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Sample records for accurate event locations

  1. Location of long-period events below Kilauea Volcano using seismic amplitudes and accurate relative relocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, J.; Got, J.-L.; Okubo, P.

    2003-01-01

    We present methods for improving the location of long-period (LP) events, deep and shallow, recorded below Kilauea Volcano by the permanent seismic network. LP events might be of particular interest to understanding eruptive processes as their source mechanism is assumed to directly involve fluid transport. However, it is usually difficult or impossible to locate their source using traditional arrival time methods because of emergent wave arrivals. At Kilauea, similar LP waveform signatures suggest the existence of LP multiplets. The waveform similarity suggests spatially close sources, while catalog solutions using arrival time estimates are widely scattered beneath Kilauea's summit caldera. In order to improve estimates of absolute LP location, we use the distribution of seismic amplitudes corrected for station site effects. The decay of the amplitude as a function of hypocentral distance is used for inferring LP location. In a second stage, we use the similarity of the events to calculate their relative positions. The analysis of the entire LP seismicity recorded between January 1997 and December 1999 suggests that a very large part of the LP event population, both deep and shallow, is generated by a small number of compact sources. Deep events are systematically composed of a weak high-frequency onset followed by a low-frequency wave train. Aligning the low-frequency wave trains does not lead to aligning the onsets indicating the two parts of the signal are dissociated. This observation favors an interpretation in terms of triggering and resonance of a magmatic conduit. Instead of defining fault planes, the precise relocation of similar LP events, based on the alignment of the high-energy low-frequency wave trains, defines limited size volumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nian; Shen, Yang; Flinders, Ashton; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (>100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example to provide realistic topography. A grid search algorithm is combined with the 3-D strain Green's tensor database to improve search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solutions. The strain Green's tensor is calculated using a 3-D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are obtained based on the least squares misfit between the "observed" and predicted P and P coda waves. The 95% confidence interval of the solution is provided as an a posteriori error estimation. For shallow events tested in the study, scattering is mainly due to topography in comparison with stochastic lateral velocity heterogeneity. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces solution uncertainty. The solution remains robust with wide ranges of random noises in data, unmodeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors. The method can be extended to locate pairs of sources in close proximity by differential waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity, further reducing errors caused by unmodeled velocity structures.

  3. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data.

  4. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking

    PubMed Central

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data. PMID:27185465

  5. Improved Event Location Uncertainty Estimates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-30

    model (such as Gaussian, spherical or exponential) typically used in geostatistics, we define the robust variogram model as the median regression curve...variogram model estimation We define the robust variogram model as the median regression curve of the residual difference squares for station pairs of...develop methodologies that improve location uncertainties in the presence of correlated, systematic model errors and non-Gaussian measurement errors. We

  6. Nonexposure Accurate Location K-Anonymity Algorithm in LBS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper tackles location privacy protection in current location-based services (LBS) where mobile users have to report their exact location information to an LBS provider in order to obtain their desired services. Location cloaking has been proposed and well studied to protect user privacy. It blurs the user's accurate coordinate and replaces it with a well-shaped cloaked region. However, to obtain such an anonymous spatial region (ASR), nearly all existent cloaking algorithms require knowing the accurate locations of all users. Therefore, location cloaking without exposing the user's accurate location to any party is urgently needed. In this paper, we present such two nonexposure accurate location cloaking algorithms. They are designed for K-anonymity, and cloaking is performed based on the identifications (IDs) of the grid areas which were reported by all the users, instead of directly on their accurate coordinates. Experimental results show that our algorithms are more secure than the existent cloaking algorithms, need not have all the users reporting their locations all the time, and can generate smaller ASR. PMID:24605060

  7. Nonexposure accurate location K-anonymity algorithm in LBS.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jinying; Zhang, Fengli

    2014-01-01

    This paper tackles location privacy protection in current location-based services (LBS) where mobile users have to report their exact location information to an LBS provider in order to obtain their desired services. Location cloaking has been proposed and well studied to protect user privacy. It blurs the user's accurate coordinate and replaces it with a well-shaped cloaked region. However, to obtain such an anonymous spatial region (ASR), nearly all existent cloaking algorithms require knowing the accurate locations of all users. Therefore, location cloaking without exposing the user's accurate location to any party is urgently needed. In this paper, we present such two nonexposure accurate location cloaking algorithms. They are designed for K-anonymity, and cloaking is performed based on the identifications (IDs) of the grid areas which were reported by all the users, instead of directly on their accurate coordinates. Experimental results show that our algorithms are more secure than the existent cloaking algorithms, need not have all the users reporting their locations all the time, and can generate smaller ASR.

  8. Hierarchical Bayesian Approach to Locating Seismic Events

    SciTech Connect

    Johannesson, G; Myers, S C; Hanley, W G

    2005-11-09

    We propose a hierarchical Bayesian model for conducting inference on the location of multiple seismic events (earthquakes) given data on the arrival of various seismic phases to sensor locations. The model explicitly accounts for the uncertainty associated with a theoretical seismic-wave travel-time model used along with the uncertainty of the arrival data. Posterior inferences is carried out using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC).

  9. Accurate relative location estimates for the North Korean nuclear tests using empirical slowness corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna, T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2017-01-01

    velocity gradients reduce the residuals, the relative location uncertainties and the sensitivity to the combination of stations used. The traveltime gradients appear to be overestimated for the regional phases, and teleseismic relative location estimates are likely to be more accurate despite an apparent lower precision. Calibrations for regional phases are essential given that smaller magnitude events are likely not to be recorded teleseismically. We discuss the implications for the absolute event locations. Placing the 2006 event under a local maximum of overburden at 41.293°N, 129.105°E would imply a location of 41.299°N, 129.075°E for the January 2016 event, providing almost optimal overburden for the later four events.

  10. Accurate Relative Location Estimates for the North Korean Nuclear Tests Using Empirical Slowness Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Pabian, F.; Näsholm, S. P.; Kværna', T.; Mykkeltveit, S.

    2016-10-01

    modified velocity gradients reduce the residuals, the relative location uncertainties, and the sensitivity to the combination of stations used. The traveltime gradients appear to be overestimated for the regional phases, and teleseismic relative location estimates are likely to be more accurate despite an apparent lower precision. Calibrations for regional phases are essential given that smaller magnitude events are likely not to be recorded teleseismically. We discuss the implications for the absolute event locations. Placing the 2006 event under a local maximum of overburden at 41.293°N, 129.105°E would imply a location of 41.299°N, 129.075°E for the January 2016 event, providing almost optimal overburden for the later four events.

  11. It's All about Location, Location, Location: Children's Memory for the "Where'' of Personally Experienced Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Doydum, Ayzit O.; Pathman, Thanujeni; Larkina, Marina; Guler, O. Evren; Burch, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Episodic memory is defined as the ability to recall specific past events located in a particular time and place. Over the preschool and into the school years, there are clear developmental changes in memory for when events took place. In contrast, little is known about developmental changes in memory for where events were experienced. In the…

  12. The accurate location of the injection-induced microearthquakes in German Continental Deep Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yi-Min; Chen, Yun-Tai

    2002-11-01

    From August 21, 2000 to October 20, 2000 a fluid injection-induced seismicity experiment has been carried out in the KTB (German Continental Deep Drilling Program). The KTB seismic network recorded more than 2 700 events. Among them 237 events were of high signal-to-noise ratio, and were processed and accurately located. When the events were located, non KTB events were weeded out by Wadati’s method. The standard deviation, mean and median were obtained by Jackknife’s technique, and finally the events were accurately located by Geiger’s method so that the mean error is about 0.1 km. No earthquakes with focal depth greater than 9.3 km, which is nearly at the bottom of the hole, were detected. One of the explanation is that at such depths the stress levels may not close to the rock’s frictional strength so that failure could not be induced by the relatively small perturbation in pore pressure. Or at these depths there may be no permeable, well-oriented faults. This depth may be in close proximity to the bottom of the hole to the brittle-ductile transition, even in this relatively stable interior of the interaplate. This phenomenon is explained by the experimental results and geothermal data from the superdeep borehole.

  13. Event Clustering: Accuracy and Precision of Multiple Event Locations with Sparse Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, T. K.; Wallace, T. C.

    2002-12-01

    In the last 15 years passive PASSCAL experiments have been fielded on every continent. Most of these deployments were designed to record teleseismic or large local seismic events to infer crustal and mantle structure. However, the deployments inevitably record small, local seismicity. Unfortunately, the configuration of the experiments are not optimal for location (typically the stations are arranged in linear arrays), and the seismicity is recorded at a very limited number of stations. The standard location procedure (Geiger's method) is severely limited without a detailed crustal model. A number of methods have been developed to improve relative location precision, including Joint Hypocenter Determination (JHD) and Progressive Multiple Event Location (PMEL). In this study we investigate the performance of PMEL for a very sparse network where there appears to be strong event clustering. CHARGE is a passive deployment of broadband seismometers in Chile and Argentina, with a primary focus of investigating the changes in dip along the descending Nazca Plate. The CHARGE stations recorded a large number of small, local events in 2000-2002. For this study events were selected from the northern profile (approximately along 30o S) in Chile. The events look similar, and appear to be clustered southeast of the city of La Serena. We performed three sets of experiments to investigate precision: (1) iterative Master Event Corrections to measure the scale length of clusters, (2) PMEL locations, and (3) PMEL locations using a cross-correlation to determine accurate relative phase timing. The analysis shows that for the PMEL experiment clusters must occupy an area of 600 km2 for the results to be consistent. We will present a method to estimate the precision errors based on bootstrapping. Charge Team: S. Beck, G. Zandt, M. Anderson, H. Folsom, R. Fromm, T. Shearer, L. Wagner, and P. Alvarado (all University of Arizona), J. Campos, E. Kausel, and J. Paredes (all University of

  14. Maternal recall of infant feeding events is accurate.

    PubMed Central

    Launer, L J; Forman, M R; Hundt, G L; Sarov, B; Chang, D; Berendes, H W; Naggan, L

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Retrospective infant feeding data are important to the study of child and adult health patterns. The accuracy of maternal recall of past infant feeding events was examined and specifically the infant's age when breast feeding was stopped and formula feeding and solid foods were introduced. DESIGN AND SETTING--The sample consisted of Bedouin Arab women (n = 318) living in the Negev in Israel who were a part of a larger cohort participating in a prospective study of infant health and who were delivered of their infants between July 1 and December 15, 1981. Data from interviews conducted 12 and 18 months postpartum were compared to the standard data collected six months postpartum. MAIN RESULTS--As length of recall increased there was a small increase in the mean difference, and its standard deviation, between the standard and recalled age when breast feeding was stopped and formula feeding and solid foods were started. Recall on formula feeding was less accurate than recall on solid foods and breast feeding. In particular, among those 61% reporting formula use at the six month interview, 51% did not recall introducing formula when interviewed at 18 months. The odds ratio (95% CI) of stunting versus normal length for age for formula fed versus breast fed infants based on recall data (OR = 2.07; 95% CI 0.82-5.22) differed only slightly from those based on the standard data (OR = 2.21; 95% CI 0.77-6.37). The accuracy of a mother's recall varied with her child's nutritional status at the time of the interview, but not with other sociodemographic, infant, or interviewer characteristics. CONCLUSIONS--Retrospective infant feeding data based on maternal recall of events up to 18 months in the past can be used with confidence in epidemiological studies. However, data on formula feeding may not be as accurate as data on breast feeding and solid food feeding, and accuracy may decrease as length of recall increases. PMID:1645071

  15. Methods for Improving Seismic Event Location Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-22

    and testing of a 3D DD tomography code, starting from the DD location code hypoDD. We applied our new DD tomography algorithm, tomoDD , to a dataset from...initial application (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). We also submitted the DD tomography code ( tomoDD ) to our Product Integrator. An additional version of the... tomoDD , are: r+-rdi At _uJsAtJ k • axI 1=1 J I k! aT’ i k~f d (5) - xAxi +Ati + 8u ds Our tomography algorithm incorporates first-difference smoothing

  16. A Bayesian Method to Apply the Results of Multiple-Event Seismic Location to a Subsequent Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, G.; Myers, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    BayesLoc is a Bayesian multiple-event seismic locator that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm to sample possible seismic hypocenters, travel-time corrections, and the precision of observed arrival data (absolute picks and differential times based on cross-correlated waveforms). By simultaneously locating multiple seismic events, regional biases in the assumed travel-time model (e.g., ak135) can be estimated and corrected for, and data from different seismic stations and phases can be weighted to reflect their accuracy/precision for an event cluster. As such, multiple-event locators generally yield more accurate locations than single-event locators, which lack the data to resolve the underlying travel-time model and adaptively "weight" the arrival data differently for each station and phase. On the other hand, single-event locators are computationally more attractive, making them more suitable for rapid (realtime) location of seismic activity. We present a novel approach to approximate the location accuracy of the BayesLoc multiple-event analysis at a computational cost that is comparable to BayesLoc single-event analysis. The proposed approach consists of two steps: a precomputed multiple-event training analysis and subsequent real-time, single-event location for new events. The precomputed training analsysis consists of carrying out a multiple-event BayesLoc run in a given target event cluster, yielding a posterior sample of travel-time corrections and weights. Given a new event in the vicinity of the training cluster, a BayesLoc single-event run is carried out which samples the travel-time corrections and weights from the multiple-event training run. Hence, it has all the benefits of the multiple-event run at the cost of a single-event run. We present the theoretical underpinnings of the new approach and we compare event location results for the full multiple-event, single-event, and the new approaches. This work was performed under the auspices of

  17. A Comparison of Multiple-Event Location Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, E. R.; Rodi, W.; Bergman, E. A.; Waldhauser, F.; Pavlis, G. L.; Israelsson, H.; Dewey, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Multiple-event location methods solve jointly for the location parameters (hypocenters and origin times) of seismic events in a cluster and travel-time corrections at the stations recording the events. This paper reports some preliminary comparisons of five such methods that have been developed over the years: hypocentral decomposition (HDC), double differencing (DD), progressive multiple-event location (PMEL), joint hypocenter determination (JHD), and a recently developed algorithm based on grid search (GMEL). We have applied each method to two adjacent earthquake clusters in Turkey: 33 events from the 17 Aug 1999 Izmit earthquake sequence and 41 events from the 12 Nov 1999 Duzce sequence. Previously, Engdahl and Bergman (2001) had applied HDC to these clusters using Pn and teleseismic P arrival times from NEIC and ground-truth (local network) locations for a few of the events. Their data set comprised approximately 3500 arrivals at 640 stations for the Izmit cluster and 3200 arrivals at 600 stations for Duzce. We applied the other multiple-event location methods to the same set of phase picks, using the same phase identifications and fixed event depths that were used in the HDC analysis. While the five algorithms are quite different in their computational approach, our initial results indicate that the methods yield quite similar relative event locations when they are applied with the same data and assumptions. However, they resolve the trade-off between the centroid location of a cluster and station corrections differently, and they also differ in how they use ground-truth information to constrain this trade-off and obtain absolute event locations. The locations relative to the cluster centroids generally agreed within 5 km, but was on the order of 10 km in some instances. This may have to do with the different schemes for weighting data used by the different methods, which cannot always be equalized between methods. To test this hypothesis, we applied GMEL with

  18. Using epicenter location to differentiate events from natural background seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Walter, W R

    1999-07-26

    Efforts to more effectively monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (commonly referred to as the CTBT) include research into methods of seismic discrimination. The most common seismic discriminants exploit differences in seismic amplitude for differing source types. Amplitude discriminants are quite effective when wave-propagation (a.k.a. path) effects are properly accounted for. However, because path effects can be exceedingly complex, path calibration is often accomplished empirically by spatially interpolating amplitude characteristics for a set of calibration earthquakes with techniques like Bayesian kriging. As a result, amplitude discriminants can be highly effective when natural seismicity provides sufficient event coverage to characterize a region. However, amplitude discrimination can become less effective for events that are far from historical (path-calibration) events. It is intuitive that events occurring at a distance from historical seismicity patterns are inherently suspect. However, quantifying the degree to which a particular event is unexpected could be of great utility in CTBT monitoring. Epicenter location is commonly used as a qualitative discriminant. For instance, if a seismic event is located in the deep ocean, then the event is generally considered to be an earthquake. Such qualitative uses of seismic location have great utility; however, a quantitative method to differentiate events from the natural pattern of seismicity could significantly advance the applicability of location as a discriminant for source type. Clustering of earthquake epicenters is the underlying aspect of earthquake seismicity that allows for an epicenter-based discriminant, and we explore the use of fractal characterization of clustering to characterize seismicity patters. We then evaluate the likelihood that an event at any given location is drawn from the background population. The use of this technique can help to identifying events that are inconsistent

  19. Accurate Event-Driven Motion Compensation in High-Resolution PET Incorporating Scattered and Random Events

    PubMed Central

    Dinelle, Katie; Cheng, Ju-Chieh; Shilov, Mikhail A.; Segars, William P.; Lidstone, Sarah C.; Blinder, Stephan; Rousset, Olivier G.; Vajihollahi, Hamid; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Wong, Dean F.; Sossi, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    With continuing improvements in spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, small patient movements during PET imaging become a significant source of resolution degradation. This work develops and investigates a comprehensive formalism for accurate motion-compensated reconstruction which at the same time is very feasible in the context of high-resolution PET. In particular, this paper proposes an effective method to incorporate presence of scattered and random coincidences in the context of motion (which is similarly applicable to various other motion correction schemes). The overall reconstruction framework takes into consideration missing projection data which are not detected due to motion, and additionally, incorporates information from all detected events, including those which fall outside the field-of-view following motion correction. The proposed approach has been extensively validated using phantom experiments as well as realistic simulations of a new mathematical brain phantom developed in this work, and the results for a dynamic patient study are also presented. PMID:18672420

  20. Bolus location associated with videofluoroscopic and respirodeglutometric events.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Adrienne L; He, Xuming; Barkmeier, Joseph; Van Leer, Eva

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the relation between specific events observed with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and respirodeglutometry. The order of occurrence was determined for each of 31 events (18 videofluoroscopic, 13 respirodeglutometric). Using 1 video frame (33.3 ms) as the maximum distance allowed between the average times of 2 events in the same cluster, 8 potential clusters were identified, 3 of which were statistically confirmed based on 90% confidence intervals on the mean time distances between events. Confirmed clusters included the time of (a) complete velar descent and the onset of the small noninspiratory flow (SNIF), (b) full separation of the base of the tongue from the pharyngeal wall and SNIF nadir, complete upper esophageal sphincter closure, and SNIF nadir, and (c) onset of epiglottic return and apnea offset. The onset of respiratory flow occurred within 13 ms after the onset of epiglottic return. Additionally, the percentage of swallows during which the bolus head or tail was located at each of 6 locations was determined for 20 of these events (10 videofluoroscopic, 10 respirodeglutometric). The 6 locations of interest included the oral cavity, base of tongue, valleculae, pyriform sinuses, upper esophageal sphincter, and the esophagus. Lastly, of the 72 swallows performed by these healthy, young adults, 65 (90.3%) were preceded by expiration, and all (100%) were followed by expiration.

