equilibrium value τ _σ ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ). The dependence of τσ(Tage,tage) on tage is well described by the stretched exponential function, τ _σ ( {T_{age},t_{age} } ) = Aexp[ { - ( {{t_{age} }/{τ _{age ( {T_{age} } )}}} )^β } ] + τ _σ ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ), where β is a constant and τage(Tage) can be taken as the structural α-relaxation time of the equilibrium liquid at T = Tage. The value of τ _σ ^{eq} ( {T_{age} } ) obtained after 63 days long annealing of CP, deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHσ) dependence of τσ(T) determined from data taken above Tg and extrapolated down to Tage. Concurrently, τage(Tage) also deviates from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTHα) dependence. The results help to answer the longstanding question of whether the VFTH dependence of τσ(T) as well as the structural α-relaxation time τα(T) holds or not in the equilibrium liquid state far below Tg.

  11. CoMOGrad and PHOG: From Computer Vision to Fast and Accurate Protein Tertiary Structure Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Rezaul; Aziz, Mohd. Momin Al; Shatabda, Swakkhar; Rahman, M. Sohel; Mia, Md. Abul Kashem; Zaman, Farhana; Rakin, Salman

    2015-01-01

    The number of entries in a structural database of proteins is increasing day by day. Methods for retrieving protein tertiary structures from such a large database have turn out to be the key to comparative analysis of structures that plays an important role to understand proteins and their functions. In this paper, we present fast and accurate methods for the retrieval of proteins having tertiary structures similar to a query protein from a large database. Our proposed methods borrow ideas from the field of computer vision. The speed and accuracy of our methods come from the two newly introduced features- the co-occurrence matrix of the oriented gradient and pyramid histogram of oriented gradient- and the use of Euclidean distance as the distance measure. Experimental results clearly indicate the superiority of our approach in both running time and accuracy. Our method is readily available for use from this website: http://research.buet.ac.bd:8080/Comograd/. PMID:26293226

  12. Exchange-Hole Dipole Dispersion Model for Accurate Energy Ranking in Molecular Crystal Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Whittleton, Sarah R; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Johnson, Erin R

    2017-02-14

    Accurate energy ranking is a key facet to the problem of first-principles crystal-structure prediction (CSP) of molecular crystals. This work presents a systematic assessment of B86bPBE-XDM, a semilocal density functional combined with the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion model, for energy ranking using 14 compounds from the first five CSP blind tests. Specifically, the set of crystals studied comprises 11 rigid, planar compounds and 3 co-crystals. The experimental structure was correctly identified as the lowest in lattice energy for 12 of the 14 total crystals. One of the exceptions is 4-hydroxythiophene-2-carbonitrile, for which the experimental structure was correctly identified once a quasi-harmonic estimate of the vibrational free-energy contribution was included, evidencing the occasional importance of thermal corrections for accurate energy ranking. The other exception is an organic salt, where charge-transfer error (also called delocalization error) is expected to cause the base density functional to be unreliable. Provided the choice of base density functional is appropriate and an estimate of temperature effects is used, XDM-corrected density-functional theory is highly reliable for the energetic ranking of competing crystal structures.

  13. Screened exchange hybrid density functional for accurate and efficient structures and interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Caldeweyher, Eike; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-06-21

    We extend the recently introduced PBEh-3c global hybrid density functional [S. Grimme et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2015, 143, 054107] by a screened Fock exchange variant based on the Henderson-Janesko-Scuseria exchange hole model. While the excellent performance of the global hybrid is maintained for small covalently bound molecules, its performance for computed condensed phase mass densities is further improved. Most importantly, a speed up of 30 to 50% can be achieved and especially for small orbital energy gap cases, the method is numerically much more robust. The latter point is important for many applications, e.g., for metal-organic frameworks, organic semiconductors, or protein structures. This enables an accurate density functional based electronic structure calculation of a full DNA helix structure on a single core desktop computer which is presented as an example in addition to comprehensive benchmark results.

  14. Complex salts formed by anionic copolymers with hexadecyltrimethylammonium: Phase equilibrium and structural characterization using SAXS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percebom, Ana Maria; Bernardes, Juliana S.; Loh, Watson

    2009-01-01

    Extending earlier studies conducted by this research group about the hexadecyltrimethylammonium (CTA+) and other poly-anions in water, this study aims at analyzing the phase equilibrium and characterizing structures of mesophases formed by mixtures of oppositely charged surfactants and polymers. Its specific objective is to verify the effect of the charge density along the poly-electrolyte. Poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid), P(SS-AM), was used because this copolymer has three acid groups with different pKa values, enabling to obtain negative charges in all groups or only in a few. The self-assembly of the complex salt (anionic copolymer+cationic surfactant) was investigated in binary (+water) and ternary systems (+water+1-decanol), determining their phase diagrams and analyzing the structures of mesophases formed by SAXS.

  15. Chromophore Structure of Photochromic Fluorescent Protein Dronpa: Acid-Base Equilibrium of Two Cis Configurations.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Asuka; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-07

    Dronpa is a novel photochromic fluorescent protein that exhibits fast response to light. The present article is the first report of the resonance and preresonance Raman spectra of Dronpa. We used the intensity and frequency of Raman bands to determine the structure of the Dronpa chromophore in two thermally stable photochromic states. The acid-base equilibrium in one photochromic state was observed by spectroscopic pH titration. The Raman spectra revealed that the chromophore in this state shows a protonation/deprotonation transition with a pKa of 5.2 ± 0.3 and maintains the cis configuration. The observed resonance Raman bands showed that the other photochromic state of the chromophore is in a trans configuration. The results demonstrate that Raman bands selectively enhanced for the chromophore yield valuable information on the molecular structure of the chromophore in photochromic fluorescent proteins after careful elimination of the fluorescence background.

  16. Conformational energy range of ligands in protein crystal structures: The difficult quest for accurate understanding.

    PubMed

    Peach, Megan L; Cachau, Raul E; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2017-02-24

    In this review, we address a fundamental question: What is the range of conformational energies seen in ligands in protein-ligand crystal structures? This value is important biophysically, for better understanding the protein-ligand binding process; and practically, for providing a parameter to be used in many computational drug design methods such as docking and pharmacophore searches. We synthesize a selection of previously reported conflicting results from computational studies of this issue and conclude that high ligand conformational energies really are present in some crystal structures. The main source of disagreement between different analyses appears to be due to divergent treatments of electrostatics and solvation. At the same time, however, for many ligands, a high conformational energy is in error, due to either crystal structure inaccuracies or incorrect determination of the reference state. Aside from simple chemistry mistakes, we argue that crystal structure error may mainly be because of the heuristic weighting of ligand stereochemical restraints relative to the fit of the structure to the electron density. This problem cannot be fixed with improvements to electron density fitting or with simple ligand geometry checks, though better metrics are needed for evaluating ligand and binding site chemistry in addition to geometry during structure refinement. The ultimate solution for accurately determining ligand conformational energies lies in ultrahigh-resolution crystal structures that can be refined without restraints.

  17. Accurate Damage Location in Complex Composite Structures and Industrial Environments using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M.; Pearson, M.; Lee, W.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately locate damage in any given structure is a highly desirable attribute for an effective structural health monitoring system and could help to reduce operating costs and improve safety. This becomes a far greater challenge in complex geometries and materials, such as modern composite airframes. The poor translation of promising laboratory based SHM demonstrators to industrial environments forms a barrier to commercial up take of technology. The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a passive NDT method that detects elastic stress waves released by the growth of damage. It offers very sensitive damage detection, using a sparse array of sensors to detect and globally locate damage within a structure. However its application to complex structures commonly yields poor accuracy due to anisotropic wave propagation and the interruption of wave propagation by structural features such as holes and thickness changes. This work adopts an empirical mapping technique for AE location, known as Delta T Mapping, which uses experimental training data to account for such structural complexities. The technique is applied to a complex geometry composite aerospace structure undergoing certification testing. The component consists of a carbon fibre composite tube with varying wall thickness and multiple holes, that was loaded under bending. The damage location was validated using X-ray CT scanning and the Delta T Mapping technique was shown to improve location accuracy when compared with commercial algorithms. The onset and progression of damage were monitored throughout the test and used to inform future design iterations.

  18. 5D model for accurate representation and visualization of dynamic cardiac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Accurate cardiac modeling is challenging due to the intricate structure and complex contraction patterns of myocardial tissues. Fast imaging techniques can provide 4D structural information acquired as a sequence of 3D images throughout the cardiac cycle. To mode. The beating heart, we created a physics-based surface model that deforms between successive time point in the cardiac cycle. 3D images of canine hearts were acquired during one complete cardiac cycle using the DSR and the EBCT. The left ventricle of the first time point is reconstructed as a triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable mode,, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, is applied to the initial mesh and allows the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resulting 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D model, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. The model faithfully represents structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provide the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allow quantitative assessment of regional myocardial motion. The electrical activation mapping provides spatial and temporal correlation within the cardiac cycle. In procedures which as intra-cardiac catheter ablation, visualization of the dynamic model can be used to accurately localize the foci of myocardial arrhythmias and guide positioning of catheters for optimal ablation.

  19. Petascale self-consistent electromagnetic computations using scalable and accurate algorithms for complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, John R.; Abell, D.; Amundson, J.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Busby, R.; Carlsson, J. A.; Dimitrov, D. A.; Kashdan, E.; Messmer, P.; Nieter, C.; Smithe, D. N.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Trines, R. M.; Wang, H.; Werner, G. R.

    2006-09-01

    As the size and cost of particle accelerators escalate, high-performance computing plays an increasingly important role; optimization through accurate, detailed computermodeling increases performance and reduces costs. But consequently, computer simulations face enormous challenges. Early approximation methods, such as expansions in distance from the design orbit, were unable to supply detailed accurate results, such as in the computation of wake fields in complex cavities. Since the advent of message-passing supercomputers with thousands of processors, earlier approximations are no longer necessary, and it is now possible to compute wake fields, the effects of dampers, and self-consistent dynamics in cavities accurately. In this environment, the focus has shifted towards the development and implementation of algorithms that scale to large numbers of processors. So-called charge-conserving algorithms evolve the electromagnetic fields without the need for any global solves (which are difficult to scale up to many processors). Using cut-cell (or embedded) boundaries, these algorithms can simulate the fields in complex accelerator cavities with curved walls. New implicit algorithms, which are stable for any time-step, conserve charge as well, allowing faster simulation of structures with details small compared to the characteristic wavelength. These algorithmic and computational advances have been implemented in the VORPAL7 Framework, a flexible, object-oriented, massively parallel computational application that allows run-time assembly of algorithms and objects, thus composing an application on the fly.

  20. The Ion-Specific, Non-Equilibrium Structural Behavior of DNA Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Saleh, Omar

    The highly tunable, sequence-dependent hybridization of DNA has enabled construction of DNA hydrogels with applications ranging from drug delivery to responsive materials. Though many have examined the structural characteristics of DNA hydrogels at equilibrium, relatively little is known about their non-equilibrium behavior, apart from their degradation rates when delivering molecular payloads. Here, we examine the effect of changing salt concentration on the dynamic formation, ageing, and degradation of DNA hydrogels comprised of branched DNA nanostars with palindromic overhangs. First, we observe that hydrogel phase is sensitive to the presence of a single unpaired base on the overhang, resulting in either a percolated network or a liquid-liquid phase separated state at high salt concentrations. Particular to the percolated network, we can induce the system to either contract or relax by changing the salt concentration. Decreasing monovalent NaCl induces the network to irreversibly contract whereas decreasing divalent MgCl2 induces the network to reversibly expand; this behavior runs counter to what is expected solely from electrostatic screening. We qualitatively understand these results by assuming that the monovalent salt modulates the dynamic hybridization between nanostar binding partners, whereas the divalent salt drives the dramatic/reversible induction of the `stacked-X' conformation in the DNA nanostars. Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program.

  1. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  2. Effect of O-Linked Glycosylation on the Equilibrium Structural Ensemble of Intrinsically Disordered Polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-12-24

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), which provides a large proteome diversity. Previous work on glycosylation of globular proteins has revealed remarkable effects of glycosylation on protein function, altering the folding stability and structure and/or altering the protein surface which affects their binding characteristics. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of large proteins are also frequently glycosylated, yet how glycosylation affects their function remains to be elucidated. An important open question is, does glycosylation affect IDP structure or binding characteristics or both? In this work, we particularly address the structural effects of O-linked glycosylation by investigating glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of two different IDPs, tau174-183 and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), by all-atom explicit solvent simulations. We simulate these IDPs in aqueous solution for O-linked glycosylated and unglycosylated forms by employing two modern all-atom force fields for which glycan parameters are also available. We find that O-linked glycosylation only has a modest effect on equilibrium structural ensembles of IDPs, for the cases studied here, which suggests that the functional role of glycosylation may be primarily exerted by modulation of the protein binding characteristics rather than structure.

  3. Accurate Structure Parameters for Tunneling Ionization Rates of Gas-Phase Linear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Guo-Li; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2017-03-01

    In the molecular Ammosov–Delone–Krainov (MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402], the ionization rate depends on the structure parameters of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. We determine systematically and tabulate accurate structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for 123 gas-phase linear molecules by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are constructed numerically using the modified Leeuwen–Baerends (LBα) model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11664035, 11674268, 11465016, 11364038, 11364039, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001 and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  4. Fluid structure in the immediate vicinity of an equilibrium contact line from first principles and assessment of disjoining pressure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nold, Andreas; Sibley, David N.; Goddard, Benjamin D.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-11-01

    Predicting the fluid structure at a three-phase contact line of macroscopic drops is of interest from a fundamental fluid dynamics point of view. However, exact computations for very small scales are prohibitive. As a consequence, coarse-grained quantities such as interface height and disjoining pressure profiles are used to model the interface shape. Here, we evaluate such coarse-grained models within a rigorous and self-consistent framework based on statistical mechanics, in particular with a Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach. We examine the nanoscale behavior of an equilibrium three-phase contact line in the presence of long-ranged intermolecular forces by employing DFT together with fundamental measure theory. Our analysis also enables us to evaluate the predictive quality of effective Hamiltonian models in the vicinity of the contact line. We compare the results for mean field effective Hamiltonians with disjoining pressures defined through the adsorption isotherm for a planar liquid film, and the normal force balance at the contact line [Phys. Fluids, 26, 072001, 2014]. Results are given for a variety of contact angles. An accurate description of the small-scale behavior of a three-phase conjunction is a prerequisite to understanding dynamic wetting phenomena.

  5. Fast and accurate search for non-coding RNA pseudoknot structures in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhibin; Wu, Yong; Robertson, Joseph; Feng, Liang; Malmberg, Russell L.; Cai, Liming

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Searching genomes for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) by their secondary structure has become an important goal for bioinformatics. For pseudoknot-free structures, ncRNA search can be effective based on the covariance model and CYK-type dynamic programming. However, the computational difficulty in aligning an RNA sequence to a pseudoknot has prohibited fast and accurate search of arbitrary RNA structures. Our previous work introduced a graph model for RNA pseudoknots and proposed to solve the structure–sequence alignment by graph optimization. Given k candidate regions in the target sequence for each of the n stems in the structure, we could compute a best alignment in time O(ktn) based upon a tree width t decomposition of the structure graph. However, to implement this method to programs that can routinely perform fast yet accurate RNA pseudoknot searches, we need novel heuristics to ensure that, without degrading the accuracy, only a small number of stem candidates need to be examined and a tree decomposition of a small tree width can always be found for the structure graph. Results: The current work builds on the previous one with newly developed preprocessing algorithms to reduce the values for parameters k and t and to implement the search method into a practical program, called RNATOPS, for RNA pseudoknot search. In particular, we introduce techniques, based on probabilistic profiling and distance penalty functions, which can identify for every stem just a small number k (e.g. k ≤ 10) of plausible regions in the target sequence to which the stem needs to align. We also devised a specialized tree decomposition algorithm that can yield tree decomposition of small tree width t (e.g. t ≤ 4) for almost all RNA structure graphs. Our experiments show that with RNATOPS it is possible to routinely search prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes for specific RNA structures of medium to large sizes, including pseudoknots, with high sensitivity and high

  6. NMR structural study of the prototropic equilibrium in solution of Schiff bases as model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ortegón-Reyna, David; Garcías-Morales, Cesar; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia; García-Báez, Efren; Aríza-Castolo, Armando; Peraza-Campos, Ana; Martínez-Martínez, Francisco

    2013-12-31

    An NMR titration method has been used to simultaneously measure the acid dissociation constant (pKa) and the intramolecular NHO prototropic constant ΔKNHO on a set of Schiff bases. The model compounds were synthesized from benzylamine and substituted ortho-hydroxyaldehydes, appropriately substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups to modulate the acidity of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond. The structure in solution was established by 1H-, 13C- and 15N-NMR spectroscopy. The physicochemical parameters of the intramolecular NHO hydrogen bond (pKa, ΔKNHO and ΔΔG°) were obtained from 1H-NMR titration data and pH measurements. The Henderson-Hasselbalch data analysis indicated that the systems are weakly acidic, and the predominant NHO equilibrium was established using Polster-Lachmann δ-diagram analysis and Perrin model data linearization.

  7. The R-factor gap in macromolecular crystallography: an untapped potential for insights on accurate structures

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James M; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A; Tainer, John A

    2014-01-01

    In macromolecular crystallography, the agreement between observed and predicted structure factors (Rcryst and Rfree) is seldom better than 20%. This is much larger than the estimate of experimental error (Rmerge). The difference between Rcryst and Rmerge is the R-factor gap. There is no such gap in small-molecule crystallography, for which calculated structure factors are generally considered more accurate than the experimental measurements. Perhaps the true noise level of macromolecular data is higher than expected? Or is the gap caused by inaccurate phases that trap refined models in local minima? By generating simulated diffraction patterns using the program MLFSOM, and including every conceivable source of experimental error, we show that neither is the case. Processing our simulated data yielded values that were indistinguishable from those of real data for all crystallographic statistics except the final Rcryst and Rfree. These values decreased to 3.8% and 5.5% for simulated data, suggesting that the reason for high R-factors in macromolecular crystallography is neither experimental error nor phase bias, but rather an underlying inadequacy in the models used to explain our observations. The present inability to accurately represent the entire macromolecule with both its flexibility and its protein-solvent interface may be improved by synergies between small-angle X-ray scattering, computational chemistry and crystallography. The exciting implication of our finding is that macromolecular data contain substantial hidden and untapped potential to resolve ambiguities in the true nature of the nanoscale, a task that the second century of crystallography promises to fulfill. Database Coordinates and structure factors for the real data have been submitted to the Protein Data Bank under accession 4tws. PMID:25040949

  8. Fuzzy Reasoning to More Accurately Determine Void Areas on Optical Micrographs of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Tate, Lanetra C.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishing the best-performing composite matrix (resin) requires that not only the processing method but also the cure cycle generate low-void-content structures. If voids are present, the performance of the composite matrix will be significantly reduced. This is usually noticed by significant reductions in matrix-dominated properties, such as compression and shear strength. Voids in composite materials are areas that are absent of the composite components: matrix and fibers. The characteristics of the voids and their accurate estimation are critical to determine for high performance composite structures. One widely used method of performing void analysis on a composite structure sample is acquiring optical micrographs or Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of lateral sides of the sample and retrieving the void areas within the micrographs/images using an image analysis technique. Segmentation for the retrieval and subsequent computation of void areas within the micrographs/images is challenging as the gray-scaled values of the void areas are close to the gray-scaled values of the matrix leading to the need of manually performing the segmentation based on the histogram of the micrographs/images to retrieve the void areas. The use of an algorithm developed by NASA and based on Fuzzy Reasoning (FR) proved to overcome the difficulty of suitably differentiate void and matrix image areas with similar gray-scaled values leading not only to a more accurate estimation of void areas on composite matrix micrographs but also to a faster void analysis process as the algorithm is fully autonomous.

  9. Accurate airway segmentation based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qier; Kitsaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel airway segmentation method based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut. Airway segmentation is an important step in analyzing chest CT volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis, asthma diagnosis, and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3-D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite challenging. Several researchers have proposed automated algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However these methods failed to detect the peripheral bronchi branches. They caused a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach that permits more accurate extraction of complex bronchial airway region. Our method are composed of three steps. First, the Hessian analysis is utilized for enhancing the line-like structure in CT volumes, then a multiscale cavity-enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure from the previous enhanced result. In the second step, we utilize the support vector machine (SVM) to construct a classifier for removing the FP regions generated. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is utilized to connect all of the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. We applied this method to sixteen cases of 3D chest CT volumes. The results showed that the branch detection rate of this method can reach about 77.7% without leaking into the lung parenchyma areas.

  10. Beyond Ellipse(s): Accurately Modelling the Isophotal Structure of Galaxies with ISOFIT and CMODEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  11. BEYOND ELLIPSE(S): ACCURATELY MODELING THE ISOPHOTAL STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES WITH ISOFIT AND CMODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciambur, B. C.

    2015-09-10

    This work introduces a new fitting formalism for isophotes that enables more accurate modeling of galaxies with non-elliptical shapes, such as disk galaxies viewed edge-on or galaxies with X-shaped/peanut bulges. Within this scheme, the angular parameter that defines quasi-elliptical isophotes is transformed from the commonly used, but inappropriate, polar coordinate to the “eccentric anomaly.” This provides a superior description of deviations from ellipticity, better capturing the true isophotal shape. Furthermore, this makes it possible to accurately recover both the surface brightness profile, using the correct azimuthally averaged isophote, and the two-dimensional model of any galaxy: the hitherto ubiquitous, but artificial, cross-like features in residual images are completely removed. The formalism has been implemented into the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility tasks Ellipse and Bmodel to create the new tasks “Isofit,” and “Cmodel.” The new tools are demonstrated here with application to five galaxies, chosen to be representative case-studies for several areas where this technique makes it possible to gain new scientific insight. Specifically: properly quantifying boxy/disky isophotes via the fourth harmonic order in edge-on galaxies, quantifying X-shaped/peanut bulges, higher-order Fourier moments for modeling bars in disks, and complex isophote shapes. Higher order (n > 4) harmonics now become meaningful and may correlate with structural properties, as boxyness/diskyness is known to do. This work also illustrates how the accurate construction, and subtraction, of a model from a galaxy image facilitates the identification and recovery of over-lapping sources such as globular clusters and the optical counterparts of X-ray sources.

  12. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism.

    PubMed

    Kieslich, Chris A; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/.

  13. Equilibrium structure of a triblock copolymer system revealed by mesoscale simulation and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei-Ren; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory S.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed both mesoscale simulations and neutron scattering experiments on Pluronic L62, a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer system in aqueous solution. The influence of simulation variables such PEO/PPO block ratio, interaction parameters, and coarse-graining methods is extensively investigated by covering all permutations of parameters found in the literatures. Upon increasing the polymer weight fraction from 50 wt% to 90 wt%, the equilibrium structure of the isotropic, reverse micellar, bicontinuous, worm-like micelle network, and lamellar phases are respectively predicted from the simulation depending on the choices of simulation parameters. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show that the same polymer systems exhibit the spherical micellar, lamellar, and reverse micellar phases with the increase of the copolymer concentration at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis and comparison with simulations suggest that one of the simulation parameter sets can provide reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed structures.

  14. Equilibrium Structure of a Triblock Copolymer System Revealed by Mesoscale Simulation and Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Changwoo; Chen, Wei-Ren; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory Scott

    2013-01-01

    We have performed both mesoscale simulations and neutron scattering experiments on Pluronic L62, a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer system in aqueous solution. The influence of simulation variables such PEO/PPO block ratio, interaction parameters, and coarse-graining methods is extensively investigated by covering all permutations of parameters found in the literatures. Upon increasing the polymer weight fraction from 50 wt% to 90 wt%, the equilibrium structure of the isotropic, reverse micellar, bicontinuous, worm-like micelle network, and lamellar phases are respectively predicted from the simulation depending on the choices of simulation parameters. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show that the same polymer systems exhibit the spherical micellar, lamellar, and reverse micellar phases with the increase of the copolymer concentration at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis and comparison with simulations suggest that one of the simulation parameter sets can provide reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed structures.

  15. Intermediate monomer-dimer equilibrium structure of native ICAM-1: implication for enhanced cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Mee; Kwon, Min-Sung; Kim, Hyang-Jin; Jeon, Byeong-Hun; Kim, Hye-Ran; Choi, Hyang-Ok; Na, Bo-Ra; Eom, Soo-Hyun; Song, Nam Woong; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2011-01-15

    Dimeric intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) has been known to more efficiently mediate cell adhesion than monomeric ICAM-1. Here, we found that truncation of the intracellular domain of ICAM-1 significantly enhances surface dimerization based on the two criteria: 1) the binding degree of monomer-specific antibody CA-7 and 2) the ratio of dimer/monomer when a mutation (L42→C42) was introduced in the interface of domain 1. Mutation analysis revealed that the positively charged amino acids, including very membrane-proximal ⁵⁰⁵R, are essential for maintaining the structural transition between the monomer and dimer. Despite a strong dimer presentation, the ICAM-1 mutants lacking an intracellular domain (IC1ΔCTD) or containing R to A substitution in position 505 (⁵⁰⁵R/A) supported a lower degree of cell adhesion than did wild-type ICAM-1. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the native structure of surface ICAM-1 is not a dimer, but is an intermediate monomer-dimer equilibrium structure by which the effectiveness of ICAM-1 can be fully achieved.

  16. Supramolecular Magnetic Brushes: The Impact of Dipolar Interactions on the Equilibrium Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of supramolecular magnetic filament brushes is analyzed at two different scales. First, we study the density and height distributions for brushes with various grafting densities and chain lengths. We use Langevin dynamics simulations with a bead–spring model that takes into account the cross-links between the surface of the ferromagnetic particles, whose magnetization is characterized by a point dipole. Magnetic filament brushes are shown to be more compact near the substrate than nonmagnetic ones, with a bimodal height distribution for large grafting densities. This latter feature makes them also different from brushes with electric dipoles. Next, in order to explain the observed behavior at the filament scale, we introduce a graph theory analysis to elucidate for the first time the structure of the brush at the scale of individual beads. It turns out that, in contrast to nonmagnetic brushes, in which the internal structure is determined by random density fluctuations, magnetic forces introduce a certain order in the system. Because of their highly directional nature, magnetic dipolar interactions prevent some of the random connections to be formed. On the other hand, they favor a higher connectivity of the chains’ free and grafted ends. We show that this complex dipolar brush microstructure has a strong impact on the magnetic response of the brush, as any weak applied field has to compete with the dipole–dipole interactions within the crowded environment. PMID:26538768

  17. A microscopic, non-equilibrium, statistical field theory for cosmic structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Fabis, Felix; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2016-04-01

    Building upon the recent pioneering work by Mazenko and by Das and Mazenko, we develop a microscopic, non-equilibrium, statistical field theory for initially correlated canonical ensembles of classical microscopic particles obeying Hamiltonian dynamics. Our primary target is cosmic structure formation, where initial Gaussian correlations in phase space are believed to be set by inflation. We give an exact expression for the generating functional of this theory and work out suitable approximations. We specify the initial correlations by a power spectrum and derive general expressions for the correlators of the density and the response field. We derive simple closed expressions for the lowest-order contributions to the nonlinear cosmological power spectrum, valid for arbitrary wave numbers. We further calculate the bispectrum expected in this theory within these approximations and the power spectrum of cosmic density fluctuations to first order in the gravitational interaction, using a recent improvement of the Zel’dovich approximation. We show that, with a modification motivated by the adhesion approximation, the nonlinear growth of the density power spectrum found in numerical simulations of cosmic structure evolution is reproduced well to redshift zero and for arbitrary wave numbers even within first-order perturbation theory. Our results present the first fully analytic calculation of the nonlinear power spectrum of cosmic structures.

  18. Accurate electronic-structure description of Mn complexes: a GGA+U approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Elise Y.; Kulik, Heather; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-03-01

    Conventional density-functional approach often fail in offering an accurate description of the spin-resolved energetics in transition metals complexes. We will focus here on Mn complexes, where many aspects of the molecular structure and the reaction mechanisms are still unresolved - most notably in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II and the manganese catalase (MC). We apply a self-consistent GGA + U approach [1], originally designed within the DFT framework for the treatment of strongly correlated materials, to describe the geometry, the electronic and the magnetic properties of various manganese oxide complexes, finding very good agreement with higher-order ab-initio calculations. In particular, the different oxidation states of dinuclear systems containing the [Mn2O2]^n+ (n= 2, 3, 4) core are investigated, in order to mimic the basic face unit of the OEC complex. [1]. H. J. Kulik, M. Cococcioni, D. A. Scherlis, N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 97, 103001

  19. Study on two-dimensional equilibrium structure of magnetized complex plasmas based on a Langevin dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei; Yang, Fang; Liu, Songfen; Shi, Feng

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin dynamics simulation method is used to study the two-dimensional (2D) equilibrium structure of complex plasmas while considering an external magnetic field. The traditional Yukawa potential and a modified Yukawa potential according to Shukla et al. [Phys. Lett. A 291, 413 (2001); Shukla and Mendonca, Phys. Scr. T113 82 (2004)] and Salimullah et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 3047 (2003)] respectively, are employed to account for the interaction of the charged dust particles. It is found that the collisions between neutral gas and charged dust particles have minor effects on the 2D equilibrium structure of the system. Based on the modified Yukawa potential, studies on the 2D equilibrium structure show that the traditional Yukawa potential is still suitable for describing the magnetized complex plasmas, even if the shielding distance of charged dust particles is affected by the strong external magnetic field.

  20. Efficient and Accurate Multiple-Phenotype Regression Method for High Dimensional Data Considering Population Structure.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jong Wha J; Kang, Eun Yong; Org, Elin; Furlotte, Nick; Parks, Brian; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Lusis, Aldons J; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-12-01

    A typical genome-wide association study tests correlation between a single phenotype and each genotype one at a time. However, single-phenotype analysis might miss unmeasured aspects of complex biological networks. Analyzing many phenotypes simultaneously may increase the power to capture these unmeasured aspects and detect more variants. Several multivariate approaches aim to detect variants related to more than one phenotype, but these current approaches do not consider the effects of population structure. As a result, these approaches may result in a significant amount of false positive identifications. Here, we introduce a new methodology, referred to as GAMMA for generalized analysis of molecular variance for mixed-model analysis, which is capable of simultaneously analyzing many phenotypes and correcting for population structure. In a simulated study using data implanted with true genetic effects, GAMMA accurately identifies these true effects without producing false positives induced by population structure. In simulations with this data, GAMMA is an improvement over other methods which either fail to detect true effects or produce many false positive identifications. We further apply our method to genetic studies of yeast and gut microbiome from mice and show that GAMMA identifies several variants that are likely to have true biological mechanisms.

  1. Regularized Mathematical Programs with Stochastic Equilibrium Constraints: Estimating Structural Demand Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-23

    equilibrium constraints involving only single-valued Lipschitz continuous functions. In addition, sampling has the further effect of replacing the...constraints, based on regularization, that replaces them by equilibrium constraints involving only single-valued Lipschitz continuous functions. In addition...only single-valued Lipschitz continuous functions. In addition, sampling has the further effect of replacing the ‘simplified’ equilibrium constraints by

  2. Low-energy structures of benzene clusters with a novel accurate potential surface.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, M; Pirani, F; Marques, J M C

    2015-12-05

    The benzene-benzene (Bz-Bz) interaction is present in several chemical systems and it is known to be crucial in understanding the specificity of important biological phenomena. In this work, we propose a novel Bz-Bz analytical potential energy surface which is fine-tuned on accurate ab initio calculations in order to improve its reliability. Once the Bz-Bz interaction is modeled, an analytical function for the energy of the Bzn clusters may be obtained by summing up over all pair potentials. We apply an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to discover the lowest-energy structures of Bzn clusters (for n=2-25), and the results are compared with previous global optimization studies where different potential functions were employed. Besides the global minimum, the EA also gives the structures of other low-lying isomers ranked by the corresponding energy. Additional ab initio calculations are carried out for the low-lying isomers of Bz3 and Bz4 clusters, and the global minimum is confirmed as the most stable structure for both sizes. Finally, a detailed analysis of the low-energy isomers of the n = 13 and 19 magic-number clusters is performed. The two lowest-energy Bz13 isomers show S6 and C3 symmetry, respectively, which is compatible with the experimental results available in the literature. The Bz19 structures reported here are all non-symmetric, showing two central Bz molecules surrounded by 12 nearest-neighbor monomers in the case of the five lowest-energy structures.

  3. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/.

  4. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-‘one-click’ experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/. PMID:26894674

  5. Accurate response surface approximations for weight equations based on structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papila, Melih

    Accurate weight prediction methods are vitally important for aircraft design optimization. Therefore, designers seek weight prediction techniques with low computational cost and high accuracy, and usually require a compromise between the two. The compromise can be achieved by combining stress analysis and response surface (RS) methodology. While stress analysis provides accurate weight information, RS techniques help to transmit effectively this information to the optimization procedure. The focus of this dissertation is structural weight equations in the form of RS approximations and their accuracy when fitted to results of structural optimizations that are based on finite element analyses. Use of RS methodology filters out the numerical noise in structural optimization results and provides a smooth weight function that can easily be used in gradient-based configuration optimization. In engineering applications RS approximations of low order polynomials are widely used, but the weight may not be modeled well by low-order polynomials, leading to bias errors. In addition, some structural optimization results may have high-amplitude errors (outliers) that may severely affect the accuracy of the weight equation. Statistical techniques associated with RS methodology are sought in order to deal with these two difficulties: (1) high-amplitude numerical noise (outliers) and (2) approximation model inadequacy. The investigation starts with reducing approximation error by identifying and repairing outliers. A potential reason for outliers in optimization results is premature convergence, and outliers of such nature may be corrected by employing different convergence settings. It is demonstrated that outlier repair can lead to accuracy improvements over the more standard approach of removing outliers. The adequacy of approximation is then studied by a modified lack-of-fit approach, and RS errors due to the approximation model are reduced by using higher order polynomials. In

  6. Accurate Ab Initio Calculation of the Isotopic Exchange Equilibrium 10B(OH)3 + 11B(OH)4- = 11B(OH)3 + 10B(OH)4- In Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    For more than a decade the B isotopic compositions of marine carbonates have been used as paleo-pH proxies for seawater and to reconstruct paleo-[CO2] concentrations in the atmosphere. A necessary step is this process is the accurate determination of the equilibrium constant, K, for the reaction shown in the title above. This equilibrium constant has been recently calculated using ab initio quantum chemical methods applied to nanoclusters containing the solutes B(OH)3 and B(OH)4- coordinated by large numbers of explicit solvent molecules, a computationally difficult procedure. To obtain the most accurate possible value for K the calculated vibrational frequencies were scaled to best fit the limited experimental data available. The value of K obtained (@ 25°C) was 1.027 (significantly larger than the long used value of 1.0194). Even more recently a purely experimental value of K= 1.0265 ± 0.0015 has been obtained through an accurate spectrophotometric determination of the difference of pKa's of commercially available bulk samples of >99% enriched 10B(OH)3(s) and 11B(OH)3 (s). Since we now know the correct experimental value and have a calculation, admittedly a difficult and slightly parameterized one, which matches the experimental result (which was obtained after the calculation), it is worthwhile to analyze the steps in the theoretical calculation of K in more detail. We need to establish a general procedure which can yield accurate K values for other similar aqueous species even if we have no accurate experimental value for K and no vibrational spectral data. To this end we will examine the dependence of the calculated values of vibrational frequencies, isotopomer frequency differences and K values on a number of factors, including (a) the quantum mechanical level (basis set and treatment of electron correlation) used for the free solutes, (b) the incorporation of aqueous medium effects, (c) the effects of vibrational anharmonicity, (d) incorporation of the

  7. A theoretical study on the electronic structures and equilibrium constants evaluation of Deferasirox iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Samie; Saljooghi, Amir Shokooh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Elemental iron is essential for cellular growth and homeostasis but it is potentially toxic to the cells and tissues. Excess iron can contribute in tumor initiation and tumor growth. Obviously, in iron overload issues using an iron chelator in order to reduce iron concentration seems to be vital. This study presents the density functional theory calculations of the electronic structure and equilibrium constant for iron-deferasirox (Fe-DFX) complexes in the gas phase, water and DMSO. A comprehensive study was performed to investigate the Deferasirox-iron complexes in chelation therapy. Calculation was performed in CAMB3LYP/6-31G(d,p) to get the optimized structures for iron complexes in high and low spin states. Natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules analyses was carried out with B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) to understand the nature of complex bond character and electronic transition in complexes. Electrostatic potential effects on the complexes were evaluated using the CHelpG calculations. The results indicated that higher affinity for Fe(III) is not strictly a function of bond length but also the degree of Fe-X (X=O,N) covalent bonding. Based on the quantum reactivity parameters which have been investigated here, it is possible reasonable design of the new chelators to improve the chelator abilities.

  8. Silicon Oxysulfide, OSiS: Rotational Spectrum, Quantum-Chemical Calculations, and Equilibrium Structure.

    PubMed

    Thorwirth, Sven; Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen; Tamassia, Filippo; Lattanzi, Valerio; McCarthy, Michael C

    2011-06-02

    Silicon oxysulfide, OSiS, and seven of its minor isotopic species have been characterized for the first time in the gas phase at high spectral resolution by means of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The equilibrium structure of OSiS has been determined from the experimental data using calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants. The structural parameters (rO-Si = 1.5064 Å and rSi-S = 1.9133 Å) are in very good agreement with values from high-level quantum chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques together with sophisticated additivity and extrapolation schemes. The bond distances in OSiS are very short in comparison with those in SiO and SiS. This unexpected finding is explained by the partial charges calculated for OSiS via a natural population analysis. The results suggest that electrostatic effects rather than multiple bonding are the key factors in determining bonding in this triatomic molecule. The data presented provide the spectroscopic information needed for radio astronomical searches for OSiS.

  9. Discrete state model and accurate estimation of loop entropy of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lin, Ming; Chen, Rong; Wang, Wei; Liang, Jie

    2008-03-28

    Conformational entropy makes important contribution to the stability and folding of RNA molecule, but it is challenging to either measure or compute conformational entropy associated with long loops. We develop optimized discrete k-state models of RNA backbone based on known RNA structures for computing entropy of loops, which are modeled as self-avoiding walks. To estimate entropy of hairpin, bulge, internal loop, and multibranch loop of long length (up to 50), we develop an efficient sampling method based on the sequential Monte Carlo principle. Our method considers excluded volume effect. It is general and can be applied to calculating entropy of loops with longer length and arbitrary complexity. For loops of short length, our results are in good agreement with a recent theoretical model and experimental measurement. For long loops, our estimated entropy of hairpin loops is in excellent agreement with the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model. However, for bulge loops and more complex secondary structures such as internal and multibranch loops, we find that the Jacobson-Stockmayer extrapolation model has large errors. Based on estimated entropy, we have developed empirical formulae for accurate calculation of entropy of long loops in different secondary structures. Our study on the effect of asymmetric size of loops suggest that loop entropy of internal loops is largely determined by the total loop length, and is only marginally affected by the asymmetric size of the two loops. Our finding suggests that the significant asymmetric effects of loop length in internal loops measured by experiments are likely to be partially enthalpic. Our method can be applied to develop improved energy parameters important for studying RNA stability and folding, and for predicting RNA secondary and tertiary structures. The discrete model and the program used to calculate loop entropy can be downloaded at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/resources/RNA.html.

  10. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: quantum mechanics versus classical.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2005-04-15

    The equilibrium properties of classical Lennard-Jones (LJ38) versus quantum Ne38 Lennard-Jones clusters are investigated. The quantum simulations use both the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and the recently developed variational-Gaussian wave packet Monte Carlo (VGW-MC) methods. The PIMC and the classical MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv(T) curve agrees well with that of Neirotti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 10340 (2000)], although a much larger confining sphere is used in the present work. The classical Cv(T) shows a peak at about 6 K, interpreted as a solid-liquid transition, and a shoulder at approximately 4 K, attributed to a solid-solid transition involving structures from the global octahedral (Oh) minimum and the main icosahedral (C5v) minimum. The VGW method is used to locate and characterize the low energy states of Ne38, which are then further refined by PIMC calculations. Unlike the classical case, the ground state of Ne38 is a liquidlike structure. Among the several liquidlike states with energies below the two symmetric states (Oh and C5v), the lowest two exhibit strong delocalization over basins associated with at least two classical local minima. Because the symmetric structures do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity is a featureless curve indicative of the absence of any structural transformations. Good agreement between the two methods, VGW and PIMC, is obtained. The present results are also consistent with the predictions by Calvo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7312 (2001)] based on the quantum superposition method within the harmonic approximation. However, because of its approximate nature, the latter method leads to an incorrect assignment of the Ne38 ground state as well as to a significant underestimation of the heat capacity.

  11. Toward Hamiltonian Adaptive QM/MM: Accurate Solvent Structures Using Many-Body Potentials.

    PubMed

    Boereboom, Jelle M; Potestio, Raffaello; Donadio, Davide; Bulo, Rosa E

    2016-08-09

    Adaptive quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) methods enable efficient molecular simulations of chemistry in solution. Reactive subregions are modeled with an accurate QM potential energy expression while the rest of the system is described in a more approximate manner (MM). As solvent molecules diffuse in and out of the reactive region, they are gradually included into (and excluded from) the QM expression. It would be desirable to model such a system with a single adaptive Hamiltonian, but thus far this has resulted in distorted structures at the boundary between the two regions. Solving this long outstanding problem will allow microcanonical adaptive QM/MM simulations that can be used to obtain vibrational spectra and dynamical properties. The difficulty lies in the complex QM potential energy expression, with a many-body expansion that contains higher order terms. Here, we outline a Hamiltonian adaptive multiscale scheme within the framework of many-body potentials. The adaptive expressions are entirely general, and complementary to all standard (nonadaptive) QM/MM embedding schemes available. We demonstrate the merit of our approach on a molecular system defined by two different MM potentials (MM/MM'). For the long-range interactions a numerical scheme is used (particle mesh Ewald), which yields energy expressions that are many-body in nature. Our Hamiltonian approach is the first to provide both energy conservation and the correct solvent structure everywhere in this system.

  12. Computational Analysis of Core/Shell-like Structure Formation through Equilibrium Segregation in Ternary Compound Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sumeet C.; Singh, Tejinder; Mountziaris, Triantafillos J.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2010-03-01

    We present a computational analysis of equilibrium surface segregation in nanocrystals of InxGa1-xAs, ZnSe1-xTex, and ZnSe1-xSx. The analysis is based on coupled compositional, structural, and strain relaxation employing Monte Carlo and conjugate-gradient methods according to proper parameterizations within the valence-force-field (VFF) description. The VFF parameterizations are validated by comparisons of their segregation energy predictions with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We report results for the equilibrium concentration distributions in the nanocrystals as a function of the compositional parameter x and nanocrystal size; the nanocrystal morphologies are polyhedral with distinct facets of low-index surface orientation as determined from DFT calculations of equilibrium crystal shapes. The results identify the particle-size and composition ranges that allow for assembly of core/shell-like nanocrystal structures with increased band-gap tunability.

  13. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  14. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: Determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD2FI, as well as of the 13C-containing species, 13CH2FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH2FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011);, 10.1063/1.3583498 G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)], 10.1080/00268976.2011.609142 enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  15. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-14

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD(2)FI, as well as of the (13)C-containing species, (13)CH(2)FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH(2)FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011); G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)] enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  16. Structural properties of methanol-water binary mixtures within the quantum cluster equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Matisz, G; Kelterer, A-M; Fabian, W M F; Kunsági-Máté, S

    2015-04-07

    Density functional theory (B3LYP-D3, M06-2X) has been used to calculate the structures, interaction energies and vibrational frequencies of a set of 93 methanol-water clusters of different type (cubic, ring, spiro, lasso, bicyclic), size and composition. These interaction energies have been used within the framework of the Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory (QCE) to calculate cluster populations as well as thermodynamic properties of binary methanol-water mixtures spanning the whole range from pure water to pure methanol. The necessary parameters amf and bxv of the QCE model were obtained by fitting to experimental isobars of MeOH-H2O mixtures with different MeOH content. The cubic and spiro motifs dominate the distribution of methanol-water clusters in the mixtures with a maximum of mixed clusters at x(MeOH) = 0.365. Reasonable agreement with experimental data as well as earlier molecular dynamics simulations was found for excess enthalpies H(E), entropies S(E) as well as Gibbs free energies of mixing G(E). In contrast, heat capacities Cp and C showed only poor agreement with experimental data.

  17. Rotational spectroscopy and equilibrium structures of S3 and S4.

    PubMed

    Thorwirth, S; McCarthy, M C; Gottlieb, C A; Thaddeus, P; Gupta, H; Stanton, J F

    2005-08-01

    The sulfur molecules thiozone S3 and tetrasulfur S4 have been observed in a supersonic molecular beam in the centimeter-wave band by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, and in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave bands in a low-pressure glow discharge. For S3 over 150 rotational transitions between 10 and 458 GHz were measured, and for S4 a comparable number between 6 and 271 GHz. The spectrum of S3 is reproduced to within the measurement uncertainties by an asymmetric top Hamiltonian with three rotational and 12 centrifugal distortion constants; ten distortion constants, but an additional term to account for very small level shifts caused by interchange tunneling, are required to reproduce to comparable accuracy the spectrum of S4. Empirical equilibrium (r(e)(emp)) structures of S3 and S4 were derived from experimental rotational constants of the normal and sulfur-34 species and vibrational corrections from coupled-cluster theory calculations. Quantum chemical calculations show that interchange tunneling occurs because S4 automerizes through a transition state with D2h symmetry which lies about 500 cm(-1) above the two equivalent C2upsilon minima on the potential energy surface.

  18. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235–360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-12-14

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, [4-{sup 13}C]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, and [1-{sup 15}N]-C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (R{sub e}) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final R{sub e} structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (I{sub a} and I{sub b} for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to

  19. Rotational spectroscopy of pyridazine and its isotopologs from 235-360 GHz: Equilibrium structure and vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Amberger, Brent K.; Shutter, Joshua D.; Daane, Mitchell A.; Stanton, John F.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2013-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of pyridazine (o-C4H4N2), the ortho disubstituted nitrogen analog of benzene, has been measured and analyzed in the gas phase. For the ground vibrational state of the normal isotopolog, over 2000 individual rotational transitions have been identified between 238 and 360 GHz and have been fit to 13 parameters of a 6th-order centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. All transitions in this frequency region can now be predicted from this model to near experimental accuracy, i.e., well enough for the purpose of any future radio-astronomical search for this species. Three isotopologs, [3-13C]-C4H4N2, [4-13C]-C4H4N2, and [1-15N]-C4H4N2, have been detected in natural abundance, and several hundred lines have been measured for each of these species and fit to 6th-order Hamiltonians. Ten additional isotopologs were synthesized with enhanced deuterium substitution and analyzed to allow for a complete structure determination. The equilibrium structure (Re) of pyridazine was obtained by correcting the experimental rotational constants for the effects of vibration-rotation coupling using interaction constants predicted from CCSD(T) calculations with an ANO0 basis set and further correcting for the effect of electron mass. The final Re structural parameters are determined with excellent accuracy, as evidenced by their ability to predict 28 independent moments of inertia (Ia and Ib for 14 isotopologs) very well from 9 structural parameters. The rotational spectra of the six lowest-energy fundamental vibrational satellites of the main isotopolog have been detected. The rotational spectra of the five lowest-energy vibrational satellites have been assigned and fit to yield accurate rotational and distortion constants, while the fit and assignment for the sixth is less complete. The resultant vibration-rotation interaction (α) constants are found to be in excellent agreement with ones predicted from coupled-cluster calculations, which proved to be the key to

  20. Straightforward and accurate technique for post-coupler stabilization in drift tube linac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalvati, Mohammad Reza; Ramberger, Suitbert

    2016-04-01

    The axial electric field of Alvarez drift tube linacs (DTLs) is known to be susceptible to variations due to static and dynamic effects like manufacturing tolerances and beam loading. Post-couplers are used to stabilize the accelerating fields of DTLs against tuning errors. Tilt sensitivity and its slope have been introduced as measures for the stability right from the invention of post-couplers but since then the actual stabilization has mostly been done by tedious iteration. In the present article, the local tilt-sensitivity slope TSn' is established as the principal measure for stabilization instead of tilt sensitivity or some visual slope, and its significance is developed on the basis of an equivalent-circuit diagram of the DTL. Experimental and 3D simulation results are used to analyze its behavior and to define a technique for stabilization that allows finding the best post-coupler settings with just four tilt-sensitivity measurements. CERN's Linac4 DTL Tank 2 and Tank 3 have been stabilized successfully using this technique. The final tilt-sensitivity error has been reduced from ±100 %/MHz down to ±3 %/MHz for Tank 2 and down to ±1 %/MHz for Tank 3. Finally, an accurate procedure for tuning the structure using slug tuners is discussed.

  1. Structural stability augmentation system design using BODEDIRECT: A quick and accurate approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goslin, T. J.; Ho, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology is presented for a modal suppression control law design using flight test data instead of mathematical models to obtain the required gain and phase information about the flexible airplane. This approach is referred to as BODEDIRECT. The purpose of the BODEDIRECT program is to provide a method of analyzing the modal phase relationships measured directly from the airplane. These measurements can be achieved with a frequency sweep at the control surface input while measuring the outputs of interest. The measured Bode-models can be used directly for analysis in the frequency domain, and for control law design. Besides providing a more accurate representation for the system inputs and outputs of interest, this method is quick and relatively inexpensive. To date, the BODEDIRECT program has been tested and verified for computational integrity. Its capabilities include calculation of series, parallel and loop closure connections between Bode-model representations. System PSD, together with gain and phase margins of stability may be calculated for successive loop closures of multi-input/multi-output systems. Current plans include extensive flight testing to obtain a Bode-model representation of a commercial aircraft for design of a structural stability augmentation system.

  2. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-05-05

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis.

  3. Coding exon-structure aware realigner (CESAR) utilizes genome alignments for accurate comparative gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Virag; Elghafari, Anas; Hiller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identifying coding genes is an essential step in genome annotation. Here, we utilize existing whole genome alignments to detect conserved coding exons and then map gene annotations from one genome to many aligned genomes. We show that genome alignments contain thousands of spurious frameshifts and splice site mutations in exons that are truly conserved. To overcome these limitations, we have developed CESAR (Coding Exon-Structure Aware Realigner) that realigns coding exons, while considering reading frame and splice sites of each exon. CESAR effectively avoids spurious frameshifts in conserved genes and detects 91% of shifted splice sites. This results in the identification of thousands of additional conserved exons and 99% of the exons that lack inactivating mutations match real exons. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of using CESAR for comparative gene annotation, we applied it to 188 788 exons of 19 865 human genes to annotate human genes in 99 other vertebrates. These comparative gene annotations are available as a resource (http://bds.mpi-cbg.de/hillerlab/CESAR/). CESAR (https://github.com/hillerlab/CESAR/) can readily be applied to other alignments to accurately annotate coding genes in many other vertebrate and invertebrate genomes. PMID:27016733

  4. COSMOS: accurate detection of somatic structural variations through asymmetric comparison between tumor and normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Koichi; Yamanishi, Ayako; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Sese, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge in cancer genomics is precise detection of structural variations (SVs) by high-throughput short-read sequencing, which is hampered by the high false discovery rates of existing analysis tools. Here, we propose an accurate SV detection method named COSMOS, which compares the statistics of the mapped read pairs in tumor samples with isogenic normal control samples in a distinct asymmetric manner. COSMOS also prioritizes the candidate SVs using strand-specific read-depth information. Performance tests on modeled tumor genomes revealed that COSMOS outperformed existing methods in terms of F-measure. We also applied COSMOS to an experimental mouse cell-based model, in which SVs were induced by genome engineering and gamma-ray irradiation, followed by polymerase chain reaction-based confirmation. The precision of COSMOS was 84.5%, while the next best existing method was 70.4%. Moreover, the sensitivity of COSMOS was the highest, indicating that COSMOS has great potential for cancer genome analysis. PMID:26833260

  5. Structure-based constitutive model can accurately predict planar biaxial properties of aortic wall tissue.

    PubMed

    Polzer, S; Gasser, T C; Novak, K; Man, V; Tichy, M; Skacel, P; Bursa, J

    2015-03-01

    Structure-based constitutive models might help in exploring mechanisms by which arterial wall histology is linked to wall mechanics. This study aims to validate a recently proposed structure-based constitutive model. Specifically, the model's ability to predict mechanical biaxial response of porcine aortic tissue with predefined collagen structure was tested. Histological slices from porcine thoracic aorta wall (n=9) were automatically processed to quantify the collagen fiber organization, and mechanical testing identified the non-linear properties of the wall samples (n=18) over a wide range of biaxial stretches. Histological and mechanical experimental data were used to identify the model parameters of a recently proposed multi-scale constitutive description for arterial layers. The model predictive capability was tested with respect to interpolation and extrapolation. Collagen in the media was predominantly aligned in circumferential direction (planar von Mises distribution with concentration parameter bM=1.03 ± 0.23), and its coherence decreased gradually from the luminal to the abluminal tissue layers (inner media, b=1.54 ± 0.40; outer media, b=0.72 ± 0.20). In contrast, the collagen in the adventitia was aligned almost isotropically (bA=0.27 ± 0.11), and no features, such as families of coherent fibers, were identified. The applied constitutive model captured the aorta biaxial properties accurately (coefficient of determination R(2)=0.95 ± 0.03) over the entire range of biaxial deformations and with physically meaningful model parameters. Good predictive properties, well outside the parameter identification space, were observed (R(2)=0.92 ± 0.04). Multi-scale constitutive models equipped with realistic micro-histological data can predict macroscopic non-linear aorta wall properties. Collagen largely defines already low strain properties of media, which explains the origin of wall anisotropy seen at this strain level. The structure and mechanical

  6. Monitoring equilibrium changes in RNA structure by 'peroxidative' and 'oxidative' hydroxyl radical footprinting.

    PubMed

    Bachu, Ravichandra; Padlan, Frances-Camille S; Rouhanifard, Sara; Brenowitz, Michael; Schlatterer, Jörg C

    2011-10-17

    RNA molecules play an essential role in biology. In addition to transmitting genetic information, RNA can fold into unique tertiary structures fulfilling a specific biologic role as regulator, binder or catalyst. Information about tertiary contact formation is essential to understand the function of RNA molecules. Hydroxyl radicals (•OH) are unique probes of the structure of nucleic acids due to their high reactivity and small size. When used as a footprinting probe, hydroxyl radicals map the solvent accessible surface of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA and RNA with as fine as single nucleotide resolution. Hydroxyl radical footprinting can be used to identify the nucleotides within an intermolecular contact surface, e.g. in DNA-protein and RNA-protein complexes. Equilibrium and kinetic transitions can be determined by conducting hydroxyl radical footprinting as a function of a solution variable or time, respectively. A key feature of footprinting is that limited exposure to the probe (e.g., 'single-hit kinetics') results in the uniform sampling of each nucleotide of the polymer. In this video article, we use the P4-P6 domain of the Tetrahymena ribozyme to illustrate RNA sample preparation and the determination of a Mg(II)-mediated folding isotherms. We describe the use of the well known hydroxyl radical footprinting protocol that requires H(2)O(2) (we call this the 'peroxidative' protocol) and a valuable, but not widely known, alternative that uses naturally dissolved O(2)(we call this the 'oxidative' protocol). An overview of the data reduction, transformation and analysis procedures is presented.

  7. Local atomic structure in equilibrium and supercooled liquid Zr[subscript 75.5]Pd[subscript 24.5

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N.A.; Fu, W.; Bendert, J.C.; Cheng, Y.Q.; Ma, E.; Kelton, K.F.

    2012-09-06

    Atomic structures were obtained in equilibrium and supercooled eutectic Zr{sub 75.5}Pd{sub 24.5} liquids by in situ high-energy synchrotron diffraction measurements using the beamline electrostatic levitation (BESL) technique, which provides a high-vacuum, containerless, environment. Reverse Monte Carlo fits to the x-ray static structure factors, constrained using partial pair correlation functions obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, indicate the presence of medium-range order (MRO) in the form of a strong tendency for Pd-Pd (solute-solute) avoidance. This order persists over the entire temperature range studied, from 170 C above the equilibrium liquidus temperature to 263 C below it. Further, a quantitative analysis of the atomic structures obtained indicates a modest degree of icosahedral-like local order around Pd atoms, with the clusters showing an increased tendency for face-sharing to form more extended structures with decreasing temperature.

  8. Electron diffraction study of the equilibrium structure of hexamethylenetetramine involving data from quantum chemistry and vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Karasev, N. M.; Kovtun, D. M.; Kochikov, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium structure of the urotropine molecule is characterized by means of gas electron diffraction (GED) with the involvement of quantum chemistry and vibrational spectroscopy. A structural analysis of the GED data is performed based on the parameters of the intramolecular potential function using of the program complex SYMM/DISP/ELDIFF/LARGE. The quadratic and cubic force constants of the urotropine molecule were obtained earlier on the basis of calculations at the MP2(full)/cc-pVTZ level and assuming molecular symmetry T d . The values of the equilibrium geometric parameters r e of the urotropine molecule are found. The experimental structural parameters are in good agreement with those calculated at the MP2(full)/cc-pVTZ level.

  9. The folding pathway of glycosomal triosephosphate isomerase: structural insights into equilibrium intermediates.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Luna, Valeria; Garza-Ramos, Georgina

    2012-06-01

    The guanidine hydrochloride-induced conformational transitions of glycosomal triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) were monitored with functional, spectroscopic, and hydrodynamic measurements. The equilibrium folding pathway was found to include two intermediates (N(2) ↔I(2) ↔2M↔2U). According to this model, the conformational stability parameters of TIM are as follows: ΔG(I2-N2) = 5.5 ± 0.6, ΔG(2M-I2) =19.6 ± 1.6, and ΔG(2U-2M) = 14.7 ± 3.1 kcal mol(-1) . The I(2) state is compact (α(SR) = 0.8); it is able to bind 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid ANS and it is composed of ∼45% of α-helix and tertiary structure content compared with the native enzyme; however, it is unable to bind the transition-state analog 2-phosphoglycolate. Conversely, the 2M state lacks detectable tertiary contacts, possesses ∼10% of the native α-helical content, is significantly expanded (α(SR) = 0.2), and has low affinity for ANS. We studied the effect of mutating cysteine residues on the structure and stability of I(2) and 2M. Three mutants were made: C39A, C126A, and C39A/C126A. The replacement of C39, which is located at β(2) , was found to be neutral. The I(2) -C126A state, however, was prone to aggregation and exhibited an emission maximum that was 3-nm red-shifted compared with the I(2) -wild type, indicating solvent exposure of W90 at β(4) . Our results suggest that the I(2) state comprises the (βα)(1-4) β(5) module in which the conserved C126 residue located at β(5) defines the boundary of the folded segment. We propose a folding pathway that highlights the remarkable thermodynamic stability of this glycosomal enzyme.

  10. An efficient and accurate model of the coax cable feeding structure for FEM simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient and accurate coax cable feed model is proposed for microstrip or cavity-backed patch antennas in the context of a hybrid finite element method (FEM). A TEM mode at the cavity-cable junction is assumed for the FEM truncation and system excitation. Of importance in this implementation is that the cavity unknowns are related to the model fields by enforcing an equipotential condition rather than field continuity. This scheme proved quite accurate and may be applied to other decomposed systems as a connectivity constraint. Comparisons of our predictions with input impedance measurements are presented and demonstrate the substantially improved accuracy of the proposed model.

  11. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    PubMed

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability.

  12. Radiative-dynamical equilibrium states for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate estimates of the radiative heating that drives motions in Jupiter's atmosphere, previous radiative equilibrium calculations are improved by including the NH3 opacities and updated results for the pressure-induced opacities. These additions increase the radiative lapse rate near the top of the statically unstable region and lead to a fairly constant radiative lapse rate below the tropopause. The radiative-convective equilibrium temperature structure consistent with these changes is calculated, but it differs only slightly from earlier calculations. The radiative equilibrium calculations are used to calculate whether equilibrium states can occur on Jupiter which are similar to the baroclinic instability regimes on the earth and Mars. The results show that Jupiter's dynamical regime cannot be of this kind, except possibly at very high latitudes, and that its regime must be a basically less stable one than this kind.

  13. Non-equilibrium Green's function calculation for GaN-based terahertz-quantum cascade laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.; Kubis, T.; Hosako, I.; Hirakawa, K.

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically investigated GaN-based resonant phonon terahertz-quantum cascade laser (QCL) structures for possible high-temperature operation by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. It was found that the GaN-based THz-QCL structures do not necessarily have a gain sufficient for lasing, even though the thermal backfilling and the thermally activated phonon scattering are effectively suppressed. The main reason for this is the broadening of the subband levels caused by a very strong interaction between electrons and longitudinal optical (LO) phonons in GaN.

  14. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  15. Seeking: Accurate Measurement Techniques for Deep-Bone Density and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, Jean

    2009-01-01

    We are seeking a clinically-useful technology with enough sensitivity to assess the microstructure of "spongy" bone that is found in the marrow cavities of whole bones. However, this technology must be for skeletal sites surrounded by layers of soft tissues, such as the spine and the hip. Soft tissue interferes with conventional imaging and using a more accessible area -- for example, the wrist or the ankle of limbs-- as a proxy for the less accessible skeletal regions, will not be accurate. A non-radioactive technology is strongly preferred.

  16. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†.

    PubMed

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-03-22

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  17. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches †

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-01-01

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  18. Accurate first-principles structures and energies of diversely bonded systems from an efficient density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Remsing, Richard C.; Zhang, Yubo; Sun, Zhaoru; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zenghui; Paul, Arpita; Waghmare, Umesh; Wu, Xifan; Klein, Michael L.; Perdew, John P.

    2016-09-01

    One atom or molecule binds to another through various types of bond, the strengths of which range from several meV to several eV. Although some computational methods can provide accurate descriptions of all bond types, those methods are not efficient enough for many studies (for example, large systems, ab initio molecular dynamics and high-throughput searches for functional materials). Here, we show that the recently developed non-empirical strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) within the density functional theory framework predicts accurate geometries and energies of diversely bonded molecules and materials (including covalent, metallic, ionic, hydrogen and van der Waals bonds). This represents a significant improvement at comparable efficiency over its predecessors, the GGAs that currently dominate materials computation. Often, SCAN matches or improves on the accuracy of a computationally expensive hybrid functional, at almost-GGA cost. SCAN is therefore expected to have a broad impact on chemistry and materials science.

  19. {ital Ab} {ital initio} investigation of the N{sub 2}{endash}HF complex: Accurate structure and energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Woon, D.E.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Peterson, K.A.

    1996-04-01

    Augmented correlation consistent basis sets of double (aug-cc-pVDZ), triple (aug-cc-pVTZ), and modified quadruple zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ{prime}) quality have been employed to describe the N{sub 2}{endash}HF potential energy surface at the Hartree{endash}Fock level and with single reference correlated wave functions including Mo/ller{endash}Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP3, MP4) and coupled cluster methods [CCSD, CCSD(T)]. The most accurate computed equilibrium binding energies {ital D}{sub {ital e}} are (with counterpoise correction) 810 cm{sup {minus}1} (MP4/aug-cc-pVQZ{prime}) and 788 cm{sup {minus}1} [CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ{prime}]. Estimated complete basis set limits of 814 cm{sup {minus}1} (MP4) and 793 cm{sup {minus}1} [CCSD(T)] indicate that the large basis set results are essentially converged. Harmonic frequencies and zero-point energies were determined through the aug-cc-pVTZ level. Combining the zero point energies computed at the aug-cc-pVTZ level with the equilibrium binding energies computed at the aug-cc-pVQZ{prime} level, we predict {ital D}{sub 0} values of 322 and 296 cm{sup {minus}1}, respectively, at the MP4 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Using experimental anharmonic frequencies, on the other hand, the CCSD(T) value of {ital D}{sub 0} is increased to 415 cm{sup {minus}1}, in good agreement with the experimental value recently reported by Miller and co-workers, 398{plus_minus}2 cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Accurate, precise, and efficient theoretical methods to calculate anion-π interaction energies in model structures.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Pál D; Csonka, Gábor I; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei

    2015-01-13

    A correct description of the anion-π interaction is essential for the design of selective anion receptors and channels and important for advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry. However, it is challenging to do accurate, precise, and efficient calculations of this interaction, which are lacking in the literature. In this article, by testing sets of 20 binary anion-π complexes of fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, or carbonate ions with hexafluorobenzene, 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene, 2,4,6-trifluoro-1,3,5-triazine, or 1,3,5-triazine and 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes composed from the same monomers, we suggest domain-based local-pair natural orbital coupled cluster energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit as reference values. We give a detailed explanation of the origin of anion-π interactions, using the permanent quadrupole moments, static dipole polarizabilities, and electrostatic potential maps. We use symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) to calculate the components of the anion-π interaction energies. We examine the performance of the direct random phase approximation (dRPA), the second-order screened exchange (SOSEX), local-pair natural-orbital (LPNO) coupled electron pair approximation (CEPA), and several dispersion-corrected density functionals (including generalized gradient approximation (GGA), meta-GGA, and double hybrid density functional). The LPNO-CEPA/1 results show the best agreement with the reference results. The dRPA method is only slightly less accurate and precise than the LPNO-CEPA/1, but it is considerably more efficient (6-17 times faster) for the binary complexes studied in this paper. For 30 ternary π-anion-π' sandwich complexes, we give dRPA interaction energies as reference values. The double hybrid functionals are much more efficient but less accurate and precise than dRPA. The dispersion-corrected double hybrid PWPB95-D3(BJ) and B2PLYP-D3(BJ) functionals perform better than the GGA and meta

  1. Atomic resolution for non-equilibrium structures in the steady state and for structural transformations at the interface between NaCl(c) and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Masanori

    1996-07-01

    Observations of both nanoscale and microscale images were carried out on a NaCl(001) surface in water using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed higher density of steps and the observed convex and concave steps in water result from the forward motion of monatomic steps and crystal growth of the so-called step-flow mode. The non-equilibrium structure having a unit cell of 0953-8984/8/27/003/img1 structure has been observed for the first time on terraces. Since every 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 on terraces is located at the same height as 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3, each 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 as well as each 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3 have been observed as protrusions by AFM. The metastable configuration at the interface between the NaCl(001) surface and water was transformed, at steps, into the equilibrium structure of NaCl(c), about 3 h after the NaCl(001) surface had been covered with its own saturated water. After about 30 min, however, 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 still remains at the same height as 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3 at steps, or sodium ions leave the surface at steps. The reason why the forward motion of monatomic steps takes place at the interface between the NaCl(001) surface and water is the decrease of about 0.05 nm in the distance of like nearest neighbours in the non-equilibrium structure having a unit cell of 0953-8984/8/27/003/img1 structure on terraces after its structural transformation to the equilibrium structure of NaCl(c) with the aid of water molecules.

  2. Accurate description of the electronic structure of organic semiconductors by GW methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Noa

    2017-03-01

    Electronic properties associated with charged excitations, such as the ionization potential (IP), the electron affinity (EA), and the energy level alignment at interfaces, are critical parameters for the performance of organic electronic devices. To computationally design organic semiconductors and functional interfaces with tailored properties for target applications it is necessary to accurately predict these properties from first principles. Many-body perturbation theory is often used for this purpose within the GW approximation, where G is the one particle Green’s function and W is the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction. Here, the formalism of GW methods at different levels of self-consistency is briefly introduced and some recent applications to organic semiconductors and interfaces are reviewed.

  3. Accurate alkynyl radical structures from density functional calculations without Hartree-Fock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.; Proynov, Emil

    2017-02-01

    Density functional approximations (DFAs) often suffer from self-repulsion and delocalization errors which are reduced by exact (Hartree-Fock-like) exchange admixture. Oyeyemi and co-workers recently showed that several DFAs with little exact exchange incorrectly predict bent alkynyl radical geometries, giving errors in ab initio composite methods using density functional theory geometries [V. B. Oyeyemi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 289 (2012)]. We show that the simple Hartree-Fock-Slater and Xα DFAs, which have substantial delocalization error, predict linear alkynyl radical geometries without incorporating exact exchange. Our Rung 3.5 DFAs, and rescaled generalized gradient approximations, can give either linear σ, bent σ -π , or nearly linear π radicals, all without incorporating exact exchange. This highlights the complexity of delocalization error, the utility of accurate empirical DFA geometries for ab initio composite methods, and the insights to be gained from Rung 3.5 DFAs.

  4. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles.

  5. Effect of the cation model on the equilibrium structure of poly-L-glutamate in aqueous sodium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Gabriel; Soetens, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemin, Denis; Bopp, Philippe A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that different sets of Lennard-Jones parameters proposed for the Na+ ion, in conjunction with the empirical combining rules routinely used in simulation packages, can lead to essentially different equilibrium structures for a deprotonated poly-L-glutamic acid molecule (poly-L-glutamate) dissolved in a 0.3M aqueous NaCl solution. It is, however, difficult to discriminate a priori between these model potentials; when investigating the structure of the Na+-solvation shell in bulk NaCl solution, all parameter sets lead to radial distribution functions and solvation numbers in broad agreement with the available experimental data. We do not find any such dependency of the equilibrium structure on the parameters associated with the Cl- ion. This work does not aim at recommending a particular set of parameters for any particular purpose. Instead, it stresses the model dependence of simulation results for complex systems such as biomolecules in solution and thus the difficulties if simulations are to be used for unbiased predictions, or to discriminate between contradictory experiments. However, this opens the possibility of validating a model specifically in view of analyzing experimental data believed to be reliable.

  6. Spectroscopy of equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge transfer in semiconductor quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, C.; Burkhard, S.; Krähenmann, T.; Röösli, M.; Märki, P.; Basset, J.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge-transfer processes by performing high-resolution transport spectroscopy. Using electrostatically defined quantum dots for energy-selective emission and detection, we achieved very high spectral resolution and a high degree of tunability of relevant experimental parameters. Most importantly, we observe that the spectral width of elastically transferred electrons can be substantially smaller than the linewidth of a thermally broadened Coulomb peak. This finding indicates that the charge-transfer process is fast compared to the electron-phonon interaction time. By drawing an analogy to double quantum dots, we argue that the spectral width of the elastic resonance is determined by the lifetime broadening hΓ of the emitter and detector states. Good agreement with the model is found also in an experiment in which the charge transfer is in the regime hΓ≫kBT. By performing spectroscopy below the Fermi energy, we furthermore observe elastic and inelastic transfer of holes.

  7. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  8. Computational methods toward accurate RNA structure prediction using coarse-grained and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods can provide significant insights into RNA structure and dynamics, bridging the gap in our understanding of the relationship between structure and biological function. Simulations enrich and enhance our understanding of data derived on the bench, as well as provide feasible alternatives to costly or technically challenging experiments. Coarse-grained computational models of RNA are especially important in this regard, as they allow analysis of events occurring in timescales relevant to RNA biological function, which are inaccessible through experimental methods alone. We have developed a three-bead coarse-grained model of RNA for discrete molecular dynamics simulations. This model is efficient in de novo prediction of short RNA tertiary structure, starting from RNA primary sequences of less than 50 nucleotides. To complement this model, we have incorporated additional base-pairing constraints and have developed a bias potential reliant on data obtained from hydroxyl probing experiments that guide RNA folding to its correct state. By introducing experimentally derived constraints to our computer simulations, we are able to make reliable predictions of RNA tertiary structures up to a few hundred nucleotides. Our refined model exemplifies a valuable benefit achieved through integration of computation and experimental methods.

  9. Electron delocalization in polyenes: a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for (3E)-1,3,5-hexatriene and theoretical structures for (3Z,5Z)-, (3E,5E)-, and (3E,5Z)-1,3,5,7-octatetraene.

    PubMed

    Craig, Norman C; Demaison, Jean; Groner, Peter; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Vogt, Natalja

    2015-01-08

    Electronic structure theory reveals that π-electron delocalization increases with the chain length in polyenes. To analyze quantitatively this effect a semiexperimental equilibrium structure has been determined for trans-hexatriene by the mixed estimation method. For this fit rotational constants for a number of carbon and hydrogen isotopologues as well as a high-level ab initio structure have been used. The accuracy is 0.001 Å for bond lengths and 0.1° for bond angles. For the three isomers of octatetraene, high-level ab initio calculations have given a comparably accurate structure. These structures have been used in comparison with the structure of s-trans-butadiene to show that "C═C" bonds increase in length and "C-C" bonds decrease in length as the polyene chain lengthens. These structural effects of π-electron delocalization increase toward the center of polyenes. Most likely, π-π conjugation in the molecules studied plays a large part in their planarity that, in turn, forces the hydrogen atoms of cis fragments in bay regions to be in a close contact. Their distance is indeed shorter than the sum of their van der Waals radii, and they seem to participate in a six-membered ring.

  10. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrum of Propene-3-d1 (CH2=CHCH2D), Quadrupole Coupling Constants of Deuterium and a Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure of Propene.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Gurusinghe, Ranil Malaka; Tubergen, Michael John; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Coudert, Laurent H; Szalay, Peter G; Császár, Attila G

    2017-04-03

    The ground state rotational spectrum of propene-3-d1, CH2=CHCH2D, was measured by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Transitions were assigned for the two conformers, one with the D atom in the symmetry plane (S) and the other with the D atom out of plane (A). The energy difference between the two conformers was calculated to be 6.5 cm-1, the S conformer having lower energy. The quadrupole hyperfine structure due to deuterium was resolved and analyzed for the two conformers. The experimental quadrupole coupling and the centrifugal distortion constants compared favorably to their ab initio counterparts. Ground state rotational constants for the S conformer are 40582.157(9), 9067.024(1), and 7766.0165(12) MHz. Ground state rotational constants for the A conformer are 43403.75(3), 8658.961(2), and 7718.247(2) MHz. For the A conformer, a small tunneling splitting (19 MHz) due to internal rotation was observed and analyzed. Using the new rotational constants of this work as well as those previously determined for the 13C species and for some deuterium-substituted species from the literature, a new semiexperimental equilibrium structure was determined and its high accuracy was confirmed. The difficulty in obtaining accurate coordinates for the out-of-plane hydrogen atom is discussed.

  11. Coarse-graining away electronic structure: a rigorous route to accurate condensed phase interaction potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-05-01

    The molecular simulation of condensed phase systems with electronic structure methods can be prohibitively expensive if the length and time scales necessary to observe the desired chemical phenomena are too large. One solution is to map the results of a representative electronic structure simulation onto a computationally more efficient model that reproduces the original calculation, while allowing for statistical sampling relevant to the required length and time scales. The statistical mechanical multiscale coarse-graining procedure is one methodology in which a model can be developed by integrating over the subset of fast degrees of freedom to construct a reduced representation of the original system that reproduces thermodynamic, and in some instances dynamic, properties. The coarse-graining away of electronic structure is one application of this general method, wherein the electronic degrees of freedom are integrated out and the full dimensionality of the system is mapped to that of only the nuclei. The forces on the nuclei in this reduced representation are obtained from a variational force-matching procedure applied to the Hellman-Feynman forces of the original full electron + nuclear system. This work discusses the coarse-graining procedure and its application to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous hydroxide ion.