  1. Event location in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, C.A.; Myers, S.C.; Ruppert, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) CTBT R{ampersand}D program has made significant progress towards improving the ability of the IMS seismic network to locate small-magnitude events in the Middle East and North Africa (MIYNA). Given that high-grade ground truth (such as known explosions) has been difficult to obtain in these regions, we have placed a significant effort towards the development of a teleseismically constrained seismic database that provides event locations good to within 20m km. This data set is used to make an initial evaluation of the effectiveness of calibration on the proposed seismic IMS network in the MWNA. Utilizing a surrogate IMS regional network in the Middle East we find that when a seismic event lies within the footprint of the recording network the uncalibrated event locations are good to within about 25 km of the teleseismically constrained (TC) location. Using region-specific static station corrections further reduces this difference to about 20 km. To obtain further improvement in location accuracy we have used the modified kriging technique developed by SNL to interpolate new travel-time corrections. We compare this technique withe other robust linear interpolation techniques with the goal of enhancing the estimation of travel-time corrections. This is important to TC events which we find can have large uncorrelated uncertainties. Finally, we are making a large effort to incorporate LLNL analyst picks on primary and secondary phases and develop azimuth and slownsess estimates horn current IMS arrays to improve/supplement the NEIC picks.

  2. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  3. Accuracy of teleseismic event locations in the Middle East and North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.

    1996-12-04

    Seismic characterization at the regional level requires accurate determination of phases and travel times for many combinations of stations and events. An important consideration in the process is the accuracy of event locations. The LLNL Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Research Program is currently working on data from the Middle East and North Africa, where seismic station coverage is relatively sparse and ``ground truth`` seismic source information is practically nonexistent. In this report the investigator use after shock studies as a source of local ground truth. He evaluates teleseismic location accuracy by comparing hypocenters determined by local networks with those determined teleseismically [e.g. the International Seismological Center (ISC) and the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC)]. Epicentral locations, origin times, and depth determinations of events from three aftershocks studies (Algeria, Armenia, and Iran) and one local network study (Iran) are compared with ISC and NEIC locations for the same events. The key parameter for the ISC locations is the number of observations used in the location determination. For more than 40-50 observations, the agreement rapidly diminishes and ISC locations can differ from local determinations by as much as 80 km or more. Events in Iran show a distinct bias of ISC location errors toward the northeast; events in Armenia and Algeria show no directional bias. This study shows that only events with ISC M{sub b} {gt} 4.4-4.5 or NEIS M{sub b} {gt} 4.7-4. should be used for compiling travel time information from teleseismic bulletins in the Middle East/North Africa region when locations from the NEIC and ISC bulletins are used.

  4. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A-H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A-H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A-H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors.

  5. Hydrogen atoms can be located accurately and precisely by x-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Woińska, Magdalena; Grabowsky, Simon; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and accurate structural information on hydrogen atoms is crucial to the study of energies of interactions important for crystal engineering, materials science, medicine, and pharmacy, and to the estimation of physical and chemical properties in solids. However, hydrogen atoms only scatter x-radiation weakly, so x-rays have not been used routinely to locate them accurately. Textbooks and teaching classes still emphasize that hydrogen atoms cannot be located with x-rays close to heavy elements; instead, neutron diffraction is needed. We show that, contrary to widespread expectation, hydrogen atoms can be located very accurately using x-ray diffraction, yielding bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms (A–H) that are in agreement with results from neutron diffraction mostly within a single standard deviation. The precision of the determination is also comparable between x-ray and neutron diffraction results. This has been achieved at resolutions as low as 0.8 Å using Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR). We have applied HAR to 81 crystal structures of organic molecules and compared the A–H bond lengths with those from neutron measurements for A–H bonds sorted into bonds of the same class. We further show in a selection of inorganic compounds that hydrogen atoms can be located in bridging positions and close to heavy transition metals accurately and precisely. We anticipate that, in the future, conventional x-radiation sources at in-house diffractometers can be used routinely for locating hydrogen atoms in small molecules accurately instead of large-scale facilities such as spallation sources or nuclear reactors. PMID:27386545

  6. Improving regional seismic event location through calibration of the international monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M; Hanley, W; M; Myers, S C; Pasyanos; Schultz, C; Swenson, J

    1999-07-27

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we are working to help calibrate the 170 seismic stations that are part of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring network, in order to enhance the network's ability to locate small seismic events. These low magnitude events are likely to be recorded by only the closest of seismic stations, ranging from local to near teleseismic distances. At these distance ranges, calibration statistics become highly nonstationary, challenging us to develop more general statistical models for proper calibration. To meet the goals outlined above, we are developing a general nonstationary framework to accurately calibrate seismic travel-time predictions over the full distance range, from local, to regional, to teleseismic distances. The objective of this framework is to develop valid region-specific corrections for the Middle Fast, North Africa, and portions of the Soviet Union, to assess our progress towards meeting calibration goals, and to perform cost-benefit analysis for future calibrations. The framework integrates six core components essential to accurate calibration. First, is the compilation and statistical characterization of well located reference events, including aftershock sequences, mining explosions and rockbursts, calibration explosions, and teleseismically constrained events (Harris et al., SSA 1999; Hanley et al., SSA 1999). Second, is the development of generalized velocity models based on these reference events (McNamara et al., SSA 1998; Pasyanos, SSA 1999). Third, is the development of nonstationary spatial corrections (nonstationary Bayesian kriging) that refine the base velocity models (Schultz et al., SSA 1998). The fourth component is the development of a detection model on a station-by-station basis. The fifth component is the cross-validation of calibration results to ensure internal consistency along with the continual benchmarking of our nonstationary model where event locations are

  7. Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T; Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2007-02-09

    The principal objective of this two-year study is to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection/location using array processing. We address a strategy to obtain significantly improved precision in the location of low-magnitude events compared with current fully-automatic approaches, combined with a low false alarm rate. We have developed and evaluated a prototype automatic system which uses as a basis regional array processing with fixed, carefully calibrated, site-specific parameters in conjuction with improved automatic phase onset time estimation. We have in parallel developed tools for Matched Field Processing for optimized detection and source-region identification of seismic signals. This narrow-band procedure aims to mitigate some of the causes of difficulty encountered using the standard array processing system, specifically complicated source-time histories of seismic events and shortcomings in the plane-wave approximation for seismic phase arrivals at regional arrays.

  8. Temporal and Location Based RFID Event Data Management and Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fusheng; Liu, Peiya

    Advance of sensor and RFID technology provides significant new power for humans to sense, understand and manage the world. RFID provides fast data collection with precise identification of objects with unique IDs without line of sight, thus it can be used for identifying, locating, tracking and monitoring physical objects. Despite these benefits, RFID poses many challenges for data processing and management. RFID data are temporal and history oriented, multi-dimensional, and carrying implicit semantics. Moreover, RFID applications are heterogeneous. RFID data management or data warehouse systems need to support generic and expressive data modeling for tracking and monitoring physical objects, and provide automated data interpretation and processing. We develop a powerful temporal and location oriented data model for modeling and queryingRFID data, and a declarative event and rule based framework for automated complex RFID event processing. The approach is general and can be easily adapted for different RFID-enabled applications, thus significantly reduces the cost of RFID data integration.

  9. An efficient sliding window strategy for accurate location of eukaryotic protein coding regions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nini; Lei, Xu; Guo, Jianxiu; Huang, Hao; Ren, Zhenglong

    2009-04-01

    The sliding window is one of important factors that seriously affect the accuracy of coding region prediction and location for the methods based on power spectrum technique. It is very difficult to select the appropriate sliding step and the window length for different organisms. In this study, a novel sliding window strategy is proposed on the basis of power spectrum analysis for the accurate location of eukaryotic protein coding regions. The proposed sliding window strategy is very simple and the sliding step of window is changeable. Our tests show that the average location error for the novel method is 12 bases. Compared with the previous location error of 54 bases using the fixed sliding step, the novel sliding window strategy increased the location accuracy greatly. Further, the consumed CPU time to run the novel strategy is much shorter than the strategy of the fixed length sliding step. So, the computational complexity for the novel method is decreased greatly.

  10. Leisure and Pleasure: Science events in unusual locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultitude, Karen; Margarida Sardo, Ana

    2012-12-01

    Building on concepts relating to informal science education, this work compares science-related activities which successfully engaged public audiences at three different 'generic' locations: a garden festival, a public park, and a music festival. The purpose was to identify what factors contribute to the perceived success of science communication activities occurring within leisure spaces. This article reports the results of 71 short (2-3 min) structured interviews with public participants at the events, and 18 structured observations sessions, demonstrating that the events were considered both novel and interesting by the participants. Audience members were found to perceive both educational and affective purposes from the events. Three key elements were identified as contributing to the success of the activities across the three 'generic venues': the informality of the surroundings, the involvement of 'real' scientists, and the opportunity to re-engage participants with scientific concepts outside formal education.

  11. Lithospheric Models of the Middle East to Improve Seismic Source Parameter Determination/Event Location Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    structure of Saudi Arabia through data collection from broadband stations. Figure 2. (Left) Map of Arabian Plate showing major tectonic ...State Award Nos. DE-AC52-07NA27344/24.2.3.2 and DOS_SIAA-11-AVC/NMA-1 ABSTRACT The Middle East is a tectonically complex and seismically...active region. The ability to accurately locate earthquakes and other seismic events in this region is complicated by tectonics , the uneven

  12. Pickless event detection and location: The waveform correlation event detection system (WCEDS) revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Arrowsmith, Stephen John; Young, Christopher J.; Ballard, Sanford; ...

    2016-01-01

    The standard paradigm for seismic event monitoring breaks the event detection problem down into a series of processing stages that can be categorized at the highest level into station-level processing and network-level processing algorithms (e.g., Le Bras and Wuster (2002)). At the station-level, waveforms are typically processed to detect signals and identify phases, which may subsequently be updated based on network processing. At the network-level, phase picks are associated to form events, which are subsequently located. Furthermore, waveforms are typically directly exploited only at the station-level, while network-level operations rely on earth models to associate and locate the events thatmore » generated the phase picks.« less

  13. Pickless event detection and location: The waveform correlation event detection system (WCEDS) revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Arrowsmith, Stephen John; Young, Christopher J.; Ballard, Sanford; Slinkard, Megan Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The standard paradigm for seismic event monitoring breaks the event detection problem down into a series of processing stages that can be categorized at the highest level into station-level processing and network-level processing algorithms (e.g., Le Bras and Wuster (2002)). At the station-level, waveforms are typically processed to detect signals and identify phases, which may subsequently be updated based on network processing. At the network-level, phase picks are associated to form events, which are subsequently located. Furthermore, waveforms are typically directly exploited only at the station-level, while network-level operations rely on earth models to associate and locate the events that generated the phase picks.

  14. An automated local and regional seismic event location method based on waveform stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, F.; Cesca, S.; Dahm, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic event location using automated procedures is a very important task in microseismic monitoring as well as within early warning applications. Increasingly large datasets recorded by dense network has recently favoured the development of different automated location methods. These methods are requested to be noise robust, since microseismic records are often characterized by a low signal-to-noise ratios. Most of the aforementioned standard automated location routines rely on automated phase picking and seismic phases identification (generally only P and S) and are generally based on the minimization of the residuals between the theoretical and observed arrival times of the main seismic phases. While different developed approaches allow to accurately pick P onsets, the automatic picking of the S onsets is still challenging, and posing a significant limit to the location performance. We present here a picking free location method based on the use of different characteristic functions, able to identify P and S phases. Both characteristic functions are based on the Short-Term-Average/Long-Term-Average (STA/LTA) traces. For P phases, we use as characteristic function the STA/LTA trace of the vertical energy function, whereas for the S phases we use the STA/LTA traces of a function obtained using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique. In order to locate a seismic event, the space of possible locations is scanned and both P and S characteristic functions are stacked along travel time surfaces corresponding to the selected hypocenter. Iterating this procedure on a three-dimensional grid we retrieve a multidimensional matrix whose absolute maximum corresponds tot he coordinates of the seismic event. We show the performance of our method with different applications, at different scales: 1) s set of low magnitude events recorded by a local network in southern Italy and 2) a set of seismic events recorded by a regional seismic network in Turkey. This work has

  15. An approach to automatic location of regional events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V. I.

    1999-06-01

    The conventional network location algorithms for automatic processing are based on P and S first arrivals. These procedures have the following shortcomings: (1) it is often difficult to identify the proper phase: (Pg or Pn, Sg or Sn); and (2) first arrivals are often masked by noise. Both factors may cause significant location errors. An alternative is to look for maximums of seismic energy time-distance distribution, which are less sensitive to these factors. We measure the time-of-maximum of P and S waves envelopes vs. distance for each available station of the Israel Seismic Network (ISN), thus providing a travel time curve (TTC). The record envelopes are obtained using 1D χ2 optimal detector and 3-6 Hz `short-time-average' time-curves, having enhanced sensitivity for seismic signal arrivals. The corresponding P and S time-of-maximum vs. distance functions are approximated linearly by a least-square method for a set of local earthquakes and quarry blasts. Travel time inversion for location of small events comprises three main steps: (1) cleaning of the records from noise bursts and computation of the envelopes, (2) triggering and identification of the P and S phases and computation of their energy maximums, and (3) maximization of a sum of station residuals as a function of epicenter coordinates. The maximum of the functional is looked for on a 60×60 km grid, step of 2 km, covering different parts of Israel and Jordan. The algorithm is not sensitive to the source depth, thus providing epicenter determination only, but shows to be convenient and robust. As a result of the preliminary study for a set of relatively weak 74 local earthquakes and 58 quarry blasts, ML˜1.5-2.5, we have obtained the accuracy of epicenter estimation ±6 km for 80-90% of both types of events, which is satisfactory for automatic location. The accuracy is measured relative to the ISN bulletin locations for earthquakes and the ground truth information for quarries, respectively.

  16. Accurate Damage Location in Complex Composite Structures and Industrial Environments using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M.; Pearson, M.; Lee, W.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately locate damage in any given structure is a highly desirable attribute for an effective structural health monitoring system and could help to reduce operating costs and improve safety. This becomes a far greater challenge in complex geometries and materials, such as modern composite airframes. The poor translation of promising laboratory based SHM demonstrators to industrial environments forms a barrier to commercial up take of technology. The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a passive NDT method that detects elastic stress waves released by the growth of damage. It offers very sensitive damage detection, using a sparse array of sensors to detect and globally locate damage within a structure. However its application to complex structures commonly yields poor accuracy due to anisotropic wave propagation and the interruption of wave propagation by structural features such as holes and thickness changes. This work adopts an empirical mapping technique for AE location, known as Delta T Mapping, which uses experimental training data to account for such structural complexities. The technique is applied to a complex geometry composite aerospace structure undergoing certification testing. The component consists of a carbon fibre composite tube with varying wall thickness and multiple holes, that was loaded under bending. The damage location was validated using X-ray CT scanning and the Delta T Mapping technique was shown to improve location accuracy when compared with commercial algorithms. The onset and progression of damage were monitored throughout the test and used to inform future design iterations.

  17. Distributed fiber sensing system with wide frequency response and accurate location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Feng, Hao; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2016-02-01

    A distributed fiber sensing system merging Mach-Zehnder interferometer and phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer (Φ-OTDR) is demonstrated for vibration measurement, which requires wide frequency response and accurate location. Two narrow line-width lasers with delicately different wavelengths are used to constitute the interferometer and reflectometer respectively. A narrow band Fiber Bragg Grating is responsible for separating the two wavelengths. In addition, heterodyne detection is applied to maintain the signal to noise rate of the locating signal. Experiment results show that the novel system has a wide frequency from 1 Hz to 50 MHz, limited by the sample frequency of data acquisition card, and a spatial resolution of 20 m, according to 200 ns pulse width, along 2.5 km fiber link.

  18. Accurate and efficient long-range lightning geo-location using a VLF radio atmospheric waveform bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Ryan Khalil

    2009-07-01

    . This new technique catalogs the dominant variation in expected received waveforms to form a set of waveform banks, which are then used to estimate the propagation distance and identify features on each waveform that allow for a more accurate determination of the arrival time. Using three stations in a trial network, this new technique is used to demonstrate an accuracy of 1-4 km, depending on network geometry and the time of day. Furthermore, this technique provides an estimate of the peak current and polarity in the lightning channel, parameters that existing long-range networks do not measure using VLF radio atmospherics. The propagation distance estimated at each receiver, together with an arrival azimuth measurement, enables accurate geo-location using as few as three sensors. The redundancy offered by this range and azimuth information mitigates the complexity involved with correlating radio atmospherics from multiple sensors and enables a high detection efficiency. An overall stroke detection efficiency between ˜40-60% is estimated by correlating individual lightning stroke events to data from a commercial LF reference network. There are a significant number of additional events reported by the trial network that do not time-correlate with data from the commercial network, but the tight spatial clustering of lightning strokes between the two networks suggest that many of the unmatched events are not spurious but rather may correspond to weak cloud-to-ground strokes or cloud flashes.

  19. Incorporation of probabilistic seismic phase labels into a Bayesian multiple-event seismic locator

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S; Johannesson, G; Hanley, W

    2008-01-17

    We add probabilistic phase labels to the multiple-event joint probability function of Myers et al., 2007 that formerly included event locations, travel-time corrections, and arrival-time measurement precision. Prior information on any of the multiple-event parameters may be used. The phase-label model includes a null label that captures phases not belonging to the collection of phases under consideration. Using the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method, samples are drawn from the multiple-event joint probability function to infer the posteriori distribution that is consistent with priors and the arrival-time data set. Using this approach phase-label error can be accessed and phase-label error is propagated to all other multiple-event parameters. We test the method using a ground-truth data set of nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. We find that posteriori phase labels agree with the meticulously analyzed data set in more than 97% of instances and the results are robust even when the input phase-label information is discarded. Only when a large percentage of the arrival-time data are corrupted does prior phase label information improve resolution of multiple-event parameters. Simultaneous modeling of the entire multiple-event system results in accurate posteriori probability regions for each multiple-event parameter.

  20. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach.

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, Jaco; Malekian, Reza

    2016-06-04

    Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM) technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz). The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved.

  1. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prinsloo, Jaco; Malekian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM) technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz). The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved. PMID:27271638

  2. Accurate prediction of V1 location from cortical folds in a surface coordinate system

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Oliver P.; Rajendran, Niranjini; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Augustinack, Jean C.; Wiggins, Graham; Wald, Lawrence L.; Rosas, H. Diana; Potthast, Andreas; Schwartz, Eric L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated substantial variability of the location of primary visual cortex (V1) in stereotaxic coordinates when linear volume-based registration is used to match volumetric image intensities (Amunts et al., 2000). However, other qualitative reports of V1 location (Smith, 1904; Stensaas et al., 1974; Rademacher et al., 1993) suggested a consistent relationship between V1 and the surrounding cortical folds. Here, the relationship between folds and the location of V1 is quantified using surface-based analysis to generate a probabilistic atlas of human V1. High-resolution (about 200 μm) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7 T of ex vivo human cerebral hemispheres allowed identification of the full area via the stria of Gennari: a myeloarchitectonic feature specific to V1. Separate, whole-brain scans were acquired using MRI at 1.5 T to allow segmentation and mesh reconstruction of the cortical gray matter. For each individual, V1 was manually identified in the high-resolution volume and projected onto the cortical surface. Surface-based intersubject registration (Fischl et al., 1999b) was performed to align the primary cortical folds of individual hemispheres to those of a reference template representing the average folding pattern. An atlas of V1 location was constructed by computing the probability of V1 inclusion for each cortical location in the template space. This probabilistic atlas of V1 exhibits low prediction error compared to previous V1 probabilistic atlases built in volumetric coordinates. The increased predictability observed under surface-based registration suggests that the location of V1 is more accurately predicted by the cortical folds than by the shape of the brain embedded in the volume of the skull. In addition, the high quality of this atlas provides direct evidence that surface-based intersubject registration methods are superior to volume-based methods at superimposing functional areas of cortex, and therefore are better

  3. Ground truth seismic events and location capability at Degelen mountain, Kazakhstan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trabant, C.; Thurber, C.; Leith, W.