  12. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  13. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  14. The Dirac equation in electronic structure calculations: Accurate evaluation of DFT predictions for actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, John M; Mattsson, Ann E

    2012-06-06

    Brooks, Johansson, and Skriver, using the LMTO-ASA method and considerable insight, were able to explain many of the ground state properties of the actinides. In the many years since this work was done, electronic structure calculations of increasing sophistication have been applied to actinide elements and compounds, attempting to quantify the applicability of DFT to actinides and actinide compounds and to try to incorporate other methodologies (i.e. DMFT) into DFT calculations. Through these calculations, the limits of both available density functionals and ad hoc methodologies are starting to become clear. However, it has also become clear that approximations used to incorporate relativity are not adequate to provide rigorous tests of the underlying equations of DFT, not to mention ad hoc additions. In this talk, we describe the result of full-potential LMTO calculations for the elemental actinides, comparing results obtained with a full Dirac basis with those obtained from scalar-relativistic bases, with and without variational spin-orbit. This comparison shows that the scalar relativistic treatment of actinides does not have sufficient accuracy to provide a rigorous test of theory and that variational spin-orbit introduces uncontrolled errors in the results of electronic structure calculations on actinide elements.

  15. Structure and dynamics of cylindrical micelles at equilibrium and under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-C.; Ryckaert, J.-P.; Xu, H.

    2009-04-01

    The dynamics and rheology of semidilute unentangled micellar solutions are investigated by Langevin dynamics mesoscopic simulations coupled to a microreversible kinetic model for scissions and recombinations. Two equilibrium state points, differing by the scission energy and therefore by the corresponding average micelle length, have been examined. The kinetic rates are tuned by an independent parameter of the model, whose range is chosen in such a way that the kinetics always strongly couple to the chain dynamics. Our results confirm, as predicted by Faivre and Gardissat, that the stress relaxation, as well as the monomer diffusion, is characterized by a time τΛ , defined by the lifetime of a segment Λ , whose Rouse relaxation time is equal to its lifetime. Moreover, the power-law dependence of the zero-shear viscosity versus τΛ was evidenced. Under stationary shear, the chains are deformed and their average bond length is increased, which enhances the overall scission frequency. In turn, this induces an overall shortening of the chains in order to increase the overall corresponding chain-end recombination frequency, as required by the stationary conditions. Nonequilibrium simulations show that the chain deformation and orientation, as well as the rheology of the system, can be expressed as universal functions of a single reduced shear rate βΛ=γ˙τΛ (with γ˙ the bare shear rate). Furthermore, local analysis of the kinetics under stationary shear gives insights on the variation of the average length with shear rate.

  16. Determinants of the abundance of invasive annual weeds: community structure and non-equilibrium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Freckleton, R P; Watkinson, A R; Dowling, P M; Ley, A R

    2000-06-07

    The dynamics of an annual pasture community are described from a five-year experimental and monitoring study. The community was dominated by two grasses (Lolium rigidum and Vulpia bromoides) and a legume (Trifolium subterraneum). Fits of population dynamic models to per capita rates of population change indicate that interactions between the grasses were generally strong, while interactions between the grasses and legumes were weaker. Most, but not all, of the net effects of competition on population growth could be attributed to interactions occurring during plant growth. Phase-plane analysis indicated that, for a constant environment, a joint equilibrium of the two grasses is unstable since interspecific competition between Lolium and Vulpia is stronger than intraspecific competition. Consequently, the community will tend to a mixture of only one or other of the grass species and T. subterraneum, depending on the founding composition of the pasture. Analysis of data taken from a year in which a drought occurred (1993-1994) demonstrated profound effects on all three species. Modelling of the long-term impacts of the effects of repeated droughts showed that disturbance of this form overrides the founder effect observed under constant conditions. Consequently, Vulpia is ultimately able to invade any mixture of the other species in environments where stochastic disturbances occur.

  17. Semi-experimental equilibrium structure of pyrazinamide from gas-phase electron diffraction. How much experimental is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Denis S.; Vishnevskiy, Yury V.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Grikina, Olga E.; Khaikin, Leonid S.

    2017-03-01

    A semi-experimental equilibrium structure of free molecules of pyrazinamide has been determined for the first time using gas electron diffraction method. The refinement was carried using regularization of geometry by calculated quantum chemical parameters. It is discussed to which extent is the final structure experimental. A numerical approach for estimation of the amount of experimental information in the refined parameters is suggested. The following values of selected internuclear distances were determined (values are in Å with 1σ in the parentheses): re(Cpyrazine-Cpyrazine)av = 1.397(2), re(Npyrazine-Cpyrazine)av = 1.332(3), re(Cpyrazine-Camide) = 1.493(1), re(Namide-Camide) = 1.335(2), re(Oamide-Camide) = 1.219(1). The given standard deviations represent pure experimental uncertainties without the influence of regularization.

  18. An Accurate Method for Free Vibration Analysis of Structures with Application to Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KEVORKIAN, S.; PASCAL, M.

    2001-10-01

    In this work, the continuous element method which has been used as an alternative to the finite element method of vibration analysis of frames is applied to more general structures like 3-D continuum and rectangular plates. The method is based on the concept of the so-called impedance matrix giving in the frequency domain, the linear relation between the generalized displacements of the boundaries and the generalized forces exerted on these boundaries. For a 3-D continuum, the concept of impedance matrix is introduced assuming a particular kind of boundary conditions. For rectangular plates, this new development leads to the solution of vibration problems for boundary conditions other than the simply supported ones.

  19. Accurate quantification of width and density of bone structures by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hangartner, Thomas N.; Short, David F.

    2007-10-15

    In computed tomography (CT), the representation of edges between objects of different densities is influenced by the limited spatial resolution of the scanner. This results in the misrepresentation of density of narrow objects, leading to errors of up to 70% and more. Our interest is in the imaging and measurement of narrow bone structures, and the issues are the same for imaging with clinical CT scanners, peripheral quantitative CT scanners or micro CT scanners. Mathematical models, phantoms and tests with patient data led to the following procedures: (i) extract density profiles at one-degree increments from the CT images at right angles to the bone boundary; (ii) consider the outer and inner edge of each profile separately due to different adjacent soft tissues; (iii) measure the width of each profile based on a threshold at fixed percentage of the difference between the soft-tissue value and a first approximated bone value; (iv) correct the underlying material density of bone for each profile based on the measured width with the help of the density-versus-width curve obtained from computer simulations and phantom measurements. This latter curve is specific to a certain scanner and is not dependent on the densities of the tissues within the range seen in patients. This procedure allows the calculation of the material density of bone. Based on phantom measurements, we estimate the density error to be below 2% relative to the density of normal bone and the bone-width error about one tenth of a pixel size.

  20. Structural adjustment for accurate conditioning in large-scale subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman

    2017-03-01

    Most of the current subsurface simulation approaches consider a priority list for honoring the well and any other auxiliary data, and eventually adopt a middle ground between the quality of the model and conditioning it to hard data. However, as the number of datasets increases, such methods often produce undesirable features in the subsurface model. Due to their high flexibility, subsurface modeling based on training images (TIs) is becoming popular. Providing comprehensive TIs remains, however, an outstanding problem. In addition, identifying a pattern similar to those in the TI that honors the well and other conditioning data is often difficult. Moreover, the current subsurface modeling approaches do not account for small perturbations that may occur in a subsurface system. Such perturbations are active in most of the depositional systems. In this paper, a new methodology is presented that is based on an irregular gridding scheme that accounts for incomplete TIs and minor offsets. Use of the methodology enables one to use a small or incomplete TI and adaptively change the patterns in the simulation grid in order to simultaneously honor the well data and take into account the effect of the local offsets. Furthermore, the proposed method was used on various complex process-based models and their structures are deformed for matching with the conditioning point data. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are successfully demonstrated by applying it to models of several complex examples.

  1. Field induced changes in the ring/chain equilibrium of hydrogen bonded structures: 5-methyl-3-heptanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young-Gonzales, Amanda R.; Richert, Ranko

    2016-08-01

    Using non-linear dielectric techniques, we have measured the dynamics of 5-methyl-3-heptanol at a temperature at which the Kirkwood correlation factor gK indicates the coexistence of ring- and chain-like hydrogen-bonded structures. Steady state permittivity spectra recorded in the presence of a high dc bias electric field (17 MV/m) reveal that both the amplitude and the time constant are increased by about 10% relative to the low field limit. This change is attributed to the field driven conversion from ring-like to the more polar chain-like structures, and a direct observation of its time dependence shows that the ring/chain structural transition occurs on a time scale that closely matches that of the dielectric Debye peak. This lends strong support to the picture that places fluctuations of the end-to-end vector of hydrogen bonded structures at the origin of the Debye process, equivalent to fluctuations of the net dipole moment or gK. Recognizing that changes in the ring/chain equilibrium constant also impact the spectral separation between Debye and α-process may explain the difference in their temperature dependence whenever gK is sensitive to temperature, i.e., when the structural motifs of hydrogen bonding change considerably.

  2. Real-space evidence of the equilibrium ordered bicontinuous double diamond structure of a diblock copolymer.

    PubMed

    Chu, C Y; Jiang, X; Jinnai, H; Pei, R Y; Lin, W F; Tsai, J C; Chen, H L

    2015-03-14

    The ordered bicontinuous double diamond (OBDD) structure has long been believed to be an unstable ordered network nanostructure, which is relative to the ordered bicontinuous double gyroid (OBDG) structure for diblock copolymers. Using electron tomography, we present the first real-space observation of the thermodynamically stable OBDD structure in a diblock copolymer composed of a stereoregular block, syndiotactic polypropylene-block-polystyrene (sPP-b-PS), in which the sPP tetrapods are interconnected via a bicontinuous network with Pn3̄m symmetry. The OBDD structure underwent a thermally reversible order-order transition (OOT) to OBDG upon heating, and the transition was accompanied with a slight reduction of domain spacing, as demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically. The thermodynamic stability of the OBDD structure was attributed to the ability of the configurationally regular sPP block to form helical segments, even above its melting point, as the reduction of internal energy associated with the helix formation may effectively compensate the greater packing frustration in OBDD relative to that in the tripods of OBDG.

  3. Combining Structural Modeling with Ensemble Machine Learning to Accurately Predict Protein Fold Stability and Binding Affinity Effects upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Lopez, Sebastian; Kim, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in sequencing have led to a rapid accumulation of mutations, some of which are associated with diseases. However, to draw mechanistic conclusions, a biochemical understanding of these mutations is necessary. For coding mutations, accurate prediction of significant changes in either the stability of proteins or their affinity to their binding partners is required. Traditional methods have used semi-empirical force fields, while newer methods employ machine learning of sequence and structural features. Here, we show how combining both of these approaches leads to a marked boost in accuracy. We introduce ELASPIC, a novel ensemble machine learning approach that is able to predict stability effects upon mutation in both, domain cores and domain-domain interfaces. We combine semi-empirical energy terms, sequence conservation, and a wide variety of molecular details with a Stochastic Gradient Boosting of Decision Trees (SGB-DT) algorithm. The accuracy of our predictions surpasses existing methods by a considerable margin, achieving correlation coefficients of 0.77 for stability, and 0.75 for affinity predictions. Notably, we integrated homology modeling to enable proteome-wide prediction and show that accurate prediction on modeled structures is possible. Lastly, ELASPIC showed significant differences between various types of disease-associated mutations, as well as between disease and common neutral mutations. Unlike pure sequence-based prediction methods that try to predict phenotypic effects of mutations, our predictions unravel the molecular details governing the protein instability, and help us better understand the molecular causes of diseases. PMID:25243403

  4. MHD Equilibrium Reconstruction in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; St John, H.E.; Peng, Q.; Ferron, J.R.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Meyer, W.H.; Zhang, C.; You, K.I.

    2005-10-15

    Physics elements and advances crucial for the development of axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium reconstruction to support plasma operation and data analysis in the DIII-D tokamak are reviewed. A response function formalism and a Picard linearization scheme are used to efficiently combine the equilibrium and the fitting iterations and search for the optimum solution vector. Algorithms to incorporate internal current and pressure profile measurements, topological constraints, and toroidal plasma rotation into the equilibrium reconstruction are described. Choice of basis functions and boundary conditions essential for accurate reconstruction of L- and H-mode equilibrium plasma boundary and current and pressure profiles is discussed. The computational structure used to efficiently integrate these elements into the equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT is summarized.

  5. Anomalous approach to thermodynamic equilibrium: Structure formation of molecules after vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Pritam Kumar; Wang, Can; Jack, Robert L.; Chi, Lifeng; Heuer, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    We describe experiments and computer simulations of molecular deposition on a substrate in which the molecules (substituted adenine derivatives) self-assemble into ordered structures. The resulting structures depend strongly on the deposition rate (flux). In particular, there are two competing surface morphologies (α and β ), which differ by their topology (interdigitated vs lamellar structure). Experimentally, the α phase dominates at both low and high flux, with the β phase being most important in the intermediate regime. A similar nonmonotonic behavior is observed on varying the substrate temperature. To understand these effects from a theoretical perspective, a lattice model is devised which reproduces qualitatively the topological features of both phases. Via extensive Monte Carlo studies we can, on the one hand, reproduce the experimental results and, on the other hand, obtain a microscopic understanding of the mechanisms behind this anomalous behavior. The results are discussed in terms of an interplay between kinetic trapping and temporal exploration of configuration space.

  6. Semiclassical shell-structure moment of inertia for equilibrium rotation of a simple Fermi system

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, A. G.; Sitdikov, A. S. Khamzin, A. A.; Bartel, J.

    2010-08-15

    Semiclassical shell-structure components of the collectivemoment of inertia are derived within the mean-field cranking model in the adiabatic approximation in terms of the free-energy shell corrections through those of a rigid body for the statistically equilibriumrotation of a Fermi system at finite temperature by using the nonperturbative extended Gutzwiller periodic-orbit theory. Their analytical structure in terms of the equatorial and 3-dimensional periodic orbits for the axially symmetric harmonic oscillator potential is in perfect agreement with the quantum results for different critical bifurcation deformations and different temperatures.

  7. The Simplest Criegee Intermediate (H_2C=O-O): Equilibrium Structure and Possible Formation from Atmospheric Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Cheng, Lan; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Martinez, Oscar, Jr.; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Womack, Carrie; Stanton, John F.

    2014-06-01

    Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in combination with double-resonance techniques has been used to detect the rotational spectra of all five singly-substituted isotopic species of H_2C=O-O, the simplest Criegee intermediate. By correcting the rotational constants of these species and those of four others previously reported by Nakajima and Endo (J. Chem. Phys. 39, 101103, 2013) for zero-point vibrational motion calculated theoretically, a highly precise equilibrium structure is reported for this important atmospheric intermediate. In contrast to the production method employed by most other groups, which has emphasized the use of halogenated percursors, we find that H_2C=O-O is produced in good yield and fairly selectively by passing a mixture of methane and excess molecular oxygen through an electrical discharge. For this reason H_2C=O-O may be produced in the direct vicinity of atmospheric lightning.

  8. Gene conversion involving the pilin structural gene correlates with pilus+ in equilibrium with pilus- changes in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J; Bergström, S; Robbins, K; Barrera, O; Corwin, D; Koomey, J M

    1986-10-24

    Gonococci (Gc) exhibit pilus+----pilus- "phase transitions" at high frequency, but only some of the pilus- Gc can revert to pilus+ phenotype. We examined reversible phase transitions between pilus+ Gc and a particular pilus- variant (P-rp+ phenotype) whose pilin mRNA carries a unique block of nucleotides encoding an "assembly missense" pilin polypeptide. The results show that Gc pilus+ in equilibrium with P-rp+ transitions can result from intragenic recombination in which there is nonreciprocal exchange of partially homologous DNA sequences from a partial pilin gene (in silent, storage form) into the expression locus' complete pilin gene. Hence Gc pilus phase variation, like pilus antigenic variation, can occur by gene conversion of the pilin structural gene expression locus.

  9. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H

    2017-01-17

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  10. The equilibrium structure of lithium salt solutions in ether-functionalized ammonium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro Henrique; Siqueira, Leonardo J A; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2012-10-11

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for ionic liquids based on a ternary mixture of lithium and ammonium cations and a common anion, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [Tf(2)N](-). We address structural changes resulting from adding Li(+) in ionic liquids with increasing length of an ether-functionalized chain in the ammonium cation. The calculation of static structure factors reveals the lithium effect on charge ordering and intermediate range order in comparison with the neat ionic liquids. The charge ordering is modified in the lithium solution because the coordination of [Tf(2)N](-) toward Li(+) is much stronger than ammonium cations. Intermediate range order is observed in neat ionic liquids based on ammonium cations with a long chain, but in the lithium solutions, there is also a nonhomogenous distribution of Li(+) cations. The presence of Li(+) enhances interactions between the ammonium cations due to correlations between the oxygen atom of the ether chain and the nitrogen atom of another ammonium cation.

  11. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail. PMID:28094322

  12. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  13. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    A decomposition of the molecular energy is presented that is motivated by the atom superposition and electron delocalization physical model of chemical binding. The energy appears in physically transparent form consisting of a classical electrostatic interaction, a zero order two electron exchange interaction, a relaxation energy, and the atomic energies. Detailed formulae are derived in zero and first order of approximation. The formulation extends beyond first order to any chosen level of approximation leading, in principle, to the exact energy. The structure of this energy decomposition lends itself to the fullest utilization of the solutions to the atomic sub problems to simplify the calculation of the molecular energy. If nonlinear relaxation effects remain minor, the molecular energy calculation requires at most the calculation of two center, two electron integrals. This scheme thus affords the prospects of substantially reducing the computational effort required for the calculation of molecular energies.

  14. The far from equilibrium structure of argon clusters doped with krypton or xenon.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, A; Bergersen, H; Rander, T; Lundwall, M; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2006-04-28

    Heterogeneous clusters created by doping Ar host clusters with Kr or Xe are shown to have radically different structures from the mixed clusters of the same type created by co-expansion of Ar-Kr or Ar-Xe gas mixtures. In contrast to the co-expansion case, the doped mixed clusters can be produced with Kr or Xe on the surface and Ar in the bulk. With the doping technique it is thus possible to control the surface composition of a specific cluster. A study of the cluster properties as a function of the doping pressure is also reported for the case of Ar clusters doped with Xe. The clusters have been studied by means of synchrotron radiation based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  15. A numerical method for generating rapidly rotating bipolytropic structures in equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Motl, Patrick M.; Frank, Juhan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Marcello, Dominic C.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that rapidly rotating bipolytropic (composite polytropic) stars and toroidal discs can be obtained using Hachisu's self-consistent field technique. The core and the envelope in such a structure can have different polytropic indices and also different average molecular weights. The models converge for high T/|W| cases, where T is the kinetic energy and W is the gravitational energy of the system. The agreement between our numerical solutions with known analytical as well as previously calculated numerical results is excellent. We show that the uniform rotation lowers the maximum core mass fraction or the Schönberg-Chandrasekhar limit for a bipolytropic sequence. We also discuss the applications of this method to magnetic braking in low-mass stars with convective envelopes.

  16. The equilibrium structure of thin magnetic flux tubes. II. [in sun and late stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal structure of the medium inside thin, vertical magnetic flux tubes embedded in a given external atmosphere is investigated, assuming cylindrical symmetry and a depth-independent plasma beta. The variation with tube radius of the temperature on the tube axis is computed and the temperature on the tube wall is estimated. The temperature variation across the flux tube is found to be due to the depth variation of the intensity and to the density stratification of the atmosphere. Since the temperature difference between the axis and the wall is small in thin flux tubes (of the order of 10 percent), the horizontal temperature gradient may often be neglected and the temperature in a tube of given radius may be described by a single function of depth. Thus, a more detailed numerical treatment of the radiative transfer within thin flux tubes can be substantially simplified by neglecting horizontal temperature differences within the flux tube proper.

  17. Branchial structure and hydromineral equilibrium in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) exposed to heavy fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Goanvec, Christelle; Poirier, Elisabeth; Le-Floch, Stéphane; Theron, Michaël

    2011-09-01

    This study is an attempt to go further in the comprehension of the effects of heavy fuel oil in the context of an accidental oil spill at sea. It focuses on the link between morphological and functional impacts of realistic doses of the dissolved fraction of a heavy fuel oil on fish gills. Juvenile turbot, Scophthalmus maximus were exposed to the dissolved fraction of a heavy fuel oil for 5 days and then placed 30 days in clean sea water for recovery. During the contamination period, the concentration of the 16 US EPA priority poly-aromatic hydrocarbons showed small variations around a mean value of 321.0 ± 9.1 ng l⁻¹ (mean ± SEM). The contamination induced a 64% increase in hepatic cytochrome P 450 1A (Western blot analysis). Osmolality, [Na⁺] and [Cl⁻] rapidly and significantly increased (by 14, 23 and 28% respectively) and slowly decreased to normal levels during the recovery period. At the same time, branchial histology showed decreases in the number of mucocytes (by 30%) and of chloride cells (by 95%) in the interlamellar epithelium. Therefore, it is suggested that the osmotic imbalance observed after the 5 days of exposure to the dissolved fraction of the heavy fuel oil is the consequence of the structural alteration of the gills i.e, the strong reduction of ionocyte numbers.

  18. Molecular polymorphism: microwave spectra, equilibrium structures, and an astronomical investigation of the HNCS isomeric family.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Brett A; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Thorwirth, Sven; Brünken, Sandra; Lattanzi, Valerio; Neill, Justin L; Spezzano, Silvia; Yu, Zhenhong; Zaleski, Daniel P; Remijan, Anthony J; Pate, Brooks H; McCarthy, Michael C

    2016-08-10

    The rotational spectra of thioisocyanic acid (HNCS), and its three energetic isomers (HSCN, HCNS, and HSNC) have been observed at high spectral resolution by a combination of chirped-pulse and Fabry-Pérot Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy between 6 and 40 GHz in a pulsed-jet discharge expansion. Two isomers, thiofulminic acid (HCNS) and isothiofulminic acid (HSNC), calculated here to be 35-37 kcal mol(-1) less stable than the ground state isomer HNCS, have been detected for the first time. Precise rotational, centrifugal distortion, and nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants have been determined for the normal and rare isotopic species of both molecules; all are in good agreement with theoretical predictions obtained at the coupled cluster level of theory. On the basis of isotopic spectroscopy, precise molecular structures have been derived for all four isomers by correcting experimental rotational constants for the effects of rotation-vibration interaction calculated theoretically. Formation and isomerization pathways have also been investigated; the high abundance of HSCN relative to ground state HNCS, and the detection of strong lines of SH using CH3CN and H2S, suggest that HSCN is preferentially produced by the radical-radical reaction HS + CN. A radio astronomical search for HSCN and its isomers has been undertaken toward the high-mass star-forming region Sgr B2(N) in the Galactic Center with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. While we find clear evidence for HSCN, only a tentative detection of HNCS is proposed, and there is no indication of HCNS or HSNC at the same rms noise level. HSCN, and tentatively HNCS, displays clear deviations from a single-excitation temperature model, suggesting weak masing may be occurring in some transitions in this source.

  19. Diagnosis of equilibrium magnetic profiles, current transport, and internal structures in a reversed-field pinch using electron temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, Eli

    Due to long fast ion confinement times, neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) yields large fast ion populations with substantial density gradients. Novel application of the unique high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic on MST has enabled characterization of a newly observed beam-driven instability, and detailed measurement of equilibrium changes caused by the fast ion population. While previous work has focused on high-frequency energetic particle modes (EPMs), recent observations indicate that fast ions drive a bursting instability near the plasma rotation frequency under appropriate conditions. The mode chirps strongly, with a frequency of approximately 7 kHz in the plasma reference frame at peak amplitude. Bursts are correlated with EPM activity and core neutral particle analyzer signals drop by 30% during a burst, suggesting that this mode participates in avalanches of the higher frequency EPMs and drives enhanced fast ion transport. Electron temperature fluctuations correlated with this low-frequency mode exhibit a core-peaked structure with a sensitive dependence on the safety factor q. Although this mode has not yet been positively identified, its characteristics and internal structure are suggestive of an internal kink (fishbone) or beta-induced Alfven eigenmode. In addition to driving EPMs, the large fast ion population also modifies the current profile. An increase in on-axis current density driven by NBI is offset by a reduction in the mid-radius, leading to net-zero current drive. This results in a slight flattening of the safety factor profile, observed by precise measurement of the rational surface locations of the dominant tearing modes; these are identified from the phase flip in correlated electron temperature fluctuations recorded by Thomson scattering. For the core n = 6 rational surface, an inward shift of 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm is observed, with an estimated reduction in q0 of 5%. This technique provides a

  20. Thermodynamic and Structural Aspects of Equilibrium and Mechanically Milled Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(6+DELTA) Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David Soong-Hua

    The equilibrium relationships between partial pressure of oxygen, temperature, lattice parameters and oxygen content in the YBa_2Cu_3O _{6+delta} superconductor were examined by differential scanning calorimetry, high -temperature x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and measurement of pressure versus concentration isotherms. Oxygen pressures ranged from 1 mbar to 1013 mbar and temperatures ranged from 400^circC to 750 ^circC. Lattice parameters as a function of temperature and partial pressure of oxygen were measured. P(c) isotherms and TGA were used to measure oxygen content as a function of temperature. A phase line separating the low temperature orthorhombic phase and the high temperature tetragonal phase was determined. No evidence of a miscibility gap between the two phases was found in the range of temperatures and oxygen pressures explored. From the data, the excess enthalpy and entropy through the orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition was calculated. It was found that the excess entropy is less than the entropy of mixing for an ideal solution. DSC was used to measure enthalpies for the transition and to calculate activation energies for the process. High temperature x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry were used to study the effect of high energy mechanical deformation on the structural and thermal characteristics of YBa_2Cu_3O _{6+delta} powder. Broadening of Bragg peaks due to the reduction of grain size makes the distinction between orthorhombic and tetragonal phases of YBa_2Cu _3O_{6+delta} difficult after only one hour of ball milling. The equilibrium orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition may occur within the first hour of ball-milling. Longer milling times (> 5hrs) produce a cationic disorder on the yttrium and barium sites. A metastable cubic (Y_ {1/3}Ba_{2/3} )CuO_{2+delta} structure with a = 3.86A is formed. Further mechanical deformation does not induce the formation of an amorphous phase; rather, an

  1. The relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution. Stars with degenerate neutron cores. 1: Structure of equilibrium models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Zytkow, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    The general relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution are reformulated in a notation which makes easy contact with Newtonian theory. Also, a general relativistic version of the mixing-length formalism for convection is presented. Finally, it is argued that in previous work on spherical systems general relativity theorists have identified the wrong quantity as "total mass-energy inside radius r."

  2. Towards Efficient and Accurate Description of Many-Electron Problems: Developments of Static and Time-Dependent Electronic Structure Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feizhi

    Understanding electronic behavior in molecular and nano-scale systems is fundamental to the development and design of novel technologies and materials for application in a variety of scientific contexts from fundamental research to energy conversion. This dissertation aims to provide insights into this goal by developing novel methods and applications of first-principle electronic structure theory. Specifically, we will present new methods and applications of excited state multi-electron dynamics based on the real-time (RT) time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) formalism, and new development of the multi-configuration self-consist field theory (MCSCF) for modeling ground-state electronic structure. The RT-TDHF/TDDFT based developments and applications can be categorized into three broad and coherently integrated research areas: (1) modeling of the interaction between moleculars and external electromagnetic perturbations. In this part we will first prove both analytically and numerically the gauge invariance of the TDHF/TDDFT formalisms, then we will present a novel, efficient method for calculating molecular nonlinear optical properties, and last we will study quantum coherent plasmon in metal namowires using RT-TDDFT; (2) modeling of excited-state charge transfer in molecules. In this part, we will investigate the mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer, and then we will introduce a newly developed non-equilibrium quantum/continuum embedding method for studying charge transfer dynamics in solution; (3) developments of first-principles spin-dependent many-electron dynamics. In this part, we will present an ab initio non-relativistic spin dynamics method based on the two-component generalized Hartree-Fock approach, and then we will generalized it to the two-component TDDFT framework and combine it with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics approach for modeling the interaction between electron spins and nuclear

  3. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2014-11-01

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm-1 (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state (2A2), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C2v symmetry through the C-N axis.

  4. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  5. Molybdena deposited on titania by equilibrium deposition filtration: structural evolution of oxo-molybdenum(vi) sites with temperature.

    PubMed

    Tsilomelekis, George; Panagiotou, George D; Stathi, Panagiota; Kalampounias, Angelos G; Bourikas, Kyriakos; Kordulis, Christos; Deligiannakis, Yiannis; Boghosian, Soghomon; Lycourghiotis, Alexis

    2016-09-14

    The equilibrium deposition filtration (EDF) method, an advanced catalyst synthesis route that is based on a molecular level approach, can be used for tailoring the oxometallic phase deposited on a porous oxide support. Here, the EDF method is used for synthesizing (MoOx)n/TiO2 catalysts. In situ Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25-450 °C, low temperature (77 K) EPR spectroscopy and DR-UV spectroscopy are used for studying the evolution of the structural configuration of oxo-Mo(VI) species on TiO2 with increasing temperature as well as the influence of the supported (MoOx)n species on the photo-generation of electrons and holes of TiO2. This study concerns (MoOx)n/TiO2 samples in which the surface densities after calcination are 0.3, 2.6 and 3.9 Mo per nm(2), thereby covering a very wide range of submonolayer coverage. The gradual heat treatment of the catalysts results in a transformation of the initially (prior to drying) deposited species and the pertinent species evolution at the nano-level is discussed by means of a number of mechanisms including anchoring, association, cleavage and surface diffusion.

  6. Informational Equilibrium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    that for variouis standard types of equilibria* they hold. In particular, if one uses the teaporary equilibrium framework one can use the standard ...T, the integral converges toward f’ia(da) f fU(b~dc)6(a,b,c)T( asdm ) A B C which is fR (da) f d(lib,c) U0 T (cab) A BxC Me converse Is obvious

  7. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob S; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Woodley, John M

    2012-08-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones. Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore, in this communication we suggest a simple experimental methodology which we hope will stimulate more accurate determination of thermodynamic equilibria when reporting the results of transaminase-catalyzed reactions in order to increase understanding of the relationship between substrate and product molecular structure on reaction thermodynamics.

  8. Monomer-dimer equilibrium for the 5'-5' stacking of propeller-type parallel-stranded G-quadruplexes: NMR structural study.

    PubMed

    Do, Ngoc Quang; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2012-11-12

    Guanine-rich sequence motifs, which contain tracts of three consecutive guanines connected by single non-guanine nucleotides, are abundant in the human genome and can form a robust G-quadruplex structure with high stability. Herein, by using NMR spectroscopy, we investigate the equilibrium between monomeric and 5'-5' stacked dimeric propeller-type G-quadruplexes that are formed by DNA sequences containing GGGT motifs. We show that the monomer-dimer equilibrium depends on a number of parameters, including the DNA concentration, DNA flanking sequences, the concentration and type of cations, and the temperature. We report on the high-definition structure of a simple monomeric G-quadruplex containing three single-residue loops, which could serve as a reference for propeller-type G-quadruplex structures in solution.

  9. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  10. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  11. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for Oxalate Species to High Ionic Strength in the System: Na-Ba-Ca-Mn-Sr-Cl-NO3-PO4-SO4-H2O at 25°C

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of an accurate aqueous thermodynamic model is described for oxalate species in the Na-Ba-Ca-Mn-Sr-Cl-NO3-PO4-SO4-H2O system at 25°C. The model is valid to high ionic strength (as high as 10m) and from very acid (10m H2SO4) to neutral and basic conditions. The model is based upon the equations of Pitzer and co-workers. The necessary ion-interaction parameters are determined by comparison with experimental data taken from the literature or determined in this study. The proposed aqueous activity and solubility model is valid for a range of applications from interpretation of studies on mineral dissolution at circumneutral pH to the dissolution of high-level waste tank sludges under acidic conditions.

  12. Temperature dependence of the structural relaxation time in equilibrium below the nominal T(g): results from freestanding polymer films.

    PubMed

    Ngai, K L; Capaccioli, Simone; Paluch, Marian; Prevosto, Daniele

    2014-05-22

    When the thickness is reduced to nanometer scale, freestanding high molecular weight polymer thin films undergo large reduction of degree of cooperativity and coupling parameter n in the Coupling Model (CM). The finite-size effect together with the surfaces with high mobility make the α-relaxation time of the polymer in nanoconfinement, τ(α)(nano)(T), much shorter than τ(α)(bulk)(T) in the bulk. The consequence is avoidance of vitrification at and below the bulk glass transition temperature, T(g)(bulk), on cooling, and the freestanding polymer thin film remains at thermodynamic equilibrium at temperatures below T(g)(bulk). Molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the specific volume of the freestanding film is the same as the bulk glass-former at equilibrium at the same temperatures. Extreme nanoconfinement renders total or almost total removal of cooperativity of the α-relaxation, and τ(α)(nano)(T) becomes the same or almost the same as the JG β-relaxation time τ(β)(bulk)(T) of the bulk glass-former at equilibrium and at temperatures below T(g)(bulk). Taking advantage of being able to obtain τ(β)(bulk)(T) at equilibrium density below T(g)(bulk) by extreme nanoconfinement of the freestanding films, and using the CM relation between τ(α)(bulk)(T) and τ(β)(bulk)(T), we conclude that the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse (VFTH) dependence of τ(α)(bulk)(T) cannot hold for glass-formers in equilibrium at temperatures significantly below T(g)(bulk). In addition, τ(α)(bulk)(T) does not diverge at the Vogel temperature, T₀, as suggested by the VFTH-dependence and predicted by some theories of glass transition. Instead, τ(α)(bulk)(T) of the glass-former at equilibrium has a much weaker temperature dependence than the VFTH-dependence at temperature below T(g)(bulk) and even below T₀. This conclusion from our analysis is consistent with the temperature dependence of τ(α)(bulk)(T) found experimentally in polymers aged long enough time to attain the

  13. Quantum Chemical Study of the Fe(III)-Desferrioxamine B Siderophore Complex-Electronic Structure, Vibrational Frequencies, and Equilibrium Fe-Isotope Fractionation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-19

    chemical study of the Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B siderophore complex—Electronic structure, vibrational frequencies, and equilibrium Fe-isotope fractionation...Fitzwater, 1988). Siderophores , an important class of organic acids with large complexation constants for Fe, are produced by sev- eral organisms in order...to overcome iron deficiencies (Wie- derhold et al., 2006). Due to their exceptionally high affinity for Fe, siderophores complex Fe(III) by extracting

  14. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: The System Na-Ca-Sr-OH-CO3-NO3-EDTA-HEDTA-H2O from 25 to 75°C

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Dixon, David A.

    2005-04-19

    This symposium manuscript describes the development of an accurate aqueous thermodynamic model for predicting the speciation of Sr in the waste tanks at the Hanford site. A systematic approach is described that details the studies performed to define the most important inorganic and organic complexation reactions as well as the effects of other important metal ions that compete with Sr for complexation reactions with the chelates. By using this approach we were able to define a reduced set of inorganic complexation, organic complexation, and competing metal reactions that best represent the much more complex waste tank chemical system. A summary is presented of the final thermodynamic model for the system Na-Ca-Sr-OH-CO3-NO3-EDTA-HEDTA-H2O from 25 to 75 ºC that was previously published in a variety of sources. Previously unpublished experimental data are also given for the competing metal Ni as well for certain chemical systems, Na-Sr-CO3-PO4-H2O, and for the solubility of amorphous iron hydroxide in the presence of several organic chelating agents. These data were not used in model development but were key to the final selection of the specific chemical systems prioritized for detailed study.

  15. Effects of complex symmetry-breakings on alpha particle power loads on first wall structures and equilibrium in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Spong, D.; Asunta, O.; Tani, K.; Strumberger, E.; Briguglio, S.; Koskela, T.; Vlad, G.; Günter, S.; Kramer, G.; Putvinski, S.; Hamamatsu, K.; ITPA Topical Group on Energetic Particles

    2011-06-01

    Within the ITPA Topical Group on Energetic Particles, we have investigated the impact that various mechanisms breaking the tokamak axisymmetry can have on the fusion alpha particle confinement in ITER as well as on the wall power loads due to these alphas. In addition to the well-known TF ripple, the 3D effect due to ferromagnetic materials (in ferritic inserts and test blanket modules) and ELM mitigation coils are included in these mechanisms. ITER scenario 4 was chosen since, due to its lower plasma current, it is more vulnerable for various off-normal features. First, the validity of using a 2D equilibrium was investigated: a 3D equilibrium was reconstructed using the VMEC code, and it was verified that no 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed but it is sufficient to add the vacuum field perturbations onto an axisymmetric equilibrium. Then the alpha particle confinement was studied using three independent codes, ASCOT, DELTA5D and F3D OFMC, all of which assume MHD quiescent background plasma and no anomalous diffusion. All the codes gave a loss power fraction of about 0.2%. The distribution of the peak power load was found to depend on the first wall shape. We also made the first attempt to accommodate the effect of fast-ion-related MHD on the wall loads in ITER using the HMGC and ASCOT codes. The power flux to the wall was found to increase due to the redistribution of fast ions by the MHD activity. Furthermore, the effect of the ELM mitigation field on the fast-ion confinement was addressed by simulating NBI ions with the F3D OFMC code. The loss power fraction of NBI ions was found to increase from 0.3% without the ELM mitigation field to 4-5% with the ELM mitigation field.

  16. Nuclear structure with accurate chiral perturbation theory nucleon-nucleon potential: Application to 6Li and 10B

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Caurier, E

    2003-10-14

    The authors calculate properties of A = 6 system using the accurate charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential at fourth order of chiral perturbation theory. By application of the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) and a variational calculation in the harmonic oscillator basis with basis size up to 16 {h_bar}{Omega} they obtain the {sup 6}Li binding energy of 28.5(5) MeV and a converged excitation spectrum. Also, they calculate properties of {sup 10}B using the same NN potential in a basis space of up to 8 {h_bar}{Omega}. The results are consistent with results obtained by standard accurate NN potentials and demonstrate a deficiency of Hamiltonians consisting of only two-body terms. At this order of chiral perturbation theory three-body terms appear. It is expected that inclusion of such terms in the Hamiltonian will improve agreement with experiment.

  17. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  18. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Derivative of Electron Density in Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Technique and Its Application to Boost Performance of Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ze; Chen, Zhi-Dong; Zhang, Jin-Yu; He, Yu; Zhang, Ming; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2009-11-01

    The non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) technique provides a solid foundation for the development of quantum mechanical simulators. However, the convergence is always of great concern. We present a general analytical formalism to acquire the accurate derivative of electron density with respect to electrical potential in the framework of NEGF. This formalism not only provides physical insight on non-local quantum phenomena in device simulation, but also can be used to set up a new scheme in solving the Poisson equation to boost the performance of convergence when the NEGF and Poisson equations are solved self-consistently. This method is illustrated by a simple one-dimensional example of an N++ N+ N++ resistor. The total simulation time and iteration number are largely reduced.

  19. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: An Accurate Image Simulation Method for High-Order Laue Zone Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Can-Ying; Zeng, Song-Jun; Liu, Hong-Rong; Yang, Qi-Bin

    2008-05-01

    A completely different formulation for simulation of the high order Laue zone (HOLZ) diffractions is derived. It refers to the new method, i.e. the Taylor series (TS) method. To check the validity and accuracy of the TS method, we take polyvinglidene fluoride (PVDF) crystal as an example to calculate the exit wavefunction by the conventional multi-slice (CMS) method and the TS method. The calculated results show that the TS method is much more accurate than the CMS method and is independent of the slice thicknesses. Moreover, the pure first order Laue zone wavefunction by the TS method can reflect the major potential distribution of the first reciprocal plane.

  20. Predicting equilibrium vapour pressure isotope effects by using artificial neural networks or multi-linear regression - A quantitative structure property relationship approach.

    PubMed

    Parinet, Julien; Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gerald; Höhener, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    We aim at predicting the effect of structure and isotopic substitutions on the equilibrium vapour pressure isotope effect of various organic compounds (alcohols, acids, alkanes, alkenes and aromatics) at intermediate temperatures. We attempt to explore quantitative structure property relationships by using artificial neural networks (ANN); the multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and compare the performances of it with multi-linear regression (MLR). These approaches are based on the relationship between the molecular structure (organic chain, polar functions, type of functions, type of isotope involved) of the organic compounds, and their equilibrium vapour pressure. A data set of 130 equilibrium vapour pressure isotope effects was used: 112 were used in the training set and the remaining 18 were used for the test/validation dataset. Two sets of descriptors were tested, a set with all the descriptors: number of(12)C, (13)C, (16)O, (18)O, (1)H, (2)H, OH functions, OD functions, CO functions, Connolly Solvent Accessible Surface Area (CSA) and temperature and a reduced set of descriptors. The dependent variable (the output) is the natural logarithm of the ratios of vapour pressures (ln R), expressed as light/heavy as in classical literature. Since the database is rather small, the leave-one-out procedure was used to validate both models. Considering higher determination coefficients and lower error values, it is concluded that the multi-layer perceptron provided better results compared to multi-linear regression. The stepwise regression procedure is a useful tool to reduce the number of descriptors. To our knowledge, a Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR) approach for isotopic studies is novel.

  1. PSSP-RFE: accurate prediction of protein structural class by recursive feature extraction from PSI-BLAST profile, physical-chemical property and functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqi; Cui, Xiang; Yu, Sanjiu; Zhang, Yuan; Luo, Zhong; Yang, Hua; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is critical to functional annotation of the massively accumulated biological sequences, which prompts an imperative need for the development of high-throughput technologies. As a first and key step in protein structure prediction, protein structural class prediction becomes an increasingly challenging task. Amongst most homological-based approaches, the accuracies of protein structural class prediction are sufficiently high for high similarity datasets, but still far from being satisfactory for low similarity datasets, i.e., below 40% in pairwise sequence similarity. Therefore, we present a novel method for accurate and reliable protein structural class prediction for both high and low similarity datasets. This method is based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) in conjunction with integrated features from position-specific score matrix (PSSM), PROFEAT and Gene Ontology (GO). A feature selection approach, SVM-RFE, is also used to rank the integrated feature vectors through recursively removing the feature with the lowest ranking score. The definitive top features selected by SVM-RFE are input into the SVM engines to predict the structural class of a query protein. To validate our method, jackknife tests were applied to seven widely used benchmark datasets, reaching overall accuracies between 84.61% and 99.79%, which are significantly higher than those achieved by state-of-the-art tools. These results suggest that our method could serve as an accurate and cost-effective alternative to existing methods in protein structural classification, especially for low similarity datasets.

  2. Structure elucidation of degradation products of the antibiotic amoxicillin with ion trap MS(n) and accurate mass determination by ESI TOF.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Edgar; Moritz, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Today, it is necessary to identify relevant compounds appearing in discovery and development of new drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. For that purpose, the measurement of accurate molecular mass and empirical formula calculation is very important for structure elucidation in addition to other available analytical methods. In this work, the identification and confirmation of degradation products in a finished dosage form of the antibiotic drug amoxicillin obtained under stress conditions will be demonstrated. Structure elucidation is performed utilizing liquid chromatography (LC) ion trap MS/MS and MS3 together with accurate mass measurement of the molecular ions and of the collision induced dissociation (CID) fragments by liquid chromatography electro spray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOF).

  3. Thermodynamic efficiency out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2011-03-01

    Molecular-scale machines typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, limiting the applicability of equilibrium statistical mechanics to understand their efficiency. Thermodynamic length analysis relates a non-equilibrium property (dissipation) to equilibrium properties (equilibrium fluctuations and their relaxation time). Herein we demonstrate that the thermodynamic length framework follows directly from the assumptions of linear response theory. Uniting these two frameworks provides thermodynamic length analysis a firmer statistical mechanical grounding, and equips linear response theory with a metric structure to facilitate the prediction and discovery of optimal (minimum dissipation) paths in complicated free energy landscapes. To explore the applicability of this theoretical framework, we examine its accuracy for simple bistable systems, parametrized to model single-molecule force-extension experiments. Through analytic derivation of the equilibrium fluctuations and numerical calculation of the dissipation and relaxation time, we verify that thermodynamic length analysis (though derived in a near-equilibrium limit) provides a strikingly good approximation even far from equilibrium, and thus provides a useful framework for understanding molecular motor efficiency.

  4. RCK: accurate and efficient inference of sequence- and structure-based protein–RNA binding models from RNAcompete data

    PubMed Central

    Orenstein, Yaron; Wang, Yuhao; Berger, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Protein–RNA interactions, which play vital roles in many processes, are mediated through both RNA sequence and structure. CLIP-based methods, which measure protein–RNA binding in vivo, suffer from experimental noise and systematic biases, whereas in vitro experiments capture a clearer signal of protein RNA-binding. Among them, RNAcompete provides binding affinities of a specific protein to more than 240 000 unstructured RNA probes in one experiment. The computational challenge is to infer RNA structure- and sequence-based binding models from these data. The state-of-the-art in sequence models, Deepbind, does not model structural preferences. RNAcontext models both sequence and structure preferences, but is outperformed by GraphProt. Unfortunately, GraphProt cannot detect structural preferences from RNAcompete data due to the unstructured nature of the data, as noted by its developers, nor can it be tractably run on the full RNACompete dataset. Results: We develop RCK, an efficient, scalable algorithm that infers both sequence and structure preferences based on a new k-mer based model. Remarkably, even though RNAcompete data is designed to be unstructured, RCK can still learn structural preferences from it. RCK significantly outperforms both RNAcontext and Deepbind in in vitro binding prediction for 244 RNAcompete experiments. Moreover, RCK is also faster and uses less memory, which enables scalability. While currently on par with existing methods in in vivo binding prediction on a small scale test, we demonstrate that RCK will increasingly benefit from experimentally measured RNA structure profiles as compared to computationally predicted ones. By running RCK on the entire RNAcompete dataset, we generate and provide as a resource a set of protein–RNA structure-based models on an unprecedented scale. Availability and Implementation: Software and models are freely available at http://rck.csail.mit.edu/ Contact: bab@mit.edu Supplementary information

  5. Basis set convergence of CCSD(T) equilibrium geometries using a large and diverse set of molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Peter R; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Karton, Amir

    2016-09-14

    We examine the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method for obtaining the structures of the 108 neutral first- and second-row species in the W4-11 database (with up to five non-hydrogen atoms). This set includes a total of 181 unique bonds: 75 H-X, 49 X-Y, 43 X=Y, and 14 X≡Y bonds (where X and Y are first- and second-row atoms). As reference values, geometries optimized at the CCSD(T)/aug'-cc-pV(6+d)Z level of theory are used. We consider the basis set convergence of the CCSD(T) method with the correlation consistent basis sets cc-pV(n+d)Z and aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z (n = D, T, Q, 5) and the Weigend-Ahlrichs def2-n ZVPP basis sets (n = T, Q). For each increase in the highest angular momentum present in the basis set, the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) over the bond distances is decreased by a factor of ∼4. For example, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pV(n+d)Z basis sets 0.0196 (D), 0.0050 (T), 0.0015 (Q), and 0.0004 (5) Å. Similar results are obtained for the aug'-cc-pV(n+d)Z and def2-n ZVPP basis sets. The double-zeta and triple-zeta quality basis sets systematically and significantly overestimate the bond distances. A simple and cost-effective way to improve the performance of these basis sets is to scale the bond distances by an empirical scaling factor of 0.9865 (cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.9969 (cc-pV(T+d)Z). This results in RMSDs of 0.0080 (scaled cc-pV(D+d)Z) and 0.0029 (scaled cc-pV(T+d)Z) Å. The basis set convergence of larger basis sets can be accelerated via standard basis-set extrapolations. In addition, the basis set convergence of explicitly correlated CCSD(T)-F12 calculations is investigated in conjunction with the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets (n = D, T). Typically, one "gains" two angular momenta in the explicitly correlated calculations. That is, the CCSD(T)-F12/cc-pVnZ-F12 level of theory shows similar performance to the CCSD(T)/cc-pV(n+2)Z level of theory. In particular, the following RMSDs are obtained for the cc-pVnZ-F12 basis sets 0.0019 (D

  6. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  7. Functional connectivity and structural covariance between regions of interest can be measured more accurately using multivariate distance correlation.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, Linda; Cam-Can; Henson, Richard N

    2016-07-15

    Studies of brain-wide functional connectivity or structural covariance typically use measures like the Pearson correlation coefficient, applied to data that have been averaged across voxels within regions of interest (ROIs). However, averaging across voxels may result in biased connectivity estimates when there is inhomogeneity within those ROIs, e.g., sub-regions that exhibit different patterns of functional connectivity or structural covariance. Here, we propose a new measure based on "distance correlation"; a test of multivariate dependence of high dimensional vectors, which allows for both linear and non-linear dependencies. We used simulations to show how distance correlation out-performs Pearson correlation in the face of inhomogeneous ROIs. To evaluate this new measure on real data, we use resting-state fMRI scans and T1 structural scans from 2 sessions on each of 214 participants from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing & Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) project. Pearson correlation and distance correlation showed similar average connectivity patterns, for both functional connectivity and structural covariance. Nevertheless, distance correlation was shown to be 1) more reliable across sessions, 2) more similar across participants, and 3) more robust to different sets of ROIs. Moreover, we found that the similarity between functional connectivity and structural covariance estimates was higher for distance correlation compared to Pearson correlation. We also explored the relative effects of different preprocessing options and motion artefacts on functional connectivity. Because distance correlation is easy to implement and fast to compute, it is a promising alternative to Pearson correlations for investigating ROI-based brain-wide connectivity patterns, for functional as well as structural data.

  8. RPI-Bind: a structure-based method for accurate identification of RNA-protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiesi; Liu, Liang; Venkateswaran, Suresh; Song, Qianqian; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2017-04-04

    RNA and protein interactions play crucial roles in multiple biological processes, while these interactions are significantly influenced by the structures and sequences of protein and RNA molecules. In this study, we first performed an analysis of RNA-protein interacting complexes, and identified interface properties of sequences and structures, which reveal the diverse nature of the binding sites. With the observations, we built a three-step prediction model, namely RPI-Bind, for the identification of RNA-protein binding regions using the sequences and structures of both proteins and RNAs. The three steps include 1) the prediction of RNA binding regions on protein, 2) the prediction of protein binding regions on RNA, and 3) the prediction of interacting regions on both RNA and protein simultaneously, with the results from steps 1) and 2). Compared with existing methods, most of which employ only sequences, our model significantly improves the prediction accuracy at each of the three steps. Especially, our model outperforms the catRAPID by >20% at the 3(rd) step. All of these results indicate the importance of structures in RNA-protein interactions, and suggest that the RPI-Bind model is a powerful theoretical framework for studying RNA-protein interactions.

  9. Gap between technically accurate information and socially appropriate information for structural health monitoring system installed into tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Akira

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the structural health monitoring system for tall buildings is now widely recognized by at least structural engineers and managers at large real estate companies to ensure the structural safety immediately after a large earthquake and appeal the quantitative safety of buildings to potential tenants. Some leading real estate companies decided to install the system into all tall buildings. Considering this tendency, a pilot project for the west area of Shinjuku Station supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency was started by the author team to explore a possibility of using the system to provide safe spaces for commuters and residents. The system was installed into six tall buildings. From our experience, it turned out that viewing only from technological aspects was not sufficient for the system to be accepted and to be really useful. Safe spaces require not only the structural safety but also the soundness of key functions of the building. We need help from social scientists, medical doctors, city planners etc. to further improve the integrity of the system.

  10. Accurate protein structure annotation through competitive diffusion of enzymatic functions over a network of local evolutionary similarities.

    PubMed

    Venner, Eric; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R Matthew; Amin, Shivas R; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2010-12-13

    High-throughput Structural Genomics yields many new protein structures without known molecular function. This study aims to uncover these missing annotations by globally comparing select functional residues across the structural proteome. First, Evolutionary Trace Annotation, or ETA, identifies which proteins have local evolutionary and structural features in common; next, these proteins are linked together into a proteomic network of ETA similarities; then, starting from proteins with known functions, competing functional labels diffuse link-by-link over the entire network. Every node is thus assigned a likelihood z-score for every function, and the most significant one at each node wins and defines its annotation. In high-throughput controls, this competitive diffusion process recovered enzyme activity annotations with 99% and 97% accuracy at half-coverage for the third and fourth Enzyme Commission (EC) levels, respectively. This corresponds to false positive rates 4-fold lower than nearest-neighbor and 5-fold lower than sequence-based annotations. In practice, experimental validation of the predicted carboxylesterase activity in a protein from Staphylococcus aureus illustrated the effectiveness of this approach in the context of an increasingly drug-resistant microbe. This study further links molecular function to a small number of evolutionarily important residues recognizable by Evolutionary Tracing and it points to the specificity and sensitivity of functional annotation by competitive global network diffusion. A web server is at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/networks.

  11. Scaled effective solvent method for predicting the equilibrium ensemble of structures with analysis of thermodynamic properties of amorphous polyethylene glycol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A; Kim, Hyungjun

    2013-01-24

    Water-soluble polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) are critical components of industrial processes ranging from drug delivery to water purification. However, the understanding of the microscopic structure of these polymers in water and of the thermodynamics of the mixtures is limited because available experimental techniques (such as SLS and SANS) give little information about conformations and provide even the radius of gyration only in the dilute limit (<~5 wt % PEG). Computer simulations employing Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques can provide an atomistic molecular structure; however, such approaches have difficulties in predicting the equilibrium polymer configurations of high-molecular-weight polymers at normal densities and in obtaining entropies and free energies directly from the MD. Here, we develop the scaled effective solvent (SES) method to predict the equilibrium ensemble of polymer configurations, which we illustrate for the case of a 20 kDa PEG (455 monomers) at a 25 wt % PEG aqueous solution (3339 waters per PEG chain). We evaluate the free energy and entropy of the members of this ensemble including explicit water, validating that it leads to average sizes (R(g)) observed experimentally and that all members of the ensemble have favorable free energies. With the SES method validated to provide well-equilibrated polymer chains in water, it should be useful for predicting ensembles of polymer chains in polymer melts and in solvents.

  12. Fast and accurate approximate quasiparticle band structure calculations of ZnO, CdO, and MgO polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataide, C. A.; Pelá, R. R.; Marques, M.; Teles, L. K.; Furthmüller, J.; Bechstedt, F.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate ZnO, CdO, and MgO oxides crystallizing in rocksalt, wurtzite, and zincblende structures. Whereas in MgO calculations, the conventional LDA-1/2 method is employed through a self-energy potential (VS), the shallow d bands in ZnO and CdO are treated through an increased amplitude (A ) of VS to modulate the self-energy of the d states to place them in the quasiparticle position. The LDA+A -1/2 scheme is applied to calculate band structures and electronic density of states of ZnO and CdO. We compare the results with those of more sophisticated quasiparticle calculations and experiments. We demonstrate that this new LDA+A -1/2 method reaches accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art methods, opening a door to study more complex systems containing shallow core electrons to the prize of LDA studies.

  13. Accurate Electronic Structures of Eu-Doped SiAlON Green Phosphor with a Semilocal Exchange-Correlation Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Dong Su; Ryu, Jeong Ho; Lee, Sung-Ho; Cho, Hyun; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2011-06-01

    The crystal structure, electronic structure, and photoluminescence properties of EuxSi6-zAlzOzN8-z (x = 0.01754, z = 0.25) green phosphor were calculated by modified version of the exchange potential proposed by Becke and Johnson [J. Chem. Phys. 124 (2006) 221101]. An interstitially doped Eu atom was found in the atomic channel parallel to the [0001] axis. The additional states originated from the hybridization of Eu 4f and Eu 5d with Si 3p and N 2p. The luminescence properties were analyzed using a quantitative calculation of the energy gap and the wavelength. The calculated emission peak wavelength of Eu from the energy gap between Eu 5d and Eu 4f was 552 nm. Conventional local or semi local density functionals always underestimate the band gap for wide gap semiconductor. In contrast, the calculated results using the semi local potential well agreed with experiment.

  14. Realistic 3D computer model of the gerbil middle ear, featuring accurate morphology of bone and soft tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Buytaert, Jan A N; Salih, Wasil H M; Dierick, Manual; Jacobs, Patric; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve realism in middle ear (ME) finite-element modeling (FEM), comprehensive and precise morphological data are needed. To date, micro-scale X-ray computed tomography (μCT) recordings have been used as geometric input data for FEM models of the ME ossicles. Previously, attempts were made to obtain these data on ME soft tissue structures as well. However, due to low X-ray absorption of soft tissue, quality of these images is limited. Another popular approach is using histological sections as data for 3D models, delivering high in-plane resolution for the sections, but the technique is destructive in nature and registration of the sections is difficult. We combine data from high-resolution μCT recordings with data from high-resolution orthogonal-plane fluorescence optical-sectioning microscopy (OPFOS), both obtained on the same gerbil specimen. State-of-the-art μCT delivers high-resolution data on the 3D shape of ossicles and other ME bony structures, while the OPFOS setup generates data of unprecedented quality both on bone and soft tissue ME structures. Each of these techniques is tomographic and non-destructive and delivers sets of automatically aligned virtual sections. The datasets coming from different techniques need to be registered with respect to each other. By combining both datasets, we obtain a complete high-resolution morphological model of all functional components in the gerbil ME. The resulting 3D model can be readily imported in FEM software and is made freely available to the research community. In this paper, we discuss the methods used, present the resulting merged model, and discuss the morphological properties of the soft tissue structures, such as muscles and ligaments.

  15. A highly accurate protein structural class prediction approach using auto cross covariance transformation and recursive feature elimination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Taigang; Tao, Peiying; Wang, Chunhua; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-01

    Structural class characterizes the overall folding type of a protein or its domain. Many methods have been proposed to improve the prediction accuracy of protein structural class in recent years, but it is still a challenge for the low-similarity sequences. In this study, we introduce a feature extraction technique based on auto cross covariance (ACC) transformation of position-specific score matrix (PSSM) to represent a protein sequence. Then support vector machine-recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) is adopted to select top K features according to their importance and these features are input to a support vector machine (SVM) to conduct the prediction. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is performed using the jackknife test on three low-similarity datasets, i.e., D640, 1189 and 25PDB. By means of this method, the overall accuracies of 97.2%, 96.2%, and 93.3% are achieved on these three datasets, which are higher than those of most existing methods. This suggests that the proposed method could serve as a very cost-effective tool for predicting protein structural class especially for low-similarity datasets.

  16. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%.

  17. ELAS: A general-purpose computer program for the equilibrium problems of linear structures. Volume 2: Documentation of the program. [subroutines and flow charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.

    1969-01-01

    A general purpose digital computer program for the in-core solution of linear equilibrium problems of structural mechanics is documented. The program requires minimum input for the description of the problem. The solution is obtained by means of the displacement method and the finite element technique. Almost any geometry and structure may be handled because of the availability of linear, triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, hexahedral, conical, triangular torus, and quadrilateral torus elements. The assumption of piecewise linear deflection distribution insures monotonic convergence of the deflections from the stiffer side with decreasing mesh size. The stresses are provided by the best-fit strain tensors in the least squares at the mesh points where the deflections are given. The selection of local coordinate systems whenever necessary is automatic. The core memory is used by means of dynamic memory allocation, an optional mesh-point relabelling scheme and imposition of the boundary conditions during the assembly time.

  18. Development of an accurate and high-throughput methodology for structural comprehension of chlorophylls derivatives. (II) Dephytylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kewei; Ríos, José Julián; Roca, María; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2015-09-18

    Dephytylated chlorophylls (chlorophyllides and pheophorbides) are the starting point of the chlorophyll catabolism in green tissues, components of the chlorophyll pattern in storage/processed food vegetables, as well as the favoured structural arrangement for chlorophyll absorption. In addition, dephytylated native chlorophylls are prone to several modifications of their structure yielding pyro-, 13(2)-hydroxy- and 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone derivatives. Despite of these outstanding remarks only few of them have been analysed by MS(n). Besides new protocols for obtaining standards, we have developed a new high throughput methodology able to determine the fragmentation pathway of 16 dephytylated chlorophyll derivatives, elucidating the structures of the new product ions and new mechanisms of fragmentation. The new methodology combines, by first time, high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and powerful post-processing software. Native chlorophyllides and pheophorbides mainly exhibit product ions that involve the fragmentation of D ring, as well as additional exclusive product ions. The introduction of an oxygenated function at E ring enhances the progress of fragmentation reactions through the β-keto ester group, developing also exclusive product ions for 13(2)-hydroxy derivatives and for 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone ones. Consequently, while MS(2)-based reactions of phytylated chlorophyll derivatives point to fragmentations at the phytyl and propionic chains, dephytylated chlorophyll derivatives behave different as the absence of phytyl makes β-keto ester group and E ring more prone to fragmentation. Proposals of the key reaction mechanisms underlying the origin of new product ions have been made.

  19. Accurate electron affinity of V and fine-structure splittings of V- via slow-electron velocity-map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoxi; Luo, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-10-01

    We report the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of negative vanadium ions obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of V was determined to be 4255.9(18) cm-1 or 0.527 66(20) eV. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 60 with regard to the previous measurement. The fine structure of V- was well resolved: 35.9(11) (5D1), 103.8(12) (5D2), 204.17(74) (5D3), and 330.58(40) cm-1 (5D4) above the ground state 5D0, respectively.

  20. Accurate electron affinity of V and fine-structure splittings of V(-) via slow-electron velocity-map imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoxi; Luo, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-10-28

    We report the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of negative vanadium ions obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of V was determined to be 4255.9(18) cm(-1) or 0.527 66(20) eV. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 60 with regard to the previous measurement. The fine structure of V(-) was well resolved: 35.9(11) ((5)D1), 103.8(12) ((5)D2), 204.17(74) ((5)D3), and 330.58(40) cm(-1) ((5)D4) above the ground state (5)D0, respectively.

  1. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  2. Accurate unrestrained DDM refinement of crystal structures from highly distorted and low-resolution powder diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Solovyov, Leonid A

    2016-10-01

    The structure of benzene:ethane co-crystal at 90 K is refined with anisotropic displacement parameters without geometric restraints from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data using the derivative difference method (DDM) with properly chosen weighting schemes. The average C-C bond precision achieved is 0.005 Å and the H-atom positions in ethane are refined independently. A new DDM weighting scheme is introduced that compensates for big distortions of experimental data. The results are compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations reported by Maynard-Casely et al. [(2016). IUCrJ, 3, 192-199] where a rigid-body Rietveld refinement was also applied to the same dataset due to severe distortions of the powder pattern attributable to experimental peculiarities. For the crystal structure of 2-aminopyridinium fumarate-fumaric acid formerly refined applying 77 geometric restraints by Dong et al. [(2013). Acta Cryst. C69, 896-900], an unrestrained DDM refinement using the same XRPD pattern surprisingly gave two times narrower dispersion of interatomic distances.

  3. Accurate extraction of Lagrangian coherent structures over finite domains with application to flight data analysis over Hong Kong International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Chan, Pak Wai; Haller, George

    2010-03-01

    Locating Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) for dynamical systems defined on a spatially limited domain present a challenge because trajectory integration must be stopped at the boundary for lack of further velocity data. This effectively turns the domain boundary into an attractor, introduces edge effects resulting in spurious ridges in the associated finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field, and causes some of the real ridges of the FTLE field to be suppressed by strong spurious ridges. To address these issues, we develop a finite-domain FTLE method that renders LCS with an accuracy and fidelity that is suitable for automated feature detection. We show the application of this technique to the analysis of velocity data from aircraft landing at the Hong Kong International Airport.

  4. Integrative structural annotation of de novo RNA-Seq provides an accurate reference gene set of the enormous genome of the onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungill; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kim, Yong-Min; Yeom, Seon-In; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Kim, Sunggil; Kim, Do-Sun; Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2015-02-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetable crops in the world. Although a considerable amount of onion transcriptome data has been deposited into public databases, the sequences of the protein-coding genes are not accurate enough to be used, owing to non-coding sequences intermixed with the coding sequences. We generated a high-quality, annotated onion transcriptome from de novo sequence assembly and intensive structural annotation using the integrated structural gene annotation pipeline (ISGAP), which identified 54,165 protein-coding genes among 165,179 assembled transcripts totalling 203.0 Mb by eliminating the intron sequences. ISGAP performed reliable annotation, recognizing accurate gene structures based on reference proteins, and ab initio gene models of the assembled transcripts. Integrative functional annotation and gene-based SNP analysis revealed a whole biological repertoire of genes and transcriptomic variation in the onion. The method developed in this study provides a powerful tool for the construction of reference gene sets for organisms based solely on de novo transcriptome data. Furthermore, the reference genes and their variation described here for the onion represent essential tools for molecular breeding and gene cloning in Allium spp.

  5. Investigation of internal magnetic structures and comparison with two-fluid equilibrium configurations in the multi-pulsing CHI on HIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, T.; Hanao, T.; Hirono, H.; Hyobu, T.; Ito, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Kanki, T.

    2012-10-01

    Spherical torus (ST) plasmas have been successfully maintained by Muti-pulsing Coaxial Helicity Injection (M-CHI) on HIST. This research object is to clarify relations between plasma characteristics and magnetic flux amplifications, and to compare magnetic field structures measured in the plasma interior to a flowing equilibrium calculation. Two-dimensional magnetic probe array has been newly introduced nearby the gun muzzle. The initial result shows that the diverter configuration with a single X-point can be formed after a bubble burst process of the plasma. The closed magnetic flux is surrounded by the open magnetic field lines intersecting with the gun electrodes. To evaluate the sustained configurations, we use the two-fluid equilibrium code containing generalized Bernoulli and Grad-Shafranov equations which was developed by L.C. Steinhauer. The radial profiles of plasma flow, density and magnetic fields measured on the midplane of the FC are consistent to the calculation. We also found that the poloidal shear flow generation is attributed to ExB drift and ion diamagnetic drift. In addition, we will study temporal behaviors of impurity lines such as OV and OVI during the flux amplification by VUV spectroscopic measurements.

  6. Quantum chemical study of the Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B siderophore complex—Electronic structure, vibrational frequencies, and equilibrium Fe-isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Paul, K. W.; Sparks, D. L.; Kubicki, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    This study presents molecular orbital/density functional theory (MO/DFT) calculations of the electronic structure, vibrational frequencies, and equilibrium isotope fractionation factors for iron desferrioxamine B (Fe-DFO-B) complexes in aqueous solution. In general, there was good agreement between the predicted properties of Fe(III)-DFO-B and previously published experimental and theoretical results. The predicted fractionation factor for equilibrium between Fe(III)-DFO-B and Fe(III)-catecholate at 22 °C, 0.68 ± 0.25‰, was in good agreement with a previously measured isotopic difference between bacterial cells and solution during the bacterial-mediated dissolution of hornblende [Brantley S. L., Liermann L. and Bullen T. D. (2001) Fractionation of Fe isotopes by soil microbes and organic acids. Geology29, 535-538]. Conceptually, this agreement is consistent with the notion that Fe is first removed from mineral surfaces via complexation with small organic acids (e.g., oxalate), subsequently sequestered by DFO-B in solution, and ultimately delivered to bacterial cells by Fe(III)-DFO-B complexes. The ability of DFO-B to discriminate between Fe(III) and Fe(II)/Al(III) was investigated with Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis and geometry calculations of each metal-DFO-B complex. The results indicated that higher affinity for Fe(III) is not strictly a function of bond length but also the degree of Fe-O covalent bonding.

  7. Accurate and efficient representation of intramolecular energy in ab initio generation of crystal structures. I. Adaptive local approximate models.

    PubMed

    Sugden, Isaac; Adjiman, Claire S; Pantelides, Constantinos C

    2016-12-01

    The global search stage of crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods requires a fine balance between accuracy and computational cost, particularly for the study of large flexible molecules. A major improvement in the accuracy and cost of the intramolecular energy function used in the CrystalPredictor II [Habgood et al. (2015). J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1957-1969] program is presented, where the most efficient use of computational effort is ensured via the use of adaptive local approximate model (LAM) placement. The entire search space of the relevant molecule's conformations is initially evaluated using a coarse, low accuracy grid. Additional LAM points are then placed at appropriate points determined via an automated process, aiming to minimize the computational effort expended in high-energy regions whilst maximizing the accuracy in low-energy regions. As the size, complexity and flexibility of molecules increase, the reduction in computational cost becomes marked. This improvement is illustrated with energy calculations for benzoic acid and the ROY molecule, and a CSP study of molecule (XXVI) from the sixth blind test [Reilly et al. (2016). Acta Cryst. B72, 439-459], which is challenging due to its size and flexibility. Its known experimental form is successfully predicted as the global minimum. The computational cost of the study is tractable without the need to make unphysical simplifying assumptions.

  8. Development of an accurate and high-throughput methodology for structural comprehension of chlorophylls derivatives. (I) Phytylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kewei; Ríos, José Julián; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Roca, María

    2015-08-07

    Phytylated chlorophyll derivatives undergo specific oxidative reactions through the natural metabolism or during food processing or storage, and consequently pyro-, 13(2)-hydroxy-, 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone chlorophylls, and pheophytins (a and b) are originated. New analytical procedures have been developed here to reproduce controlled oxidation reactions that specifically, and in reasonable amounts, produce those natural target standards. At the same time and under the same conditions, 16 natural chlorophyll derivatives have been analyzed by APCI-HPLC-hrMS(2) and most of them by the first time. The combination of the high-resolution MS mode with powerful post-processing software has allowed the identification of new fragmentation patterns, characterizing specific product ions for some particular standards. In addition, new hypotheses and reaction mechanisms for the established MS(2)-based reactions have been proposed. As a general rule, the main product ions involve the phytyl and the propionic chains but the introduction of oxygenated functional groups at the isocyclic ring produces new and specific productions and at the same time inhibits some particular fragmentations. It is noteworthy that all b derivatives, except 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone compounds, undergo specific CO losses. We propose a new reaction mechanism based in the structural configuration of a and b chlorophyll derivatives that explain the exclusive CO fragmentation in all b series except for 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone b and all a series compounds.

  9. Semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C6 backbone of cis-1,3,5-hexatriene; structural evidence for greater pi-electron delocalization with increasing chain length in polyenes.

    PubMed

    Suenram, Richard D; Pate, Brooks H; Lesarri, Alberto; Neill, Justin L; Shipman, Steven; Holmes, Robin A; Leyden, Matthew C; Craig, Norman C

    2009-03-05

    Twenty-five microwave lines were observed for cis-1,3,5-hexatriene (0.05 D dipole moment) and a smaller number for its three (13)C isotopomers in natural abundance. Ground-state rotational constants were fitted for all four species to a Watson-type rotational Hamiltonian for an asymmetric top (kappa = -0.9768). Vibration-rotation (alpha) constants were predicted with a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model and used to adjust the ground-state rotational constants to equilibrium rotational constants. The small inertial defect for cis-hexatriene shows that the molecule is planar, despite significant H-H repulsion. The substitution method was applied to the equilibrium rotational constants to give a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C(6) backbone. This structure and one predicted with the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model show structural evidence for increased pi-electron delocalization in comparison with butadiene, the first member of the polyene series.

  10. Matching unknown empirical formulas to chemical structure using LC/MS TOF accurate mass and database searching: example of unknown pesticides on tomato skins.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo Rodriguez

    2005-03-04

    Traditionally, the screening of unknown pesticides in food has been accomplished by GC/MS methods using conventional library searching routines. However, many of the new polar and thermally labile pesticides and their degradates are more readily and easily analyzed by LC/MS methods and no searchable libraries currently exist (with the exception of some user libraries, which are limited). Therefore, there is a need for LC/MS approaches to detect unknown non-target pesticides in food. This report develops an identification scheme using a combination of LC/MS time-of-flight (accurate mass) and LC/MS ion trap MS (MS/MS) with searching of empirical formulas generated through accurate mass and a ChemIndex database or Merck Index database. The approach is different than conventional library searching of fragment ions. The concept here consists of four parts. First is the initial detection of a possible unknown pesticide in actual market-place vegetable extracts (tomato skins) using accurate mass and generating empirical formulas. Second is searching either the Merck Index database on CD (10,000 compounds) or the ChemIndex (77,000 compounds) for possible structures. Third is MS/MS of the unknown pesticide in the tomato-skin extract followed by fragment ion identification using chemical drawing software and comparison with accurate-mass ion fragments. Fourth is the verification with authentic standards, if available. Three examples of unknown, non-target pesticides are shown using a tomato-skin extract from an actual market place sample. Limitations of the approach are discussed including the use of A + 2 isotope signatures, extended databases, lack of authentic standards, and natural product unknowns in food extracts.

  11. How does your crystal grow? A commentary on Burton, Cabrera and Frank (1951) ‘The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces’

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, D. P.

    2015-01-01

    The key ideas presented in the classic paper ‘The growth of crystals and the equilibrium structure of their surfaces’ by W. K. Burton, N. Cabrera and F. C. Frank, published in Philosophical Transactions A in 1951, are summarized and put in the context of both the state of knowledge at the time of publication and the considerable amount of work since that time that has built on and developed these ideas. Many of these developments exploit the huge increase in the capabilities of computer modelling that complement the original analytic approach of the paper. The dearth of relevant experimental data at the time of the original publication has been transformed by the application of increasingly sophisticated modern methods of surface science. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750141

  12. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  13. Liquid-liquid phase equilibrium and core-shell structure formation in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Jia, Peng; Sun, Xiaofei; Geng, Haoran; Zuo, Min; Zhao, Degang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the liquid-phase separation of ternary immiscible Al45Bi19.8Sn35.2 and Al60Bi14.4Sn25.6 melts was studied with resistivity and thermal analysis methods at different temperature. The resistivity-temperature curves appear abrupt and anomalously change with rising temperature, corresponding to the anomalous and low peak of melting process in DSC curves, indicative of the occurrence of the liquid-phase separation. The anomalous behavior of the resistivity temperature dependence is attributable to concentration-concentration fluctuations. The effect of composition and melt temperature on the liquid-phase separation and core-shell structure formation in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys was studied. The liquid-phase separation and formation of the core-shell structure in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys are readily acquired when the alloy compositions fall into liquid miscibility gap. What's more, the cross-sectional structure changes from irregular, dispersed to core-type shapes under the actions of Marangoni motion with increasing melt temperature. This study provides some clues for the preparation of core-shell microspheres of immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys via liquid-phase separation.

  14. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  15. Equilibrium state of anatase to rutile transformation for nano-structured Titanium Dioxide powder using polymer template method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Tapabrata; Jena, Sidhartha S.; Pradhan, Dillip K.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we report the novel synthesis procedure of phase-pure nano-structured titania in anatase phase using polyacrylamide gel based polymer template method. The evolution of rutile phased titania with increasing temperature has also been investigated. The synthesized nano-materials are characterized using X-ray diffraction, Brunauer - Emmett - Teller surface analysis technique and Scanning electron microscopy. We have used dual phase Rietveld refinement method to analyse the X-Ray diffraction data to get clear picture of crystallographic information of the prepared samples.

  16. Theoretical investigation of the equilibrium surface structure of Si 1- x- yGe xC y alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelires, P. C.

    1998-12-01

    We investigate the surface structure of SiGeC alloys at typical growth temperatures using Monte Carlo simulations within the empirical potential formalism. We find a strong tendency of carbon to segregate to the top layer. As a consequence, germanium segregation is drastically reduced. The carbon composition profile oscillates in the subsurface layers, with a marked enhancement in the third layer. Si-C dimers are the favored surface bonding geometry, and are mostly found in (2×2) and c(4×2) arrangements.