    2002-01-01

    We utilized nuclear explosions from the Degelen Mountain sub-region of the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS), Kazakhstan, to assess seismic location capability directly. Excellent ground truth information for these events was either known or was estimated from maps of the Degelen Mountain adit complex. Origin times were refined for events for which absolute origin time information was unknown using catalog arrival times, our ground truth location estimates, and a time baseline provided by fixing known origin times during a joint hypocenter determination (JHD). Precise arrival time picks were determined using a waveform cross-correlation process applied to the available digital data. These data were used in a JHD analysis. We found that very accurate locations were possible when high precision, waveform cross-correlation arrival times were combined with JHD. Relocation with our full digital data set resulted in a mean mislocation of 2 km and a mean 95% confidence ellipse (CE) area of 6.6 km2 (90% CE: 5.1 km2), however, only 5 of the 18 computed error ellipses actually covered the associated ground truth location estimate. To test a more realistic nuclear test monitoring scenario, we applied our JHD analysis to a set of seven events (one fixed) using data only from seismic stations within 40?? epicentral distance. Relocation with these data resulted in a mean mislocation of 7.4 km, with four of the 95% error ellipses covering less than 570 km2 (90% CE: 438 km2), and the other two covering 1730 and 8869 km2 (90% CE: 1331 and 6822 km2). Location uncertainties calculated using JHD often underestimated the true error, but a circular region with a radius equal to the mislocation covered less than 1000 km2 for all events having more than three observations. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bolus Location Associated with Videofluoroscopic and Respirodeglutometric Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Adrienne L.; He, Xuming; Barkmeier, Joseph; Van Leer, Eva

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the relation between specific events observed with simultaneous videofluoroscopy and respirodeglutometry. The order of occurrence was determined for each of 31 events (18 videofluoroscopic, 13 respirodeglutometric). Using 1 video frame (33.3 ms) as the maximum distance allowed between the…

  5. Leisure and Pleasure: Science Events in Unusual Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bultitude, Karen; Sardo, Ana Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Building on concepts relating to informal science education, this work compares science-related activities which successfully engaged public audiences at three different "generic" locations: a garden festival, a public park, and a music festival. The purpose was to identify what factors contribute to the perceived success of science…

  6. A single geophone to locate seismic events on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, Aurélien; Berenguer, Jean-Luc; Bozdag, Ebru

    2016-04-01

    Knowing the structure of Mars is a key point in understanding the formation of Earth-like planets as plate tectonics and erosion have erased the original suface of the Earth formation. Installing a seismometer on Mars surface makes it possible to identify its structure. An important step in the identification of the structure of a planet is the epicenter's location of a seismic source, typically a meteoric impact or an earthquake. On Earth, the classical way of locating epicenters is triangulation, which requires at least 3 stations. The Mars InSight Project plans to set a single station with 3 components. We propose a software to locate seismic sources on Mars thanks to the 3-components simulated data of an earthquake given by Geoazur (Nice Sophia-Antipolis University, CNRS) researchers. Instrumental response of a sensor is crucial for data interpretation. We study the oscillations of geophone in several situations so as to awaken students to the meaning of damping in second order modeling. In physics, car shock absorbers are often used to illustrate the principle of damping but rarely in practical experiments. We propose the use of a simple seismometer (a string with a mass and a damper) that allows changing several parameters (inductive damping, temperature and pressure) so as to see the effects of these parameters on the impulse response and, in particular, on the damping coefficient. In a second step, we illustrate the effect of damping on a seismogram with the difficulty of identifying and interpreting the different phase arrival times with low damping.

  7. Relocating Seismicity on the Arctic Plate Boundary Using Teleseismic and Regional Phases and a Bayesian Multiple Event Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Kværna, Tormod; Larsen, Tine B.; Paulsen, Berit; Voss, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The tectonophysics of plate boundaries are illuminated by the pattern of seismicity - and the ability to locate seismic events accurately depends upon the number and quality of observations, the distribution of recording stations, and how well the traveltimes of seismic phases are modelled. The boundary between the Eurasian and North American plates between 70 and 84 degrees North hosts large seismic events which are well recorded teleseismically and many more events at far lower magnitudes that are well recorded only at regional distances. Existing seismic bulletins have considerable spread and bias resulting from limited station coverage and deficiencies in the velocity models applied; this is particularly acute for the lower magnitude events which may only be constrained by a small number of Pn and Sn arrivals. Over the past 15 years, there has been a significant improvement in the seismic network in the Arctic - a difficult region to instrument due to the harsh climate, a sparsity of quiet and accessible sites, and the expense and difficult logistics of deploying and maintaining stations. New deployments and upgrades to stations on Greenland, Svalbard, and the islands Jan Mayen, Hopen, and Bjørnøya have resulted in a sparse but stable regional seismic network which results in events down to magnitudes below 3 generating high quality Pn and Sn signals on multiple stations. A catalog of over 1000 events in the region since 1998 has been generated using many new phase readings on stations on both sides of the spreading ridge in addition to teleseismic P phases. The Bayesloc program, a Bayesian hierarchical multiple event location algorithm, has been used to relocate the full set of events iteratively and this has resulted in a significant reduction in the spread in hypocenter estimates for both large and small events. Whereas single event location algorithms minimize the vector of time residuals on an event-by-event basis, Bayesloc favours the hypocenters which

  8. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S

    2015-06-23

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres' tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms.

  9. Use of Loran-C navigation system to accurately determine sampling site location in an above ground cooling reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, R.E.; Blankinship, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental monitoring programs often require accurate determination of sampling site locations in aquatic environments. This is especially true when a {open_quotes}picture{close_quotes} of high resolution is needed for observing a changing variable in a given area and location is assumed to be important to the distribution of that variable. Sample site location can be difficult if few visible land marks are available for reference on a large body of water. The use of navigational systems such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and its predecessor, Loran-C, provide an excellent method for sample site location. McFarland (1992) discusses the practicality of GPS for location determination. This article discusses the use of Loran-C in a sampling scheme implemented at the South Texas Project Electrical Generating Station (STPEGS), Wadsworth, Texas.

  10. A General Event Location Algorithm with Applications to Eclispe and Station Line-of-Sight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Hughes, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    A general-purpose algorithm for the detection and location of orbital events is developed. The proposed algorithm reduces the problem to a global root-finding problem by mapping events of interest (such as eclipses, station access events, etc.) to continuous, differentiable event functions. A stepping algorithm and a bracketing algorithm are used to detect and locate the roots. Examples of event functions and the stepping/bracketing algorithms are discussed, along with results indicating performance and accuracy in comparison to commercial tools across a variety of trajectories.

  11. Accurate estimation of object location in an image sequence using helicopter flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Yuan-Liang; Kasturi, Rangachar

    1994-01-01

    In autonomous navigation, it is essential to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) description of the static environment in which the vehicle is traveling. For a rotorcraft conducting low-latitude flight, this description is particularly useful for obstacle detection and avoidance. In this paper, we address the problem of 3D position estimation for static objects from a monocular sequence of images captured from a low-latitude flying helicopter. Since the environment is static, it is well known that the optical flow in the image will produce a radiating pattern from the focus of expansion. We propose a motion analysis system which utilizes the epipolar constraint to accurately estimate 3D positions of scene objects in a real world image sequence taken from a low-altitude flying helicopter. Results show that this approach gives good estimates of object positions near the rotorcraft's intended flight-path.

  12. A novel method to accurately locate and count large numbers of steps by photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Custer, Thomas C.; Jashnsaz, Hossein; Walter, Nils G.; Pressé, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Photobleaching event counting is a single-molecule fluorescence technique that is increasingly being used to determine the stoichiometry of protein and RNA complexes composed of many subunits in vivo as well as in vitro. By tagging protein or RNA subunits with fluorophores, activating them, and subsequently observing as the fluorophores photobleach, one obtains information on the number of subunits in a complex. The noise properties in a photobleaching time trace depend on the number of active fluorescent subunits. Thus, as fluorophores stochastically photobleach, noise properties of the time trace change stochastically, and these varying noise properties have created a challenge in identifying photobleaching steps in a time trace. Although photobleaching steps are often detected by eye, this method only works for high individual fluorophore emission signal-to-noise ratios and small numbers of fluorophores. With filtering methods or currently available algorithms, it is possible to reliably identify photobleaching steps for up to 20–30 fluorophores and signal-to-noise ratios down to ∼1. Here we present a new Bayesian method of counting steps in photobleaching time traces that takes into account stochastic noise variation in addition to complications such as overlapping photobleaching events that may arise from fluorophore interactions, as well as on-off blinking. Our method is capable of detecting ≥50 photobleaching steps even for signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.1, can find up to ≥500 steps for more favorable noise profiles, and is computationally inexpensive. PMID:27654946

  13. Location of the Green Canyon (Offshore Southern Louisiana) Seismic Event of February 10, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, James W.; Dellinger, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    We calculated an epicenter for the Offshore Southern Louisiana seismic event of February 10, 2006 (the 'Green Canyon event') that was adopted as the preferred epicenter for the event by the USGS/NEIC. The event is held at a focal depth of 5 km; the focal depth could not be reliably calculated but was most likely between 1 km and 15 km beneath sea level. The epicenter was calculated with a radially symmetric global Earth model similar to that routinely used at the USGS/NEIC for all earthquakes worldwide. The location was calculated using P-waves recorded by seismographic stations from which the USGS/NEIC routinely obtains seismological data, plus data from two seismic exploration arrays, the Atlantis ocean-bottom node array, operated by BP in partnership with BHP Billiton Limited, and the CGG Green Canyon phase VIII multi-client towed-streamer survey. The preferred epicenter is approximately 26 km north of an epicenter earlier published by the USGS/NEIC, which was obtained without benefit of the seismic exploration arrays. We estimate that the preferred epicenter is accurate to within 15 km. We selected the preferred epicenter from a suite of trial calculations that attempted to fit arrival times of seismic energy associated with the Green Canyon event and that explored the effect of errors in the velocity model used to calculate the preferred epicenter. The various trials were helpful in confirming the approximate correctness of the preferred epicenter and in assessing the accuracy of the preferred epicenter, but none of the trial calculations, including that of the preferred epicenter, was able to reconcile arrival-time observations and assumed velocity model as well as is typical for the vast majority of earthquakes in and near the continental United States. We believe that remaining misfits between the preferred solution and the observations reflect errors in interpreted arrival times of emergent seismic phases that are due partly to a temporally extended source

  14. An infrastructure for accurate characterization of single-event transients in digital circuits☆

    PubMed Central

    Savulimedu Veeravalli, Varadan; Polzer, Thomas; Schmid, Ulrich; Steininger, Andreas; Hofbauer, Michael; Schweiger, Kurt; Dietrich, Horst; Schneider-Hornstein, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Horst; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Merk, Bruno; Hajek, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present the architecture and a detailed pre-fabrication analysis of a digital measurement ASIC facilitating long-term irradiation experiments of basic asynchronous circuits, which also demonstrates the suitability of the general approach for obtaining accurate radiation failure models developed in our FATAL project. Our ASIC design combines radiation targets like Muller C-elements and elastic pipelines as well as standard combinational gates and flip-flops with an elaborate on-chip measurement infrastructure. Major architectural challenges result from the fact that the latter must operate reliably under the same radiation conditions the target circuits are exposed to, without wasting precious die area for a rad-hard design. A measurement architecture based on multiple non-rad-hard counters is used, which we show to be resilient against double faults, as well as many triple and even higher-multiplicity faults. The design evaluation is done by means of comprehensive fault injection experiments, which are based on detailed Spice models of the target circuits in conjunction with a standard double-exponential current injection model for single-event transients (SET). To be as accurate as possible, the parameters of this current model have been aligned with results obtained from 3D device simulation models, which have in turn been validated and calibrated using micro-beam radiation experiments at the GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. For the latter, target circuits instrumented with high-speed sense amplifiers have been used for analog SET recording. Together with a probabilistic analysis of the sustainable particle flow rates, based on a detailed area analysis and experimental cross-section data, we can conclude that the proposed architecture will indeed sustain significant target hit rates, without exceeding the resilience bound of the measurement infrastructure. PMID:24748694

  15. An infrastructure for accurate characterization of single-event transients in digital circuits.

    PubMed

    Savulimedu Veeravalli, Varadan; Polzer, Thomas; Schmid, Ulrich; Steininger, Andreas; Hofbauer, Michael; Schweiger, Kurt; Dietrich, Horst; Schneider-Hornstein, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Horst; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Merk, Bruno; Hajek, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We present the architecture and a detailed pre-fabrication analysis of a digital measurement ASIC facilitating long-term irradiation experiments of basic asynchronous circuits, which also demonstrates the suitability of the general approach for obtaining accurate radiation failure models developed in our FATAL project. Our ASIC design combines radiation targets like Muller C-elements and elastic pipelines as well as standard combinational gates and flip-flops with an elaborate on-chip measurement infrastructure. Major architectural challenges result from the fact that the latter must operate reliably under the same radiation conditions the target circuits are exposed to, without wasting precious die area for a rad-hard design. A measurement architecture based on multiple non-rad-hard counters is used, which we show to be resilient against double faults, as well as many triple and even higher-multiplicity faults. The design evaluation is done by means of comprehensive fault injection experiments, which are based on detailed Spice models of the target circuits in conjunction with a standard double-exponential current injection model for single-event transients (SET). To be as accurate as possible, the parameters of this current model have been aligned with results obtained from 3D device simulation models, which have in turn been validated and calibrated using micro-beam radiation experiments at the GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. For the latter, target circuits instrumented with high-speed sense amplifiers have been used for analog SET recording. Together with a probabilistic analysis of the sustainable particle flow rates, based on a detailed area analysis and experimental cross-section data, we can conclude that the proposed architecture will indeed sustain significant target hit rates, without exceeding the resilience bound of the measurement infrastructure.

  16. Multiple-Event Seismic Location Using the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Hanley, W.

    2005-12-01

    We develop a new multiple-event location algorithm (MCMCloc) that utilizes the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Unlike most inverse methods, the MCMC approach produces a suite of solutions, each of which is consistent with observations and prior estimates of data and model uncertainties. Model parameters in MCMCloc consist of event hypocenters, and travel-time predictions. Data are arrival time measurements and phase assignments. Posteriori estimates of event locations, path corrections, pick errors, and phase assignments are made through analysis of the posteriori suite of acceptable solutions. Prior uncertainty estimates include correlations between travel-time predictions, correlations between measurement errors, the probability of misidentifying one phase for another, and the probability of spurious data. Inclusion of prior constraints on location accuracy allows direct utilization of ground-truth locations or well-constrained location parameters (e.g. from InSAR) that aid in the accuracy of the solution. Implementation of a correlation structure for travel-time predictions allows MCMCloc to operate over arbitrarily large geographic areas. Transition in behavior between a multiple-event locator for tightly clustered events and a single-event locator for solitary events is controlled by the spatial correlation of travel-time predictions. We test the MCMC locator on a regional data set of Nevada Test Site nuclear explosions. Event locations and origin times are known for these events, allowing us to test the features of MCMCloc using a high-quality ground truth data set. Preliminary tests suggest that MCMCloc provides excellent relative locations, often outperforming traditional multiple-event location algorithms, and excellent absolute locations are attained when constraints from one or more ground truth event are included. When phase assignments are switched, we find that MCMCloc properly corrects the error when predicted arrival times are separated by

  17. Detecting and Locating Seismic Events Without Phase Picks or Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, S.; Young, C. J.; Ballard, S.; Slinkard, M.

    2015-12-01

    The standard paradigm for seismic event monitoring is to scan waveforms from a network of stations and identify the arrival time of various seismic phases. A signal association algorithm then groups the picks to form events, which are subsequently located by minimizing residuals between measured travel times and travel times predicted by an Earth model. Many of these steps are prone to significant errors which can lead to erroneous arrival associations and event locations. Here, we revisit a concept for event detection that does not require phase picks or travel time curves and fuses detection, association and location into a single algorithm. Our pickless event detector exploits existing catalog and waveform data to build an empirical stack of the full regional seismic wavefield, which is subsequently used to detect and locate events at a network level using correlation techniques. Because the technique uses more of the information content of the original waveforms, the concept is particularly powerful for detecting weak events that would be missed by conventional methods. We apply our detector to seismic data from the University of Utah Seismograph Stations network and compare our results with the earthquake catalog published by the University of Utah. We demonstrate that the pickless detector can detect and locate significant numbers of events previously missed by standard data processing techniques.

  18. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform. [for sea floor geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  19. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  20. An Integrated Approach to Seismic Event Location. 1. Evaluating How Method of Location Affects the Volume of Groups of Hypocenters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-12

    1985: and Pujol , 1988). 3) Methods for evaluating errors in event locations. The classical approach to error analysis utilizes a formal statistical...minimum volume polyhedron as a practical enclosure for a set of points has not been suggested previously in the seismological or geological literature. 4 2...Set of Points in Space Background: There exist’numerous applications in seismology and geology where it is useful to define a volume in space which

  1. Locations and focal mechanisms of deep long period events beneath Aleutian Arc volcanoes using back projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, A. C.; Roman, D. C.; Haney, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Deep long period (DLP) earthquakes are commonly observed in volcanic settings such as the Aleutian Arc in Alaska. DLPs are poorly understood but are thought to be associated with movements of fluids, such as magma or hydrothermal fluids, deep in the volcanic plumbing system. These events have been recognized for several decades but few studies have gone beyond their identification and location. All long period events are more difficult to identify and locate than volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes because traditional detection schemes focus on high frequency (short period) energy. In addition, DLPs present analytical challenges because they tend to be emergent and so it is difficult to accurately pick the onset of arriving body waves. We now expect to find DLPs at most volcanic centers, the challenge lies in identification and location. We aim to reduce the element of human error in location by applying back projection to better constrain the depth and horizontal position of these events. Power et al. (2004) provided the first compilation of DLP activity in the Aleutian Arc. This study focuses on the reanalysis of 162 cataloged DLPs beneath 11 volcanoes in the Aleutian arc (we expect to ultimately identify and reanalyze more DLPs). We are currently adapting the approach of Haney (2014) for volcanic tremor to use back projection over a 4D grid to determine position and origin time of DLPs. This method holds great potential in that it will allow automated, high-accuracy picking of arrival times and could reduce the number of arrival time picks necessary for traditional location schemes to well constrain event origins. Back projection can also calculate a relative focal mechanism (difficult with traditional methods due to the emergent nature of DLPs) allowing the first in depth analysis of source properties. Our event catalog (spanning over 25 years and volcanoes) is one of the longest and largest and enables us to investigate spatial and temporal variation in DLPs.

  2. Multi-Detection Events, Probability Density Functions, and Reduced Location Area

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2016-03-01

    Abstract Several efforts have been made in the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) community to assess the benefits of combining detections of radionuclides to improve the location estimates available from atmospheric transport modeling (ATM) backtrack calculations. We present a Bayesian estimation approach rather than a simple dilution field of regard approach to allow xenon detections and non-detections to be combined mathematically. This system represents one possible probabilistic approach to radionuclide event formation. Application of this method to a recent interesting radionuclide event shows a substantial reduction in the location uncertainty of that event.

  3. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  4. Comparison of hypocenters and their uncertainties determined by three location methods: A case study on hydro-fracturing microseismic events recorded at a dense sub-surface array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, J. U.; Rhie, J.; Kim, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The hypocenters of microseismic events induced by hydro-fracturing for developing shale gas provide important information on the characteristics of the fracture networks. This information is crucial to evaluate the production rate and also make a plan for efficient hydro-fracturing design. Therefore, the accurate hypocenter determination of microseismic events is very important from the economic point of view and the tolerable location error should be only dozens of meters for this purpose. In this study, we test three methods, which are widely used for locating earthquakes in seismology, to determine the hypocenters of microseismic events generated during the commercial shale gas development and recorded at a dense sub-surface array. We selected 1-hour time window and applied automatic picking algorithm to identify events and measure P and S arrival times of them. Our automatic picking algorithm identified 84 events in given time window and 73 of them are reliably located by all three methods. The first method is based on linear and iterative inversion and locates individual events separately. The second method simultaneously locates clustered events and reduces location errors due to incorrect velocity model by introducing the station terms. The third method locates only relative rather than absolute locations of clustered events using double difference algorithm. 1D P and S-wave velocity models are constructed based on well-logging data. Automatically measured P and S arrival times are used for determining absolute locations and relative arrival times measured by waveform cross-correlation are utilized for relative locations. Our preliminary result indicates that double difference method combined with waveform cross-correlations is more applicable than other two methods in that it satisfies the required accuracy for the microseismic monitoring.

  5. Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

    2007-01-30

    In the field of nuclear explosion monitoring, it has become a priority to detect, locate, and identify seismic events down to increasingly small magnitudes. The consideration of smaller seismic events has implications for a reliable monitoring regime. Firstly, the number of events to be considered increases greatly; an exponential increase in naturally occurring seismicity is compounded by large numbers of seismic signals generated by human activity. Secondly, the signals from smaller events become more difficult to detect above the background noise and estimates of parameters required for locating the events may be subject to greater errors. Thirdly, events are likely to be observed by a far smaller number of seismic stations, and the reliability of event detection and location using a very limited set of observations needs to be quantified. For many key seismic stations, detection lists may be dominated by signals from routine industrial explosions which should be ascribed, automatically and with a high level of confidence, to known sources. This means that expensive analyst time is not spent locating routine events from repeating seismic sources and that events from unknown sources, which could be of concern in an explosion monitoring context, are more easily identified and can be examined with due care. We have obtained extensive lists of confirmed seismic events from mining and other artificial sources which have provided an excellent opportunity to assess the quality of existing fully-automatic event bulletins and to guide the development of new techniques for online seismic processing. Comparing the times and locations of confirmed events from sources in Fennoscandia and NW Russia with the corresponding time and location estimates reported in existing automatic bulletins has revealed substantial mislocation errors which preclude a confident association of detected signals with known industrial sources. The causes of the errors are well understood and are

  6. A new method for producing automated seismic bulletins: Probabilistic event detection, association, and location

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, Timothy J.; Ballard, Sanford; Young, Christopher J.; Brogan, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Given a set of observations within a specified time window, a fitness value is calculated at each grid node by summing station-specific conditional fitness values. Assuming each observation was generated by a refracted P wave, these values are proportional to the conditional probabilities that each observation was generated by a seismic event at the grid node. The node with highest fitness value is accepted as a hypothetical event location, subject to some minimal fitness value, and all arrivals within a longer time window consistent with that event are associated with it. During the association step, a variety of different phases are considered. In addition, once associated with an event, an arrival is removed from further consideration. While unassociated arrivals remain, the search for other events is repeated until none are identified.

  7. A new method for producing automated seismic bulletins: Probabilistic event detection, association, and location

    DOE PAGES

    Draelos, Timothy J.; Ballard, Sanford; Young, Christopher J.; ...

    2015-10-01

    Given a set of observations within a specified time window, a fitness value is calculated at each grid node by summing station-specific conditional fitness values. Assuming each observation was generated by a refracted P wave, these values are proportional to the conditional probabilities that each observation was generated by a seismic event at the grid node. The node with highest fitness value is accepted as a hypothetical event location, subject to some minimal fitness value, and all arrivals within a longer time window consistent with that event are associated with it. During the association step, a variety of different phasesmore » are considered. In addition, once associated with an event, an arrival is removed from further consideration. While unassociated arrivals remain, the search for other events is repeated until none are identified.« less

  8. Accurate Analysis of the Change in Volume, Location, and Shape of Metastatic Cervical Lymph Nodes During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Seishin; Tadano, Shigeru; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Koichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikawa, Masayori; Bengua, Gerard; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a method for the accurate acquisition and analysis of the variations in tumor volume, location, and three-dimensional (3D) shape of tumors during radiotherapy in the era of image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Finite element models of lymph nodes were developed based on computed tomography (CT) images taken before the start of treatment and every week during the treatment period. A surface geometry map with a volumetric scale was adopted and used for the analysis. Six metastatic cervical lymph nodes, 3.5 to 55.1 cm{sup 3} before treatment, in 6 patients with head and neck carcinomas were analyzed in this study. Three fiducial markers implanted in mouthpieces were used for the fusion of CT images. Changes in the location of the lymph nodes were measured on the basis of these fiducial markers. Results: The surface geometry maps showed convex regions in red and concave regions in blue to ensure that the characteristics of the 3D tumor geometries are simply understood visually. After the irradiation of 66 to 70 Gy in 2 Gy daily doses, the patterns of the colors had not changed significantly, and the maps before and during treatment were strongly correlated (average correlation coefficient was 0.808), suggesting that the tumors shrank uniformly, maintaining the original characteristics of the shapes in all 6 patients. The movement of the gravitational center of the lymph nodes during the treatment period was everywhere less than {+-}5 mm except in 1 patient, in whom the change reached nearly 10 mm. Conclusions: The surface geometry map was useful for an accurate evaluation of the changes in volume and 3D shapes of metastatic lymph nodes. The fusion of the initial and follow-up CT images based on fiducial markers enabled an analysis of changes in the location of the targets. Metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients were suggested to decrease in size without significant changes in the 3D shape during radiotherapy. The movements of the

  9. Evaluation of Cross-Correlation Methods on a Massive Scale for Accurate Relocation of Seismic Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-28

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory AFRLfVSBYE 29 Randolph Road Hanscom AFB, MA 01731...double-difference location: application to the 1999 Xiuyan China, sequence, Bull. Seism. Soc. Amer. 94: 867-879. Schaff, D. P., and P. G. Richards (2004b

  10. Finding Faces Among Faces: Human Faces are Located More Quickly and Accurately than Other Primate and Mammal Faces

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Buchin, Zachary; Werner, Katie; Worrell, Rey; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the specificity of human face search efficiency by examining whether there is a broad window of detection for various face-like stimuli—human and animal faces—or whether own-species faces receive greater attentional allocation. We assessed the strength of the own-species face detection bias by testing whether human faces are located more efficiently than other animal faces, when presented among various other species’ faces, in heterogeneous 16-, 36-, and 64-item arrays. Across all array sizes, we found that, controlling for distractor type, human faces were located faster and more accurately than primate and mammal faces, and that, controlling for target type, searches were faster when distractors were human faces compared to animal faces, revealing more efficient processing of human faces regardless of their role as targets or distractors (Experiment 1). Critically, these effects remained when searches were for specific species’ faces (human, chimpanzee, otter), ruling out a category-level explanation (Experiment 2). Together, these results suggest that human faces may be processed more efficiently than animal faces, both when task-relevant (targets), and when task-irrelevant (distractors), even when in direct competition with other faces. These results suggest that there is not a broad window of detection for all face-like patterns, but that human adults process own-species’ faces more efficiently than other species’ faces. Such own-species search efficiencies may arise through experience with own-species faces throughout development, or may be privileged early in development, due to the evolutionary importance of conspecifics’ faces. PMID:25113852

  11. Can an Atmospherically Forced Ocean Model Accurately Simulate Sea Surface Temperature During ENSO Events?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Mateger, Herley E. Hurlburt, Alan J. Walloraft H a inleficed to offer this paper to the (Nanm of Confe ounce) (Dafe. P/ace and Classification of...temperature during ENSO events? By A. BIROL KARA.HARLEY E. HURLBURT*. CHARLIE N. BARRON. ALAN J. WALLCRAFT andE. JOSEPH METZGER, Naval Research...Quantifying SST errors from an OGCM in relation to atmospheric forcing variables. Ocean Modell. 29, 43-57. Urge. W. G., McWilliams , J. C. and Doney. S. C

  12. A study of various methods for calculating locations of lightning events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, John R.

    1995-01-01

    This article reports on the results of numerical experiments on finding the location of lightning events using different numerical methods. The methods include linear least squares, nonlinear least squares, statistical estimations, cluster analysis and angular filters and combinations of such techniques. The experiments involved investigations of methods for excluding fake solutions which are solutions that appear to be reasonable but are in fact several kilometers distant from the actual location. Some of the conclusions derived from the study are that bad data produces fakes, that no fool-proof method of excluding fakes was found, that a short base-line interferometer under development at Kennedy Space Center to measure the direction cosines of an event shows promise as a filter for excluding fakes. The experiments generated a number of open questions, some of which are discussed at the end of the report.

  13. Epicentral Location of Regional Seismic Events Based on Empirical Green’s Functions from Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    located and characterized by the University of Utah Seismic Stations (UUSS) and by the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Saint Louis...of sources at different depths; e.g., earthquakes within Earth’s crust, volcanic explosions, meteoritic impacts, explosions, mine collapses, or...not require knowledge of Earth structure. ● It works for weak events where the detection of body wave phases may be problematic. ●The empirical

  14. Improvement of IDC/CTBTO Event Locations in Latin America and the Caribbean Using a Regional Seismic Travel Time Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Given, J. W.; Guendel, F.

    2013-05-01

    The International Data Centre is a vital element of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification mechanism. The fundamental mission of the International Data Centre (IDC) is to collect, process, and analyze monitoring data and to present results as event bulletins to Member States. For the IDC and in particular for waveform technologies, a key measure of the quality of its products is the accuracy by which every detected event is located. Accurate event location is crucial for purposes of an On Site Inspection (OSI), which would confirm the conduct of a nuclear test. Thus it is important for the IDC monitoring and data analysis to adopt new processing algorithms that improve the accuracy of event location. Among them the development of new algorithms to compute regional seismic travel times through 3-dimensional models have greatly increased IDC's location precision, the reduction of computational time, allowing forward and inverse modeling of large data sets. One of these algorithms has been the Regional Seismic Travel Time model (RSTT) of Myers et al., (2011). The RSTT model is nominally a global model; however, it currently covers only North America and Eurasia in sufficient detail. It is the intention CTBTO's Provisional Technical Secretariat and the IDC to extend the RSTT model to other regions of the earth, e.g. Latin America-Caribbean, Africa and Asia. This is particularly important for the IDC location procedure, as there are regions of the earth for which crustal models are not well constrained. For this purpose IDC has launched a RSTT initiative. In May 2012, a technical meeting was held in Vienna under the auspices of the CTBTO. The purpose of this meeting was to invite National Data Centre experts as well as network operators from Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Australia, Latin and North America to discuss the context under which a project to extend the RSTT model would be implemented. A total of 41 participants from 32 Member States

  15. Using ancillary information to improve hypocenter estimation: Bayesian single event location (BSEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and tested an algorithm, Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL), for estimating the location of a seismic event. The main driver for our research is the inadequate representation of ancillary information in the hypocenter estimation procedure. The added benefit is that we have also addressed instability issues often encountered with historical NLR solvers (e.g., non-convergence or seismically infeasible results). BSEL differs from established nonlinear regression techniques by using a Bayesian prior probability density function (prior PDF) to incorporate ancillary physical basis constraints about event location. P-wave arrival times from seismic events are used in the development. Depth, a focus of this paper, may be modeled with a prior PDF (potentially skewed) that captures physical basis bounds from surface wave observations. This PDF is constructed from a Rayleigh wave depth excitation eigenfunction that is based on the observed minimum period from a spectrogram analysis and estimated near-source elastic parameters. For example, if the surface wave is an Rg phase, it potentially provides a strong constraint for depth, which has important implications for remote monitoring of nuclear explosions. The proposed Bayesian algorithm is illustrated with events that demonstrate its congruity with established hypocenter estimation methods and its application potential. The BSEL method is applied to three events: (1) A shallow Mw 4 earthquake that occurred near Bardwell, KY on June 6, 2003, (2) the Mw 5.6 earthquake of July 26, 2005 that occurred near Dillon, MT, and (3) a deep Mw 5.7 earthquake that occurred off the coast of Japan on April 22, 1980. A strong Rg was observed from the Bardwell, KY earthquake that places very strong constraints on depth and origin time. No Rg was observed for the Dillon, MT earthquake, but we used the minimum observed period of a Rayleigh wave (7 seconds) to reduce the depth and origin time uncertainty. Because the Japan

  16. Application of an Artificial Intelligence Method for Velocity Calibration and Events Location in Microseismic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Chen, X.

    2013-12-01

    Good quality hydraulic fracture maps are heavily dependent upon the best possible velocity structure. Particle Swarm Optimization inversion scheme, an artificial intelligence technique for velocity calibration and events location could serve as a viable option, able to produce high quality data. Using perforation data to recalibrate the 1D isotropic velocity model derived from dipole sonic logs (or even without them), we are able to get the initial velocity model used for consequential events location. Velocity parameters can be inverted, as well as the thickness of the layer, through an iterative procedure. Performing inversion without integrating available data is unlikely to produce reliable results; especially if there are only one perforation shot and a single poor-layer-covered array along with low signal/noise ratio signal. The inversion method was validated via simulations and compared to the Fast Simulated Annealing approach and the Conjugate Gradient method. Further velocity model refinement can be accomplished while calculating events location during the iterative procedure minimizing the residuals from both sides. This artificial intelligence technique also displays promising application to the joint inversion of large-scale seismic activities data.

  17. A New Characteristic Function for Fast Time-Reverse Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Andri; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael; Jaya, Makky; Muksin, Muksin

    2015-04-01

    Microseismicity produced by natural activities is usually characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and huge amount of data as recording is conducted for a long period of time. Locating microseismic events is preferably carried out using migration-based methods such as time-reverse modeling (TRM). The original TRM is based on backpropagating the wavefield from the receiver down to the source location. Alternatively, we are using a characteristic function (CF) derived from the measured wavefield as input for the TRM. The motivation for such a strategy is to avoid undesired contributions from secondary arrivals which may generate artifacts in the final images. In this presentation, we introduce a new CF as input for TRM method. To obtain this CF, initially we apply kurtosis-based automatic onset detection and convolution with a given wavelet. The convolution with low frequency wavelets allows us to conduct time-reverse modeling using coarser sampling hence it will reduce computing time. We apply the method to locate seismic events measured along an active part of the Sumatra Fault around the Tarutung pull-apart basin (North Sumatra, Indonesia). The results show that seismic events are well-determined since they are concentrated along the Sumatran fault. Internal details of the Tarutung basin structure could be derived. Our results are consistent with those obtained from inversion of manually picked travel time data.

  18. Quantifying uncertainties in location and source mechanism for Long-Period events at Mt Etna, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchie, Léna; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Bean, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The manifestation of Long-Period events is documented at many volcanoes worldwide. However the mechanism at their origin is still object of discussion. Models proposed so far involve (i) the resonance of fluid-filled cracks or conduits that are triggered by fluid instabilities or the brittle failure of high viscous magmas and (ii) the slow-rupture earthquakes in the shallow portion of volcanic edifices. Since LP activity usually precedes and accompanies volcanic eruption, the understanding of these sources is important in terms of hazard assessment and eruption early warning. The work is thus primarily aimed at the assessment of the uncertainties in the determination of LP source properties as a consequence of poor knowledge of the velocity structure and location errors. We used data from temporary networks deployed on Mt Etna in 2005. During August, 2005, about 13000 LP events were detected through a STA/LTA approach, and were classified into two families on the basis of waveform similarity. For each family of events, we located the source using three different approaches: (1) a single-station-location method based on the back-propagation of the polarization vector estimated from covariance analysis of three-component signals; (2) multi-channel analysis of data recorded by two seismic arrays; (3) relative locations based on inversion of differential times obtained through cross-correlation of similar waveforms. For all these three different methods, the solutions are very sensitive to the chosen velocity model. We thus iterated the location procedure for different medium properties; the preferred velocity is that for which the results obtained with the three different methods are consistent each other. For each family, we then defined a volume of possible source location and performed a full-waveform, moment tensor (MT) inversion for the entire catalog of events. In this manner, we obtained a MT solution for each grid node of the investigated volume. The MT

  19. Modeling methodology for the accurate and prompt prediction of symptomatic events in chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Josué; Risco-Martín, José L; Moya, José M; Ayala, José L

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of symptomatic crises in chronic diseases allows to take decisions before the symptoms occur, such as the intake of drugs to avoid the symptoms or the activation of medical alarms. The prediction horizon is in this case an important parameter in order to fulfill the pharmacokinetics of medications, or the time response of medical services. This paper presents a study about the prediction limits of a chronic disease with symptomatic crises: the migraine. For that purpose, this work develops a methodology to build predictive migraine models and to improve these predictions beyond the limits of the initial models. The maximum prediction horizon is analyzed, and its dependency on the selected features is studied. A strategy for model selection is proposed to tackle the trade off between conservative but robust predictive models, with respect to less accurate predictions with higher horizons. The obtained results show a prediction horizon close to 40min, which is in the time range of the drug pharmacokinetics. Experiments have been performed in a realistic scenario where input data have been acquired in an ambulatory clinical study by the deployment of a non-intrusive Wireless Body Sensor Network. Our results provide an effective methodology for the selection of the future horizon in the development of prediction algorithms for diseases experiencing symptomatic crises.