  17. Equilibrium conformational ensemble of the intrinsically disordered peptide n16N: linking subdomain structures and function in nacre.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aaron H; Rodger, P Mark; Evans, John Spencer; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2014-12-08

    n16 is a framework protein family associated with biogenic mineral stabilization, thought to operate at three key interfaces in nacre: protein/β-chitin, protein/protein, and protein/CaCO3. The N-terminal half of this protein, n16N, is known to be active in conferring this mineral stabilization and organization. While some details relating to the stabilization and organization of the mineral are known, the molecular mechanisms that underpin these processes are not yet established. To provide these molecular-scale details, here we explore current hypotheses regarding the possible subdomain organization of n16N, as related to these three interfaces in nacre, by combining outcomes of Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering molecular dynamics simulations with NMR experiments, to investigate the conformational ensemble of n16N in solution. We verify that n16N lacks a well-defined secondary structure, both with and without the presence of Ca(2+) ions, as identified from previous experiments. Our data support the presence of three different, functional subdomains within n16N. Our results reveal that tyrosine, chiefly located in the center of the peptide, plays a multifunctional role in stabilizing conformations of n16N, for intrapeptide and possibly interpeptide interactions. Complementary NMR spectroscopy data confirm the participation of tyrosine in this stabilization. The C-terminal half of n16N, lacking in tyrosine and highly charged, shows substantive conformational diversity and is proposed as a likely site for nucleation of calcium carbonate. Finally, dominant structures from our predicted conformational ensemble suggest the presentation of key residues thought to be critical to the selective binding to β-chitin surfaces.

  18. The progressive development of structure and stability during the equilibrium folding of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gualfetti, P. J.; Bilsel, O.; Matthews, C. R.

    1999-01-01

    The urea-induced equilibrium unfolding of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase (alphaTS), a single domain alpha/beta barrel protein, displays a stable intermediate at approximately 3.2 M urea when monitored by absorbance and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy (Matthews CR, Crisanti MM, 1981, Biochemistry 20:784-792). The same experiment, monitored by one-dimensional proton NMR, shows another cooperative process between 5 and 9 M urea that involves His92 (Saab-Rincón G et al., 1993, Biochemistry 32:13,981-13,990). To further test and quantify the implied four-state model, N <--> I1 <--> I2 <--> U, the urea-induced equilibrium unfolding process was followed by tyrosine fluorescence total intensity, tyrosine fluorescence anisotropy and far-UV CD. All three techniques resolve the four stable states, and the transitions between them when the FL total intensity and CD spectroscopy data were analyzed by the singular value decomposition method. Relative to U, the stabilities of the N, I1, and I2 states are 15.4, 9.4, and 4.9 kcal mol(-1), respectively. I2 partially buries one or more of the seven tyrosines with a noticeable restriction of their motion; it also recovers approximately 6% of the native CD signal. This intermediate, which is known to be stabilized by the hydrophobic effect, appears to reflect the early coalescence of nonpolar side chains without significant organization of the backbone. I1 recovers an additional 43% of the CD signal, further sequesters tyrosine residues in nonpolar environments, and restricts their motion to an extent similar to N. The progressive development of a higher order structure as the denaturant concentration decreases implies a monotonic contraction in the ensemble of conformations that represent the U, I2, I1, and N states of alphaTS. PMID:10452606

  19. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) for direct, versatile, and accurate RNA structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Matthew J.; Rice, Greggory M.; Busan, Steven; Siegfried, Nathan A.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    SHAPE chemistries exploit small electrophilic reagents that react with the 2′-hydroxyl group to interrogate RNA structure at single-nucleotide resolution. Mutational profiling (MaP) identifies modified residues based on the ability of reverse transcriptase to misread a SHAPE-modified nucleotide and then counting the resulting mutations by massively parallel sequencing. The SHAPE-MaP approach measures the structure of large and transcriptome-wide systems as accurately as for simple model RNAs. This protocol describes the experimental steps, implemented over three days, required to perform SHAPE probing and construct multiplexed SHAPE-MaP libraries suitable for deep sequencing. These steps include RNA folding and SHAPE structure probing, mutational profiling by reverse transcription, library construction, and sequencing. Automated processing of MaP sequencing data is accomplished using two software packages. ShapeMapper converts raw sequencing files into mutational profiles, creates SHAPE reactivity plots, and provides useful troubleshooting information, often within an hour. SuperFold uses these data to model RNA secondary structures, identify regions with well-defined structures, and visualize probable and alternative helices, often in under a day. We illustrate these algorithms with the E. coli thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch, E. coli 16S rRNA, and HIV-1 genomic RNAs. SHAPE-MaP can be used to make nucleotide-resolution biophysical measurements of individual RNA motifs, rare components of complex RNA ensembles, and entire transcriptomes. The straightforward MaP strategy greatly expands the number, length, and complexity of analyzable RNA structures. PMID:26426499

  20. The photoluminescence response to structural changes of Yb implanted ZnO crystals subjected to non-equilibrium processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, R.; Prucnal, S.; Guziewicz, E.; Mieszczynski, C.; Snigurenko, D.; Stachowicz, M.; Skorupa, W.; Turos, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present the detailed study of optical and structural properties of Yb implanted single ZnO crystals. Hydrothermally grown wurtzite (0001) ZnO crystals were implanted with 150 keV Yb ions to fluencies of 5 × 1014 and 1 × 1015 at/cm2. After ion implantation, two different types of annealing were performed: rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and millisecond range flash lamp annealing (FLA). Crystalline quality, damage recovery, and Yb lattice site location were evaluated by the Channeling Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS/c). It is shown that independent of the used annealing technique, defects formed in ZnO during ion implantation can be removed. Upon RTA performed at the temperature higher than 800 °C, strong out-diffusion of implanted Yb atoms and precipitation on the surface takes place. Consequently, the degradation of the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency is observed. The diffusion of implanted Yb during millisecond range FLA does not occur for such experimental conditions. Moreover, FLA treatment for 20 ms leads to the formation of single crystalline ZnO layer with Yb incorporated in the substitutional lattice sites. According to RBS/c and PL data, Yb atoms substituted in the Zn sublattice are predominantly in the 2+ oxidation state. The most intensive PL has been observed after annealing at 800 °C for 20 min which is accompanied with the reduction of Yb substitutional fraction and formation of octahedron Yb-oxygen clusters within ZnO.

  1. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina; Alonso, José Luis; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  2. Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1; a Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structure for the C6 Backbone for trans-Hexatriene

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Norman C.; Tian, Hengfeng; Blake, Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1 (tHTE-1-13C1) has been synthesized, and its high-resolution (0.0015 cm-1) infrared spectrum has been recorded. The rotational structure in the C-type bands for v26 at 1011 cm-1 and v30 at 894 cm-1 has been analyzed. To the 1458 ground state combination differences from these bands, ground state rotational constants were fitted to a Watson-type Hamiltonian to give A0 = 0.8728202(9), B0 = 0.0435868(4), and C0 = 0.0415314(2) cm-1. Upper state rotational constants for the v30 band were also fitted. Predictions of the ground state rotational constants for t-HTE-1-13C1 from a B3LYP/cc-pVTZ model with scale factors based on the normal species were in excellent agreement with observations. Similar good agreement was found between predicted and observed ground state rotational constants for the three 13C1 isotopologues of cis-hexatriene (cHTE), as determined from microwave spectroscopy. Equilibrium rotational constants for tHTE and its three 13C1 isotopologues, of which two were predicted, were used to find a semiexperimental equilibrium structure for the C6 backbone of tHTE. This structure shows increased structural effects of pi-electron delocalization in comparison with butadiene.

  3. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  4. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  5. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, Kimberly R. Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  6. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  7. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of equilibrium structural fluctuations of native and partially unfolded states of Zinc II-substituted and metal-free cytochromes C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Jagnyaseni

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize the equilibrium and non-equilibrium protein structural fluctuations in Zn II-substituted (ZnCytc) and metal-free (fbCytc) cytochromes c using dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift (FSS) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements. The intrinsic porphyrin chromophore is used as the probe for the structural fluctuations of the surrounding protein and solvent. The FSS experiments examine how the time scales detected from the dynamic solvation of a chromoprotein report changes in the character of motion. ZnCytc and fbCytc serve as limited, single-chromophore models for photosynthetic reaction center and light-harvesting proteins. The dynamic solvation of redox and light-harvesting chromophores in photosynthesis plays an important role in the quantum efficiency of electron transfer and energy transfer performed by these systems, respectively. The FSS response function of fbCytc in water is biexponential over the 100-ps--50-ns regime and the two time constants are 1.4 ns and 9.1 ns. ZnCytc under similar solution conditions shows a biexponential FSS response but with time constants of 0.2 ns and 1.5 ns. The two correlation times from the FSS response function correspond to motions of the hydrophobic core and the solvent-contact layer, respectively. Both FSS correlation times were lengthened and the solvation reorganization energy was reduced from 43 cm-1 to 33 cm-1 in the presence of 50% (v/v) glycerol. A Brownian diffusion model with thermally activated barrier crossings on the protein-folding energy landscape is used to interpret these results. The conclusion is that the mean-squared deviations of the fluctuations exhibited by fbCytc are perhaps a factor of ten larger than those in ZnCytc, which is consistent with the suggestion that fbCytc assumes a dynamic, partially unfolded structure with some of the characteristics of a molten globule. The nature of the motion associated with the

  8. Accurate and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method for geometrical and structural photoisomers of bilirubin IX alpha using the relative molar absorptivity values.

    PubMed

    Itoh, S; Isobe, K; Onishi, S

    1999-07-02

    It has been reported that considerable differences exist between the relative molar absorptivity values of the geometrical and structural photoisomers of bilirubin. We have devised an accurate HPLC method for photoisomer quantification based on the following principle: the sum of both the integrated peak areas corrected by each factor for each photoisomer, and the integrated peak area of unchanged (ZZ)-bilirubin [(ZZ)-B] after an anaerobic photoirradiation, should be constant and equal to the integrated peak area of initial (ZZ)-bilirubin [(ZZ)-Bi] before photoirradiation. On this basis, the following equation can be used to determine each factor. [equation: see text] alpha, beta, gamma and delta represent the factors used to correct the integrated peak areas of individual bilirubin photoisomers, and they are arranged in the order of the formula. It was demonstrated that the relative 455 nm molar absorptivity values for (ZZ)-bilirubin and all its geometrical and structural photoisomers, i.e., (ZZ)-bilirubin, (ZE)-bilirubin (EZ)-bilirubin, (EZ)-cyclobilirubin (= lumirubin) and (EE)-cyclobilirubin in the HPLC eluent, are, respectively, 1.0, 0.81 (= alpha), 0.54 (= beta), 0.47 (= gamma) and 0.39 (= delta).

  9. Sub-Doppler millimetre-wave spectroscopy of DBS and HBS: accurate values of nuclear electric and magnetic hyperfine structure constants.

    PubMed

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca

    2008-02-07

    The unstable thioborine molecule and its deuterated variant have been produced by a high-temperature reaction between hydrogen sulfide and crystalline boron at 1100 degrees C in a flow system. Five rotational transitions from J = 2 <-- 1, to J = 6 <-- 5 have been recorded with sub-Doppler resolution for the vibrational ground state of H10/11BS and D10/11BS using the Lamb-dip technique. The hyperfine structure due to the electric quadrupole interaction of deuterium nucleus has been resolved yielding the first experimental determination of the deuterium quadrupole coupling constant in thioborine, which is 0.1403(75) MHz in D11 BS and 0.1360(38) MHz in D10BS. Fairly accurate values of 10/11B spin-rotation coupling constants and of the hydrogen-boron spin-spin coupling constants have also been determined. Additionally, the hyperfine structure of the rotational lines for the nu2 = 1 excited state has been investigated, thus obtaining information on the asymmetry of the electric field gradient at the B nucleus in the bending state.

  10. Towards accurate structural characterization of metal centres in protein crystals: the structures of Ni and Cu T{sub 6} bovine insulin derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Frankaer, Christian Grundahl; Mossin, Susanne; Ståhl, Kenny; Harris, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The level of structural detail around the metal sites in Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} T{sub 6} insulin derivatives was significantly improved by using a combination of single-crystal X-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Photoreduction and subsequent radiation damage of the Cu{sup 2+} sites in Cu insulin was followed by XANES spectroscopy. Using synchrotron radiation (SR), the crystal structures of T{sub 6} bovine insulin complexed with Ni{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} were solved to 1.50 and 1.45 Å resolution, respectively. The level of detail around the metal centres in these structures was highly limited, and the coordination of water in Cu site II of the copper insulin derivative was deteriorated as a consequence of radiation damage. To provide more detail, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to improve the information level about metal coordination in each derivative. The nickel derivative contains hexacoordinated Ni{sup 2+} with trigonal symmetry, whereas the copper derivative contains tetragonally distorted hexacoordinated Cu{sup 2+} as a result of the Jahn–Teller effect, with a significantly longer coordination distance for one of the three water molecules in the coordination sphere. That the copper centre is of type II was further confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The coordination distances were refined from EXAFS with standard deviations within 0.01 Å. The insulin derivative containing Cu{sup 2+} is sensitive towards photoreduction when exposed to SR. During the reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}, the coordination geometry of copper changes towards lower coordination numbers. Primary damage, i.e. photoreduction, was followed directly by XANES as a function of radiation dose, while secondary damage in the form of structural changes around the Cu atoms after exposure to different radiation doses was studied by crystallography using a laboratory diffractometer. Protection against photoreduction and subsequent

  11. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  12. Modeling small-scale physical non-equilibrium and large-scale preferential fluid and solute transport in a structured soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; Wilson, G.V.; Yeh, G.-T.

    1994-09-01

    The deviation of non-reactive solute transport from that predicted by classical convection-dispersion equations is usually attributed to physical non-equilibrium caused by small- and large-scale pore structures in porous media. Diffusion of fluid and solute into micropores or rock matrix may occur locally, while fluid and solutes can also be channeled preferentially through interconnected macropores or fractures. A multiple-pore-region (MPR) approach with local advective-diffusive mass exchange is adopted to simulate soil column tracer breakthrough and field-scale tracer releases in the Melton Branch Subsurface Transport Facility within the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The soil column simulation indicates that both inter-region mass exchange and intra-region convection-dispersion contribute to small-scale solute transport in approximately the same order of magnitude. The field-scale study suggests that advective mass exchange has minor effect on subsurface hydrographs, and that large diffusive mass exchange may retain tracers near the source area. Comparison of modeling results and field data suggests that subsurface bedding planes on the field site may be the cause of large-scale heterogeneity and preferential mass transport.

  13. Calculating Shocks In Flows At Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Scott; Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    Boundary conditions prove critical. Conference paper describes algorithm for calculation of shocks in hypersonic flows of gases at chemical equilibrium. Although algorithm represents intermediate stage in development of reliable, accurate computer code for two-dimensional flow, research leading up to it contributes to understanding of what is needed to complete task.

  14. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  15. Accurate Crystal Structure Refinement of La3Ta0.25Zr0.50Ga5.25O14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, A. P.; Chitra, R.; Choudhury, R. R.; Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Simonov, V. I.

    2010-11-01

    An accurate X-ray diffraction study of a La3Ta0.25Zr0.50Ga5.25O14 single crystal ( a = 8.2574(4) Å, c = 5.1465(4) Å, sp. gr. P321, Z = 1, R/ R w = 0.62/0.57% for 4144 unique reflections and 91 parameters) has been performed with a simultaneous neutron diffraction analysis. Tantalum, zirconium, and gallium atoms are found to occupy the mixed octahedral position (symmetry 32). Gallium atoms and a few zirconium atoms are in the position on axis 2 in the tetrahedron. The tetrahedral position on axis 3 is completely occupied by gallium atoms, while the large polyhedron on axis 2 is occupied by lanthanum atoms. The high resolution and averaging of the results obtained in two independent X-ray experiments with the same sample provided accu- rate structural data, in particular, on the anharmonicity of thermal atomic vibrations (atomic displacements). The X-ray and neutron diffraction data on the atomic displacements are compared.

  16. Equilibrium of KSTAR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D.-K.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L.; Kstar Team

    2011-10-01

    We have installed the EFIT code on our computing system and made some modification to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research). KSTAR PF and TF coil systems use a CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductor) type superconductor. The CICC jacket material for most PF and all TF coils is Incoloy 908, which is a magnetic material with relative magnetic permeability greater than 10 in low external field. We newly introduced Diamagnetic Loop and variational Motion Stark Effect signals to equilibrium reconstruction. In this paper, we present some results of equilibrium reconstruction with the EFIT code, assess the effects of newly introduced diagnsotics signal on the equilibrium reconstruction and compare the EFIT results with the various diagnostics data in various plasma conditions including H- and L- modes. In addition, we will show the Incoloy908 effects on the plasma equilibrium.

  17. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-12-15

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  18. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  19. Effect of chemical fixatives on accurate preservation of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis structure in cells prepared by freeze-substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, L.L.; Beveridge, T.J. )

    1990-04-01

    Five chemical fixatives were evaluated for their ability to accurately preserve bacterial ultrastructure during freeze-substitution of select Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains. Radioisotopes were specifically incorporated into the peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, and nucleic acids of E. coli SFK11 and W7 and into the peptidoglycan and RNA of B. subtilis 168 and W23. The ease of extraction of radiolabels, as assessed by liquid scintillation counting during all stages of processing for freeze-substitution, was used as an indicator of cell structural integrity and retention of cellular chemical composition. Subsequent visual examination by electron microscopy was used to confirm ultrastructural conformation. The fixatives used were: 2% (wt/vol) osmium tetroxide and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) glutaraldehyde and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (vol/vol) acrolein and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate; 2% (wt/vol) gallic acid; and 2% (wt/vol) uranyl acetate. All fixatives were prepared in a substitution solvent of anhydrous acetone. Extraction of cellular constituents depended on the chemical fixative used. A combination of 2% osmium tetroxide-2% uranyl acetate or 2% gallic acid alone resulted in optimum fixation as ascertained by least extraction of radiolabels. In both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, high levels of radiolabel were detected in the processing fluids in which 2% acrolein-2% uranyl acetate, 2% glutaraldehyde-2% uranyl acetate, or 2% uranyl acetate alone were used as fixatives. Ultrastructural variations were observed in cells freeze-substituted in the presence of different chemical fixatives. We recommend the use of osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate in acetone for routine freeze-substitution of eubacteria, while gallic acid is recommended for use when microanalytical processing necessitates the omission of osmium.

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  1. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  2. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  3. Equilibrium properties of hybrid field reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Onofri, M.; Osin, D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Hubbard, K.; Gota, H.

    2017-01-01

    Field Reversed Configurations (FRCs) heated by neutral beam injection may include a large fast ion pressure that significantly modifies the equilibrium. A new analysis is required to characterize such hybrid FRCs, as the simple relations used up to now prove inaccurate. The substantial contributions of fast ions to FRC radial pressure balance and diamagnetism are described. A simple model is offered to reconstruct more accurately the equilibrium parameters of elongated hybrid FRCs. Further modeling requires new measurements of either the magnetic field or the plasma pressure.

  4. Analytic prediction of airplane equilibrium spin characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion are solved algebraically for conditions for which an airplane is in an equilibrium spin. Constrained minimization techniques are employed in obtaining the solution. Linear characteristics of the airplane about the equilibrium points are also presented and their significance in identifying the stability characteristics of the equilibrium points is discussed. Computer time requirements are small making the method appear potentially applicable in airplane design. Results are obtained for several configurations and are compared with other analytic-numerical methods employed in spin prediction. Correlation with experimental results is discussed for one configuration for which a rather extensive data base was available. A need is indicated for higher Reynolds number data taken under conditions which more accurately simulate a spin.

  5. Inferring unstable equilibrium configurations from experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgin, L. N.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.; Beberniss, T.

    2016-09-01

    This research considers the structural behavior of slender, mechanically buckled beams and panels of the type commonly found in aerospace structures. The specimens were deflected and then clamped in a rigid frame in order to exhibit snap-through. That is, the initial equilibrium and the buckled (snapped-through) equilibrium configurations both co-existed for the given clamped conditions. In order to transit between these two stable equilibrium configurations (for example, under the action of an externally applied load), it is necessary for the structural component to pass through an intermediate unstable equilibrium configuration. A sequence of sudden impacts was imparted to the system, of various strengths and at various locations. The goal of this impact force was to induce relatively intermediate-sized transients that effectively slowed-down in the vicinity of the unstable equilibrium configuration. Thus, monitoring the velocity of the motion, and specifically its slowing down, should give an indication of the presence of an equilibrium configuration, even though it is unstable and not amenable to direct experimental observation. A digital image correlation (DIC) system was used in conjunction with an instrumented impact hammer to track trajectories and statistical methods used to infer the presence of unstable equilibria in both a beam and a panel.

  6. Determination of nonaxisymmetric equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Elkin, D.

    1980-01-01

    The Princeton Equilibrium Code is modified to determine the equilibrium surfaces for a large aspect ratio toroidal system with helical magnetic fields. The code may easily be made to include any variety of modes. Verification of the code is made by comparison with an analytic solution for l = 3. Previously observed shifting of the magnetic axis with increasing pressure or with a changed externally applied vertical field is obtained. The case l = 0, a bumpy torus, gives convergence only for the lenient convergence tolerance of epsilon/sub b/ = 1.0 x 10-/sup 2/.

  7. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  8. The importance of suppressing spin diffusion effects in the accurate determination of the spatial structure of a flexible molecule by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodov, I. A.; Efimov, S. V.; Klochkov, V. V.; Batista de Carvalho, L. A. E.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy is applied to the elucidation of conformation distribution of small molecules in solution. An essential influence of the nonlinear multistep magnetization transfer (spin diffusion) on the NMR-based analysis of conformers distribution for small druglike molecules in solution was revealed. Therefore, the spin diffusion should be eliminated from the obtained NMR data in order to obtain accurate results. Efficiency of QUIET-NOESY spectroscopy in solving the problem of accurate determination of inter-proton distances in a small molecule was shown in a study of ibuprofen. Although it requires much experimental time, this technique was found to be helpful to solve the spin diffusion problem.

  9. Conformations of Proteins in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Cristian; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2001-08-01

    We introduce a simple theoretical approach for an equilibrium study of proteins with known native-state structures. We test our approach with results on well-studied globular proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor (2ci2), barnase, and the alpha spectrin SH3 domain, and present evidence for a hierarchical onset of order on lowering the temperature with significant organization at the local level even at high temperatures. A further application to the folding process of HIV-1 protease shows that the model can be reliably used to identify key folding sites that are responsible for the development of drug resistance.

  10. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  11. TESTING STRICT HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM IN SIMULATED CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR A1689

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, S. M.; Umetsu, K.; Chiu, I.-N.; Chen, P.; Hearn, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Bryan, G.; Shang, C.

    2010-11-20

    Accurate mass determination of clusters of galaxies is crucial if they are to be used as cosmological probes. However, there are some discrepancies between cluster masses determined based on gravitational lensing and X-ray observations assuming strict hydrostatic equilibrium (i.e., the equilibrium gas pressure is provided entirely by thermal pressure). Cosmological simulations suggest that turbulent gas motions remaining from hierarchical structure formation may provide a significant contribution to the equilibrium pressure in clusters. We analyze a sample of massive clusters of galaxies drawn from high-resolution cosmological simulations and find a significant contribution (20%-45%) from non-thermal pressure near the center of relaxed clusters, and, in accord with previous studies, a minimum contribution at about 0.1 R {sub vir}, growing to about 30%-45% at the virial radius, R {sub vir}. Our results strongly suggest that relaxed clusters should have significant non-thermal support in their core region. As an example, we test the validity of strict hydrostatic equilibrium in the well-studied massive galaxy cluster A1689 using the latest high-resolution gravitational lensing and X-ray observations. We find a contribution of about 40% from non-thermal pressure within the core region of A1689, suggesting an alternate explanation for the mass discrepancy: the strict hydrostatic equilibrium is not valid in this region.

  12. Thiazol-4-one derivatives from the reaction of monosubstituted thioureas with maleimides: structures and factors determining the selectivity and tautomeric equilibrium in solution

    PubMed Central

    Golubev, Pavel R; Khlebnikov, Alexander F; Ivanov, Alexander Yu; Kuznetsov, Mikhail A

    2016-01-01

    2-(Alkyl(aryl)amino)thiazol-4(5H)-ones can regioselectively be prepared from monoalkyl(aryl)thioureas and maleimides. In solution, the former heterocycles exist in a tautomeric equilibrium with 2-(alkyl(aryl)imino)thiazolidin-4-ones and the substituent on the exocyclic nitrogen atom governs the ratio of these tautomers. Isomers with the alkyl group in the endocyclic position can be obtained from N-methyl(ethyl)thioureas. 2D NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations rationalize experimental results. PMID:28144325

  13. Nanosize-induced drastic drop in equilibrium hydrogen pressure for hydride formation and structural stabilization in Pd-Rh solid-solution alloys.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Morita, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo

    2012-08-01

    We have synthesized and characterized homogeneous solid-solution alloy nanoparticles of Pd and Rh, which are immiscible with each other in the equilibrium bulk state at around room temperature. The Pd-Rh alloy nanoparticles can absorb hydrogen at ambient pressure and the hydrogen pressure of Pd-Rh alloys for hydrogen storage is dramatically decreased by more than 4 orders of magnitude from the corresponding pressure in the metastable bulk state. The solid-solution state is still maintained in the nanoparticles even after hydrogen absorption/desorption, in contrast to the metastable bulks which are separated into Pd and Rh during the process.

  14. The transformation dynamics towards equilibrium in non-equilibrium w/w/o double emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Youchuang; Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2016-10-01

    We use a glass-based microfluidic device to generate non-equilibrium water-in-water-in-oil (w/w/o) double emulsions and study how they transform into equilibrium configurations. The method relies on using three immiscible liquids, with two of them from the phase-separated aqueous two-phase systems. We find that the transformation is accompanied by an expansion rim, while the characteristic transformation speed of the rim mainly depends on the interfacial tension between the innermost and middle phases, as well as the viscosity of the innermost phase when the middle phase is non-viscous. Remarkably, the viscosity of the outermost phase has little effect on the transformation speed. Our results account for the dynamics of non-equilibrium double emulsions towards their equilibrium structure and suggest a possibility to utilize the non-equilibrium drops to synthesize functional particles.

  15. Accurate interlaminar stress recovery from finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Riggs, H. Ronald

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy and robustness of a two-dimensional smoothing methodology is examined for the problem of recovering accurate interlaminar shear stress distributions in laminated composite and sandwich plates. The smoothing methodology is based on a variational formulation which combines discrete least-squares and penalty-constraint functionals in a single variational form. The smoothing analysis utilizes optimal strains computed at discrete locations in a finite element analysis. These discrete strain data are smoothed with a smoothing element discretization, producing superior accuracy strains and their first gradients. The approach enables the resulting smooth strain field to be practically C1-continuous throughout the domain of smoothing, exhibiting superconvergent properties of the smoothed quantity. The continuous strain gradients are also obtained directly from the solution. The recovered strain gradients are subsequently employed in the integration o equilibrium equations to obtain accurate interlaminar shear stresses. The problem is a simply-supported rectangular plate under a doubly sinusoidal load. The problem has an exact analytic solution which serves as a measure of goodness of the recovered interlaminar shear stresses. The method has the versatility of being applicable to the analysis of rather general and complex structures built of distinct components and materials, such as found in aircraft design. For these types of structures, the smoothing is achieved with 'patches', each patch covering the domain in which the smoothed quantity is physically continuous.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  17. Fluid structure in the immediate vicinity of an equilibrium three-phase contact line and assessment of disjoining pressure models using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nold, Andreas; Sibley, David N.; Goddard, Benjamin D.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-07-01

    We examine the nanoscale behavior of an equilibrium three-phase contact line in the presence of long-ranged intermolecular forces by employing a statistical mechanics of fluids approach, namely, density functional theory (DFT) together with fundamental measure theory (FMT). This enables us to evaluate the predictive quality of effective Hamiltonian models in the vicinity of the contact line. In particular, we compare the results for mean field effective Hamiltonians with disjoining pressures defined through (i) the adsorption isotherm for a planar liquid film, and (ii) the normal force balance at the contact line. We find that the height profile obtained using (i) shows good agreement with the adsorption film thickness of the DFT-FMT equilibrium density profile in terms of maximal curvature and the behavior at large film heights. In contrast, we observe that while the height profile obtained by using (ii) satisfies basic sum rules, it shows little agreement with the adsorption film thickness of the DFT results. The results are verified for contact angles of 20°, 40°, and 60°.

  18. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  19. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  20. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  1. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  2. Determining hydrodynamic boundary conditions from equilibrium fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyu; Wang, Han; Qian, Tiezheng; Sheng, Ping

    2015-10-01

    The lack of a first-principles derivation has made the hydrodynamic boundary condition a classical issue for the past century. The fact that the fluid can have interfacial structures adds additional complications and ambiguities to the problem. Here we report the use of molecular dynamics to identify from equilibrium thermal fluctuations the hydrodynamic modes in a fluid confined by solid walls, thereby extending the application of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to yield not only the accurate location of the hydrodynamic boundary at the molecular scale, but also the relevant parameter value(s) for the description of the macroscopic boundary condition. We present molecular dynamics results on two examples to illustrate the application of this approach—one on the hydrophilic case and one on the hydrophobic case. It is shown that the use of the orthogonality condition of the modes can uniquely locate the hydrodynamic boundary to be inside the fluid in both cases, separated from the molecular solid-liquid interface by a small distance Δ that is a few molecules in size. The eigenvalue equation of the hydrodynamic modes directly yields the slip length, which is about equal to Δ in the hydrophilic case but is larger than Δ in the hydrophobic case. From the decay time we also obtain the bulk viscosity which is in good agreement with the value obtained from dynamic simulations. To complete the picture, we derive the Green-Kubo relation for a finite fluid system and show that the boundary fluctuations decouple from the bulk only in the infinite-fluid-channel limit; and in that limit we recover the interfacial fluctuation-dissipation theorem first presented by Bocquet and Barrat. The coupling between the bulk and the boundary fluctuations provides both the justification and the reason for the effectiveness of the present approach, which promises broad utility for probing the hydrodynamic boundary conditions relevant to structured or elastic interfaces, as well as

  3. Solids Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, C.

    2011-03-01

    Preface; 1. Shape and growth of crystals P. Nozières; 2. Instabilities of planar solidification fronts B. Caroli, C. Caroli and B. Roulet; 3. An introduction to the kinetics of first-order phase transition J. S. Langer; 4. Dendritic growth and related topics Y. Pomeau and M. Ben Amar; 5. Growth and aggregation far from equilibrium L. M. Sander; 6. Kinetic roughening of growing surfaces J. Krug and H. Spohn; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  4. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  5. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  6. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  7. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed (111) Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  8. The Combination of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion Technology for Creation of Accurate Exterior and Interior Orthophotos of ST. Nicholas Baroque Church

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koska, B.; Křemen, T.

    2013-02-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology is used for creation of building documentation and 3D building model from its emerging at the turn of the millennium. Photogrammetry has even longer tradition in this field. Both technologies have some technical limitations if they are used for creation of a façade or even an interior orthophoto, but combination of both technologies seems profitable. Laser scanning can be used for creation of an accurate 3D model and photogrammetry for consequent application of high quality colour information. Both technologies were used in synergy to create the building plans, 2D drawing documentation of facades and interior views and the orthophotos of St. Nicholas Baroque church in Prague. The case study is described in details in the paper.

  9. Non-equilibrium Green's function calculation of AlGaAs-well-based and GaSb-based terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, H. Hosako, I.

    2015-03-16

    We investigate the performance of terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}As and GaSb/AlGaSb material systems to realize higher-temperature operation. Calculations with the non-equilibrium Green's function method reveal that the AlGaAs-well-based THz-QCLs do not show improved performance, mainly because of alloy scattering in the ternary compound semiconductor. The GaSb-based THz-QCLs offer clear advantages over GaAs-based THz-QCLs. Weaker longitudinal optical phonon–electron interaction in GaSb produces higher peaks in the spectral functions of the lasing levels, which enables more electrons to be accumulated in the upper lasing level.

  10. Synthesis, structure and study of azo-hydrazone tautomeric equilibrium of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(arylazo)-6-amino-uracil derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Li, Bing-Han; Lin, Chia-Her; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Azo dyes, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(arylazo)-6-aminouracil (aryl = -C6H5 (1), -p-CH3C6H4 (2), -p-ClC6H4 (3), -p-NO2C6H4 (4)) were prepared and characterized by UV-vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and single crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis. In the light of spectroscopic analysis it evidences that of the tautomeric forms, the azo-enamine-keto (A) form is the predominant form in the solid state whereas in different solvents it is the hydrazone-imine-keto (B) form. The study also reveals that the hydrazone-imine-keto (B) form exists in an equilibrium mixture with its anionic form in various organic solvents. The solvatochromic and photophysical properties of the dyes in various solvents with different hydrogen bonding parameter were investigated. The dyes exhibit positive solvatochromic property on moving from polar protic to polar aprotic solvents. They are fluorescent active molecules and exhibit high intense fluorescent peak in some solvents like DMSO and DMF. It has been demonstrated that the anionic form of the hydrazone-imine form is responsible for the high intense fluorescent peak. In addition, the acid-base equilibrium in between neutral and anionic form of hydrazone-imine form in buffer solution of varying pH was investigated and evaluated the pKa values of the dyes by making the use of UV-vis spectroscopic methods. The determined acid dissociation constant (pKa) values increase according to the sequence of 2 > 1 > 3 > 4.

  11. Embarras de richesses – It is not good to be too anomalous: Accurate structure of selenourea, a chiral crystal of planar molecules

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhipu

    2017-01-01

    Selenourea, SeC(NH2)2, recently found an application as a derivatization reagent providing a significant anomalous diffraction signal used for phasing macromolecular crystal structures. The crystal structure of selenourea itself was solved about 50 years ago, from data recorded on films and evaluated by eye and refined to R = 0.15 with errors of bond lengths and angles about 0.1 Å and 6°. In the current work this structure is re-evaluated on the basis of synchrotron data and refined to R1 = 0.021 with bond and angle errors about 0.007 Å and 0.5°. The nine planar molecules of selenourea pack either in the P31 or in the P32 unit cell. All unique molecules are connected by a complex network of Se•••H-N hydrogen bonds and Se•••Se contacts. The packing of selenourea molecules is highly pseudosymmetric, approximating either of the P31(2)12, R3, and R32 space groups. Because the overwhelming majority of diffracted X-ray intensity originates form the anomalously scattering selenium atoms, the measurable anomalous Bijvoet differences are diminished and it was not possible to solve this crystal structure based on the anomalous signal alone. PMID:28207770

  12. GlycoMinestruct: a new bioinformatics tool for highly accurate mapping of the human N-linked and O-linked glycoproteomes by incorporating structural features

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyi; Li, Chen; Revote, Jerico; Zhang, Yang; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in cell-cell adhesion, ligand-binding and subcellular recognition. Current approaches for predicting protein glycosylation are primarily based on sequence-derived features, while little work has been done to systematically assess the importance of structural features to glycosylation prediction. Here, we propose a novel bioinformatics method called GlycoMinestruct(http://glycomine.erc.monash.edu/Lab/GlycoMine_Struct/) for improved prediction of human N- and O-linked glycosylation sites by combining sequence and structural features in an integrated computational framework with a two-step feature-selection strategy. Experiments indicated that GlycoMinestruct outperformed NGlycPred, the only predictor that incorporated both sequence and structure features, achieving AUC values of 0.941 and 0.922 for N- and O-linked glycosylation, respectively, on an independent test dataset. We applied GlycoMinestruct to screen the human structural proteome and obtained high-confidence predictions for N- and O-linked glycosylation sites. GlycoMinestruct can be used as a powerful tool to expedite the discovery of glycosylation events and substrates to facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental studies. PMID:27708373

  13. FILMPAR: A parallel algorithm designed for the efficient and accurate computation of thin film flow on functional surfaces containing micro-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Thompson, H. M.; Gaskell, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    , industrial and physical applications. However, despite recent modelling advances, the accurate numerical solution of the equations governing such problems is still at a relatively early stage. Indeed, recent studies employing a simplifying long-wave approximation have shown that highly efficient numerical methods are necessary to solve the resulting lubrication equations in order to achieve the level of grid resolution required to accurately capture the effects of micro- and nano-scale topographical features. Solution method: A portable parallel multigrid algorithm has been developed for the above purpose, for the particular case of flow over submerged topographical features. Within the multigrid framework adopted, a W-cycle is used to accelerate convergence in respect of the time dependent nature of the problem, with relaxation sweeps performed using a fixed number of pre- and post-Red-Black Gauss-Seidel Newton iterations. In addition, the algorithm incorporates automatic adaptive time-stepping to avoid the computational expense associated with repeated time-step failure. Running time: 1.31 minutes using 128 processors on BlueGene/P with a problem size of over 16.7 million mesh points.

  14. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation.

  15. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  16. Tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states with axisymmetric boundary and a 3D helical core.

    PubMed

    Cooper, W A; Graves, J P; Pochelon, A; Sauter, O; Villard, L

    2010-07-16

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium states with imposed axisymmetric boundary are computed in which a spontaneous bifurcation develops to produce an internal three-dimensional (3D) configuration with a helical structure in addition to the standard axisymmetric system. Equilibrium states with similar MHD energy levels are shown to develop very different geometric structures. The helical equilibrium states resemble saturated internal kink mode structures.

  17. Tokamak Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibrium States with Axisymmetric Boundary and a 3D Helical Core

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pochelon, A.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.

    2010-07-16

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium states with imposed axisymmetric boundary are computed in which a spontaneous bifurcation develops to produce an internal three-dimensional (3D) configuration with a helical structure in addition to the standard axisymmetric system. Equilibrium states with similar MHD energy levels are shown to develop very different geometric structures. The helical equilibrium states resemble saturated internal kink mode structures.

  18. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Patrizia; Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement.