  20. Event Detection and Location of Earthquakes Using the Cascadia Initiative Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, E.; Bilek, S. L.; Rowe, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) produces a range of slip behavior along the plate boundary megathrust, from great earthquakes to episodic slow slip and tremor (ETS). Unlike other subduction zones that produce great earthquakes and ETS, the CSZ is notable for the lack of small and moderate magnitude earthquakes recorded. The seismogenic zone extent is currently estimated to be primarily offshore, thus the lack of observed small, interplate earthquakes may be partially due to the use of only land seismometers. The Cascadia Initiative (CI) community seismic experiment seeks to address this issue by including ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed directly over the locked seismogenic zone, in addition to land seismometers. We use these seismic data to explore whether small magnitude earthquakes are occurring on the plate interface, but have gone undetected by the land-based seismic networks. We select a subset of small magnitude (M0.1-3.7) earthquakes from existing earthquake catalogs, based on land seismic data, whose preliminary hypocentral locations suggest they may have occurred on the plate interface. We window the waveforms on CI OBS and land seismometers around the phase arrival times for these earthquakes to generate templates for subspace detection, which allows for additional flexibility over traditional matched filter detection methods. Here we present event detections from the first year of CI deployment and preliminary locations for the detected events. Initial results of scanning the first year of the CI deployment using one cluster of template events, located near a previously identified subducted seamount, include 473 detections on OBS station M08A (~61.6 km offshore) and 710 detections on OBS station J25A (~44.8 km northeast of M08A). Ongoing efforts include detection using additional OBS stations along the margin, as well as determining locations of clusters detected in the first year of deployment.

  1. a Topic Modeling Based Representation to Detect Tweet Locations. Example of the Event "je Suis Charlie"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchid, M.; Josselin, D.; Portilla, Y.; Dufour, R.; Altman, E.; Linarès, G.

    2015-09-01

    Social Networks became a major actor in information propagation. Using the Twitter popular platform, mobile users post or relay messages from different locations. The tweet content, meaning and location, show how an event-such as the bursty one "JeSuisCharlie", happened in France in January 2015, is comprehended in different countries. This research aims at clustering the tweets according to the co-occurrence of their terms, including the country, and forecasting the probable country of a non-located tweet, knowing its content. First, we present the process of collecting a large quantity of data from the Twitter website. We finally have a set of 2,189 located tweets about "Charlie", from the 7th to the 14th of January. We describe an original method adapted from the Author-Topic (AT) model based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) method. We define an homogeneous space containing both lexical content (words) and spatial information (country). During a training process on a part of the sample, we provide a set of clusters (topics) based on statistical relations between lexical and spatial terms. During a clustering task, we evaluate the method effectiveness on the rest of the sample that reaches up to 95% of good assignment. It shows that our model is pertinent to foresee tweet location after a learning process.

  2. The Mw=8.8 Maule earthquake aftershock sequence, event catalog and locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, A.; Benz, H.; Brown, L.; Russo, R. M.; Beck, S. L.; Roecker, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    The aftershock sequence of the Mw=8.8 Maule earthquake off the coast of Chile in February 2010 is one of the most well-recorded aftershock sequences from a great megathrust earthquake. Immediately following the Maule earthquake, teams of geophysicists from Chile, France, Germany, Great Britain and the United States coordinated resources to capture aftershocks and other seismic signals associated with this significant earthquake. In total, 91 broadband, 48 short period, and 25 accelerometers stations were deployed above the rupture zone of the main shock from 33-38.5°S and from the coast to the Andean range front. In order to integrate these data into a unified catalog, the USGS National Earthquake Information Center develop procedures to use their real-time seismic monitoring system (Bulletin Hydra) to detect, associate, location and compute earthquake source parameters from these stations. As a first step in the process, the USGS has built a seismic catalog of all M3.5 or larger earthquakes for the time period of the main aftershock deployment from March 2010-October 2010. The catalog includes earthquake locations, magnitudes (Ml, Mb, Mb_BB, Ms, Ms_BB, Ms_VX, Mc), associated phase readings and regional moment tensor solutions for most of the M4 or larger events. Also included in the catalog are teleseismic phases and amplitude measures and body-wave MT and CMT solutions for the larger events, typically M5.5 and larger. Tuning of automated detection and association parameters should allow a complete catalog of events to approximately M2.5 or larger for that dataset of more than 164 stations. We characterize the aftershock sequence in terms of magnitude, frequency, and location over time. Using the catalog locations and travel times as a starting point we use double difference techniques to investigate relative locations and earthquake clustering. In addition, phase data from candidate ground truth events and modeling of surface waves can be used to calibrate the

  3. Locating narrow bipolar events with single-station measurement of low-frequency magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Lu, Gaopeng; Qie, Xiushu; Jiang, Rubin; Fan, Yanfeng; Tian, Ye; Sun, Zhuling; Liu, Mingyuan; Wang, Zhichao; Liu, Dongxia; Feng, Guili

    2016-06-01

    We developed a method to locate the narrow bipolar events (NBEs) based on the single-station measurement of low-frequency (LF, 40-500 kHz) magnetic fields. The direction finding of a two-axis magnetic sensor provides the azimuth of NBEs relative to the measurement site; the ionospheric reflection pairs in the lightning sferics are used to determine the range and height. We applied this method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) locations of 1475 NBEs with magnetic signals recorded during the SHandong Artificially Triggered Lightning Experiment (SHATLE) in summer of 2013. The NBE detections are evaluated on a storm basis by comparing with radar observations of reflectivity and lightning data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) for two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) of different sizes. As revealed by previous studies, NBEs are predominately produced in the convective regions with relatively strong radar echo (with composite reflectivity ≥30 dBZ), although not all the convections with high reflectivity and active lightning production are in favor of NBE production. The NBEs located by the single-station magnetic method also exhibit the distinct segregation in altitude for positive and negative NBEs, namely positive NBEs are mainly produced between 7 km and 15 km, while negative NBEs are predominantly produced above 14 km. In summary, the results of comparison generally show that the single-station magnetic method can locate NBEs with good reliability, although the accuracy of 3D location remains to be evaluated with the traditional multi-station method based on the time-of-arrival technique. This method can be applied to track the motion of storm convection within 800 km, especially when they move out to ocean beyond the detection range (typically <400 km) of meteorological radars, making it possible to study NBEs in oceanic thunderstorms for which the location with multiple ground-based stations is usually not feasible.

  4. A data-based model to locate mass movements triggered by seismic events in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fabio Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes affect the entire world and have catastrophic consequences. On May 12, 2008, an earthquake of magnitude 7.9 on the Richter scale occurred in the Wenchuan area of Sichuan province in China. This event, together with subsequent aftershocks, caused many avalanches, landslides, debris flows, collapses, and quake lakes and induced numerous unstable slopes. This work proposes a methodology that uses a data mining approach and geographic information systems to predict these mass movements based on their association with the main and aftershock epicenters, geologic faults, riverbeds, and topography. A dataset comprising 3,883 mass movements is analyzed, and some models to predict the location of these mass movements are developed. These predictive models could be used by the Chinese authorities as an important tool for identifying risk areas and rescuing survivors during similar events in the future.

  5. A Unified Approach to Joint Regional/Teleseismic Calibration and Event Location with a 3D Earth Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    raytracing in 3D models, which has been a serious impediment to the pursuit of 3D event location methods. We will investigate whether, for...Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies 488 3D Raytracing A critical choice in both event location and travel-time tomography with 3D

  6. On the violation of causal, emotional, and locative inferences: An event-related potentials study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo; Sánchez-Carmona, Alberto; Smith, Cybelle; Pozo, Miguel A; Hinojosa, José A; Moreno, Eva M

    2016-07-01

    Previous event-related potential studies have demonstrated the online generation of inferences during reading for comprehension tasks. The present study contrasted the brainwave patterns of activity to the fulfilment or violation of various types of inferences (causal, emotional, locative). Relative to inference congruent sentence endings, a typical centro-parietal N400 was elicited for the violation of causal and locative inferences. This N400 effect was initially absent for emotional inferences, most likely due to their lower cloze probability. Between 500 and 750ms, a larger frontal positivity (pN400FP) was elicited by inference incongruent sentence endings in the causal condition. In emotional sentences, both inference congruent and incongruent endings exerted this frontally distributed late positivity. For the violation of locative inferences, the larger positivity was only marginally significant over left posterior scalp locations. Thus, not all inference eliciting sentences evoked a similar pattern of ERP responses. We interpret and discuss our results in line with recent views on what the N400, the P600 and the pN400FP brainwave potentials index.

  7. Recognition memory for object form and object location: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Mecklinger, A; Meinshausen, R M

    1998-09-01

    In this study, the processes associated with retrieving object forms and object locations from working memory were examined with the use of simultaneously recorded event-related potential (ERP) activity. Subjects memorized object forms and their spatial locations and made either object-based or location-based recognition judgments. In Experiment 1, recognition performance was higher for object locations than for object forms. Old responses evoked more positive-going ERP activity between 0.3 and 1.8 sec poststimulus than did new responses. The topographic distribution of these old/new effects in the P300 time interval was task specific, with object-based recognition judgments being associated with anteriorly focused effects and location-based judgments with posteriorly focused effects. Late old/new effects were dominant at right frontal recordings. Using an interference paradigm, it was shown in Experiment 2 that visual representations were used to rehearse both object forms and object locations in working memory. The results of Experiment 3 indicated that the observed differential topographic distributions of the old/new effects in the P300 time interval are unlikely to reflect differences between easy and difficult recognition judgments. More specific effects were obtained for a subgroup of subjects for which the processing characteristics during location-based judgments presumably were similar to those in Experiment 1. These data, together with those from Experiment 1, indicate that different brain areas are engaged in retrieving object forms and object locations from working memory. Further analyses support the view that retrieval of object forms relies on conceptual semantic representation, whereas retrieving object locations is based on structural representations of spatial information. The effects in the later time intervals may play a functional role in post-retrieval processing, such as recollecting information from the study episode or other processes

  8. Estimating observing locations for advancing beyond the winter predictability barrier of Indian Ocean dipole event predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Rong; Duan, Wansuo; Mu, Mu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we explored potential observing locations (i.e., the sensitive areas) of positive Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events to advance beyond the winter predictability barrier (WPB) using the geophysical fluid dynamics laboratory climate model version 2p1 (GFDL CM2p1). The sensitivity analysis is conducted through perfect model predictability experiments, in which the model is assumed to be perfect and so any prediction errors are caused by initial errors. The results show that the initial errors with an east-west dipole pattern are more likely to result in a significant WPB than spatially correlated noises; the areas where the large values of the dipole pattern initial errors are located have great effects on prediction uncertainties in winter and provide useful information regarding the sensitive areas. Further, the prediction uncertainties in winter are more sensitive to the initial errors in the subsurface large value areas than to those in the surface large value areas. The results indicate that the subsurface large value areas are sensitive areas for advancing beyond the WPB of IOD predictions and if we carry out intensive observations across these areas, the prediction errors in winter may be largely reduced. This will lead to large improvements in the skill of wintertime IOD event forecasts.

  9. Simultaneous Determination of Structure and Event Location Using Body and Surface Wave Measurements at a Single Station: Preparation for Mars Data from the InSight Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, M. P.; Banerdt, W. B.; Beucler, E.; Blanchette-Guertin, J. F.; Boese, M.; Clinton, J. F.; Drilleau, M.; James, S. R.; Kawamura, T.; Khan, A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Mocquet, A.; van Driel, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important challenge for the upcoming InSight mission to Mars, which will deliver a broadband seismic station to Mars along with other geophysical instruments in 2016, is to accurately determine event locations with the use of a single station. Locations are critical for the primary objective of the mission, determining the internal structure of Mars, as well as a secondary objective of measuring the activity of distribution of seismic events. As part of the mission planning process, a variety of techniques have been explored for location of marsquakes and inversion of structure, and preliminary procedures and software are already under development as part of the InSight Mars Quake and Mars Structure Services. One proposed method, involving the use of recordings of multiple-orbit surface waves, has already been tested with synthetic data and Earth recordings. This method has the strength of not requiring an a priori velocity model of Mars for quake location, but will only be practical for larger events. For smaller events where only first orbit surface waves and body waves are observable, other methods are required. In this study, we implement a transdimensional Bayesian inversion approach to simultaneously invert for basic velocity structure and location parameters (epicentral distance and origin time) using only measurements of body wave arrival times and dispersion of first orbit surface waves. The method is tested with synthetic data with expected Mars noise and Earth data for single events and groups of events and evaluated for errors in both location and structural determination, as well as tradeoffs between resolvable parameters and the effect of 3D crustal variations.

  10. A Unified Approach to Joint Regional/Teleseismic Calibration and Event Location with a 3D Earth Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    difficulties that arise in the pursuit of a unified location/calibration capability. One is to develop fast and accurate raytracing techniques for modeling...that arise in the pursuit of a unified location/calibration capability. One is to develop fast and accurate raytracing techniques for modeling different... raytracing and travel-time calculation in 3D Earth models, such as the finite-difference eikonal method (e.g., Podvin and Lecomte, 1991), fast

  11. Location negative priming effects in children with developmental dyslexia: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yujun; Wang, Enguo; Yuan, Tian; Zhao, Guo Xiang

    2016-08-01

    As the reading process is inseparable from working memory, inhibition, and other higher cognitive processes, the deep cognitive processing defects that are associated with dyslexia may be due to defective distraction inhibition systems. In this study, we used event-related potential technology to explore the source of negative priming effects in children with developmental dyslexia and in a group of healthy children for comparison. We found that the changes in the average response times in the negative priming and control conditions were consistent across the two groups, while the negative priming effects differed significantly between the groups. The magnitude of the negative priming effect was significantly different between the two groups, with the magnitude being significantly higher in the control group than it was in the developmental dyslexia group. These results indicate that there are deficits in distraction inhibition in children with developmental dyslexia. In terms of the time course of processing, inhibition deficits in the dyslexia group appeared during early-stage cognition selection and lasted through the response selection phase. Regarding the cerebral cortex locations, early-stage cognition selection was mainly located in the parietal region, while late-stage response selection was mainly located in the frontal and central regions. The results of our study may help further our understanding of the intrinsic causes of developmental dyslexia.

  12. An Event-related Potential Study on the Interaction between Lighting Level and Stimulus Spatial Location

    PubMed Central

    Carretié, Luis; Ruiz-Padial, Elisabeth; Mendoza, María T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to heterogeneous photoreceptor distribution, spatial location of stimulation is crucial to study visual brain activity in different light environments. This unexplored issue was studied through occipital event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded from 40 participants in response to discrete visual stimuli presented at different locations and in two environmental light conditions, low mesopic (L, 0.03 lux) and high mesopic (H, 6.5 lux), characterized by a differential photoreceptor activity balance: rod > cone and rod < cone, respectively. Stimuli, which were exactly the same in L and H, consisted of squares presented at fixation, at the vertical periphery (above or below fixation) or at the horizontal periphery (left or right). Analyses showed that occipital ERPs presented important L vs. H differences in the 100 to 450 ms window, which were significantly modulated by spatial location of stimulation: differences were greater in response to peripheral stimuli than to stimuli presented at fixation. Moreover, in the former case, significance of L vs. H differences was even stronger in response to stimuli presented at the horizontal than at the vertical periphery. These low vs. high mesopic differences may be explained by photoreceptor activation and their retinal distribution, and confirm that ERPs discriminate between rod– and cone-originated visual processing. PMID:26635588

  13. Fast, Accurate and Precise Mid-Sagittal Plane Location in 3D MR Images of the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergo, Felipe P. G.; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Ruppert, Guilherme C. S.

    Extraction of the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) is a key step for brain image registration and asymmetry analysis. We present a fast MSP extraction method for 3D MR images, based on automatic segmentation of the brain and on heuristic maximization of the cerebro-spinal fluid within the MSP. The method is robust to severe anatomical asymmetries between the hemispheres, caused by surgical procedures and lesions. The method is also accurate with respect to MSP delineations done by a specialist. The method was evaluated on 64 MR images (36 pathological, 20 healthy, 8 synthetic), and it found a precise and accurate approximation of the MSP in all of them with a mean time of 60.0 seconds per image, mean angular variation within a same image (precision) of 1.26o and mean angular difference from specialist delineations (accuracy) of 1.64o.

  14. Location of multi-phase volcanic events from a temporary dense seismic array at White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Lokmer, Ivan; Thun, Johannes; Salichon, Jerome; Fournier, Nico; Fry, Bill

    2016-04-01

    The August 2012 to October 2013 White Island eruption sequence included an increase in gas flux and RSAM seismic tremor beginning in late 2011. Prior to this unrest, a small swarm of 25 events was observed on 19-21 August 2011. The events were captured on a temporary dense seismic array including 12 broadband sensors that were deployed between June and November 2011. Each event comprised coupled earthquakes having distinct high frequency (HF = >1 s), long-period (LP = 2-4 s) and very long period (VLP = 10-30 s) pulses. For each coupled HF, LP and VLP event, we compute the source locations, origin times and related uncertainties by application of standard arrival time locations for the HF events and waveform back-projection for the LP and VLP events. Preliminary results suggest that the events are centred beneath active vent at depths generally less than 2 km. The HF earthquakes have diffuse locations (<2 km), while LP events are constrained to generally shallower source depths (< 1km) and VLP events have slightly deeper source locations (1 to 2 km). The arrival-time locations have been constrained using a realistic shallow velocity model while the waveform back-projection locations have been constrained by thorough synthetic testing. Emergent onsets for LP and VLP sources make an analysis of the absolute origin times problematic but waveform matching of VLP to LP components suggests relative time variations of less than a second or two. We will discuss the location and relative timing for the three event types in context with possible hydrothermal and magmatic processes at White Island volcano.

  15. Acoustic monitoring of laboratory faults: locating the origin of unstable slip events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Niemeijer, André; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Over the past several decades, much work has been done on studying the frictional properties of fault gouges at earthquake nucleation velocities. In addition, post-experiment microstructural analyses have been performed in an attempt to link microphysical mechanisms to the observed mechanical data. However, all observations are necessarily post-mortem and it is thus difficult to directly link transients to microstructural characteristics. We are developing an acoustic monitoring system to be used in sliding experiments using a ring shear apparatus. The goal is to locate acoustic emission sources in sheared granular assemblages and link them to processes that act on microstructures responsible for the frictional stability of the simulated fault gouge. The results will be used to develop and constrain microphysical models that explain the relation of these processes to empirical friction laws, such as rate- and state-dependent friction. The acoustic monitoring setup is comprised of an array of 16 piezo-electric sensors installed on the top and bottom sides of an annular sample, at 45 degree intervals. Acoustic emissions associated with slip events can be recorded at sampling rates of up to 50 MHz, in triggered mode. Initial experiments on 0.1 to 0.2 mm and 0.4 to 0.5 mm diameter glass beads, at 1 to 5 MPa normal stress and 1 to 30 um/s load point velocity, have been conducted to estimate the sensitivity of the sensor array. Preliminary results reveal that the intensity of the audible signal is not necessarily proportional to the magnitude of the associated stress drop for constant loading conditions, and that acoustic emissions precede slip events by a small amount of time, in the order of a few milliseconds. Currently, our efforts are focused on developing a suitable source location algorithm with the aim to identify differences in the mode of (unstable) sliding for different types of materials. This will help to identify the micromechanical mechanisms operating

  16. Location of EMIC Wave Events Relative to the Plasmapause: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetrick, S.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Gkioulidou, M.; Reeves, G. D.; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Many early theoretical studies of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves generated in Earth's magnetosphere predicted that the equatorial plasmapause (PP) would be a preferred location for their generation. However, several large statistical studies in the past two decades, most notably Fraser and Nguyen [2001], have provided little support for this location. In this study we present a survey of the most intense EMIC waves observed by the EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer on the Van Allen Probes-A spacecraft (with apogee at 5.9 RE) from its launch through the end of 2014, and have compared their location with simultaneous electron density data obtained by the EFW electric field instrument and ring current ion flux data obtained by the HOPE and RBSPICE instruments. We show distributions of these waves as a function of distance inside or outside the PP as a function of local time sector, frequency band (H+, He+, or both), and timing relative to magnetic storms and substorms. Most EMIC waves in this data set occurred within 1 RE of the PP in all local time sectors, but very few were limited to ± 0.1 RE, and most of these occurred in the 06-12 MLT sector during non-storm conditions. The majority of storm main phase waves in the dusk sector occurred inside the PP. He+ band waves dominated at most local times inside the PP, and H+ band waves were never observed there. Although the presence of elevated fluxes of ring current protons was common to all events, the configuration of lower energy ion populations varied as a function of geomagnetic activity and storm phase.