  19. Accurate Assessment of the Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalytic Activity of Mn/Polypyrrole Nanocomposites Based on Rotating Disk Electrode Measurements, Complemented with Multitechnique Structural Characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carolina Ramírez; Taurino, Antonietta; Bozzini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the quantitative assessment of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity of electrodeposited Mn/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposites for alkaline aqueous solutions, based on the Rotating Disk Electrode (RDE) method and accompanied by structural characterizations relevant to the establishment of structure-function relationships. The characterization of Mn/PPy films is addressed to the following: (i) morphology, as assessed by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM); (ii) local electrical conductivity, as measured by Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM); and (iii) molecular structure, accessed by Raman Spectroscopy; these data provide the background against which the electrocatalytic activity can be rationalised. For comparison, the properties of Mn/PPy are gauged against those of graphite, PPy, and polycrystalline-Pt (poly-Pt). Due to the literature lack of accepted protocols for precise catalytic activity measurement at poly-Pt electrode in alkaline solution using the RDE methodology, we have also worked on the obtainment of an intralaboratory benchmark by evidencing some of the time-consuming parameters which drastically affect the reliability and repeatability of the measurement. PMID:28042491

  20. Scaling up the Single Transducer Thickness-Independent Ultrasonic Imaging Method for Accurate Characterization of Microstructural Gradients in Monolithic and Composite Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Carney, Dorothy V.; Baaklini, George Y.; Bodis, James R.; Rauser, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging that uses back surface reflections to gauge volumetric material quality is highly suited for quantitative characterization of microstructural gradients including those due to pore fraction, density, fiber fraction, and chemical composition variations. However, a weakness of conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic velocity/time-of-flight imaging is that the image shows the effects of thickness as well as microstructural variations unless the part is uniformly thick. This limits this imaging method's usefulness in practical applications. Prior studies have described a pulse-echo time-of-flight-based ultrasonic imaging method that requires using a single transducer in combination with a reflector plate placed behind samples that eliminates the effect of thickness variation in the image. In those studies, this method was successful at isolating ultrasonic variations due to material microstructure in plate-like samples of silicon nitride, metal matrix composite, and polymer matrix composite. In this study, the method is engineered for inspection of more complex-shaped structures-those having (hollow) tubular/curved geometry. The experimental inspection technique and results are described as applied to (1) monolithic mullite ceramic and polymer matrix composite 'proof-of-concept' tubular structures that contain machined patches of various depths and (2) as-manufactured monolithic silicon nitride ceramic and silicon carbide/silicon carbide composite tubular structures that might be used in 'real world' applications.

  1. Accurate Prediction of Glucuronidation of Structurally Diverse Phenolics by Human UGT1A9 Using Combined Experimental and In Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baojian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Shuxing; Hu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The catalytic selectivity of human UGT1A9, an important membrane-bound enzyme catalyzing glucuronidation of xenobiotics were determined experimentally using 145 phenolics, and analyzed by 3D-QSAR methods. Methods The catalytic efficiency of UGT1A9 was determined by kinetic profiling. Quantitative structure activity relationships were analyzed using the CoMFA and CoMSIA techniques. Molecular alignment of the substrate structures was made by superimposing the glucuronidation site and its adjacent aromatic ring to achieve maximal steric overlap. For a substrate with multiple active glucuronidation sites, each site was considered as a separate substrate. Results The 3D-QSAR analyses produced statistically reliable models with good predictive power (CoMFA: q2 = 0.548, r2= 0.949, r2pred = 0.775; CoMSIA: q2 = 0.579, r2= 0.876, r2pred = 0.700). The contour coefficient maps were applied to elucidate structural features among substrates that are responsible for the selectivity differences. Furthermore, the contour coefficient maps were overlaid in the catalytic pocket of a homology model of UGT1A9; this enabled us to identify the UGT1A9 catalytic pocket with a high degree of confidence. Conclusion The CoMFA/CoMSIA models can predict the substrate selectivity and in vitro clearance of UGT1A9. Our findings also provide a possible molecular basis for understanding UGT1A9 functions and its substrate selectivity. PMID:22302521

  2. Accurate prediction of higher-level electronic structure energies for large databases using neural networks, Hartree-Fock energies, and small subsets of the database.

    PubMed

    Malshe, M; Pukrittayakamee, A; Raff, L M; Hagan, M; Bukkapatnam, S; Komanduri, R

    2009-09-28

    A novel method is presented that significantly reduces the computational bottleneck of executing high-level, electronic structure calculations of the energies and their gradients for a large database that adequately samples the configuration space of importance for systems containing more than four atoms that are undergoing multiple, simultaneous reactions in several energetically open channels. The basis of the method is the high-degree of correlation that generally exists between the Hartree-Fock (HF) and higher-level electronic structure energies. It is shown that if the input vector to a neural network (NN) includes both the configuration coordinates and the HF energies of a small subset of the database, MP4(SDQ) energies with the same basis set can be predicted for the entire database using only the HF and MP4(SDQ) energies for the small subset and the HF energies for the remainder of the database. The predictive error is shown to be less than or equal to the NN fitting error if a NN is fitted to the entire database of higher-level electronic structure energies. The general method is applied to the computation of MP4(SDQ) energies of 68,308 configurations that comprise the database for the simultaneous, unimolecular decomposition of vinyl bromide into six different reaction channels. The predictive accuracy of the method is investigated by employing successively smaller subsets of the database to train the NN to predict the MP4(SDQ) energies of the remaining configurations of the database. The results indicate that for this system, the subset can be as small as 8% of the total number of configurations in the database without loss of accuracy beyond that expected if a NN is employed to fit the higher-level energies for the entire database. The utilization of this procedure is shown to save about 78% of the total computational time required for the execution of the MP4(SDQ) calculations. The sampling error involved with selection of the subset is shown to be

  3. Accurate prediction of higher-level electronic structure energies for large databases using neural networks, Hartree-Fock energies, and small subsets of the database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malshe, M.; Pukrittayakamee, A.; Raff, L. M.; Hagan, M.; Bukkapatnam, S.; Komanduri, R.

    2009-09-01

    A novel method is presented that significantly reduces the computational bottleneck of executing high-level, electronic structure calculations of the energies and their gradients for a large database that adequately samples the configuration space of importance for systems containing more than four atoms that are undergoing multiple, simultaneous reactions in several energetically open channels. The basis of the method is the high-degree of correlation that generally exists between the Hartree-Fock (HF) and higher-level electronic structure energies. It is shown that if the input vector to a neural network (NN) includes both the configuration coordinates and the HF energies of a small subset of the database, MP4(SDQ) energies with the same basis set can be predicted for the entire database using only the HF and MP4(SDQ) energies for the small subset and the HF energies for the remainder of the database. The predictive error is shown to be less than or equal to the NN fitting error if a NN is fitted to the entire database of higher-level electronic structure energies. The general method is applied to the computation of MP4(SDQ) energies of 68 308 configurations that comprise the database for the simultaneous, unimolecular decomposition of vinyl bromide into six different reaction channels. The predictive accuracy of the method is investigated by employing successively smaller subsets of the database to train the NN to predict the MP4(SDQ) energies of the remaining configurations of the database. The results indicate that for this system, the subset can be as small as 8% of the total number of configurations in the database without loss of accuracy beyond that expected if a NN is employed to fit the higher-level energies for the entire database. The utilization of this procedure is shown to save about 78% of the total computational time required for the execution of the MP4(SDQ) calculations. The sampling error involved with selection of the subset is shown to be

  4. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  5. Equilibrium of nematic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A variational scheme is proposed which allows the derivation of a concise and elegant formulation of the equilibrium equations for closed fluid membranes, endowed with a nematic microstructure. The nematic order is described by an in-plane nematic director and a degree of orientation, as customary in the theory of uniaxial nematics. The only constitutive ingredient in this scheme is a free-energy density which depends on the vesicle geometry and order parameters. The stress and the couple stress tensors related to this free-energy density are provided. As an application of the proposed scheme, a certain number of special theories are deduced: soap bubbles, lipid vesicles, chiral and achiral nematic membranes, and nematics on curved substrates.

  6. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  7. Equilibrium solutions for microscopic stochastic systems in population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lachowicz, Mirosław; Ryabukha, Tatiana

    2013-06-01

    The present paper deals with the problem of existence of equilibrium solutions of equations describing the general population dynamics at the microscopic level of modified Liouville equation (individually--based model) corresponding to a Markov jump process. We show the existence of factorized equilibrium solutions and discuss uniqueness. The conditions guaranteeing uniqueness or non-uniqueness are proposed under the assumption of periodic structures.

  8. Accurate and efficient representation of intra­molecular energy in ab initio generation of crystal structures. I. Adaptive local approximate models

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Isaac; Adjiman, Claire S.; Pantelides, Constantinos C.

    2016-01-01

    The global search stage of crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods requires a fine balance between accuracy and computational cost, particularly for the study of large flexible molecules. A major improvement in the accuracy and cost of the intramolecular energy function used in the CrystalPredictor II [Habgood et al. (2015 ▸). J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 1957–1969] program is presented, where the most efficient use of computational effort is ensured via the use of adaptive local approximate model (LAM) placement. The entire search space of the relevant molecule’s conformations is initially evaluated using a coarse, low accuracy grid. Additional LAM points are then placed at appropriate points determined via an automated process, aiming to minimize the computational effort expended in high-energy regions whilst maximizing the accuracy in low-energy regions. As the size, complexity and flexibility of molecules increase, the reduction in computational cost becomes marked. This improvement is illustrated with energy calculations for benzoic acid and the ROY molecule, and a CSP study of molecule (XXVI) from the sixth blind test [Reilly et al. (2016 ▸). Acta Cryst. B72, 439–459], which is challenging due to its size and flexibility. Its known experimental form is successfully predicted as the global minimum. The computational cost of the study is tractable without the need to make unphysical simplifying assumptions. PMID:27910837

  9. Band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids using accurate Kohn-Sham potentials with self-interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Krieger, J.B. ); Norman, M.R. ); Iafrate, G.J. )

    1991-11-15

    The optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method and a method developed recently by Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) are applied to the band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids employing the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The resulting band gaps from both calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental values. The discrepancies are typically within a few percent with results that are nearly the same as those of previously published orbital-dependent multipotential SIC calculations, whereas the LSD results underestimate the band gaps by as much as 40%. As in the LSD---and it is believed to be the case even for the exact Kohn-Sham potential---both the OEP and KLI predict valence-band widths which are narrower than those of experiment. In all cases, the KLI method yields essentially the same results as the OEP.

  10. Interspecies scaling of urinary excretory amounts of nine drugs belonging to different therapeutic areas with diverse chemical structures - accurate prediction of the human urinary excretory amounts.

    PubMed

    Bhamidipati, Ravi Kanth; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2017-02-01

    1. The human urinary excretory amounts of total drug (parent + metabolites) were predicted for nine drugs with diverse chemical structures using simple allometry. The drugs used for scaling were cephapirin, olanzapine, labetolol, carisbamate, voriconazole, tofacitinib, nevirapine, ropinirole, and cyclindole. 2. The traditional allometric scaling was attempted using Y = aW(b) relationship. The corresponding predicted urinary amounts were converted into % recovery by using appropriate human dose. Appropriate statistical tests comprising of fold-difference (predicted/observed values) and error calculations (MAE and RMSE) were performed. 3. The interspecies scaling of all nine drugs tested showed excellent correlation (r > 0.9672). The predictions for eight out of nine drugs (exception was cephaphirin) were contained within 0.80-1.25 fold-differences. The MAE and RMSE were within ± 18% and 14.64%, respectively. 4. The present work supported the potential application of prospective allometry scaling to predict the urinary excretory amounts of the total drug and gauge any issues for the renal handling of the total drug.

  11. Equilibrium Policy Proposals with Abstentions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    AB I I I EQUILIBRIUM POLICY PROPOSALS WITH ABSTENTIONS* by Peter Coughlin** 1. Introduction Spatial analyses of economic policy formation in elections...alternative in S at which there is a local equilibrium when the incumbent must defend the status quo. 5. Applications to Related Spatial Voting Models...York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Hestenes, M. [19751, Optimization Theoy, New York: Wiley. Hinich, M. [1977], " Equilibrium in Spatial Voting: The Median

  12. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  13. Complexation of Ln(3+) Ions with Cyclam Dipicolinates: A Small Bridge that Makes Huge Differences in Structure, Equilibrium, and Kinetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Aurora; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tripier, Raphaël; Tircsó, Gyula; Kálmán, Ferenc Krisztián; Bényei, Attila Csaba; Tóth, Imre; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2016-03-07

    The coordination properties toward the lanthanide ions of two macrocyclic ligands based on a cyclam platform containing picolinate pendant arms have been investigated. The synthesis of the ligands was achieved by using the well-known bis-aminal chemistry. One of the cyclam derivatives (cb-tedpa(2-)) is reinforced with a cross-bridge unit, which results in exceptionally inert [Ln(cb-tedpa)](+) complexes. The X-ray structures of the [La(cb-tedpa)Cl], [Gd(cb-tedpa)](+), and [Lu(Me2tedpa)](+) complexes indicate octadentate binding of the ligands to the metal ions. The analysis of the Yb(3+)-induced shifts in [Yb(Me2tedpa)](+) indicates that this complex presents a solution structure very similar to that observed in the solid state for the Lu(3+) analogue. The X-ray structures of [La(H2Me2tedpa)2](3+) and [Yb(H2Me2tedpa)2](3+) complexes confirm the exocyclic coordination of the metal ions, which gives rise to coordination polymers with the metal coordination environment being fulfilled by oxygen atoms of the picolinate groups and water molecules. The X-ray structure of [Gd(Hcb-tedpa)2](+) also indicates exocyclic coordination that in this case results in a discrete structure with an eight-coordinated metal ion. The nonreinforced complexes [Ln(Me2tedpa)](+) were prepared and isolated as chloride salts in nonaqueous media. However, these complexes were found to undergo dissociation in aqueous solution, except in the case of the complexes with the smallest Ln(3+) ions (Ln(3+) = Yb(3+) and Lu(3+)). A DFT investigation shows that the increased stability of the [Ln(Me2tedpa)](+) complexes in solution across the lanthanide series is the result of an increased binding energy of the ligand due to the increased charge density of the Ln(3+) ion.

  14. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  15. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  16. Understanding water content data in cottons equilibrated to moisture equilibrium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accurate measurement of moisture in cottons conditioned to moisture equilibrium and understanding the data are prerequisites to the development of applications of the data. In this study, moisture is measured by Karl Fischer Titration, which is highly selective for water in cotton; the results ...

  17. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  18. Equilibrium states for hyperbolic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Vanessa; Viana, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    We prove the existence of finitely many ergodic equilibrium states for local homeomorphisms and hyperbolic potentials. We also deal with partially hyperbolic skew-products over non-uniformly expanding maps with uniform contraction on the fibre. For these systems we prove the existence and finiteness of the equilibrium states associated with a class of Hölder continuous potentials.

  19. Automated method for determination of dissolved organic carbon-water distribution constants of structurally diverse pollutants using pre-equilibrium solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ripszam, Matyas; Haglund, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays a key role in determining the environmental fate of semivolatile organic environmental contaminants. The goal of the present study was to develop a method using commercially available hardware to rapidly characterize the sorption properties of DOC in water samples. The resulting method uses negligible-depletion direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Its performance was evaluated using Nordic reference fulvic acid and 40 priority environmental contaminants that cover a wide range of physicochemical properties. Two SPME fibers had to be used to cope with the span of properties, 1 coated with polydimethylsiloxane and 1 coated with polystyrene divinylbenzene polydimethylsiloxane, for nonpolar and semipolar contaminants, respectively. The measured DOC-water distribution constants showed reasonably good reproducibility (standard deviation ≤ 0.32) and good correlation (R(2)  = 0.80) with log octanol-water partition coefficients for nonpolar persistent organic pollutants. The sample pretreatment is limited to filtration, and the method is easy to adjust to different DOC concentrations. These experiments also utilized the latest SPME automation that largely decreases total cycle time (to 20 min or shorter) and increases sample throughput, which is advantageous in cases when many samples of DOC must be characterized or when the determinations must be performed quickly, for example, to avoid precipitation, aggregation, and other changes of DOC structure and properties. The data generated by this method are valuable as a basis for transport and fate modeling studies.

  20. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  1. Interregional equilibrium with heterogeneous labor.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Perrot, A; Thisse J-f

    1996-02-01

    "The impact of labor migration on interregional equilibrium is studied when workers are heterogeneous in productivity and regional mobility. The skilled respond to market disequilibrium by moving into the most attractive region. The unskilled are immobile in the short-run and move with the skilled in the long-run. Both regions have a neoclassical production function affected by an externality depending on the number of skilled. Workers move according to the utility differential when regional amenities vary with population or according to the wage differential. The equilibrium pattern depends on the unskilled's mobility and on migration incentives. Typically, regional imbalance characterizes the equilibrium which is often suboptimal."

  2. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    . Benzhydrylium ions (diarylcarbenium ions) with para- and meta-substituents are used as reference compounds for these investigations, because their Lewis acidities and electrophilicities can be varied by many orders of magnitude, while the steric surroundings of the reaction centers are kept constant. The rate constants for their reactions with nucleophiles correlate linearly over a wide range with the Lewis acidities of the benzhydrylium ions: from slow reactions with late transition states to very fast reactions with early, reactant-like transition states (including reactions which proceed without an enthalpic barrier, ΔH(⧧) = 0). Thus, unequivocal evidence is obtained that even within a series of closely related reactions, the Leffler-Hammond α cannot be a measure for the position of the transition state. Differences in intrinsic barriers lead to deviations from the linear rate-equilibrium correlations and give rise to counterintuitive phenomena. Thus, 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) reacts with lower intrinsic barriers than 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP) and, therefore, is a stronger nucleophile as well as a better nucleofuge than DMAP. Common synthetically used SN2 reactions are presented, in which weak nucleophiles replace stronger ones. Whereas solvolysis rates of alkoxy- and alkyl-substituted benzhydryl derivatives correlate linearly with the Lewis acidities of the resulting carbenium ions, this is not the case for amino-substituted benzhydrylium ions, where differences in intrinsic barriers play a major role. The common rule that a structural variation, which increases the electrophilicity of a carbocation at the same time reduces its electrofugality, does not hold any longer. The need to systematically analyze the role of intrinsic barriers is emphasized.

  3. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  4. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  5. Simulations for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddle, Penelope A.; White, Margaret Dawn; Rogers, Fiona

    2000-07-01

    This paper outlines a systematic approach to teaching chemical equilibrium using simulation experiments that address most known alternate conceptions in the topic. Graphs drawn using the data from the simulations are identical to those obtained using real experimental data for reactions that go to equilibrium. This allows easy mapping of the analogy to the target. The requirements for the simulations are simple and inexpensive, making them accessible to even the poorest schools. The simulations can be adapted for all levels, from pupils who are first encountering equilibrium through students in tertiary education to qualified teachers who have experienced difficulty in teaching the topic. The simulations were piloted on four very different audiences. Minor modifications were then made before the Equilibrium Games as reported in this paper were tested on three groups of subjects: a Grade 12 class, college students, and university Chemistry I students. Marked improvements in understanding of the concept were shown in two of the three sets of subjects.

  6. The structure and development of avian lumbosacral specializations of the vertebral canal and the spinal cord with special reference to a possible function as a sense organ of equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Necker, R

    2005-08-01

    The avian lumbosacral vertebral column and spinal cord show a number of specializations which have recently been interpreted as a sense organ of equilibrium. This sense organ is thought to support balanced walking on the ground. Although most of the peculiar structures have been described previously, there was a need to reevaluate the specializations with regard to the possible function as a sense organ. Specializations were studied in detail in the adult pigeon. The development of the system was studied both in the pigeon (semiprecocial at hatching) and in the chicken (precocial). Specializations in the vertebral canal consist of a considerable enlargement, which is not due to an increase in the size of the spinal nervous tissue, but to a large glycogen body embedded in a dorsal rhomboid sinus. The dorsal wall of the vertebral canal shows segmented bilateral dorsal grooves, which are covered by the meninges towards the lumen of the vertebral canal leaving openings in the midline and laterally. This results in a system of lumbosacral canals which look and may function similar to the semicircular canals in the inner ear. Laterally these canals open above ventrolateral protrusions or accessory lobes of the spinal cord which contain neurons. There are large subarachnoidal cerebrospinal fluid spaces, lateral and ventral to the accessory lobes. Movement of this fluid is thought to stimulate the lobes mechanically. As to the development of avian lumbosacral specializations, main attention was given to the organization of the lobes and the adjacent fluid spaces including the dorsal canals. In the pigeon the system is far from being adult-like at hatching but maturates rapidly after hatching. In the chicken the system looks already adult-like at hatching. The implications derived from the structural findings are discussed with regard to a possible function of the lumbosacral specializations as a sense organ of equilibrium. The adult-like organization in the newly hatched

  7. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  8. A search for equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient search algorithm is described for the location of equilibrium states in a search set of states which differ from one another only by the choice of pure phases. The algorithm has three important characteristics: (1) it ignores states which have little prospect for being an improved approximation to the true equilibrium state; (2) it avoids states which lead to singular iteration equations; (3) it furnishes a search history which can provide clues to alternative search paths.

  9. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-15

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80{<=}t{<=}300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables.

  10. Sensitivity of kinetic ballooning mode instability to tokamak equilibrium implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H. S.; Xiao, Y.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Belli, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    Global, first-principles study of the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) is crucial to understand tokamak edge physics in high-confinement mode (H-mode). In contrast to the ion temperature gradient mode and trapped electron mode, the KBM is found to be very sensitive to the equilibrium implementations in gyrokinetic codes. In this paper, we show that a second-order difference in Shafranov shift or geometric coordinates, or a difference between local and global profile implementations can bring a factor of two or more discrepancy in real frequency and growth rate. This suggests that an accurate global equilibrium is required for validation of gyrokinetic KBM simulations.

  11. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  12. On determining continuum quantities of non-equilibrium processes via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao

    In this dissertation, a high-fidelity atomistic-to-continuum link for highly non-equilibrium processes has been established by making several modifications to Hardy's theory. Although Hardy's thermomechanical quantities were derived analytically to conserve mass, momentum and energy, they have not been rigorously tested and validated numerically in the past. Hence the first task was to investigate the effectiveness of ensemble averaging in removing thermal fluctuations and compare with conventional time averaging for fcc crystals simulated using both equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, where the non-equilibrium process was introduced by a shock impact. It has been found that the ensemble averaging has better convergence than time averaging due to the statistical independence of the thermomechanical quantities computed using ensemble averaging. The second task was to test the validity of Hardy's theory by checking if it is able to conserve mass, momentum and energy numerically. A few highly non-equilibrium processes were simulated using MD, including Gaussian wave and shock impact propagation in 1D and 3D fcc crystals. Based on the test results, a new normalization rule has been proposed so that the computed thermomechanical quantities can conserve the fundamental properties more accurately. To a large extent, Hardy's theory has been found to be valid regardless of the width of the localization function, the interatomic potential and crystal structure, and with and without ensemble averaging. To further test the validity of Hardy's theory for more complex non-equilibrium processes, where plastic deformation is accomplished through dislocation glide and slip band emission, a crack propagation problem in iron crystal with a pre-created center crack is simulated using MD. The computed Hardy's thermomechanical quantities can generally conserve mass, momentum and energy. Exceptions have been found around the crack region, where the

  13. The human immunodeficiency virus gp120 binding site on CD4: delineation by quantitative equilibrium and kinetic binding studies of mutants in conjunction with a high-resolution CD4 atomic structure

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The first immunoglobulin V-like domain of CD4 contains the binding site for human immunodeficiency virus gp120. Guided by the atomic structure of a two-domain CD4 fragment, we have examined gp120 interaction with informative CD4 mutants, both by equilibrium and kinetic analysis. The binding site on CD4 appears to be a surface region of about 900 A2 on the C" edge of the domain. It contains an exposed hydrophobic residue, Phe43, on the C" strand and four positively charged residues, Lys29, Lys35, Lys46, and Arg59, on the C, C', C", and D strands, respectively. Replacement of Phe43 with Ala or Ile reduces affinity for gp120 by more than 500-fold; Tyr, Trp, and Leu substitutions have smaller effects. The four positively charged side chains each make significant contributions (7-50-fold). This CD4 site may dock into a conserved hydrophobic pocket bordered by several negatively charged residues in gp120. Class II major histocompatibility complex binding includes the same region on CD4; this overlap needs to be considered in the design of inhibitors of the CD4-gp120 interaction. PMID:1500858

  14. Equilibrium Phase Behavior of Polydisperse Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolo, Moreno; Sollich, Peter

    2003-08-01

    We calculate the phase behavior of hard spheres with size polydispersity, using accurate free energies for the fluid and solid phases. Cloud and shadow curves are found exactly by the moment free energy method, but we also compute the complete phase diagram, taking full account of fractionation. In contrast to earlier, simplified treatments we find no point of equal concentration between fluid and solid or reentrant melting at higher densities. Rather, the fluid cloud curve continues to the largest polydispersity that we study (14%); from the equilibrium phase behavior a terminal polydispersity can thus be defined only for the solid, where we find it to be around 7%. At sufficiently large polydispersity, fractionation into several solid phases can occur, consistent with previous approximate calculations; we find, in addition, that coexistence of several solids with a fluid phase is also possible.

  15. ASHEE: a compressible, Equilibrium-Eulerian model for volcanic ash plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerminara, M.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Berselli, L. C.

    2015-10-01

    A new fluid-dynamic model is developed to numerically simulate the non-equilibrium dynamics of polydisperse gas-particle mixtures forming volcanic plumes. Starting from the three-dimensional N-phase Eulerian transport equations (Neri et al., 2003) for a mixture of gases and solid dispersed particles, we adopt an asymptotic expansion strategy to derive a compressible version of the first-order non-equilibrium model (Ferry and Balachandar, 2001), valid for low concentration regimes (particle volume fraction less than 10-3) and particles Stokes number (St, i.e., the ratio between their relaxation time and flow characteristic time) not exceeding about 0.2. The new model, which is called ASHEE (ASH Equilibrium Eulerian), is significantly faster than the N-phase Eulerian model while retaining the capability to describe gas-particle non-equilibrium effects. Direct numerical simulation accurately reproduce the dynamics of isotropic, compressible turbulence in subsonic regime. For gas-particle mixtures, it describes the main features of density fluctuations and the preferential concentration and clustering of particles by turbulence, thus verifying the model reliability and suitability for the numerical simulation of high-Reynolds number and high-temperature regimes in presence of a dispersed phase. On the other hand, Large-Eddy Numerical Simulations of forced plumes are able to reproduce their observed averaged and instantaneous flow properties. In particular, the self-similar Gaussian radial profile and the development of large-scale coherent structures are reproduced, including the rate of turbulent mixing and entrainment of atmospheric air. Application to the Large-Eddy Simulation of the injection of the eruptive mixture in a stratified atmosphere describes some of important features of turbulent volcanic plumes, including air entrainment, buoyancy reversal, and maximum plume height. For very fine particles (St → 0, when non-equilibrium effects are negligible) the

  16. Loss of dispersion energy changes the stability and folding/unfolding equilibrium of the Trp-cage protein.

    PubMed

    Cerný, Jirí; Vondrásek, Jirí; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-04-23

    The structure of proteins as well as their folding/unfolding equilibrium are commonly attributed to H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions. We have used the molecular dynamic simulations in an explicit water environment based on the standard empirical potential as well as more accurately (and thus also more reliably) on the QM/MM potential. The simulations where the dispersion term was suppressed have led to a substantial change of the tryptophan-cage protein structure (unfolded structure). This structure cannot fold without the dispersion energy term, whereas, if it is covered fully, the system finds its native structure relatively quickly. This implies that after such physical factors as temperature and pH, the dispersion energy is an important factor in protein structure determination as well as in the protein folding/unfolding equilibrium. The loss of dispersion also affected the R-helical structure. On the other hand, weakening the electrostatic interactions (and thus H-bonding) affected the R-helical structure only to a minor extent.

  17. Crystal structure of phospholipase A2 complex with the hydrolysis products of platelet activating factor: equilibrium binding of fatty acid and lysophospholipid-ether at the active site may be mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying H; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Berg, Otto G; Jain, Mahendra K; Bahnson, Brian J

    2002-12-17

    We have solved the 1.55 A crystal structure of the anion-assisted dimer of porcine pancreatic group IB phospholipase A2 (PLA2), complexed with the products of hydrolysis of the substrate platelet activating factor. The dimer contains five coplanar phosphate anions bound at the contact surface between the two PLA2 subunits. This structure parallels a previously reported anion-assisted dimer that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate of PLA2 bound to a substrate interface [Pan, Y. H., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 609-617]. The dimer structure has a molecule of the product acetate bound in subunit A and the other product 1-octadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC-ether) to subunit B. Therefore, this structure is of the two individual product binary complexes and not of a ternary complex with both products in one active site of PLA2. Protein crystals with bound products were only obtained by cocrystallization starting from the initial substrate. In contrast, an alternate crystal form was obtained when PLA2 was cocrystallized with LPC-ether and succinate, and this crystal form did not contain bound products. The product bound structure has acetate positioned in the catalytic site of subunit A such that one of its oxygen atoms is located 3.5 A from the catalytic calcium. Likewise, a longer than typical Ca-to-Gly(32) carbonyl distance of 3.4 A results in a final Ca coordination that is four-coordinate and has distorted geometry. The other oxygen of acetate makes hydrogen bonds with N(delta)(1)-His(48), O(delta)(1)-Asp(49), and the catalytic assisting water (w7). In contrast, the glycerophosphocholine headgroup of LPC-ether in subunit B makes no contacts with calcium or with the catalytic residues His(48) or Asp(49). The tail of the LPC-ether is located near the active site pocket with the last nine carbons of the sn-1- acyl chain refined in two alternate conformations. The remaining atoms of the LPC-ether product have been modeled into the solvent channel but have their

  18. A versatile phenomenological model for the S-shaped temperature dependence of photoluminescence energy for an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Porwal, S.; Singh, S. D.; Sharma, T. K.; Ghosh, Sandip; Oak, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) peak energy of bulk and quantum well (QW) structures is studied by using a new phenomenological model for including the effect of localized states. In general an anomalous S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is observed for many materials which is usually associated with the localization of excitons in band-tail states that are formed due to potential fluctuations. Under such conditions, the conventional models of Varshni, Viña and Passler fail to replicate the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provide inconsistent and unrealistic values of the fitting parameters. The proposed formalism persuasively reproduces the S-shaped temperature dependence of the PL peak energy and provides an accurate determination of the exciton localization energy in bulk and QW structures along with the appropriate values of material parameters. An example of a strained InAs0.38P0.62/InP QW is presented by performing detailed temperature and excitation intensity dependent PL measurements and subsequent in-depth analysis using the proposed model. Versatility of the new formalism is tested on a few other semiconductor materials, e.g. GaN, nanotextured GaN, AlGaN and InGaN, which are known to have a significant contribution from the localized states. A quantitative evaluation of the fractional contribution of the localized states is essential for understanding the temperature dependence of the PL peak energy of bulk and QW well structures having a large contribution of the band-tail states.

  19. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  20. Escape rate of active particles in the effective equilibrium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Wittmann, R.; Brader, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The escape rate of a Brownian particle over a potential barrier is accurately described by the Kramers theory. A quantitative theory explicitly taking the activity of Brownian particles into account has been lacking due to the inherently out-of-equilibrium nature of these particles. Using an effective equilibrium approach [Farage et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 042310 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.042310] we study the escape rate of active particles over a potential barrier and compare our analytical results with data from direct numerical simulation of the colored noise Langevin equation. The effective equilibrium approach generates an effective potential that, when used as input to Kramers rate theory, provides results in excellent agreement with the simulation data.

  1. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description.

  2. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  3. "Non-equilibrium" block copolymer micelles with glassy cores: a predictive approach based on theory of equilibrium micelles.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2015-07-01

    Micelles generated in water from most amphiphilic block copolymers are widely recognized to be non-equilibrium structures. Typically, the micelles are prepared by a kinetic process, first allowing molecular scale dissolution of the block copolymer in a common solvent that likes both the blocks and then gradually replacing the common solvent by water to promote the hydrophobic blocks to aggregate and create the micelles. The non-equilibrium nature of the micelle originates from the fact that dynamic exchange between the block copolymer molecules in the micelle and the singly dispersed block copolymer molecules in water is suppressed, because of the glassy nature of the core forming polymer block and/or its very large hydrophobicity. Although most amphiphilic block copolymers generate such non-equilibrium micelles, no theoretical approach to a priori predict the micelle characteristics currently exists. In this work, we propose a predictive approach for non-equilibrium micelles with glassy cores by applying the equilibrium theory of micelles in two steps. In the first, we calculate the properties of micelles formed in the mixed solvent while true equilibrium prevails, until the micelle core becomes glassy. In the second step, we freeze the micelle aggregation number at this glassy state and calculate the corona dimension from the equilibrium theory of micelles. The condition when the micelle core becomes glassy is independently determined from a statistical thermodynamic treatment of diluent effect on polymer glass transition temperature. The predictions based on this "non-equilibrium" model compare reasonably well with experimental data for polystyrene-polyethylene oxide diblock copolymer, which is the most extensively studied system in the literature. In contrast, the application of the equilibrium model to describe such a system significantly overpredicts the micelle core and corona dimensions and the aggregation number. The non-equilibrium model suggests ways to

  4. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  5. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  6. Equilibrium Principles: A Game for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, Lionel J., Jr.; Lewis, Don L.

    1999-04-01

    The laboratory exercise is a game using marked sugar cubes as dice. The game emphasizes the dynamic character of equilibrium. Forward and reverse rate-constant values are used to calculate an equilibrium constant and to predict equilibrium populations. Predicted equilibrium populations are compared with experimental results.

  7. Supersonic Jet Mixing with Vibrational Non-Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Heath H.; Kc, Utsav; Varghese, Philip L.; Clemens, Noel T.

    2013-11-01

    A new study has been initiated to study the effect of vibrational non-equilibrium on turbulent mixing and combustion. This work is relevant to high-speed, high-temperature environments, such as scramjet combustors, where shocks and mixing can lead to high degrees of vibrational non-equilibrium. In this experimental study, a new facility has been developed that consists of a perfectly-expanded axisymmetric Mach 1.5 turbulent air jet issuing into an electrically heated co-flow of air for precise control of the temperature and thus vibrationally-active population. This hot flow can be brought into non-equilibrium when the co-flow fluid is rapidly mixed with the colder supersonic jet fluid. Effects of the non-equilibrium can be isolated by replacing the nitrogen in the flow with argon. The degree of non-equilibrium in the jet shear layers is quantified by using high-spectral resolution time-averaged spontaneous Raman scattering centered on the Stokes-shifted Q branch line of N2 at 607 nm. In this first phase of the study, the effect of non-equilibrium on the mixing field will be investigated, but future work will focus on H2-air combustion. Planar Rayleigh thermometry is utilized to investigate the effects of vibrational non-equilibrium on the turbulent structures and thermal dissipation field. This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under BRI grant FA9550-12-0460.

  8. Chemical equilibrium. [maximizing entropy of gas system to derive relations between thermodynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The entropy of a gas system with the number of particles subject to external control is maximized to derive relations between the thermodynamic variables that obtain at equilibrium. These relations are described in terms of the chemical potential, defined as equivalent partial derivatives of entropy, energy, enthalpy, free energy, or free enthalpy. At equilibrium, the change in total chemical potential must vanish. This fact is used to derive the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions in terms of the partition functions of the species involved in the reaction. Thus the equilibrium constants can be determined accurately, just as other thermodynamic properties, from a knowledge of the energy levels and degeneracies for the gas species involved. These equilibrium constants permit one to calculate the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures of chemically reacting species that occur in gas mixtures at any given condition of pressure and temperature or volume and temperature.

  9. Accurate Crystal Structure Refinement of La{sub 3}Ta{sub 0.25}Zr{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 5.25}O{sub 14}

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P.; Chitra, R.; Choudhury, R. R.; Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Simonov, V. I.

    2010-11-15

    An accurate X-ray diffraction study of a La{sub 3}Ta{sub 0.25}Zr{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 5.25}O{sub 14} single crystal (a = 8.2574(4) A, c = 5.1465(4) A, sp. gr. P321, Z = 1, R/R{sub w} = 0.62/0.57% for 4144 unique reflections and 91 parameters) has been performed with a simultaneous neutron diffraction analysis. Tantalum, zirconium, and gallium atoms are found to occupy the mixed octahedral position (symmetry 32). Gallium atoms and a few zirconium atoms are in the position on axis 2 in the tetrahedron. The tetrahedral position on axis 3 is completely occupied by gallium atoms, while the large polyhedron on axis 2 is occupied by lanthanum atoms. The high resolution and averaging of the results obtained in two independent X-ray experiments with the same sample provided accu- rate structural data, in particular, on the anharmonicity of thermal atomic vibrations (atomic displacements). The X-ray and neutron diffraction data on the atomic displacements are compared.

  10. Structure, dynamics, and hydration of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)10, in aqueous media: a chemical equilibrium analysis of triple helix-to-single coil transition.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Minakawa, Ayako; Okuyama, Kenji

    2009-10-29

    The structure, dynamics, and hydration behavior of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)(10) (PPG10), were investigated in pure water and dilute acetic acid over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric relaxation (DR) techniques that spanned frequencies from 1 kHz to 20 GHz. All samples showed pronounced dielectric dispersion with two major relaxation processes around 3 MHz and 20 GHz. Because DR measurements sensitively probe dipoles and their dynamics, the structures and ionization states of the carboxy and amino termini of aqueous PPG10 were precisely determined from the relaxation times and strengths in the 3 MHz frequency range. In solution, PPG10 formed mixtures of monodisperse rods as triple helices with lengths and diameters of 8.6 and 1.5 nm, respectively, and monomeric random coils with radii of approximately 1.4 nm. Ionization of the C-terminus was suppressed by the addition of acetic acid in both states. The fraction of random coils (f(coil)) was found to be a function of temperature (T) and the concentration of PPG10 (c). At low temperatures, small f(coil) values were found, which increased with temperature to reach f(coil) = 1 at approximately 60 degrees C, irrespective of c. This phenomenon, well-known as a triple helix-to-single coil transition, is discussed on the basis of the chemical reaction, (PPG10)(3) <==> 3PPG10, with an equilibrium constant of K = 3(c/55.6)(2)f(coil)(3)(1 - f(coil))(-1). The standard enthalpy change evaluated from Arrhenius plots (ln K versus T(-1)) was found to change dramatically at the same transition temperature that was previously determined by using optical rotation experiments. The other major DR process, observed at approximately 20 GHz, was assigned to free and hydrated water molecules and used to determine the average hydration number (m) per PPG10. The m values for the triple helix and random coil state at 25 degrees C were evaluated to be m(th) = 60-70 and m(coil) = 250-270. The m

  11. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  12. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  13. Impact of the molecular structure and adsorption mode of D-π-A dye sensitizers with a pyridyl group in dye-sensitized solar cells on the adsorption equilibrium constant for dye-adsorption on TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Yousuke; Yamaguchi, Naoya; Ohshita, Joji; Harima, Yutaka

    2016-12-07

    D-π-A dyes NI-4 bearing a pyridyl group, YNI-1 bearing two pyridyl groups and YNI-2 bearing two thienylpyridyl groups as the anchoring group on the TiO2 surface have been developed as dye sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), where NI-4 and YNI-2 can adsorb onto the TiO2 electrode through the formation of the coordinate bond between the pyridyl group of the dye and the Lewis acid site (exposed Ti(n+) cations) on the TiO2 surface, but YNI-1 is predominantly adsorbed on the TiO2 electrode through the formation of the hydrogen bond between the pyridyl group of the dye and the Brønsted acid sites (surface-bound hydroxyl groups, Ti-OH) on the TiO2 surface. The difference in the dye-adsorption mode among the three dyes on the TiO2 surface has been investigated from the adsorption equilibrium constant (Kad) based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherms. It was found that the Kad values of YNI-1 and YNI-2 are higher than that of NI-4, and more interestingly, the Kad value of YNI-2 is higher than that of YNI-1. This work demonstrates that that for the D-π-A dye sensitizers with the pyridyl group as the anchoring group to the TiO2 surface the number of pyridyl groups and the dye-adsorption mode on the TiO2 electrode as well as the molecular structure of the dye sensitizer affect the Kad value for the adsorption of the dye to the TiO2 electrode, that is, resulting in a difference in the Kad value among the D-π-A dye sensitizers NI-4, YNI-1 and YNI-2.

  14. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  15. Equilibrium 2H/1H fractionation in organic molecules: III. Cyclic ketones and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Sessions, Alex L.; Nielsen, Robert J.; Goddard, William A.

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative interpretation of stable hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H) in organic compounds is greatly aided by knowledge of the relevant equilibrium fractionation factors (ɛeq). Previous efforts have combined experimental measurements and hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to accurately predict equilibrium fractionations in linear (acyclic) organic molecules (Wang et al., 2009a,b), but the calibration produced by that study is not applicable to cyclic compounds. Here we report experimental measurements of equilibrium 2H/1H fractionation in six cyclic ketones, and use those data to evaluate DFT calculations of fractionation in diverse monocyclic and polycyclic compounds commonly found in sedimentary organic matter and petroleum. At 25, 50, and 75 °C, the experimentally measured ɛeq values for secondary and tertiary Hα in isotopic equilibrium with water are in the ranges of -130‰ to -150‰ and +10‰ to -40‰ respectively. Measured data are similar to DFT calculations of ɛeq for axial Hα but not equatorial Hα. In tertiary Cα positions with methyl substituents, this can be understood as a result of the methyl group forcing Hα atoms into a dominantly axial position. For secondary Cα positions containing both axial and equatorial Hα atoms, we propose that axial Hα exchanges with water significantly faster than the equatorial Hα does, due to the hyperconjugation-stabilized transition state. Interconversion of axial and equatorial positions via ring flipping is much faster than isotopic exchange at either position, and as a result the steady-state isotopic composition of both H's is strongly weighted toward that of axial Hα. Based on comparison with measured ɛeq values, a total uncertainty of 10-30‰ remains for theoretical ɛeq values. Using DFT, we systematically estimated the ɛeq values for individual H positions in various cyclic structures. By summing over all individual H positions, the molecular equilibrium fractionation was

  16. The Nash Equilibrium Revisited: Chaos and Complexity Hidden in Simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    The Nash Equilibrium is a much discussed, deceptively complex, method for the analysis of non-cooperative games (McLennan and Berg, 2005). If one reads many of the commonly available definitions the description of the Nash Equilibrium is deceptively simple in appearance. Modern research has discovered a number of new and important complex properties of the Nash Equilibrium, some of which remain as contemporary conundrums of extraordinary difficulty and complexity (Quint and Shubik, 1997). Among the recently discovered features which the Nash Equilibrium exhibits under various conditions are heteroclinic Hamiltonian dynamics, a very complex asymptotic structure in the context of two-player bi-matrix games and a number of computationally complex or computationally intractable features in other settings (Sato, Akiyama and Farmer, 2002). This paper reviews those findings and then suggests how they may inform various market prediction strategies.

  17. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures: equilibrium hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics at the ground state and the infrared absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2011-07-28

    We present a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the structure and dynamics of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures. One of the methanol molecules is tagged, and its hydroxyl stretch is treated quantum-mechanically, while the remaining degrees of freedom are treated classically. The adiabatic Hamiltonian of the quantum-mechanical hydroxyl is diagonalized on-the-fly to obtain the corresponding adiabatic energy levels and wave functions which depend parametrically on the instantaneous configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. The dynamics of the classical degrees of freedom are in turn affected by the quantum-mechanical state of the tagged hydroxyl stretch via the corresponding Hellmann-Feynman forces. The ability of five different force-field combinations to reproduce the experimental absorption infrared spectrum of the hydroxyl stretch is examined for different isotopomers and on a wide range of compositions. It is found that, in addition to accounting for the anharmonic nature of the hydroxyl stretch, one also has to employ polarizable force fields and account for the damping of the polarizability at short distances. The equilibrium ground-state hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics is analyzed, and its signature on the absorption infrared spectrum of the hydroxyl stretch is investigated in detail. Five different hydroxyl stretch subpopulations are identified and spectrally assigned: monomers (α), hydrogen-bond acceptors (β), hydrogen-bond donors (γ), simultaneous hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors (δ), and simultaneous hydrogen-bond donors and double-acceptors (ε). The fundamental transition frequencies of the α and β subpopulations are found to be narrowly distributed and to overlap, thereby giving rise to a single narrow band whose intensity is significantly diminished by rotational relaxation. The fundamental transition frequency distributions of the γ, δ, and ε subpopulations are found to be

  18. Study of the thymine molecule: equilibrium structure from joint analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction and microwave data and assignment of vibrational spectra using results of ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Natalja; Khaikin, Leonid S; Grikina, Olga E; Rykov, Anatolii N; Vogt, Jürgen

    2008-08-21

    Thymine is one of the nucleobases which forms the nucleic acid (NA) base pair with adenine in DNA. The study of molecular structure and dynamics of nucleobases can help to understand and explain some processes in biological systems and therefore it is of interest. Because the scattered intensities on the C, N, and O atoms as well as some bond lengths in thymine are close to each other the structural problem cannot been solved by the gas phase electron diffraction (GED) method alone. Therefore the rotational constants from microvawe (MW) studies and differences in the groups of N-C, C=O, N-H, and C-H bond lengths from MP2 (full)/cc-pVQZ calculations were used as supplementary data. The analysis of GED data was based on the C(s) molecular symmetry according to results of the structure optimizations at the MP2 (full) level using 6-311G (d,p), cc-pVTZ, and cc-pVQZ basis sets confirmed by vibrational frequency calculations with 6-311G (d,p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. Mean-square amplitudes as well as harmonic and anharmonic vibrational corrections to the internuclear distances (r(e)-r(a)) and to the rotational constants (B(e)(k)-B(0)(k), where k = A, B, C) were calculated from the quadratic (MP2 (full)/cc-pVTZ) and cubic (MP2 (full)/6-311G (d,p)) force constants (the latter were used only for anharmonic corrections). The harmonic force field was scaled using published IR and Raman spectra of the parent and N1,N3-dideuterated species, which were for the first time completely assigned in the present work. The main equilibrium structural parameters of the thymine molecule determined from GED data supplemented by MW rotational constants and results of MP2 calculations are the following (bond lengths in Angstroms and bond angles in degrees with 3sigma in parentheses): r(e) (C5=C6) = 1.344 (16), r(e) (C5-C9) = 1.487 (8), r(e) (N1-C6) = 1.372 (3), r(e) (N1-C2) = 1.377 (3), r(e) (C2-N3) = 1.378 (3), r(e) (N3-C4) = 1.395 (3), r(e) (C2=O7) = 1.210 (1), r(e) (C4=O8) = 1.215 (1

  19. Accurate crystal-structure refinement of Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 14} at 295 and 100 K and analysis of the disorder in the atomic positions

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P.; Mill', B. V.

    2013-07-15

    The accurate X-ray diffraction study of a Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 14} crystal (sp. gr. P321, Z = 1) has been performed using repeated X-ray diffraction data sets collected on a diffractometer equipped with a CCD area detector at 295 and 100 K. The asymmetric disorder in the atomic positions in Ca{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 14} is described in two alternative ways: with the use of anharmonic atomic displacements (at 295 K R/wR = 0.68/0.60%, 3754 reflections; at 100 K R/wR = 0.90/0.70%, 3632 reflections) and using a split model (SM) (at 295 K R/wR = 0.74/0.67%; at 100 K R/wR = 0.95/0.74%). An analysis of the probability density function that defines the probability of finding an atom at a particular point in space shows that, at 295 K, five of the seven independent atoms in the unit cell are asymmetrically disordered in the vicinity of their sites, whereas only three atoms are disordered at 100 K. At both temperatures the largest disorder is observed at the 3f site on a twofold axis, which is a prerequisite for the formation of helicoidal chains of atoms along the c axis of the crystal and can serve as a structural basis for multiferroic properties of this family of crystals with magnetic ions.

  20. Equilibrium econophysics: A unified formalism for neoclassical economics and equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago

    2006-11-01

    We develop a unified conceptual and mathematical structure for equilibrium econophysics, i.e., the use of concepts and tools of equilibrium thermodynamics in neoclassical microeconomics and vice versa. Within this conceptual structure the results obtained in microeconomic theory are: (1) the definition of irreversibility in economic behavior; (2) the clarification that the Engel curve and the offer curve are not descriptions of real processes dictated by the maximization of utility at constant endowment; (3) the derivation of a relation between elasticities proving that economic elasticities are not all independent; (4) the proof that Giffen goods do not exist in a stable equilibrium; (5) the derivation that ‘economic integrability’ is equivalent to the generalized Le Chatelier principle and (6) the definition of a first order phase transition, i.e., a transition between separate points in the utility function. In thermodynamics the results obtained are: (1) a relation between the non-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities and the increase or decrease in the thermodynamic potentials; (2) the distinction between mathematical integrability and optimization behavior and (3) the generalization of the Clapeyron equation.

  1. Korshunov instantons out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, M.; Gutman, D. B.

    2016-04-01

    Zero-dimensional dissipative action possesses nontrivial minima known as Korshunov instantons. They have been known so far only for imaginary time representation that is limited to equilibrium systems. In this work we reconstruct and generalise Korshunov instantons using real-time Keldysh approach. This allows us to formulate the dissipative action theory for generic nonequilibrium conditions. Possible applications of the theory to transport in strongly biased quantum dots are discussed.

  2. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  3. FT-IR, UV-vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and the equilibrium structure of organic dye molecule disperse red 1 acrylate: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Mehmet; Coruh, Ali; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    This study reports the characterization of disperse red 1 acrylate compound by spectral techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The spectroscopic properties were analyzed by FT-IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR techniques. FT-IR spectrum in solid state was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1). The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the compound that dissolved in methanol was recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded in CDCl(3) solution. The structural and spectroscopic data of the molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation and the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational wavenumbers were calculated and scaled values were compared with experimental FT-IR spectrum. A satisfactory consistency between the experimental and theoretical spectra was obtained and it shows that the hybrid DFT method is very useful in predicting accurate vibrational structure, especially for high-frequency region. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental results and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. Isotropic chemical shifts were calculated using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. A study on the electronic properties were performed by timedependent DFT (TD-DFT) and CIS(D) approach. To investigate non linear optical properties, the electric dipole moment μ, polarizability α, anisotropy of polarizability Δα and molecular first hyperpolarizability β were computed. The linear polarizabilities and first hyperpolarizabilities of the studied molecule indicate that the compound can be a good candidate of nonlinear optical materials.

  4. Oxygen nonstoichiometry and defect equilibrium in Ca1- x Pr x MnO3-δ manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonidov, I. A.; Konstantinova, E. I.; Markov, A. A.; Merkulov, O. V.; Patrakeev, M. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. L.

    2016-08-01

    The content of oxygen in Ca1- x Pr x MnO3-δ ( x = 0.1) material with perovskite-like structure is determined at 750-950°C and oxygen partial pressures in the gas phase from 3 × 10-6 to 0.55 atm. The regions of existence of orthorhombic, tetragonal, and cubic structural modifications are determined. The equilibrium constants, enthalpies, and entropies of reactions of the formation of defects are determined, allowing us to describe the experimental δ ({p_{{O_2}}}, T) dependences accurately and calculate the concentrations of manganese ions. It is shown that a change in Ca0.9Pr0.1MnO3-δ structure has a considerable effect on the thermodynamic functions of reactions of the formation of defects.

  5. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  6. The use of Bayesian inversion to resolve plasma equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, M. J.; Nessi, G. von; Pretty, D.; Howard, J.; Blackwell, B.; Svensson, J.; Appel, L. C.

    2010-10-15

    Recently, Bayesian probability theory has been used at a number of experiments to fold uncertainties and interdependencies in the diagnostic data and forward models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to increase accuracy of inferred physics variables. A new probabilistic framework, MINERVA, based on Bayesian graphical models, has been used at JET and W7-AS to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework is the Bayesian inversion for poloidal magnetic flux without the need for an explicit equilibrium assumption. Building on this, we discuss results from a new project to develop Bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak, and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac. Specifically, we report on correction of the motional Stark effect, pickup coils, flux-loop constrained Bayesian inferred equilibrium for varying toroidal flux.

  7. The use of bayesian inversion to resolve plasma equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hole, M J; von Nessi, G; Pretty, D; Howard, J; Blackwell, B; Svensson, J; Appel, L C

    2010-10-01

    Recently, bayesian probability theory has been used at a number of experiments to fold uncertainties and interdependencies in the diagnostic data and forward models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to increase accuracy of inferred physics variables. A new probabilistic framework, MINERVA, based on bayesian graphical models, has been used at JET and W7-AS to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework is the bayesian inversion for poloidal magnetic flux without the need for an explicit equilibrium assumption. Building on this, we discuss results from a new project to develop bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak, and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac. Specifically, we report on correction of the motional Stark effect, pickup coils, flux-loop constrained bayesian inferred equilibrium for varying toroidal flux.

  8. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  9. Statistical equilibrium in cometary C2. II - Swan/Phillips band ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swamy, K. S. K.; Odell, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    Statistical equilibrium calculations have been made for both the triplet and ground state singlets for C2 in comets, using the exchange rate as a free parameter. The predictions of the results are consistent with optical observations and may be tested definitively by accurate observations of the Phillips and Swan band ratios. Comparison with the one reported observation indicates compatibility with a low exchange rate and resonance fluorescence statistical equilibrium.

  10. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    SciTech Connect

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J.

    1995-09-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness.

  11. Equilibrium and volumetric data and model development of coal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.L. Jr.; Gasem, K.A.M.; Park, J.

    1992-04-28

    The long term goal of our efforts is to develop accurate predictive methods for description of equilibrium phase properties for a variety of types of mixtures and operating conditions. The specific objectives of the work specified herein include: (1) development of an experimental facility having the capability to provide data on equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) and liquid densities, and doing so with greater accuracy and speed than our previous facility, (2) measurement of equilibrium phase properties for systematically-selected mixtures-specifically those containing important solute gases (such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, carbonyl sulfide, ammonia) in a series of heavy paraffinic, naphthenic and aromatic solvents (e.g., n-decane, n-eicosane, n-octacosane, n-hexatriacontane, cyclohexane, Decalin, perhydrophenanthrene, perhydropyrene, benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene), (3) testing/development of correlation frameworks for representing the phase behavior of fluids of the type encountered in coal conversion processes, and (4) generalization of parameters in the correlation frameworks to enable accurate predictions for systems of the type studied, permitting predictions to be made for systems and conditions other than those for which experimental data are available.

  12. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    Can the fundamental processes that underlie molecular biology be understood and simulated by DNA nanotechnology? The early development of DNA nanotechnology by Ned Seeman was driven by the desire to find a solution to the protein crystallization problem. Much of the later development of the field was also driven by envisioned applications in computing and nanofabrication. While the DNA nanotechnology community has assembled a versatile tool kit with which DNA nanostructures of considerable complexity can be assembled, the application of this tool kit to other areas of science and technology is still in its infancy. This dissertation reports on the construction of non-equilibrium DNA nanotube dynamic to probe molecular processes in the areas of hydrodynamics and cytoskeletal behavior. As the first example, we used DNA nanotubes as a molecular probe for elongational flow measurement in different micro-scale flow settings. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of simple geometrical objects, such as a rigid DNA nanotube, is amenable to rigorous theoretical investigation. We measured the distribution of elongational flows produced in progressively more complex settings, ranging from the vicinity of an orifice in a microfluidic chamber to within a bursting bubble of Pacific ocean water. This information can be used to constrain theories on the origin of life in which replication involves a hydrodynamically driven fission process, such as the coacervate fission proposed by Oparin. A second theme of this dissertation is the bottom-up construction of a de novo artificial cytoskeleton with DNA nanotubes. The work reported here encompasses structural, locomotion, and control aspects of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal behavior. We first measured the kinetic parameters of DNA nanotube assembly and tested the accuracy of the existing polymerization models in the literature. Toward recapitulation of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal dynamics, we coupled the polymerization of DNA

  13. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  14. On statistical equilibrium in helical fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2006-06-01

    The statistical mechanics of 3-D helical flows is re-examined for a continuum truncated at a top wavenumber. Based on the principle of equipartition of the flow enstrophy between helical modes, the emerging (i) energy spectrum law "-2" and (ii) formal mathematical analogy between the helicity and the thermodynamic entropy are discussed. It is noted that the "-2" scaling law is consistent with both spectral equilibrium and spectral cascade paradigms. In an attempt to apply the obtained results to a turbulent flow regime within the Earth's outer liquid core, where the net helicity of a turbulent flow component is presumably explained by Earth's rotation, it has been noticed that it is the energy spectral law "-1", but not "-2", which is likely realized there and within the logarithmic accuracy corresponds to the case of the velocity structure function [u(l)]2 independency on the spatial scale l, the latter is consistent with observations. It is argued that the "-1" scaling law can also be interpreted in terms of the spectral equilibrium and it is emphasized that the causes of the likely dominance of the spectral law "-1" over the spectral law "-2" in this geophysical application deserve further investigation and clarification.

  15. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Rotational Spectrum of 1,1-Difluoroethane: Internal Rotation Analysis and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamanan, R. M.; Chen, W. D.; Wlodarczak, G.; Demaison, J.; Lesarri, A. G.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    1995-05-01

    The rotational spectrum of CH3CHF2 in its ground state was measured up to 653 GHz. Accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The internal rotation splittings were analyzed using the internal axis method. An ab initio structure has been calculated and a near-equilibrium structure has been estimated using offsets derived empirically. This structure was compared to an experimental r0 structure. The four lowest excited states (including the methyl torsion) have also been assigned.

  17. Princeton spectral equilibrium code: PSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-03-01

    A fast computer code has been developed to calculate free-boundary solutions to the plasma equilibrium equation that are consistent with the currents in external coils and conductors. The free-boundary formulation is based on the minimization of a mean-square error epsilon while the fixed-boundary solution is based on a variational principle and spectral representation of the coordinates x(psi,theta) and z(psi,theta). Specific calculations using the Columbia University Torus II, the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) geometries are performed.

  18. Out-of-equilibrium finite-size method for critical behavior analyses.

    PubMed

    Lulli, Matteo; Parisi, Giorgio; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    We present a dynamic off-equilibrium method for the study of continuous transitions, which represents a dynamic generalization of the usual equilibrium cumulant method. Its main advantage is that critical parameters are derived from numerical data obtained much before equilibrium has been attained. Therefore, the method is particularly useful for systems with long equilibration times, like spin glasses. We apply it to the three-dimensional Ising spin-glass model, obtaining accurate estimates of the critical exponents and of the critical temperature with a limited computational effort.

  19. Out-of-equilibrium finite-size method for critical behavior analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulli, Matteo; Parisi, Giorgio; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    We present a dynamic off-equilibrium method for the study of continuous transitions, which represents a dynamic generalization of the usual equilibrium cumulant method. Its main advantage is that critical parameters are derived from numerical data obtained much before equilibrium has been attained. Therefore, the method is particularly useful for systems with long equilibration times, like spin glasses. We apply it to the three-dimensional Ising spin-glass model, obtaining accurate estimates of the critical exponents and of the critical temperature with a limited computational effort.

  20. Unfolding single RNA molecules: bridging the gap between equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    During the last 15 years, scientists have developed methods that permit the direct mechanical manipulation of individual molecules. Using this approach, they have begun to investigate the effect of force and torque in chemical and biochemical reactions. These studies span from the study of the mechanical properties of macromolecules, to the characterization of molecular motors, to the mechanical unfolding of individual proteins and RNA. Here I present a review of some of our most recent results using mechanical force to unfold individual molecules of RNA. These studies make it possible to follow in real time the trajectory of each molecule as it unfolds and characterize the various intermediates of the reaction. Moreover, if the process takes place reversibly it is possible to extract both kinetic and thermodynamic information from these experiments at the same time that we characterize the forces that maintain the three-dimensional structure of the molecule in solution. These studies bring us closer to the biological unfolding processes in the cell as they simulate in vitro, the mechanical unfolding of RNAs carried out in the cell by helicases. If the unfolding process occurs irreversibly, I show here that single-molecule experiments can still provide equilibrium, thermodynamic information from non-equilibrium data by using recently discovered fluctuation theorems. Such theorems represent a bridge between equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In fact, first derived in 1997, the first experimental demonstration of the validity of fluctuation theorems was obtained by unfolding mechanically a single molecule of RNA. It is perhaps a sign of the times that important physical results are these days used to extract information about biological systems and that biological systems are being used to test and confirm fundamental new laws in physics.

  1. Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and their reliability are often highly suspect. We have utilized state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He to Zn. We have also utilized state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998), we have calculated improved collisional ionization equilibrium calculations. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. (1998) for all elements from H to Ni, and with the fractional abundances derived from the modern DR and RR calculations of Gu (2003a,b, 2004) for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni.

  2. [Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test is the base of genetic epidemiology. The new methods for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test involve: X chromosome-linked single nucleotide polymorphism Hardy-Weinberg test, inbreeding coefficient (F) test, an incomplete enumeration algorithm for an exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions with multiple alleles, and graphical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the ternary plot. It is necessary to conduct Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test in genetic epidemiology studies and adjust the associations as deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium occurs.

  3. Equilibrium Tuition, Applications, Admissions and Enrollment in the College Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Chao

    2010-01-01

    I develop and structurally estimate an equilibrium model of the college market. Students, who are heterogeneous in both abilities and preferences, make college application decisions, subject to uncertainty and application costs. Colleges observe only noisy measures of student ability and set up tuition and admissions policies to compete for more…

  4. Continuous Morse-Smale flows with three equilibrium positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuzhoma, E. V.; Medvedev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous Morse-Smale flows on closed manifolds whose nonwandering set consists of three equilibrium positions are considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions for topological equivalence of such flows are obtained and the topological structure of the underlying manifolds is described. Bibliography: 36 titles.

  5. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  6. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium in global flux surface hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Sifain, Andrew E.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-06-14

    Global flux surface hopping (GFSH) generalizes fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH)—one of the most popular approaches to nonadiabatic molecular dynamics—for processes exhibiting superexchange. We show that GFSH satisfies detailed balance and leads to thermodynamic equilibrium with accuracy similar to FSSH. This feature is particularly important when studying electron-vibrational relaxation and phonon-assisted transport. By studying the dynamics in a three-level quantum system coupled to a classical atom in contact with a classical bath, we demonstrate that both FSSH and GFSH achieve the Boltzmann state populations. Thermal equilibrium is attained significantly faster with GFSH, since it accurately represents the superexchange process. GFSH converges closer to the Boltzmann averages than FSSH and exhibits significantly smaller statistical errors.

  7. LAPS discretization and solution of plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missanelli, Maria; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu

    2011-10-01

    LAPS provides spectral element discretization for solving steady state plasma profiles. Our initial focus is on its implementation for two dimensional open magnetic field equilibria in linear and toroidal geometries. The linear geometry is an axisymmetric magnetic mirror with anisotropic pressure. The toroidal case is a tokamak scrape-off layer plasma. Structured grids are produced by the grid generation package in LAPS. The spectral element discretization uses modal bases over quadrilateral elements. A Newton-Krylov solver implemented with the Portable, Extensible Toolkits for Scientific Computing PETSc is applied to iteratively converge the solution. Care has been taken in the code design to separate the grid generation, spectral element discretization, and (non)linear solver from the user-specified equilibrium equations, so the LAPS infrastructure can be easily used for different applications. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  8. Kinetics of allophycocyanin's trimer-monomer equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Berns, D S; MacColl, R

    1987-01-13

    Kinetic studies of the dissociation of allophycocyanin trimers to monomers have been performed by using stopped-flow techniques. The dissociation was monitored by two techniques: by light scattering to observe the molecular weight changes directly and by 650-nm absorbance to observe the linkage of quaternary structure to spectra. The light-scattering experiments showed a simple exponential decay of trimers to monomers with a dissociation constant of 0.23 s-1. The absorption changes were complex, with two processes occurring. The faster absorption change appeared to be almost simultaneous with the molecular weight change (about 0.27 s-1) and was perhaps totally coordinated with it. The slower absorption change (0.071 s-1) was possibly a result of a conformational change in the chromophore arising during the conversion from newly dissociated monomers to equilibrium monomers.

  9. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  10. Dynamic Stability of Equilibrium Capillary Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, William M.; Kim, Inwon C.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a model for contact angle motion of quasi-static capillary drops resting on a horizontal plane. We prove global in time existence and long time behavior (convergence to equilibrium) in a class of star-shaped initial data for which we show that topological changes of drops can be ruled out for all times. Our result applies to any drop which is initially star-shaped with respect to a small ball inside the drop, given that the volume of the drop is sufficiently large. For the analysis, we combine geometric arguments based on the moving-plane type method with energy dissipation methods based on the formal gradient flow structure of the problem.

  11. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  12. Statistical equilibrium of bubble oscillations in dilute bubbly flows

    PubMed Central

    Colonius, Tim; Hagmeijer, Rob; Ando, Keita; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of predicting the moments of the distribution of bubble radius in bubbly flows is considered. The particular case where bubble oscillations occur due to a rapid (impulsive or step change) change in pressure is analyzed, and it is mathematically shown that in this case, inviscid bubble oscillations reach a stationary statistical equilibrium, whereby phase cancellations among bubbles with different sizes lead to time-invariant values of the statistics. It is also shown that at statistical equilibrium, moments of the bubble radius may be computed using the period-averaged bubble radius in place of the instantaneous one. For sufficiently broad distributions of bubble equilibrium (or initial) radius, it is demonstrated that bubble statistics reach equilibrium on a time scale that is fast compared to physical damping of bubble oscillations due to viscosity, heat transfer, and liquid compressibility. The period-averaged bubble radius may then be used to predict the slow changes in the moments caused by the damping. A benefit is that period averaging gives a much smoother integrand, and accurate statistics can be obtained by tracking as few as five bubbles from the broad distribution. The period-averaged formula may therefore prove useful in reducing computational effort in models of dilute bubbly flow wherein bubbles are forced by shock waves or other rapid pressure changes, for which, at present, the strong effects caused by a distribution in bubble size can only be accurately predicted by tracking thousands of bubbles. Some challenges associated with extending the results to more general (nonimpulsive) forcing and strong two-way coupled bubbly flows are briefly discussed. PMID:19547725

  13. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  14. Carbon dioxide hydrate phase equilibrium and cage occupancy calculations using ab initio intermolecular potentials.

    PubMed

    Velaga, Srinath C; Anderson, Brian J

    2014-01-16

    Gas hydrate deposits are receiving increased attention as potential locations for CO2 sequestration, with CO2 replacing the methane that is recovered as an energy source. In this scenario, it is very important to correctly characterize the cage occupancies of CO2 to correctly assess the sequestration potential as well as the methane recoverability. In order to predict accurate cage occupancies, the guest–host interaction potential must be represented properly. Earlier, these potential parameters were obtained by fitting to experimental equilibrium data and these fitted parameters do not match with those obtained by second virial coefficient or gas viscosity data. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations provide an independent means to directly obtain accurate intermolecular potentials. A potential energy surface (PES) between H2O and CO2 was computed at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level and corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE), an error caused due to the lower basis set, by using the half counterpoise method. Intermolecular potentials were obtained by fitting Exponential-6 and Lennard-Jones 6-12 models to the ab initio PES, correcting for many-body interactions. We denoted this model as the “VAS” model. Reference parameters for structure I carbon dioxide hydrate were calculated using the VAS model (site–site ab initio intermolecular potentials) as Δμ(w)(0) = 1206 ± 2 J/mol and ΔH(w)(0) = 1260 ± 12 J/mol. With these reference parameters and the VAS model, pure CO2 hydrate equilibrium pressure was predicted with an average absolute deviation of less than 3.2% from the experimental data. Predictions of the small cage occupancy ranged from 32 to 51%, and the large cage is more than 98% occupied. The intermolecular potentials were also tested by calculating the pure CO2 density and diffusion of CO2 in water using molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurati, Marco; Capellmann, Ronja; Kohl, Matthias; Egelhaaf, Stefan; Schmiedeberg, Michael

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy exper- iments and simulations of gel-forming colloid-polymer mixtures with competing interactions. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles syneresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation is a universality class of transitions out of equilibrium, our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels.

  16. 3D Equilibrium Reconstructions in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. W.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.; Hirshman, H. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Sontag, A. C.; Hanson, J.; Trevisan, G.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and efficient 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed in tokamaks for study of 3D magnetic field effects on experimentally reconstructed equilibrium and for analysis of MHD stability experiments with externally imposed magnetic perturbations. A large number of new magnetic probes have been recently installed in DIII-D to improve 3D equilibrium measurements and to facilitate 3D reconstructions. The V3FIT code has been in use in DIII-D to support 3D reconstruction and the new magnetic diagnostic design. V3FIT is based on the 3D equilibrium code VMEC that assumes nested magnetic surfaces. V3FIT uses a pseudo-Newton least-square algorithm to search for the solution vector. In parallel, the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code is being extended to allow for 3D effects using a perturbation approach based on an expansion of the MHD equations. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include the magnetic island and stochastic effects. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the GATO, MARS-F, or M3D-C1 MHD codes. DIII-D 3D reconstruction examples using EFIT and V3FIT and the new 3D magnetic data will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  17. Nanomechanics Model for Static Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon

    2002-09-01

    This study presented a computational technique to model and simulate atomistic behavior of materials under static loads, Interatomic potential energy was used to maintain equilibrium among atoms under static loads and constraints, In addition, the atomistic model was coupled with the finite element analysis model so that more flexible loads and constraints could be applied to the atomistic model A multi-scale technique was also presented for some single wall nanotubes of both zigzag and armchair and then their effective stiffness were estimated Those designed nanotubes are woven into fabric composites, which can be used in various military applications including body armored, vehicles, and infantry transportation vehicles because advanced nano- composites could be much lighter and stronger than current ones, Some example problems were presented to illustrate the developed technique for the nano-composites and SWNTs, The proposed technique for nanomechanics can be used for design and analysis of materials at the atomic or molecular level,

  18. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  19. Development of equilibrium raindrop size distribution in natural rain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio D'Adderio, Leo; Porcu, Federico; Tokay, Ali

    2015-04-01

    The NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission dual-frequency precipitation radar retrieval has adopted a three-parameter gamma distribution to retrieve the raindrop size distribution (DSD) from dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) measurements. Recent analysis from disdrometric measurements collected during GPM ground validation (GV) field experiments shows that the three-parameter gamma distribution does not well fit the observed spectra in the presence of collisional break-up, i.e. when the DSD reaches the equilibrium stage. An automatic algorithm is used to select equilibrium DSD in six datasets for a total number of more than 12,000 minutes with rain rate higher than 5 mmh-1 collected from 2-DVD disdrometers. The algorithm is based on the analysis of the DSD slope in the interval 1.0-2.5 mm diameter. The 1-minute time series are studied in order to assess the conditions more favorable for equilibrium DSD to take place, showing the transition between the one-peak DSD to the 2-peak DSD, for selected case studies, over a wide range of rainrate values. The results are discussed in terms of precipitation type and intensity, showing a very rapid onset and dissipation of equilibrium DSD conditions. The temporal evolution of some DSD parameters is also analyzed, and, for two of the six datasets (MC3E and Wallops), was also possible to evaluate the small-scale spatial structure of equilibrium DSD.

  20. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M D

    2017-02-07

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ∼10(5) times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  1. Nematic-like stable glasses without equilibrium liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jaritza; Gujral, Ankit; Huang, Chengbin; Bishop, Camille; Yu, Lian; Ediger, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    We report the thermal and structural properties of glasses of posaconazole, a rod-like molecule, prepared using physical vapor deposition (PVD). PVD glasses of posaconazole can show substantial molecular orientation depending upon the choice of substrate temperature, Tsubstrate, during deposition. Ellipsometry and IR measurements indicate that glasses prepared at Tsubstrate very near the glass transition temperature (Tg) are highly ordered. For these posaconazole glasses, the orientation order parameter is similar to that observed in macroscopically aligned nematic liquid crystals, indicating that the molecules are mostly parallel to one another and perpendicular to the interface. To our knowledge, these are the most anisotropic glasses ever prepared by PVD from a molecule that does not form equilibrium liquid crystal phases. These results are consistent with a previously proposed mechanism in which molecular orientation in PVD glasses is inherited from the orientation present at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid. This mechanism suggests that molecular orientation at the surface of the equilibrium liquid of posaconazole is nematic-like. Posaconazole glasses can show very high kinetic stability; the isothermal transformation of a 400 nm glass into the supercooled liquid occurs via a propagating front that originates at the free surface and requires ˜105 times the structural relaxation time of the liquid (τα). We also studied the kinetic stability of PVD glasses of itraconazole, which is a structurally similar molecule with equilibrium liquid crystal phases. While itraconazole glasses can be even more anisotropic than posaconazole glasses, they exhibit lower kinetic stability.

  2. Equilibrium avalanches in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Müller, Markus; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-06-01

    We study the distribution of equilibrium avalanches (shocks) in Ising spin glasses which occur at zero temperature upon small changes in the magnetic field. For the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, we present a detailed derivation of the density ρ(ΔM) of the magnetization jumps ΔM. It is obtained by introducing a multicomponent generalization of the Parisi-Duplantier equation, which allows us to compute all cumulants of the magnetization. We find that ρ(ΔM)˜ΔM-τ with an avalanche exponent τ=1 for the SK model, originating from the marginal stability (criticality) of the model. It holds for jumps of size 1≪ΔMequilibrium dynamics of the SK model. For finite-range models, using droplet arguments, we obtain the prediction τ=(df+θ)/dm where df,dm, and θ are the fractal dimension, magnetization exponent, and energy exponent of a droplet, respectively. This formula is expected to apply to other glassy disordered systems, such as the random-field model and pinned interfaces. We make suggestions for further numerical investigations, as well as experimental studies of the Barkhausen noise in spin glasses.

  3. High resolution equilibrium calculations of pedestal and SOL plasma in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. Yu; Martynov, A. A.; Drozdov, V. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Poshekhonov, Yu Yu

    2017-02-01

    For integrated modeling of equilibrium, stability and dynamics of the divertor tokamak plasma with scrape-off layer (SOL) high resolution equilibrium calculations are needed. A new version of the CAXE equilibrium code computes the tokamak equilibrium on a numerical grid adaptive to magnetic surfaces both in the plasma region with closed flux surfaces and in the SOL region with open magnetic lines. The plasma profiles can be prescribed independently in each region with nested flux surfaces, and realistic SOL profiles with very short pressure drop off length can be accurately treated. The influence of the finite current density in SOL on the connection length is studied. From the point of view of the MHD equilibrium and stability modeling, self-consistent calculations of diverted tokamak configurations with finite current density at the separatrix require taking into account plasma outside the separatrix. Calculated high resolution equilibria provide an input to new versions of the ideal MHD stability codes treating tokamak plasma with SOL. The study of the influence of the pressure gradient profile in the pedestal plasma inside and outside the separatrix on the pedestal height limit set by external kink-ballooning mode stability is presented. Another possible application of the high resolution pedestal and SOL equilibrium code is a coupling to the SOLPS code with a purpose to increase equilibrium accuracy and support self-consistent plasma flow/equilibrium modeling.

  4. Influence of debris flow scale on equilibrium bed slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, T.; Egashira, S.; Papa, M.; Miyamoto, K.