  17. Applications of Location Similarity Measures and Conceptual Spaces to Event Coreference and Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConky, Katie Theresa

    2013-01-01

    This work covers topics in event coreference and event classification from spoken conversation. Event coreference is the process of identifying descriptions of the same event across sentences, documents, or structured databases. Existing event coreference work focuses on sentence similarity models or feature based similarity models requiring slot…

  18. Alignment of leading-edge and peak-picking time of arrival methods to obtain accurate source locations

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.; Fox, C.; and Vanderlinde, O.

    2009-08-01

    The location of a radiating source can be determined by time-tagging the arrival of the radiated signal at a network of spatially distributed sensors. The accuracy of this approach depends strongly on the particular time-tagging algorithm employed at each of the sensors. If different techniques are used across the network, then the time tags must be referenced to a common fiducial for maximum location accuracy. In this report we derive the time corrections needed to temporally align leading-edge, time-tagging techniques with peak-picking algorithms. We focus on broadband radio frequency (RF) sources, an ionospheric propagation channel, and narrowband receivers, but the final results can be generalized to apply to any source, propagation environment, and sensor. Our analytic results are checked against numerical simulations for a number of representative cases and agree with the specific leading-edge algorithm studied independently by Kim and Eng (1995) and Pongratz (2005 and 2007).

  19. Helicopter Based Magnetic Detection Of Wells At The Teapot Dome (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Oilfield: Rapid And Accurate Geophysical Algorithms For Locating Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, W.; Hammack, R.; Veloski, G.; Hodge, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this study Airborne magnetic data was collected by Fugro Airborne Surveys from a helicopter platform (Figure 1) using the Midas II system over the 39 km2 NPR3 (Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3) oilfield in east-central Wyoming. The Midas II system employs two Scintrex CS-2 cesium vapor magnetometers on opposite ends of a transversely mounted, 13.4-m long horizontal boom located amidships (Fig. 1). Each magnetic sensor had an in-flight sensitivity of 0.01 nT. Real time compensation of the magnetic data for magnetic noise induced by maneuvering of the aircraft was accomplished using two fluxgate magnetometers mounted just inboard of the cesium sensors. The total area surveyed was 40.5 km2 (NPR3) near Casper, Wyoming. The purpose of the survey was to accurately locate wells that had been drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood to enhance oil recovery, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells that are missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The well location method used combined an input dataset (for example, leveled total magnetic field reduced to the pole), combined with first and second horizontal spatial derivatives of this input dataset, which were then analyzed using focal statistics and finally combined using a fuzzy combination operation. Analytic signal and the Shi and Butt (2004) ZS attribute were also analyzed using this algorithm. A parameter could be adjusted to determine sensitivity. Depending on the input dataset 88% to 100% of the wells were located, with typical values being 95% to 99% for the NPR3 field site.

  20. Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer: Mission Design for Rapid, Accurate Location of Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer is a NASA Mid-sized Explorer (MIDEX) with the primary mission of determining the origins of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). It will be the first mission to autonomously respond to newly-discovered GRBs and provide immediate follow-up with narrow field instruments capable of multi-wavelength (UV, Optical, X-ray) observations. The characteristics of GRBs that are the key mission design drivers, are their non-repeating and brief duration bursts of multi-wavelength photons. In addition, rapid notification of the location and characteristics of the GRBs to ground-and-space-based observatories drive the end-to-end data analysis and distribution requirements.

  1. Seismic monitoring of EGS tests at the Coso Geothermal area, California, using accurate MEQ locations and full moment tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Julian, Bruce R.; Monastero, Francis C.

    2008-03-31

    In this study, we studied high-resolution relative locations and full moment tensors of microearthquakes (MEQs) occurring before, during and following Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) experiments in two wells at the Coso geothermal area, California. The objective was to map new fractures, determine the mode and sense of failure, and characterize the stress cycle associated with injection. New software developed for this work combines waveform cross-correlation measurement of arrival times with relative relocation methods, and assesses confidence regions for moment tensors derived using linear-programming methods. For moment tensor determination we also developed a convenient Graphical User Interface (GUI), to streamline the work. We used data from the U.S. Navy’s permanent network of three-component digital borehole seismometers and from 14 portable three-component digital instruments. The latter supplemented the permanent network during injection experiments in well 34A-9 in 2004 and well 34-9RD2 in 2005. In the experiment in well 34A-9, the co-injection earthquakes were more numerous, smaller, more explosive and had more horizontal motion, compared with the pre-injection earthquakes. In the experiment in well 34-9RD2 the relocated hypocenters reveal a well-defined planar structure, 700 m long and 600 m high in the depth range 0.8 to 1.4 km below sea level, striking N 20° E and dipping at 75° to the WNW. The moment tensors show that it corresponds to a mode I (opening) crack. Finally, for both wells, the perturbed stress state near the bottom of the well persisted for at least two months following the injection.

  2. Epicenter Location of Regional Seismic Events Using Love Wave and Rayleigh Wave Ambient Seismic Noise Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Moschetti, M. P.; Mendoza, C.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a novel method to locate regional seismic events based on exploiting Empirical Green's Functions (EGF) that are produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long time-series of ambient noise recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh waves on the vertical-vertical cross-correlations and Love waves on the transverse-transverse cross-correlations. Earlier work (Barmin et al., "Epicentral location based on Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions from ambient seismic noise", Geophys. J. Int., 2011) showed that group time delays observed on Rayleigh wave EGFs can be exploited to locate to within about 1 km moderate sized earthquakes using USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations. The principal advantage of the method is that the ambient noise EGFs are affected by lateral variations in structure similarly to the earthquake signals, so the location is largely unbiased by 3-D structure. However, locations based on Rayleigh waves alone may be biased by more than 1 km if the earthquake depth is unknown but lies between 2 km and 7 km. This presentation is motivated by the fact that group time delays for Love waves are much less affected by earthquake depth than Rayleigh waves; thus exploitation of Love wave EGFs may reduce location bias caused by uncertainty in event depth. The advantage of Love waves to locate seismic events, however, is mitigated by the fact that Love wave EGFs have a smaller SNR than Rayleigh waves. Here, we test the use of Love and Rayleigh wave EGFs between 5- and 15-sec period to locate seismic events based on the USArray TA in the western US. We focus on locating aftershocks of the 2008 M 6.0 Wells earthquake, mining blasts in Wyoming and Montana, and small earthquakes near Norman, OK and Dallas, TX, some of which may be triggered by hydrofracking or injection wells.

  3. Using Earthquake Intensity Data to Determine Earthquake Locations and Magniitudes of PRE-1966 Events in the Rio Grande Rift Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan, P.; Castro, J.; Doser, D. I.

    2012-12-01

    Prior to the use of modern seismographs beginning in the mid-1960's, not much information exists on the location and magnitudes of earthquakes in the Rio Grande rift and surrounding regions of Colorado, New Mexico, west Texas, and Chihuahua, Mexico. However, a fair amount of intensity information is available for these earthquakes. Using procedures originally developed by Bakun and Wentworth (1997) we can use intensity information for well located, recent earthquakes as calibration events to develop intensity-distance attenuation models. The intensity attenuation models can then be used to determine the epicenters and magnitudes for the older events. Preliminary analysis of intensity data for recent events in the Rio Grande rift-southeastern Rocky Mountains area suggest this region has a similar intensity attenuation relationship to that determined by Bakun (2006) for the Basin and Range province. Intensity data for recent events in the eastern Colorado Plateau and westernmost Great Plains appears consistent with intensity attenuation models developed by Bakun and Hopper (2004) for eastern North America. We will use these attenuation models to determine the magnitudes and locations of pre-1966 events, with special emphasis on events occurring in the central Rio Grande rift between 1905 and 1950.

  4. Accurately mapping the location of the binding site for the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein and cytochrome c oxidase III

    PubMed Central

    LI, DAN; DING, JIAN; CHEN, ZHIXIN; CHEN, YUN; LIN, NA; CHEN, FENGLIN; WANG, XIAOZHONG

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) plays an important pathogenetic role in hepatocarcinoma tumorigenesis. As HBx does not have the ability to bind to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), protein-protein interaction is crucial for HBx functions. In a previous study, we screened a novel HBx-interacting protein, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (COXIII). In the present study, we aimed to accurately map the location of the binding site for the interaction of HBx with COXIII. Two fragments of HBx mutants (X1 aa1-72 and X2 aa1-117) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and separately inserted into the pAS2-1 plasmid. PCR and gene sequencing confirmed the correct insertion of the mutant fragments in the plasmid. The tanscription of the mutant fragments in yeast cells was demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analysis confirmed that they were accurately translated into fusion proteins. Hybridization on solid medium and the detection of β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity indicated that the binding site for the interaction between HBx and COXIII was located between aa72 and aa117. Specific interactions between the HBxX2 protein and COXIII were verified by co-immunoprecipitation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing to demonstrate that aa72-117 in HBx is the key region for binding with COXIII. PMID:25483779

  5. The magnetic network location of explosive events observed in the solar transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. G.; Dere, K. P.

    1991-01-01

    Compact short-lived explosive events have been observed in solar transition region lines with the High-Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) flown by the Naval Research Laboratory on a series of rockets and on Spacelab 2. Data from Spacelab 2 are coaligned with a simultaneous magnetogram and near-simultaneous He I 10,380 -A spectroheliogram obtained at the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak. The comparison shows that the explosive events occur in the solar magnetic network lanes at the boundaries of supergranular convective cells. However, the events occur away from the larger concentrations of magnetic flux in the network, in contradiction to the observed tendency of the more energetic solar phenomena to be associated with the stronger magnetic fields.

  6. Much ado about nothing: Capturing attention toward locations without new perceptual events.

    PubMed

    Hilchey, Matthew D; Taylor, J Eric T; Pratt, Jay

    2016-12-01

    Popular frameworks of attention propose that visual orienting occurs through a combination of bottom-up (stimulus-driven) and top-down (goal-directed) processes. Much of the basic research on these processes adheres paradigmatically to experimental methods that introduce salient but task-irrelevant stimuli (objects or transients) to the visual environment to determine whether attention is captured to their locations. This common practice of changing or adding a stimulus to a location to determine whether it captures attention reflects a notion that locations at which new features or stimuli spontaneously appear are prioritized above all else. In this article, we challenge this notion with results from a modified additional singleton paradigm. In the critical condition, following a preview array of placeholder stimuli, 1 placeholder stimulus transforms into a target diamond and changes luminance at the same time that all other placeholders, except 1 (the truly "static singleton") change in luminance. This static singleton location, which involves neither a new stimulus nor any sensory transient, produces a clear pattern of attentional capture originating near its location. These findings violate multiple bottom-up and top-down perspectives while encouraging a new approach to studying attentional capture. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Characterization of Source and Wave Propagation Effects of Volcano-seismic Events and Tremor Using the Amplitude Source Location Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Londono, J. M.; López, C. M.; Ruiz, M. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Maeda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize source and wave propagation effects of volcano-seismic events and tremor observed at different volcanoes. We used this method to estimate the source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude (Is) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10 Hz band. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador; long-period (LP) events at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador; and LP events at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua; noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that Is increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for explosion events and LP events, and that Is increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. The Is values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were consistent with previous estimates of volumes of tephra fallout. The linear relationship between the source amplitude and Is for LP events can be explained by the wave propagation effects in the diffusion model for multiple scattering assuming a diffusion coefficient of 105 m2/s and an intrinsic Q factor of around 50. The resultant mean free path is approximately 100 m. Our results suggest that Cotopaxi and Nevado del Ruiz volcanoes have similar highly scattering and attenuating structures. Our approach provides a systematic way to compare the size of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. The scaling relations among source parameters that we identified

  8. Bayesloc Multiple-Event Location Applied to a Global Data Set

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    sampling strategy is designed to provide the ray coverage needed to determine lithospheric -scale structure in the Middle East using the complementary...determine lithospheric -scale structure in the Middle East using the complementary ray geometry provided by regional (sub-horizontal) and teleseismic (sub...events. This sampling strategy is designed to provide the ray coverage needed to determine lithospheric -scale structure in the Middle East using the

  9. How many clinic BP readings are needed to predict cardiovascular events as accurately as ambulatory BP monitoring?

    PubMed

    Eguchi, K; Hoshide, S; Shimada, K; Kario, K

    2014-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that multiple clinic blood pressure (BP) readings over an extended baseline period would be as predictive as ambulatory BP (ABP) for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Clinic and ABP monitoring were performed in 457 hypertensive patients at baseline. Clinic BP was measured monthly and the means of the first 3, 5 and 10 clinic BP readings were taken as the multiple clinic BP readings. The subjects were followed up, and stroke, HARD CVD, and ALL CVD events were determined as outcomes. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) best predicted three outcomes independently of baseline and multiple clinic SBP readings. The mean of 10 clinic SBP readings predicted stroke (hazards ratio (HR)=1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02-1.90, P=0.04) and ALL CVD (HR=1.41, 95% CI=1.13-1.74, P=0.002) independently of baseline clinic SBP. Clinic SBPs by three and five readings were not associated with any CVD events, except that clinic SBP by three readings was associated with ALL CVD (P=0.015). Besides ABP values, the mean of the first 10 clinic SBP values was a significant predictor of stroke and ALL CVD events. It is important to take more than several clinic BP readings early after the baseline period for the risk stratification of future CVD events.

  10. ONR C-IED STIFLE (Stigmergic Tracking of IED Factories, Locations and Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-19

    is straightforward to show (see, for example, F. Reif , Fundamentals of Statistical and Thermal Physics (McGraw-Hill, 1965)) that the diffusion...modeling approach within the TAEMS framework, a formal representation and reasoning mechanism for hierarchical task networks. Together with Prof. Bob...additional flavor used by these agents conveys a statistical long-term assessment of the level of IED threat (attractive) at a particular location. The

  11. Encoding negative events under stress: high subjective arousal is related to accurate emotional memory despite misinformation exposure.

    PubMed

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; LaBar, Kevin S; Ryan, Lee; Jacobs, W Jake; Nadel, Lynn

    2014-07-01

    Stress at encoding affects memory processes, typically enhancing, or preserving, memory for emotional information. These effects have interesting implications for eyewitness accounts, which in real-world contexts typically involve encoding an aversive event under stressful conditions followed by potential exposure to misinformation. The present study investigated memory for a negative event encoded under stress and subsequent misinformation endorsement. Healthy young adults participated in a between-groups design with three experimental sessions conducted 48 h apart. Session one consisted of a psychosocial stress induction (or control task) followed by incidental encoding of a negative slideshow. During session two, participants were asked questions about the slideshow, during which a random subgroup was exposed to misinformation. Memory for the slideshow was tested during the third session. Assessment of memory accuracy across stress and no-stress groups revealed that stress induced just prior to encoding led to significantly better memory for the slideshow overall. The classic misinformation effect was also observed - participants exposed to misinformation were significantly more likely to endorse false information during memory testing. In the stress group, however, memory accuracy and misinformation effects were moderated by arousal experienced during encoding of the negative event. Misinformed-stress group participants who reported that the negative slideshow elicited high arousal during encoding were less likely to endorse misinformation for the most aversive phase of the story. Furthermore, these individuals showed better memory for components of the aversive slideshow phase that had been directly misinformed. Results from the current study provide evidence that stress and high subjective arousal elicited by a negative event act concomitantly during encoding to enhance emotional memory such that the most aversive aspects of the event are well remembered and

  12. Is vent location an important factor in the assessment of pyroclastic flow hazard from sub-Plinian events at Vesuvius?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marianelli, P.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.; Cavazzoni, C.; Erbacci, G.

    2009-04-01

    Reconstructions of vent location of past sub-Plinian (and Plinian) eruptions of Vesuvius show a significant spatial variability of the vent inside the caldera area. Moreover, it is likely that the exact location of the vent of a future explosive event of that type at Vesuvius will be unknown until the onset of the event itself. Nevertheless, to our knowledge, no studies exist that analyse the influence of vent location on the simulated eruptive scenarios. This omission could be particularly critical for the assessment of pyroclastic flow (or pyroclastic density current, PDC) hazard due to the specific morphology of the Somma-Vesuvius complex. In this work, we present new numerical simulations of column collapse and pyroclastic density current scenarios at Vesuvius by using the transient 3D multiphase flow code PDAC (Esposti Ongaro et al., Parallel Computing, 33, 2007). Simulations have been carried out by assuming three different locations of the vent within the caldera area: the first is in Valle del Gigante, between Mt. Somma ridge and the present Gran Cono, the second is in Piano delle Ginestre, to the west of the Gran Cono, while the third one is in Valle dell'Inferno, in the south-eastern direction with respect to the Gran Cono. Source conditions for all cases refer to a sub-Plinian event and to both partial and nearly-total collapse of the eruptive column. Simulation results clearly show the first-order effect of vent location on the propagation directions of PDCs and the areal distribution of pyroclasts, owing to the complex interaction of the flow with the proximal volcano morphology. Comparisons with simulations assuming a central vent located in the position of Gran Cono clearly show the different roles of Mt. Somma, Gran Cono, along with mean slope and channelling effects as a function of the assumed vent location. Estimates of the areas invaded by the flows are presented, although the definition of their runout is particularly difficult due to the

  13. Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, Brad J

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  14. Pyroclastic density current hazard maps at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy): the effects of event scale, vent location and time forecasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, Andrea; Neri, Augusto; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Isaia, Roberto; Flandoli, Franco; Bisson, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Today hundreds of thousands people live inside the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) and in the adjacent part of the city of Naples making a future eruption of such volcano an event with huge consequences. Very high risks are associated with the occurrence of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Mapping of background or long-term PDC hazard in the area is a great challenge due to the unknown eruption time, scale and vent location of the next event as well as the complex dynamics of the flow over the caldera topography. This is additionally complicated by the remarkable epistemic uncertainty on the eruptive record, affecting the time of past events, the location of vents as well as the PDCs areal extent estimates. First probability maps of PDC invasion were produced combining a vent-opening probability map, statistical estimates concerning the eruptive scales and a Cox-type temporal model including self-excitement effects, based on the eruptive record of the last 15 kyr. Maps were produced by using a Monte Carlo approach and adopting a simplified inundation model based on the "box model" integral approximation tested with 2D transient numerical simulations of flow dynamics. In this presentation we illustrate the independent effects of eruption scale, vent location and time of forecast of the next event. Specific focus was given to the remarkable differences between the eastern and western sectors of the caldera and their effects on the hazard maps. The analysis allowed to identify areas with elevated probabilities of flow invasion as a function of the diverse assumptions made. With the quantification of some sources of uncertainty in relation to the system, we were also able to provide mean and percentile maps of PDC hazard levels.

  15. BlueDetect: An iBeacon-Enabled Scheme for Accurate and Energy-Efficient Indoor-Outdoor Detection and Seamless Location-Based Service.

    PubMed

    Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Luo, Yiwen; Zhu, Jianjie; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Xie, Lihua

    2016-02-22

    The location and contextual status (indoor or outdoor) is fundamental and critical information for upper-layer applications, such as activity recognition and location-based services (LBS) for individuals. In addition, optimizations of building management systems (BMS), such as the pre-cooling or heating process of the air-conditioning system according to the human traffic entering or exiting a building, can utilize the information, as well. The emerging mobile devices, which are equipped with various sensors, become a feasible and flexible platform to perform indoor-outdoor (IO) detection. However, power-hungry sensors, such as GPS and WiFi, should be used with caution due to the constrained battery storage on mobile device. We propose BlueDetect: an accurate, fast response and energy-efficient scheme for IO detection and seamless LBS running on the mobile device based on the emerging low-power iBeacon technology. By leveraging the on-broad Bluetooth module and our proposed algorithms, BlueDetect provides a precise IO detection service that can turn on/off on-board power-hungry sensors smartly and automatically, optimize their performances and reduce the power consumption of mobile devices simultaneously. Moreover, seamless positioning and navigation services can be realized by it, especially in a semi-outdoor environment, which cannot be achieved by GPS or an indoor positioning system (IPS) easily. We prototype BlueDetect on Android mobile devices and evaluate its performance comprehensively. The experimental results have validated the superiority of BlueDetect in terms of IO detection accuracy, localization accuracy and energy consumption.

  16. BlueDetect: An iBeacon-Enabled Scheme for Accurate and Energy-Efficient Indoor-Outdoor Detection and Seamless Location-Based Service

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Han; Jiang, Hao; Luo, Yiwen; Zhu, Jianjie; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Xie, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The location and contextual status (indoor or outdoor) is fundamental and critical information for upper-layer applications, such as activity recognition and location-based services (LBS) for individuals. In addition, optimizations of building management systems (BMS), such as the pre-cooling or heating process of the air-conditioning system according to the human traffic entering or exiting a building, can utilize the information, as well. The emerging mobile devices, which are equipped with various sensors, become a feasible and flexible platform to perform indoor-outdoor (IO) detection. However, power-hungry sensors, such as GPS and WiFi, should be used with caution due to the constrained battery storage on mobile device. We propose BlueDetect: an accurate, fast response and energy-efficient scheme for IO detection and seamless LBS running on the mobile device based on the emerging low-power iBeacon technology. By leveraging the on-broad Bluetooth module and our proposed algorithms, BlueDetect provides a precise IO detection service that can turn on/off on-board power-hungry sensors smartly and automatically, optimize their performances and reduce the power consumption of mobile devices simultaneously. Moreover, seamless positioning and navigation services can be realized by it, especially in a semi-outdoor environment, which cannot be achieved by GPS or an indoor positioning system (IPS) easily. We prototype BlueDetect on Android mobile devices and evaluate its performance comprehensively. The experimental results have validated the superiority of BlueDetect in terms of IO detection accuracy, localization accuracy and energy consumption. PMID:26907295

  17. Sensitive and accurate identification of protein–DNA binding events in ChIP-chip assays using higher order derivative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christian L.; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Immuno-precipitation of protein–DNA complexes followed by microarray hybridization is a powerful and cost-effective technology for discovering protein–DNA binding events at the genome scale. It is still an unresolved challenge to comprehensively, accurately and sensitively extract binding event information from the produced data. We have developed a novel strategy composed of an information-preserving signal-smoothing procedure, higher order derivative analysis and application of the principle of maximum entropy to address this challenge. Importantly, our method does not require any input parameters to be specified by the user. Using genome-scale binding data of two Escherichia coli global transcription regulators for which a relatively large number of experimentally supported sites are known, we show that ∼90% of known sites were resolved to within four probes, or ∼88 bp. Over half of the sites were resolved to within two probes, or ∼38 bp. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our strategy delivers significant quantitative and qualitative performance gains over available methods. Such accurate and sensitive binding site resolution has important consequences for accurately reconstructing transcriptional regulatory networks, for motif discovery, for furthering our understanding of local and non-local factors in protein–DNA interactions and for extending the usefulness horizon of the ChIP-chip platform. PMID:21051353

  18. Generating regional infrasound celerity-range models using ground-truth information and the implications for event location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nippress, Alexandra; Green, David N.; Marcillo, Omar E.; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2014-05-01

    Celerity-range models, where celerity is defined as the epicentral distance divided by the total traveltime (similar to the definition of group velocity for dispersed seismic surface waves), can be used for the association of infrasound automatic detections, for event location and for the validation of acoustic propagation simulations. Signals recorded from ground truth events are used to establish celerity-range models, but data coverage is uneven in both space and time. To achieve a high density of regional recordings we use data from USArray seismic stations recording air-to-ground coupled waves from explosions during the summers of 2004-2008 at the Utah Training and Test Range, in the western United States, together with data from five microbarograph arrays at regional distances (<1000 km). We have developed a consistent methodology for analysing the infrasound and seismic data, including choosing filter characteristics from a limited group of two-octave wide filter bands and picking the maximum peak-to-peak arrival. We clearly observe tropospheric, thermospheric and stratospheric arrivals, in agreement with regional ray tracing models. Due to data availability and the dependence of infrasound propagation on the season, we develop three regional celerity-range models for the U.S. summer, with a total of 2211 data picks. The new models suggest event locations using the Geiger method could be improved in terms of both accuracy (up to 80 per cent closer to ground truth) and precision (error ellipse area reduced by >90 per cent) when compared to those estimated using the global International Data Center model, particularly for events where stations detect arrivals at ranges <350 km. Whilst adding data-based prior information into the Bayesian Infrasound Source Localization (BISL) method is also shown to increase precision, to increase accuracy, the parameter space must be expanded to include station-specific celerity distributions.

  19. Testing the Quick Seismic Event Locator and Magnitude Calculator (SSL_Calc) by Marsite Project Data Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunc, Suleyman; Tunc, Berna; Caka, Deniz; Baris, Serif

    2016-04-01

    Locating and calculating size of the seismic events is quickly one of the most important and challenging issue in especially real time seismology. In this study, we developed a Matlab application to locate seismic events and calculate their magnitudes (Local Magnitude and empirical Moment Magnitude) using single station called SSL_Calc. This newly developed sSoftware has been tested on the all stations of the Marsite project "New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite-MARsite". SSL_Calc algorithm is suitable both for velocity and acceleration sensors. Data has to be in GCF (Güralp Compressed Format). Online or offline data can be selected in SCREAM software (belongs to Guralp Systems Limited) and transferred to SSL_Calc. To locate event P and S wave picks have to be marked by using SSL_Calc window manually. During magnitude calculation, instrument correction has been removed and converted to real displacement in millimeter. Then the displacement data is converted to Wood Anderson Seismometer output by using; Z=[0;0]; P=[-6.28+4.71j; -6.28-4.71j]; A0=[2080] parameters. For Local Magnitude calculation,; maximum displacement amplitude (A) and distance (dist) are used in formula (1) for distances up to 200km and formula (2) for more than 200km. ML=log10(A)-(-1.118-0.0647*dist+0.00071*dist2-3.39E-6*dist3+5.71e-9*dist4) (1) ML=log10(A)+(2.1173+0.0082*dist-0.0000059628*dist2) (2) Following Local Magnitude calculation, the programcode calculates two empiric Moment Magnitudes using formulas (3) Akkar et al. (2010) and (4) Ulusay et al. (2004). Mw=0.953* ML+0.422 (3) Mw=0.7768* ML+1.5921 (4) SSL_Calc is a software that is easy to implement and user friendly and offers practical solution to individual users to location of event and ML, Mw calculation.

  20. Single-station and single-event marsquake location and inversion for structure using synthetic Martian waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; van Driel, M.; Böse, M.; Giardini, D.; Ceylan, S.; Yan, J.; Clinton, J.; Euchner, F.; Lognonné, P.; Murdoch, N.; Mimoun, D.; Panning, M.; Knapmeyer, M.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2016-09-01

    In anticipation of the upcoming InSight mission, which is expected to deploy a single seismic station on the Martian surface in November 2018, we describe a methodology that enables locating marsquakes and obtaining information on the interior structure of Mars. The method works sequentially and is illustrated using single representative 3-component seismograms from two separate events: a relatively large teleseismic event (Mw5.1) and a small-to-moderate-sized regional event (Mw3.8). Location and origin time of the event is determined probabilistically from observations of Rayleigh waves and body-wave arrivals. From the recording of surface waves, averaged fundamental-mode group velocity dispersion data can be extracted and, in combination with body-wave arrival picks, inverted for crust and mantle structure. In the absence of Martian seismic data, we performed full waveform computations using a spectral element method (AxiSEM) to compute seismograms down to a period of 1 s. The model (radial profiles of density, P- and S-wave-speed, and attenuation) used for this purpose is constructed on the basis of an average Martian mantle composition and model areotherm using thermodynamic principles, mineral physics data, and viscoelastic modeling. Noise was added to the synthetic seismic data using an up-to-date noise model that considers a whole series of possible noise sources generated in instrument and lander, including wind-, thermal-, and pressure-induced effects and electromagnetic noise. The examples studied here, which are based on the assumption of spherical symmetry, show that we are able to determine epicentral distance and origin time to accuracies of ∼ 0.5-1° and ± 3-6 s, respectively. For the events and the particular noise level chosen, information on Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion in the period range ∼ 14-48 s (Mw5.1) and ∼ 14-34 s (Mw3.8) could be determined. Stochastic inversion of dispersion data in combination with body-wave travel time

  1. Improved tremor and LP event locations using station-corrected waveforms: applications to data recorded with a small aperture array at Fuego volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, G. P.; Lyons, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate Green functions are required in order to determine the source mechanisms of low-frequency seismic events on volcanoes. Given the steep topography and alternating layers of ash and lava flows found on many volcanoes, this is particularly difficult for LP band (.5-5 Hz) tremor and discrete events. We have found that large variations in signals from LPs and tremor recorded on a small-aperture array near the active vent of Fuego volcano, Guatemala are primarily due to station site effects. This variation complicates array analyses that rely on waveform similarity and results in poorly-resolved slowness parameters. We use an iterative approach to correct for the site effects for a class of repetitive LP events and then apply those corrections to investigate non-harmonic tremor in the same frequency band. Fuego volcano, Guatemala, is an open-vent basaltic-andesite stratovolcano characterized by nearly constant, but varied low-level eruptive activity since 1999. In January 2008, we deployed small antennas of six broadband seismic and five acoustic sensors 900 m north of the active vent to investigate the source of explosions and low-frequency seismicity. The seismic array had stations spaced 30 m apart, a total aperture of ~140 m, and was deployed on the western side of a long ridge that extends from the active vent to an older portion of the edifice to the north. The infrasound sensors were deployed in a similar array, but with average station spacing of 50 m. There was no lava effusion during the deployment, but explosions were recorded approximately once per hour, with varied amounts of ash and durations from 20-150 s. In addition to the explosions, our seismic array recorded narrow band tremor with dominant frequencies of 1.6 and 1.9 Hz and discrete events that were not generally detected by the acoustic array. The dominant class of these events, which repeated approximately 10-15 times per hour, had an impulsive onset with first motion toward the vent, a

  2. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  3. Method to locate the polar cap boundary in the nightside ionosphere and application to a substorm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A. T.; Pitkänen, T.; Kozlovsky, A.; Amm, O.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new method to be used for the polar cap boundary (PCB) determination in the nightside ionosphere by using the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) field-aligned measurements by the 42-m antenna and southward directed low-elevation measurements by the ESR 32 m antenna or northward directed low-elevation measurements by the EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø. The method is based on increased electron temperature (Te) caused by precipitating particles on closed field lines. Since the Svalbard field-aligned measurement provides the reference polar cap Te height profile, the method can be utilised only when the PCB is located between Svalbard and the mainland. Comparison with the Polar UVI images shows that the radar-based method is generally in agreement with the PAE (poleward auroral emission) boundary from Polar UVI.

    The new technique to map the polar cap boundary was applied to a substorm event on 6 November 2002. Simultaneous measurements by the MIRACLE magnetometers enabled us to put the PCB location in the framework of ionospheric electrojets. During the substorm growth phase, the polar cap expands and the region of the westward electrojet shifts gradually more apart from the PCB. The substorm onset takes place deep within the region of closed magnetic field region, separated by about 6-7° in latitude from the PCB in the ionosphere. We interpret the observations in the framework of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model of substorms. After the substorm onset, the reconnection at the NENL reaches within 3 min the open-closed field line boundary and then the PCB moves poleward together with the poleward boundary of the substorm current wedge. The poleward expansion occurs in the form of individual bursts, which are separated by 2-10 min, indicating that the reconnection in the magnetotail neutral line is impulsive. The poleward expansions of the PCB are followed by latitude dispersed intensifications in the westward

  4. The Role of Color Cues in Facilitating Accurate and Rapid Location of Aided Symbols by Children with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Krista; Carlin, Michael; Thistle, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research examined how the color distribution of symbols within a visual aided augmentative and alternative communication array influenced the speed and accuracy with which participants with and without Down syndrome located a target picture symbol. Method: Eight typically developing children below the age of 4 years, 8 typically…

  5. Lost in translation: preclinical studies on 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine provide information on mechanisms of action, but do not allow accurate prediction of adverse events in humans

    PubMed Central

    Green, AR; King, MV; Shortall, SE; Fone, KCF

    2012-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) induces both acute adverse effects and long-term neurotoxic loss of brain 5-HT neurones in laboratory animals. However, when choosing doses, most preclinical studies have paid little attention to the pharmacokinetics of the drug in humans or animals. The recreational use of MDMA and current clinical investigations of the drug for therapeutic purposes demand better translational pharmacology to allow accurate risk assessment of its ability to induce adverse events. Recent pharmacokinetic studies on MDMA in animals and humans are reviewed and indicate that the risks following MDMA ingestion should be re-evaluated. Acute behavioural and body temperature changes result from rapid MDMA-induced monoamine release, whereas long-term neurotoxicity is primarily caused by metabolites of the drug. Therefore acute physiological changes in humans are fairly accurately mimicked in animals by appropriate dosing, although allometric dosing calculations have little value. Long-term changes require MDMA to be metabolized in a similar manner in experimental animals and humans. However, the rate of metabolism of MDMA and its major metabolites is slower in humans than rats or monkeys, potentially allowing endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms to function in a species specific manner. Furthermore acute hyperthermia in humans probably limits the chance of recreational users ingesting sufficient MDMA to produce neurotoxicity, unlike in the rat. MDMA also inhibits the major enzyme responsible for its metabolism in humans thereby also assisting in preventing neurotoxicity. These observations question whether MDMA alone produces long-term 5-HT neurotoxicity in human brain, although when taken in combination with other recreational drugs it may induce neurotoxicity. LINKED ARTICLES This article is commented on by Parrott, pp. 1518–1520 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01941.x and to view the the

  6. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  7. A multi-station matched filter and coherent network processing approach to the automatic detection and relative location of seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Kværna, Tormod

    2014-05-01

    Correlation detectors facilitate seismic monitoring in the near vicinity of previously observed events at far lower detection thresholds than are possible using the methods applied in most existing processing pipelines. The use of seismic arrays has been demonstrated to be highly beneficial in pressing down the detection threshold, due to superior noise suppression, and also in eliminating vast numbers of false alarms by performing array processing on the multi-channel output of the correlation detectors. This last property means that it is highly desirable to run continuous detectors for sites of repeating seismic events on a single-array basis for many arrays across a global network. Spurious detections for a given signal template on a single array can however still occur when an unrelated wavefront crosses the array from a very similar direction to that of the master event wavefront. We present an algorithm which scans automatically the output from multiple stations - both array and 3-component - for coherence between the individual station correlator outputs that is consistent with a disturbance in the vicinity of the master event. The procedure results in a categorical rejection of an event hypothesis in the absence of support from stations other than the one generating the trigger and provides a fully automatic relative event location estimate when patterns in the correlation detector outputs are found to be consistent with a common event. This coherence-based approach removes the need to make explicit measurements of the time-differences for single stations and this eliminates a potential source of error. The method is demonstrated for the North Korea nuclear test site and the relative event location estimates obtained for the 2006, 2009, and 2013 events are compared with previous estimates from different station configurations.

  8. A Global 3D P-Velocity Model of the Earth’s Crust and Mantle for Improved Event Location

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    locations were based on the ak135 model (Kennett et al., 1995). This shifting of locations tends to occur mostly along subduction zones , where the...features, many structural features present themselves. Clearly visible in the figures are subduction zones , mid-ocean ridges, slower velocities in...produced. Colors are percent change from the ak135 model. Clearly visible are tectonic features such as mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones , and large

  9. Seasonal variations of infrasonic arrivals from long term ground truth observations in Nevada and implication for event location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negraru, Petru; Golden, Paul

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYLong term ground truth observations were collected at two infrasound arrays in Nevada to investigate how seasonal atmospheric variations affect the detection, travel time and signal characteristics (azimuth, trace velocity, frequency content and amplitudes) of infrasonic arrivals at regional distances. The arrays were <span class="hlt">located</span> in different azimuthal directions from a munition disposal facility in Nevada. FNIAR, <span class="hlt">located</span> 154 km north of the source has a high detection rate throughout the year. Over 90% of the detonations have travel times indicative of stratospheric arrivals, while tropospheric waveguides are observed from only 27% of the detonations. The second array, DNIAR, <span class="hlt">located</span> 293 km southeast of the source exhibits strong seasonal variations with high stratospheric detection rates in winter and the virtual absence of stratospheric arrivals in summer. Tropospheric waveguides and thermospheric arrivals are also observed for DNIAR. Modelling through the Naval Research Laboratory Ground to Space (G2S) atmospheric sound speeds leads to mixed results: FNIAR arrivals are usually not predicted to be present at all (either stratospheric or tropospheric), while DNIAR arrivals are usually correctly predicted, but summer arrivals show a consistent travel time bias. In the end we show the possible improvement in <span class="hlt">location</span> using empirically calibrated travel time and azimuth observations. Using the Bayesian Infrasound Source Localization we show that we can decrease the area enclosed by the 90% credibility contours by a factor of 2.5.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGE....12..220Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGE....12..220Z"><span>Microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> using an inverse method of joint P-S phase arrival difference and P-wave arrival difference in a borehole system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Wen; Wang, Liangshu; Guan, Luping; Guo, Quanshi; Cui, Shuguo; Yu, Bo</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The accuracy of hypocenter <span class="hlt">location</span> is the essential issue for microseismic monitoring, and is the basis for evaluating the effect of fracture. Although the signal obtained from a borehole monitoring system has a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than the surface system, a narrow monitoring aperture makes the <span class="hlt">location</span> sensitive to noise and tends to be a misguided shape. In order to overcome this disadvantage and obtain a more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimation of the source, we develop a ‘jointing method’, which combines the P-S phase arrival difference and P-wave arrival difference of each receiver pair (PSP) in the objective function. In the synthetic example, we compare the noise responses of three different <span class="hlt">location</span> methods which are based on P-wave arrival time difference, P-S wave arrival time difference and the PSP method, respectively. This analysis shows that the P-wave arrival difference method is more sensitive to arrival time error than the others and the <span class="hlt">location</span> results tend to be in a misleading line directed to the receivers. The P-S arrival difference method is more robust than the method using P-wave and its error distribution is perpendicular to the ray-path direction. The PSP method, as expected, is the most stable and <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. When the P-S method and PSP method are applied to field data of a coal bed methane hydro-fracture process monitoring, the results indicate that the PSP method is preferable. The successful <span class="hlt">location</span> with the PSP method proves that it is suitable for field data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70178568','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70178568"><span>Effects of land use and sample <span class="hlt">location</span> on nitrate-stream flow hysteresis descriptors during storm <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Feinson, Lawrence S.; Gibs, Jacob; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Garrett, Jessica D.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The U.S. Geological Survey's New Jersey and Iowa Water Science Centers deployed ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometric sensors at water-quality monitoring sites on the Passaic and Pompton Rivers at Two Bridges, New Jersey, on Toms River at Toms River, New Jersey, and on the North Raccoon River near Jefferson, Iowa to continuously measure in-stream nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen (NO3 + NO2) concentrations in conjunction with continuous stream flow measurements. Statistical analysis of NO3 + NO2 vs. stream discharge during storm <span class="hlt">events</span> found statistically significant links between land use types and sampling site with the normalized area and rotational direction of NO3 + NO2-stream discharge (N-Q) hysteresis patterns. Statistically significant relations were also found between the normalized area of a hysteresis pattern and several flow parameters as well as the normalized area adjusted for rotational direction and minimum NO3 + NO2 concentrations. The mean normalized hysteresis area for forested land use was smaller than that of urban and agricultural land uses. The hysteresis rotational direction of the agricultural land use was opposite of that of the urban and undeveloped land uses. An r2 of 0.81 for the relation between the minimum normalized NO3 + NO2 concentration during a storm vs. the normalized NO3 + NO2 concentration at peak flow suggested that dilution was the dominant process controlling NO3 + NO2 concentrations over the course of most storm <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10131399','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10131399"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> capability of a sparse regional network (RSTN) using a multi-phase earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm (REGLOC)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hutchings, L.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) was deployed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether data recorded by a regional network could be used to detect and <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> that might be clandestine nuclear tests. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the <span class="hlt">location</span> capability of the RSTN. A major part of this project was the development of the <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm REGLOC and application of Basian a prior statistics for determining the accuracy of the <span class="hlt">location</span> estimates. REGLOC utilizes all identifiable phases, including backazimuth, in the <span class="hlt">location</span>. Ninty-four <span class="hlt">events</span>, distributed throughout the network area, detected by both the RSTN and <span class="hlt">located</span> by local networks were used in the study. The <span class="hlt">location</span> capability of the RSTN was evaluated by estimating the <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy, error ellipse accuracy, and the percentage of <span class="hlt">events</span> that could be <span class="hlt">located</span>, as a function of magnitude. The <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy was verified by comparing the RSTN results for the 94 <span class="hlt">events</span> with published <span class="hlt">locations</span> based on data from the local networks. The error ellipse accuracy was evaluated by determining whether the error ellipse includes the actual <span class="hlt">location</span>. The percentage of <span class="hlt">events</span> <span class="hlt">located</span> was assessed by combining detection capability with <span class="hlt">location</span> capability to determine the percentage of <span class="hlt">events</span> that could be <span class="hlt">located</span> within the study area. <span class="hlt">Events</span> were <span class="hlt">located</span> with both an average crustal model for the entire region, and with regional velocity models along with station corrections obtained from master <span class="hlt">events</span>. Most <span class="hlt">events</span> with a magnitude <3.0 can only be <span class="hlt">located</span> with arrivals from one station. Their average <span class="hlt">location</span> errors are 453 and 414 km for the average- and regional-velocity model <span class="hlt">locations</span>, respectively. Single station <span class="hlt">locations</span> are very unreliable because they depend on <span class="hlt">accurate</span> backazimuth estimates, and backazimuth proved to be a very unreliable computation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T33B1374W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T33B1374W"><span>Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated <span class="hlt">Event</span> <span class="hlt">Locations</span> for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts <span class="hlt">located</span> ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to <span class="hlt">locating</span> ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be <span class="hlt">located</span>. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality <span class="hlt">locations</span> for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span>. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for <span class="hlt">events</span> that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate <span class="hlt">events</span> that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We <span class="hlt">locate</span> the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.T33B1374W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.T33B1374W"><span>Seismicity Along the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge: Automated <span class="hlt">Event</span> <span class="hlt">Locations</span> for an Ocean-Bottom Seismometer Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Weekly, R. T.; Wilcock, W. S.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; McGill, P. R.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>From 2003-2006, the W.M. Keck Foundation supported the operation of a network of eight ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed with a remotely operated vehicle along the central portion of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge as part of a multidisciplinary prototype NEPTUNE experiment. Data from 2003-2004 were initially analyzed during a research apprenticeship class at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. Eight student analysts <span class="hlt">located</span> ~13,000 earthquakes along the Endeavour Segment. Analysis of data from 2004-2005 has to date been limited to <span class="hlt">locating</span> ~6,000 earthquakes associated with a swarm in February-March 2005 near the northern end of the Endeavour Segment. The remaining data includes several significant swarms and it is anticipated that tens of thousands of earthquakes still need to be <span class="hlt">located</span>. In order to efficiently obtain a complete catalog of high-quality <span class="hlt">locations</span> for the 3-year experiment, we are developing an automatic method for earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span>. We first apply a 5-Hz high-pass filter and identify triggers when the ratio of the root-mean square (RMS) amplitudes in short- and long- term windows exceeds a specified threshold. We search for <span class="hlt">events</span> that are characterized by triggers within a short time interval on the majority of stations and use the signal spectra to eliminate <span class="hlt">events</span> that are the result of 20-Hz Fin and Blue whale vocalizations. An autoregressive technique is applied to a short time window centered on the trigger time to pick P-wave times on each station's vertical channel. We <span class="hlt">locate</span> the earthquake with these picks and either attempt to repick or eliminate arrivals with unacceptable residuals. Preliminary S-wave picks are then made on the horizontal channels by applying a 5-12 Hz bandpass filter, identifying the peak RMS amplitude for a short running window, and making a pick at the time the RMS amplitude rises above 50% of this value. The picks are refined using the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/273142','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/273142"><span>Regional seismic <span class="hlt">event</span> identification and improved <span class="hlt">locations</span> with small arrays and networks. Final report, 7 May 1993-30 September 1995</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Vernon, F.L.; Minster, J.B.; Orcutt, J.A.</p> <p>1995-09-20</p> <p>This final report contains a summary of our work on the use of seismic networks and arrays to improve <span class="hlt">locations</span> and identify small seismic <span class="hlt">event</span>. We have developed techniques to migrate 3-component array records of local, regional and teleseismic wavetrains to directly image buried two- and three-dimensional heterogeneities (e.g. layer irregularities, volumetric heterogeneities) in the vicinity of the array. We have developed a technique to empirically characterize local and regional seismic code by binning and stacking network recordings of dense aftershock sequences. The principle motivation for this work was to look for robust coda phases dependent on source depth. We have extended our ripple-fired <span class="hlt">event</span> discriminant (based on the time-independence of coda produced by ripple firing) by looking for an independence of the coda from the recording direction (also indicative of ripple-firing).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GeoJI.208..333G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GeoJI.208..333G"><span>Development of double-pair double difference earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm for improving earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guo, Hao; Zhang, Haijiang</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Event</span>-pair double-difference (DD) earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> method, as incorporated in hypoDD, has been widely used to improve relative earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span> by using <span class="hlt">event</span>-pair differential arrival times from pairs of <span class="hlt">events</span> to common stations because some common path anomalies outside the source region can be cancelled out due to similar ray paths. Similarly, station-pair differential arrival times from one <span class="hlt">event</span> to pairs of stations can also be used to improve earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span> by cancelling out the <span class="hlt">event</span> origin time and some path anomalies inside the source region. To utilize advantages of both DD <span class="hlt">location</span> methods, we have developed a new double-pair DD <span class="hlt">location</span> method to use differential times constructed from pairs of <span class="hlt">events</span> to pairs of stations to determine higher-precision relative earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Compared to the <span class="hlt">event</span>-pair and station-pair DD <span class="hlt">location</span> methods, the new method can remove <span class="hlt">event</span> origin times and station correction terms from the inversion system and cancel out path anomalies both outside and inside the source region at the same time. The new method is tested on earthquakes around the San Andreas Fault, California to validate its performance. From earthquake relocations it is demonstrated that the double-pair DD <span class="hlt">location</span> method is able to better sharpen the images of seismicity with smaller relative <span class="hlt">location</span> uncertainties compared to the <span class="hlt">event</span>-pair DD <span class="hlt">location</span> method and thus to reveal more fine-scale structures. In comparison, among three DD <span class="hlt">location</span> methods, station-pair DD <span class="hlt">location</span> method can better improve the absolute earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span>. For this reason, we further propose a hybrid double-pair DD <span class="hlt">location</span> method combining station-pair and double-pair differential times to determine <span class="hlt">accurate</span> absolute and relative <span class="hlt">locations</span> at the same time, which is validated by both synthetic and real data sets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20225402','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20225402"><span>A universal support vector machines based method for automatic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> in waveforms and video-movies: applications to massive nuclear fusion databases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vega, J; Murari, A; González, S</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Big physics experiments can collect terabytes (even petabytes) of data under continuous or long pulse basis. The measurement systems that follow the temporal evolution of physical quantities translate their observations into very large time-series data and video-movies. This article describes a universal and automatic technique to recognize and <span class="hlt">locate</span> inside waveforms and video-films both signal segments with data of potential interest for specific investigations and singular <span class="hlt">events</span>. The method is based on regression estimations of the signals using support vector machines. A reduced number of the samples is shown as outliers in the regression process and these samples allow the identification of both special signatures and singular points. Results are given with the database of the JET fusion device: <span class="hlt">location</span> of sawteeth in soft x-ray signals to automate the plasma incremental diffusivity computation, identification of plasma disruptive behaviors with its automatic time instant determination, and, finally, recognition of potential interesting plasma <span class="hlt">events</span> from infrared video-movies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1112663P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..1112663P"><span>Testing the global capabilities of the Antelope software suite: fast <span class="hlt">location</span> and Mb determination of teleseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> using the ASAIN and GSN seismic networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pesaresi, D.; Russi, M.; Plasencia, M.; Cravos, C.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, OGS) is running the Antarctic Seismographic Argentinean Italian Network (ASAIN), made of 5 seismic stations <span class="hlt">located</span> in the Scotia Sea region in Antarctica and in Argentina: data from these stations are transferred in real time to the OGS headquarters in Trieste (Italy) via satellite links. OGS is also running, in close cooperation with the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Civil Defense, the North East (NI) Italy seismic network, making use of the Antelope commercial software suite from BRTT as the main acquisition system. As a test to check the global capabilities of Antelope, we set up an instance of Antelope acquiring data in real time from both the regional ASAIN seismic network in Antarctica and a subset of the Global Seismic Network (GSN) funded by the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS). The facilities of the IRIS Data Management System, and specifically the IRIS Data Management Center, were used for real time access to waveform required in this study. Preliminary results over 1 month period indicated that about 82% of the earthquakes with magnitude M>5.0 listed in the PDE catalogue of the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) were also correctly detected by Antelope, with an average <span class="hlt">location</span> error of 0.05 degrees and average body wave magnitude Mb estimation error below 0.1. The average time difference between <span class="hlt">event</span> origin time and the actual time of <span class="hlt">event</span> determination by Antelope was of about 45': the comparison with 20', the IASPEI91 P-wave travel time for 180 degrees distance, and 25', the estimate of our test system data latency, indicate that Antelope is a serious candidate for regional and global early warning systems. Updated figures calculated over a longer period of time will be presented and discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PEPI..261...46Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PEPI..261...46Z"><span>Wave equation based microseismic source <span class="hlt">location</span> and velocity inversion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zheng, Yikang; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> and velocity information can be used to infer the stress field and guide hydraulic fracturing process, as well as to image the subsurface structures. How to get <span class="hlt">accurate</span> microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> and velocity model is the principal problem in reservoir monitoring. For most <span class="hlt">location</span> methods, the velocity model has significant relation with the accuracy of the <span class="hlt">location</span> results. The velocity obtained from log data is usually too rough to be used for <span class="hlt">location</span> directly. It is necessary to discuss how to combine the <span class="hlt">location</span> and velocity inversion. Among the main techniques for <span class="hlt">locating</span> microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span>, time reversal imaging (TRI) based on wave equation avoids traveltime picking and offers high-resolution <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Frequency dependent wave equation traveltime inversion (FWT) is an inversion method that can invert velocity model with source uncertainty at certain frequency band. Thus we combine TRI with FWT to produce improved <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> and velocity model. In the proposed approach, the <span class="hlt">location</span> and model information are interactively used and updated. Through the proposed workflow, the inverted model is better resolved and the <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> are more <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. We test this method on synthetic borehole data and filed data of a hydraulic fracturing experiment. The results verify the effectiveness of the method and prove it has potential for real-time microseismic monitoring.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.V11A1378W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.V11A1378W"><span>Intra-caldera <span class="hlt">Events</span>: A Look at the Hydrovolcanic Deposit Stratigraphically <span class="hlt">Located</span> Between two Caldera-Forming Eruptions of Okmok Volcano, Umnak Island, Alaska</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wong, L. J.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>Within the 10 km diameter caldera that characterizes Okmok Volcano, a field of post-caldera cones and deposits demonstrate many features associated with water-magma interactions. A unit deposited prior to the formation of the present caldera provides evidence for large explosive hydrovolcanic eruptions in the past as well. This unit is referred to as the Middle Scoria Unit as it is stratigraphically <span class="hlt">located</span> between the ~9000 BP Okmok I and 2050 BP Okmok II caldera-forming <span class="hlt">events</span>. Here, we present data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, and eruptive mechanisms of the Middle Scoria Unit, which averages a thickness of 2.5 meters. The basal layer of the Middle Scoria consists of moderately well sorted, highly inflated juvenile clasts of basaltic composition (53.88 wt.% SiO2) that average 3 to 5 cm in size. Capping the base is a sequence of layers alternating between oxidized reddish lithic fragments and poorly vesicular scoria averaging 1 mm to 3 cm in size. The contacts between the scoria and lithic layers are less discrete in the top section, with a higher proportion of mixing averaging up to 75% for a clast-rich layer. The upper layers of the unit also show reverse grading and contain dense, poorly vesicular scoria fragments and lithic fragments of 2 mm to 1.5 cm in size. The Middle Scoria unit has been found on the neighboring Unalaska Island, approximately 30 km to the East, revealing a wide dispersal. Our results indicate that this eruption began as a highly explosive, purely magmatic and rare basaltic Plinian eruption. With time, the eruptive series evolved to incorporate external water, as demonstrated by the successions of oxidized lithic lapilli and poorly vesicular scoria layers. Our preliminary interpretations of the Middle Scoria indicate that Okmok Volcano may be capable of highly explosive basaltic Plinian and hydrovolcanic eruptions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011535','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011535"><span>Earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> in island arcs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>-velocity lithospheric slab. In application, JHD has the practical advantage that it does not require the specification of a theoretical velocity model for the slab. Considering earthquakes within a 260 km long by 60 km wide section of the Aleutian main thrust zone, our results suggest that the theoretical velocity structure of the slab is presently not sufficiently well known that <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> can be obtained independently of locally recorded data. Using a locally recorded earthquake as a calibration <span class="hlt">event</span>, JHD gave excellent results over the entire section of the main thrust zone here studied, without showing a strong effect that might be attributed to spatially varying source-station anomalies. We also calibrated the ray-tracing method using locally recorded data and obtained results generally similar to those obtained by JHD. ?? 1982.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf"><span>38 CFR 4.46 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and <span class="hlt">location</span> of scars with respect...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf"><span>38 CFR 4.46 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and <span class="hlt">location</span> of scars with respect...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf"><span>38 CFR 4.46 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and <span class="hlt">location</span> of scars with respect...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf"><span>38 CFR 4.46 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and <span class="hlt">location</span> of scars with respect...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title38-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title38-vol1-sec4-46.pdf"><span>38 CFR 4.46 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and <span class="hlt">location</span> of scars with respect...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010068033','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20010068033"><span>Photographic Analysis Technique for Assessing External Tank Foam Loss <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M.; OFarrell, J. M.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>A video camera and recorder were placed inside the solid rocket booster forward skirt in order to view foam loss <span class="hlt">events</span> over an area on the external tank (ET) intertank surface. In this Technical Memorandum, a method of processing video images to allow rapid detection of permanent changes indicative of foam loss <span class="hlt">events</span> on the ET surface was defined and applied to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> count, categorize, and <span class="hlt">locate</span> such <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E..79A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E..79A"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> Estimation of the Bow Shock and Theta angle (B, n) cuasiperpendicular magnetospheric, using data from 14 different <span class="hlt">events</span> crossings shock recorded by THEMIS-C.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Amazo-Gomez, Eliana; Alvarado-Gomez, Julian David; Calvo Mozo, Benjamin</p> <p></p> <p>In this Work we calculated the average position of the bow shock, through the eigenvalues ​​and corresponding eigenvectors of the covariance matrix for the magnetic field developed from 10 different crosses shock <span class="hlt">events</span> recorded by THEMIS A, during the years 2009 and 2010. With data obtained from previous calibration and the propagation direction of the magnetic field of the plasma is able to find the interaction quasi perpendicular angle Theta (B,n) which depends on the direction normal shock and the direction of incidence of field magnetic plasma. The importance of this type of analysis is that the understanding of the phenomenology of the bow shock, which is vital for the characterization of processes such as magnetic reconnection between magnetospheric lines terrestrial and interplanetary field lines carrying a large contribution from the Sun apparently lines will also be important for the description of how to enter the plasma charged particles from impacting the bow shock to the internal field lines to these particles subsequently lead to the Earth's atmosphere, these initially enter through the polar region (Polar Cusp) and then disseminated depending on the conditions of the plasma into the Earth's atmosphere , and parameters such as the position of the bow shock, this variation and interaction angle Theta (B,n) are basic to reach a minimal representation of the phenomenon. In <span class="hlt">events</span> of great magnitude can have undesirable effects on satellites, power lines, communications and air travel, the latter is the interest on discrimination of some parameters of the phenomenon presented in this work. The study of the Bow shock, bow shock and Magnetospheric has as its starting point a detailed description of Earth's magnetosphere and solar wind phenomena must be understood independently initially and then trying to relate in terms of their interaction and communion in their respective limits, parameters