    2003-04-01

    Results obtained from both of flume tests and theory suggest that an equilibrium bed slope in flow over an erodible bed is determined only by sediment discharge rate when the movements of sediment particles are laminar and thus no suspended transportation take place. This means that the static friction force is dominant in debris flow and that sediment concentration is determined by shear stress balance on the bed surface; i.e., the external shear stress must be equal to the resisting static shear stress of sediment particles, as seen in our previous studies. On the other hand, if part of sediment particles in debris flow body is transported in suspension, sediment concentration will be larger in comparison with that in case of laminar motion of sediment particles and the equilibrium bed slope will decrease. These facts are supported Egashira et al.'s experimental data. The present study discusses an influence of flow scales on an equilibrium bed slope and flow structure experimentally and theoretically. Equilibrium bed slopes and velocity profiles are measured for many flow conditions in flume tests. Those results emphasize that the equilibrium bed slope decreases with increasing of flow scale if part of debris flow body is turbulent, and it is predicted corresponding to increase of mass density of fluid phase. Experimental data for velocity profiles are compared to the results predicted by authors' constitutive equations for non-cohesive sediment and water mixture. When no turbulent diffusions take place, flow characteristics such as velocity profiles and flow resistance are predicted very well by our equations. However, the equations will underestimate the flow resistance if a part of the flow body becomes turbulent because of increase of flow scale. These suggest that the changes of equilibrium bed slope and flow structure are caused by phase-shift from solid phase to fluid phase depending on debris flow scale.

  5. Predicting equilibrium uranium isotope fractionation in crystals and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in using 238U/235U measurements as a proxy for changes in oxygen abundance in surface and near-surface environments, the present theoretical understanding of uranium isotope fractionation is limited to a few simple gas-phase molecules and analogues of dissolved species (e.g., 1,2,3). Understanding uranium isotope fractionation behavior in more complicated species, such as crystals and adsorption complexes, will help in the design and interpretation of experiments and field studies, and may suggest other uses for 38U/235U measurements. In this study, a recently developed first-principles method for estimating the nuclear volume component of field shift fractionation in crystals and complex molecular species (4) is combined with mass-dependent fractionation theory to predict equilibrium 38U/235U fractionations in aqueous and crystalline uranium compounds, including uraninite (UO2). The nuclear field shift effect, caused by the interaction of electrons with the finite volume of the positive charge distribution in uranium nuclei, is estimated using Density Functional Theory and the Projector Augmented Wave method (DFT-PAW). Tests against relativistic electronic structure calculations and Mössbauer isomer shift data indicate that the DFT-PAW method is reasonably accurate, while being much better suited to models of complex and crystalline species. Initial results confirm previous predictions that the nuclear volume effect overwhelms mass depdendent fractionation in U(VI)-U(IV) exchange reactions, leading to higher 238U/235U in U(IV) species (i.e., for UO2 xtal vs. UO22+aq, ln αNV ≈ +1.8‰ , ln αMD ≈ -0.8‰, ln αTotal ≈ +1.0‰ at 25ºC). UO2 and U(H2O)94+, are within ~0.4‰ of each other, while U(VI) species appear to be more variable. This suggests that speciation is likely to significantly affect natural uranium isotope fractionations, in addition to oxidation state. Tentatively, it appears that uranyl-type (UO22

  6. Atomistic Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Paul Erik

    The goal of this work is to model the heterogeneous recombination of atomic oxygen on silica surfaces, which is of interest for accurately predicting the heating on vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds. This is accomplished by creating a finite rate catalytic model, which describes recombination with a set of elementary gas-surface reactions. Fundamental to a description of surface catalytic reactions are the in situ chemical structures on the surface where recombination can occur. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the Reax GSISiO potential, we find that the chemical sites active in direct gas-phase reactions on silica surfaces consist of a small number of specific structures (or defects). The existence of these defects on real silica surfaces is supported by experimental results and the structure and energetics of these defects have been verified with quantum chemical calculations. The reactions in the finite rate catalytic model are based on the interaction of molecular and atomic oxygen with these defects. Trajectory calculations are used to find the parameters in the forward rate equations, while a combination of detailed balance and transition state theory are used to find the parameters in the reverse rate equations. The rate model predicts that the oxygen recombination coefficient is relatively constant at T (300-1000 K), in agreement with experimental results. At T > 1000 K the rate model predicts a drop off in the oxygen recombination coefficient, in disagreement with experimental results, which predict that the oxygen recombination coefficient increases with temperature. A discussion of the possible reasons for this disagreement, including non-adiabatic collision dynamics, variable surface site concentrations, and additional recombination mechanisms is presented. This thesis also describes atomistic simulations with Classical Trajectory Calculation Direction Simulation Monte Carlo (CTC-DSMC), a particle based method for modeling non-equilibrium

  7. Toward Improving Atmospheric Models and Ozone Projections: Laboratory UV Absorption Cross Sections and Equilibrium Constant of ClOOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years have now passed since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, and despite comprehensive international agreements being in place to phase out CFCs and halons, polar ozone losses generally remain severe. The relevant halogen compounds have very long atmospheric lifetimes, which ensures that seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Changes in the climate system can further impact stratospheric ozone abundance through changes in the temperature and water vapor structure of the atmosphere and through the potential initiation of solar radiation management efforts. In many ways, the rate at which climate is changing must now be considered fast relative to the slow removal of halogens from the atmosphere. Photochemical models of Earth's atmosphere play a critical role in understanding and projecting ozone levels, but in order for these models to be accurate, they must be built on a foundation of accurate laboratory data. ClOOCl is the centerpiece of the catalytic cycle that accounts for more than 50% of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere every spring, and so uncertainties in the ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl are particularly important. Additionally, the equilibrium constant of the dimerization reaction of ClO merits further study, as there are important discrepancies between in situ measurements and lab-based models, and the JPL-11 recommended equilibrium constant includes high error bars at atmospherically relevant temperatures (~75% at 200 K). Here we analyze available data for the ClOOCl ultraviolet cross sections and equilibrium constant and present new laboratory spectroscopic results.

  8. Evaporation from Soils Under Thermal Boundary Conditions: Experimental and Modeling Investigation to Compare Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    In the shallow subsurface immediately below the land-atmosphere interface, it is widely recognized that the movement of water vapor is closely coupled to thermal processes. However, their mutual interactions are rarely considered in most soil water modeling efforts or in practical applications where it becomes necessary to understand and predict the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture. The validation of numerical models that are designed to capture these processes is difficult due to the inherent complexities of the problem in field systems and the scarcity of field or laboratory data with accurately known hydraulic and thermal parameters of soils, thus limiting the testing and refinement of heat and water transfer theories. In addition, it is often assumed in traditional soil physics applications that water vapor concentration in the air adjacent to the water phase in soil pores is always in equilibrium with liquid water, i.e., vaporization occurs instantaneously, which can result in over prediction of evaporation from soil. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture and temperature using soil with accurately known hydraulic/thermal properties and use this data to test existing theories and develop appropriate numerical models. In this work, water vapor flow under varying temperature gradients was implemented based on a concept that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion. In order to validate this new approach, we developed a long column apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and generated data under well-controlled thermal boundary conditions at the soil surface. Water saturation, capillary pressure, temperature, relative humidity and column weight to record total mass of water in the column were continuously monitored. Results from numerical simulations based on the conventional equilibrium and non-equilibrium approaches were compared with

  9. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics textbooks, these two conditions appear as ΣF=0(1) and Στ=0,(2) where each torque τ is defined as the cross product between the lever arm vector r and the corresponding applied force F, τ =r×F,(3) having magnitude, τ =Frsinθ.(4) The angle θ here is between the two vectors F and r. In Eq. (1), upward (downward) forces are considered positive (negative). In Eq. (2), counterclockwise (clockwise) torques are considered positive (negative). Equation (1) holds that the vector sum of the external forces acting on an object must be zero to prevent linear accelerations; Eq. (2) states that the vector sum of torques due to external forces about any axis must be zero to prevent angular accelerations. In our view these conditions can be problematic for students because a) the equations contain the unfamiliar summation notation Σ, b) students are uncertain of the role of torques in causing rotations, and c) it is not clear why the sum of torques is zero regardless of the choice of axis. Gianino5 describes an experiment using MBL and a force sensor to convey the meaning of torque as applied to a rigid-body lever system without exploring quantitative aspects of the conditions for static equilibrium.

  10. Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Fields of Cyclic and Bent HC2N Isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force field (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC2N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T). Dunning s correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X=3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schr dinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by perturbation theory). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either perturbation theory or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC2N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05D, 3.06D, and 1.71D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  11. Accurate ab initio quartic force fields of cyclic and bent HC2N isomers.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-12-28

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force fields (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC(2)N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted as CCSD(T). Dunning's correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X = 3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (PT) (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by PT). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either PT or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC(2)N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05 D, 3.06 D, and 1.71 D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  12. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  13. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  14. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  15. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  16. Real time equilibrium reconstruction for control of the discharge in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ferron, J.R.; Walker, M.L.; Lao, L.L.; Penaflor, B.G.; St. John, H.E.; Humphreys, D.A.; Leuer, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    Optimum performance of a tokamak discharge requires accurate feedback control of many of the discharge parameters. For this to be possible, the values of these parameters must be accurately measured. The values of many discharge parameters, such as shape and safety factor profile, are not directly measured but can be evaluated from the available diagnostic data: magnetic field and flux measurements, for example. The most complete evaluation comes from a least squares fit of the diagnostic data to the Grad-Shafranov model that describes the force balance of the tokamak equilibrium, while allowing for a distributed current source. This full reconstruction of the equilibrium has normally been performed offline using a computation-intensive fitting code such as EFIT. This paper provides an introduction to a practical method for performing an equilibrium reconstruction in real time for arbitrary time-varying discharge shapes and current profiles. A detailed description of the algorithm is given in Ref. 2. An approximate solution to the Grad-Shafranov equilibrium relation is found which best fits the diagnostic measurements so that an equilibrium solution consistent with force balance, expressed in terms of the spatial distributions of the toroidal current density and poloidal flux, is available in real time for accurate evaluation of the discharge parameters. The algorithm is very close to that of EFIT and is executed on a time scale fast enough for control of the DIII-D tokamak.

  17. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  18. The influence of non-equilibrium pressure on rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardadkhan, Irfan Rashid

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of pressure relaxation on steady, incompressible flows with strong streamline curvature. In the early part of this dissertation research, the significance of non-equilibrium pressure forces in controlling the structure of a steady, two dimensional axial vortex was demonstrated. In order to extend the study of pressure relaxation influences on more complex rotating flows, this dissertation has examined other rotating flow features that can be associated with hurricanes, tornadoes and dust devils. To model these flows, modified boundary layer equations were developed for a fluid column rotating near a solid plane including the influence of non-equilibrium pressure forces. The far-field boundary conditions were inferred using the asymptotic behavior of the governing equations, and the boundary conditions for the axial and radial components of velocity were shown to be dependent on the pressure relaxation coefficient, η p, and the characteristic angular velocity of the rotating fluid column, ω. This research has shown for the first time that the inclusion of non-equilibrium pressure results in a free-standing stagnation plane at the top of a funnel shaped rotating fluid column, which is consistent with observational data for hurricanes, tornadoes and dust devils. It has also been shown that in the absence of non-equilibrium pressure, the stagnation plane for rotating flows cannot be observed. The velocity and pressure distributions resulting from incorporating non-equilibrium pressure effects were then compared with available observational data for tornadoes and dust devils. The general profiles of the velocity and pressure distributions were found to be in good agreement with physical measurements, which was not possible without introducing empirical turbulence effects, in the absence of non-equilibrium pressure effects.

  19. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  20. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  1. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yen Vinokur, Marcel; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model’s accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  2. Liquid-liquid phase equilibrium of methanol + ethylbenzene + isooctane + ethanol system at 303 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, Mónica B.; Veliz, Jonatan H.; Cases, Alicia M.

    2017-03-01

    The phase equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + isooctane systems were obtained at 303.15 K. Data for methanol + ethylbenzene + isooctane system were taken from literature. The effect of ethanol addition on the system equilibrium was investigated at the same temperature. The distribution curves for ternary and quaternary system was analyzed. The experimental results for ternary systems were correlated with UNIQUAC and NRTL equations. For the ternary systems studied here, the NRTL equation is more accurate than the UNIQUAC. The equilibrium data for the three ternary systems were used to determine interactions parameters for the UNIQUAC equation. For the quaternary system, the experimental data can be fitted more accurately to UNIQUAC equation than by the UNIFAC method.

  3. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Contribute to Ion Selectivity in the KcsA Channel

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stephan; Farley, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of biological ion channels to conduct selected ions across cell membranes is critical for the survival of both animal and bacterial cells. Numerous investigations of ion selectivity have been conducted over more than 50 years, yet the mechanisms whereby the channels select certain ions and reject others are not well understood. Here we report a new application of Jarzynski’s Equality to investigate the mechanism of ion selectivity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of Na+ and K+ ions moving through the KcsA channel. The simulations show that the selectivity filter of KcsA adapts and responds to the presence of the ions with structural rearrangements that are different for Na+ and K+. These structural rearrangements facilitate entry of K+ ions into the selectivity filter and permeation through the channel, and rejection of Na+ ions. A mechanistic model of ion selectivity by this channel based on the results of the simulations relates the structural rearrangement of the selectivity filter to the differential dehydration of ions and multiple-ion occupancy and describes a mechanism to efficiently select and conduct K+. Estimates of the K+/Na+ selectivity ratio and steady state ion conductance for KcsA from the simulations are in good quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. This model also accurately describes experimental observations of channel block by cytoplasmic Na+ ions, the “punch through” relief of channel block by cytoplasmic positive voltages, and is consistent with the knock-on mechanism of ion permeation. PMID:24465882

  4. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  5. Far from Equilibrium: The Gas Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of studying the far-from-equilibrium phenomena in college chemistry. Presents a system using the gas pendulum which displays all of the essential characteristics of dissipative systems. Promotes the use of the gas pendulum as a teaching example of a nonlinear far-from-equilibrium process. (TW)

  6. Equilibrium Tail Distribution Due to Touschek Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Single large angle Coulomb scattering is referred to as Touschek scattering. In addition to causing particle loss when the scattered particles are outside the momentum aperture, the process also results in a non-Gaussian tail, which is an equilibrium between the Touschek scattering and radiation damping. Here we present an analytical calculation for this equilibrium distribution.

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  11. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  12. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  13. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    PubMed Central

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-01-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light. PMID:28266646

  14. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  15. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  16. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization.

    PubMed

    Anzà, F; Vedral, V

    2017-03-07

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  17. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium.

  18. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    PubMed

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-15

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  19. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  20. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, Aaron; Johnston, Chris; Cruden, Brett

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents measurements and simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation relevant to high-speed Earth entry data obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79 N2 : 21 O2) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08 N2 : 20.95 O2 : 0.04 CO2 : 0.93 Ar). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to promote discussion about various aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance profiles integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the VUV through to the NIR, were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURAHARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50 and over-predict by as much as 20 depending on the shock speed. DPLRNEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40 and over-predict by as much as 12 depending on the shock speed. In terms of an upper bound estimate for the absolute error in wall-directed heat flux, at the lower speeds investigated in this paper, 8 to 9 km/s, even

  1. Accurate oxidation potentials of 40 benzene and biphenyl derivatives with heteroatom substituents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pu; Feinberg, Adam M; Guirado, Gonzalo; Farid, Samir; Dinnocenzo, Joseph P

    2014-10-03

    The redox equilibrium method was used to determine accurate oxidation potentials in acetonitrile for 40 heteroatom-substituted compounds. These include methoxy-substituted benzenes and biphenyls, aromatic amines, and substituted acetanilides. The redox equilibrium method allowed oxidation potentials to be determined with high precision (≤ ±6 mV). Whereas most of the relative oxidation potentials follow well-established chemical trends, interestingly, the oxidation potentials of substituted N-methylacetanilides were found to be higher than those of the corresponding acetanilides. Density functional theory calculations provided insight into the origin of these surprising results in terms of the preferred conformations of the amides versus their cation radicals.

  2. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  3. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  4. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    SciTech Connect

    Valkass, R. A. J. Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S.; Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A.; Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R.

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  5. Accurate methods for large molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Mark S; Mullin, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Spencer R; Roskop, Luke B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Boatz, Jerry A

    2009-07-23

    Three exciting new methods that address the accurate prediction of processes and properties of large molecular systems are discussed. The systematic fragmentation method (SFM) and the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method both decompose a large molecular system (e.g., protein, liquid, zeolite) into small subunits (fragments) in very different ways that are designed to both retain the high accuracy of the chosen quantum mechanical level of theory while greatly reducing the demands on computational time and resources. Each of these methods is inherently scalable and is therefore eminently capable of taking advantage of massively parallel computer hardware while retaining the accuracy of the corresponding electronic structure method from which it is derived. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a sophisticated approach for the prediction of nonbonded and intermolecular interactions. Therefore, the EFP method provides a way to further reduce the computational effort while retaining accuracy by treating the far-field interactions in place of the full electronic structure method. The performance of the methods is demonstrated using applications to several systems, including benzene dimer, small organic species, pieces of the alpha helix, water, and ionic liquids.

  6. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. In this dissertation, I explore the role of both thermal and active fluctuations within cross-linked polymer networks. The systems I study are in large part inspired by the amazing physics found within the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. I first predict and verify the existence of a thermal Casimir force between cross-linkers bound to a semi-flexible polymer. The calculation is complicated by the appearance of second order derivatives in the bending Hamiltonian for such polymers, which requires a careful evaluation of the the path integral formulation of the partition function in order to arrive at the physically correct continuum limit and properly address ultraviolet divergences. I find that cross linkers interact along a filament with an attractive logarithmic potential proportional to thermal energy. The proportionality constant depends on whether and how the cross linkers constrain the relative angle between the two filaments to which they are bound. The interaction has important implications for the synthesis of biopolymer bundles within cells. I model the cross-linkers as existing in two phases: bound to the bundle and free in solution. When the cross-linkers are bound, they behave as a one-dimensional gas of particles interacting with the Casimir force, while the free phase is a simple ideal gas. Demanding equilibrium between the two phases, I find a discontinuous transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous condensation transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. This work is supported by the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross-linkers. I

  7. Analytic study of the classical equilibrium of highly rotating spheroidal polytropes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J. P.; Yadava, R. B.

    1992-11-01

    The theory of polytropes is fundamental in investigations of stellar structure, star formation, galactic dynamics etc., but also in the rough estimation of some processes in real stars. Some aspects of the structural features of the classical (Newtonian) equilibrium of a highly rotating spheroidal polytrope n = 1 are considered. Approximate analytical solutions to the equilibrium equations suitable for use in very short computer programs or on calculators are given. Under certain transformations, the equilibrium equation was written into first order differential equations. Transformations connecting solutions in these planes were derived. It was found that the present approach is also more suitable for the study of both slowly and highly rotating configurations.

  8. Accurate bond dissociation energies (D 0) for FHF- isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Christopher; Oswald, Rainer; Sebald, Peter; Botschwina, Peter; Stoll, Hermann; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2013-09-01

    Accurate bond dissociation energies (D 0) are determined for three isotopologues of the bifluoride ion (FHF-). While the zero-point vibrational contributions are taken from our previous work (P. Sebald, A. Bargholz, R. Oswald, C. Stein, P. Botschwina, J. Phys. Chem. A, DOI: 10.1021/jp3123677), the equilibrium dissociation energy (D e ) of the reaction ? was obtained by a composite method including frozen-core (fc) CCSD(T) calculations with basis sets up to cardinal number n = 7 followed by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit. Smaller terms beyond fc-CCSD(T) cancel each other almost completely. The D 0 values of FHF-, FDF-, and FTF- are predicted to be 15,176, 15,191, and 15,198 cm-1, respectively, with an uncertainty of ca. 15 cm-1.

  9. Non equilibrium studies on FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The recent development of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), giving ultrafast, high intensity pulses in the X-ray and XUV energy range is opening new opportunities for WDM studies. Development of X-ray diagnostics such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray scattering, has received much attention for the in situ measurement of the structure and physical properties of matter at extreme conditions. Coupled to ultrafast pump - probe schemas, such diagnostics are giving new insights into out-of-equilibrium processes and thus validate current models. We report recent developments to perform few fs time resolved pump - probe experiments, giving access to ultrafast transient WDM states. We also present collective Thomson Scattering with soft x-ray Free Electron Laser radiation (at FLASH) as a method to track the evolution of highly transient warm dense hydrogen with around 100 fs time resolution. In addition, recent experiments at LCLS are suggesting the possibility to perform X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) on FEL facilities to provide simultaneously information on the valence electrons and on the atomic local arrangement within sub-ps time scales.

  10. [Biological experiments in microgravity: equilibrium function].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Shipov, A A; Horn, E

    2012-01-01

    The review deals with the investigations of structural and functional modifications in the equilibrium organ (EO) in invertebrates (coelenterates, shells, crustaceans and insects) and vertebrates (fishes, amphibians, rats, primates) on different ontogenetic stages in the condition of microgravity and during readaptation to the Earth's gravity. Results of the investigations detail the adaptive strategy of terrestrial organism in the environment lacking the gravitational components that leads to the discrepancy of an inner model of the body-environment schema constructed by the central nervous system at 1 g and the novel reality. It is manifested by ataxic behavior and increased graviceptors' afferentation against efferent system inactivation. The new condition is defined as a sensibilization phase ensued by the eluding phase: behavior obeys the innate motion strategy, whereas graviceptors' afferentation decreases due to activation of the efferent system. Readaptation to 1 G takes several to 50 days and proceeds as a sequence of slow in motion behavior, ataxia and vestibular sensitization. Reactivity of the gravitosensory system to microgravity was found to be age-dependent. Gain in the EO inertial mass in microgravity and reduction with return to 1 g indicates gravity relevance to EO genesis.

  11. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  12. A highly accurate ab initio potential energy surface for methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Yachmenev, Andrey; Tennyson, Jonathan; Thiel, Walter

    2016-09-01

    A new nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for methane has been generated using state-of-the-art ab initio theory. The PES is based on explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit and incorporates a range of higher-level additive energy corrections. These include core-valence electron correlation, higher-order coupled cluster terms beyond perturbative triples, scalar relativistic effects, and the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction. Sub-wavenumber accuracy is achieved for the majority of experimentally known vibrational energy levels with the four fundamentals of 12CH4 reproduced with a root-mean-square error of 0.70 cm-1. The computed ab initio equilibrium C-H bond length is in excellent agreement with previous values despite pure rotational energies displaying minor systematic errors as J (rotational excitation) increases. It is shown that these errors can be significantly reduced by adjusting the equilibrium geometry. The PES represents the most accurate ab initio surface to date and will serve as a good starting point for empirical refinement.

  13. How Accurate Are Transition States from Simulations of Enzymatic Reactions?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rate expression of traditional transition state theory (TST) assumes no recrossing of the transition state (TS) and thermal quasi-equilibrium between the ground state and the TS. Currently, it is not well understood to what extent these assumptions influence the nature of the activated complex obtained in traditional TST-based simulations of processes in the condensed phase in general and in enzymes in particular. Here we scrutinize these assumptions by characterizing the TSs for hydride transfer catalyzed by the enzyme Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase obtained using various simulation approaches. Specifically, we compare the TSs obtained with common TST-based methods and a dynamics-based method. Using a recently developed accurate hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential, we find that the TST-based and dynamics-based methods give considerably different TS ensembles. This discrepancy, which could be due equilibrium solvation effects and the nature of the reaction coordinate employed and its motion, raises major questions about how to interpret the TSs determined by common simulation methods. We conclude that further investigation is needed to characterize the impact of various TST assumptions on the TS phase-space ensemble and on the reaction kinetics. PMID:24860275

  14. Testing Equilibrium Models of Molecular Gas in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Tony

    We propose to study the molecular gas fractions and physical conditions of diffuse molecular clouds in the Magellanic Clouds using ultraviolet (UV) and optical absorption spectra, principally from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archives. We will use these data to constrain the abundance of molecular hydrogen (H_2) undetectable in CO emission surveys and to test equilibrium models that seek to predict the H_2 mass fraction and the H_2/HI ratio as functions of metallicity, column density, and thermal pressure. Our approach complements HI and CO surveys by providing direct estimates of HI and H_2 column densities. For sight lines where sufficiently high resolution spectra are available, we will use the excitation of CI to determine thermal pressures, allowing us to test models that assume thermodynamic equilibrium in order to determine the HI-H_2 balance. The recently completed Spitzer Legacy surveys of the MCs provide images of PAH emission on sub-parsec scales, which may provide a means to model the distribution and small-scale clumping of gas in the vicinity of the absorption sight lines, and thus connect the absorption data with the much coarser resolution radio data. We will investigate this possibility and the implications that small-scale clumping have for comparisons with theoretical models. A preliminary analysis of the FUSE and HST data is already underway, and we present a few early results. We seek support to continue this effort over the next two years and to disseminate our results. Our methodology is novel in several respects. It includes the use of high-resolution optical spectra to derive component models for the FUSE absorption spectra, in order to derive more accurate column densities, especially for the higher J transitions of H_2 which provide key diagnostics of density and radiation field strength. Such component models will also aid in the analysis of the CI spectra. We will work to increase

  15. Self-assembly and transformation of hybrid nano-objects and nanostructures under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Understanding how chemically derived processes control the construction and organization of matter across extended and multiple length scales is of growing interest in many areas of materials research. Here we review present equilibrium and non-equilibrium self-assembly approaches to the synthetic construction of discrete hybrid (inorganic-organic) nano-objects and higher-level nanostructured networks. We examine a range of synthetic modalities under equilibrium conditions that give rise to integrative self-assembly (supramolecular wrapping, nanoscale incarceration and nanostructure templating) or higher-order self-assembly (programmed/directed aggregation). We contrast these strategies with processes of transformative self-assembly that use self-organizing media, reaction-diffusion systems and coupled mesophases to produce higher-level hybrid structures under non-equilibrium conditions. Key elements of the constructional codes associated with these processes are identified with regard to existing theoretical knowledge, and presented as a heuristic guideline for the rational design of hybrid nano-objects and nanomaterials.

  16. Modeling rocky coastline evolution and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limber, P. W.; Murray, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the world’s rocky coastlines exhibit planform roughness in the form of alternating headlands and embayments. Along cliffed coasts, it is often assumed that headlands consist of rock that is more resistant to wave attack than in neighboring bays, because of either structural or lithologic variations. Bays would then retreat landward faster than headlands, creating the undulating planform profiles characteristic of a rocky coastal landscape. While the interplay between alongshore rock strength and nearshore wave energy is, in some circumstances, a fundamental control on coastline shape, beach sediment is also important. Laboratory experiments and field observations have shown that beach sediment, in small volumes, can act as an abrasive tool to encourage sea cliff retreat. In large volumes, though, sediment discourages wave attack on the cliff face, acting as a protective barrier. This nonlinearity suggests a means for headland persistence, even without alongshore variations in rock strength: bare-rock headlands could retreat more slowly than, or at the same rate as, neighboring sediment-filled embayments because of alongshore variations in the availability of beach sediment. Accordingly, nearshore sediment dynamics (i.e. sediment production from sea cliff retreat and alongshore sediment transport) could promote the development of autogenic planform geometry. To explore these ideas, we present numerical and analytical modeling of large-scale (> one kilometer) and long-term (millennial-scale) planform rocky coastline evolution, in which sediment is supplied by both sea cliff erosion and coastal rivers and is distributed by alongshore sediment transport. We also compare model predictions with real landscapes. Previously, our modeling exercises focused on a basic rocky coastline configuration where lithologically-homogeneous sea cliffs supplied all beach sediment and maintained a constant alongshore height. Results showed that 1) an equilibrium alongshore

  17. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  18. A general framework for ion equilibrium calculations in compacted bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birgersson, Martin

    2017-03-01

    An approach for treating chemical equilibrium between compacted bentonite and aqueous solutions is presented. The treatment is based on conceptualizing bentonite as a homogeneous mixture of water and montmorillonite, and assumes Gibbs-Donnan membrane equilibrium across interfaces to external solutions. An equation for calculating the electrostatic potential difference between bentonite and external solution (Donnan potential) is derived and solved analytically for some simple systems. The solutions are furthermore analyzed in order to illuminate the general mechanisms of ion equilibrium and their relation to measurable quantities. A method is suggested for estimating interlayer activity coefficients based on the notion of an interlayer ionic strength. Using this method, several applications of the framework are presented, giving a set of quantitative predictions which may be relatively simply tested experimentally, e.g.: (1) the relative amount of anions entering the bentonite depends approximately on the square-root of the external concentration for a 1:2 salt (e.g. CaCl2). For a 1:1 salt (e.g. NaCl) the dependence is approximately linear, and for a 1:2 salt (e.g. Na2SO4) the dependence is approximately quadratic. (2) Bentonite contains substantially more nitrate as compared to chloride if equilibrated with the two salt solutions at equal external concentration. (3) Potassium bentonite generally contains more anions as compared to sodium bentonite if equilibrated at the same external concentration. (4) The anion concentration ratio in two bentonite samples of different cations (but with the same density and cation exchange capacity) resembles the ion exchange selectivity coefficient for that specific cation pair. The results show that an adequate treatment of chemical equilibrium between interlayers and bulk solutions are essential when modeling compacted bentonite, and that activity corrections generally are required for relevant ion equilibrium calculations. It

  19. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  20. Equilibrium limit of thermal conduction and boundary scattering in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Justin B; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Çağın, Tahir

    2014-06-28

    Determining the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of nanostructures is especially challenging in that, aside from the phonon-phonon scattering present in large systems, the scattering of phonons from the system boundary greatly influences heat transport, particularly when system length (L) is less than the average phonon mean free path (MFP). One possible route to modeling κ in these systems is through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, inherently including both phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering effects in the classical limit. Here, we compare current MD methods for computing κ in nanostructures with both L ⩽ MFP and L ≫ MFP, referred to as mean free path constrained (cMFP) and unconstrained (uMFP), respectively. Using a (10,0) CNT (carbon nanotube) as a benchmark case, we find that while the uMFP limit of κ is well-defined through the use of equilibrium MD and the time-correlation formalism, the standard equilibrium procedure for κ is not appropriate for the treatment of the cMFP limit because of the large influence of boundary scattering. To address this issue, we define an appropriate equilibrium procedure for cMFP systems that, through comparison to high-fidelity non-equilibrium methods, is shown to be the low thermal gradient limit to non-equilibrium results. Further, as a means of predicting κ in systems having L ≫ MFP from cMFP results, we employ an extrapolation procedure based on the phenomenological, boundary scattering inclusive expression of Callaway [Phys. Rev. 113, 1046 (1959)]. Using κ from systems with L ⩽ 3 μm in the extrapolation, we find that the equilibrium uMFP κ of a (10,0) CNT can be predicted within 5%. The equilibrium procedure is then applied to a variety of carbon-based nanostructures, such as graphene flakes (GF), graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), CNTs, and icosahedral fullerenes, to determine the influence of size and environment (suspended versus supported) on κ. Concerning the GF and GNR systems, we find that

  1. Rapid Equilibrium-Ordered Enzyme Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauncey, Thomas R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) characteristic initial velocity behavior (considering the five-step reaction sequence for rapid equilibrium-order bisubstrate mechanisms); (2) dead-end inhibition; (3) inhibition by single products; and (4) an activator as a leading reactant. (JN)

  2. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  3. Direct Determination of the Equilibrium Unbinding Potential Profile for a Short DNA Duplex from Force Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A

    2004-05-04

    Modern force microscopy techniques allow researchers to use mechanical forces to probe interactions between biomolecules. However, such measurements often happen in non-equilibrium regime, which precludes straightforward extraction of the equilibrium energy information. Here we use the work averaging method based on Jarzynski equality to reconstruct the equilibrium interaction potential from the unbinding of a complementary 14-mer DNA duplex from the results of non-equilibrium single-molecule measurements. The reconstructed potential reproduces most of the features of the DNA stretching transition, previously observed only in equilibrium stretching of long DNA sequences. We also compare the reconstructed potential with the thermodynamic parameters of DNA duplex unbinding and show that the reconstruction accurately predicts duplex melting enthalpy.

  4. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  5. Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC) For Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujling

    2014-02-24

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids

  6. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    For Earth re-entry at velocities between 8 and 11.5 km/s, the accuracy of NASA's computational uid dynamic and radiative simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation is assessed through comparisons with measurements. These measurements were obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79% N2 : 21% O2 by mole) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08% N2 : 20.95% O2 : 0.04% CO2 : 0.93% Ar by mole). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth re-entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to examine critical aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance pro les integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) through to the Near Infra-Red (NIR), were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURA/HARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40% and over-predict by as much as 12% depending on the shock speed. DPLR/NEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50% and over-predict by as much as 20% depending

  7. Angularly Adaptive P1 - Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-08-08

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  8. Angularly Adaptive P1-Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-12-13

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  9. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  10. Communication: An accurate global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, Richard E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Lolur, Phalgun; Li, Anyang; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2013-11-28

    We report a new full-dimensional and global potential energy surface (PES) for the O + O{sub 2} → O{sub 3} ozone forming reaction based on explicitly correlated multireference configuration interaction (MRCI-F12) data. It extends our previous [R. Dawes, P. Lolur, J. Ma, and H. Guo, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)] dynamically weighted multistate MRCI calculations of the asymptotic region which showed the widely found submerged reef along the minimum energy path to be the spurious result of an avoided crossing with an excited state. A spin-orbit correction was added and the PES tends asymptotically to the recently developed long-range electrostatic model of Lepers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 234305 (2012)]. This PES features: (1) excellent equilibrium structural parameters, (2) good agreement with experimental vibrational levels, (3) accurate dissociation energy, and (4) most-notably, a transition region without a spurious reef. The new PES is expected to allow insight into the still unresolved issues surrounding the kinetics, dynamics, and isotope signature of ozone.

  11. Kinetics of faceting of crystals in growth, etching, and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, D. G.; Schmidt, L. D.; Aris, R.

    1993-03-01

    The faceting of crystals in equilibrium with the gas phase and also during crystal growth and etching conditions is studied using the Monte Carlo method. The dynamics of the transformation of unstable crystallographic orientations into hill and valley structures and the spatial patterns that develop are examined as functions of surface temperature, crystallographic orientation, and strength of interatomic potential for two transport processes: adsorption-desorption and surface diffusion. The results are compared with the continuum theory for facet formation. Thermodynamically unstable orientations break into hill and valley structures, and faceting exhibits three time regimes: disordering, facet nucleation, and coarsening of small facets to large facets. Faceting is accelerated as temperature increases, but thermal roughening can occur at high temperatures. Surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism at short times and small facets but adsorption-desorption becomes important at long times and large facets. Growth and etching promote faceting for conditions close to equilibrium but induce kinetic roughening for conditions far from equilibrium. Simultaneous irreversible growth and etching conditions with fast surface diffusion result in enhanced faceting.

  12. Statistical equilibrium predictions of jets and spots on Jupiter

    PubMed Central

    Turkington, Bruce; Majda, Andrew; Haven, Kyle; DiBattista, Mark

    2001-01-01

    An equilibrium statistical theory of coherent structures is applied to midlatitude bands in the northern and southern hemispheres of Jupiter. The theory imposes energy and circulation constraints on the large-scale motion and uses a prior distribution on potential vorticity fluctuations to parameterize the small-scale turbulent eddies. Nonlinearly stable coherent structures are computed by solving the constrained maximum entropy principle governing the equilibrium states of the statistical theory. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the observed large-scale features of the weather layer if and only if the prior distribution has anticyclonic skewness, meaning that intense anticyclones predominate at small scales. Then the computations show that anticyclonic vortices emerge at the latitudes of the Great Red Spot and the White Ovals in the southern band, whereas in the northern band no vortices form within the zonal jets. Recent observational data from the Galileo mission support the occurrence of intense small-scale anticyclonic forcing. The results suggest the possibility of using equilibrium statistical theory for inverse modeling of the small-scale characteristics of the Jovian atmosphere from observed features. PMID:11592986

  13. Scalar Fluctuations from Extended Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    In the framework of extended non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the local non-equilibrium state of a liquid is described by the density, temperature, and a structural variable, ζ, and its rate-of-change. ζ is the ensemble average of a function A (Q) of the configuration co-ordinates, and it is assumed to relax to local equilibrium in a time short compared to the time for diffusion of an appreciable number of particles into the system. By a projection operator technique of Grabert, an equation is derived from the Liouville equation for the distribution of fluctuations in TV, the particle number, and in A and Ȧ. An approximate solution is proposed which exhibits nonequilibrium corrections to the Einstein function in the form of a sum of thermodynamic forces. For a particular structural model, the corresponding non-Einstein contributions to correlation functions are estimated to be very small. For variables of the type considered here, the thermodynamic pressure is found to equal the pressure trace.

  14. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. [Good laboratory practice of equilibrium solubility measurement II. Study of pH-dependent solubility of ionizable compounds].

    PubMed

    Völgyi, Gergely; Baka, Edit; Kovács, Márta; Takácsné, Novák Krisztina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the pH-equilibrium solubility profiles of ionizable drugs are presented. The aim of the present work was to study the validity of the Henderson-Hasselbalch (HH) relationship in the case of structurally diverse weak bases. In the case of monoprotic bases, namely papaverine, promethazine and propafenone the experimental equilibrium solubility data precisely follow the theoretical HH curve until the limit of salt solubility. The common ion effect on salt solubility was found to be significant at low pHs. Deviation from the HH equation in the case of dibasic quetiapine hydrogen fumarate can be easily interpreted with the formation of different salt compositions. The significance of pH control and the effect of the salt form (e.g., fumarate) was also investigated. It is critical that the pKa value and the intrinsic solubility are accurately determined when the HH relationship is used to predict the pH-dependent aqueous solubility of drugs.

  16. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase ( PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  17. Effects of secondary yield parameter variation on predicted equilibrium potential of an object in a charging environment. [using computerized simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1979-01-01

    The sensitivity of predicted equilibrium potential to changes in secondary electron yield parameters was investigated using MATCHG, a simple charging code which incorporates the NASCAP material property formulations. The equilibrium potential was found to be a sensitive function of one of the two parameters specifying secondary electron yield due to proton impact and of essentially all the parameters specifying yield due to electron impact. The information on the electron generated secondary yield parameters was discovered to be obtainable from monoenergetic beam charging data if charging rates as well as equilibrium potentials are accurately recorded.

  18. Non-equilibrium Helium Ionization in an MHD Simulation of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11-18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  19. NON-EQUILIBRIUM HELIUM IONIZATION IN AN MHD SIMULATION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical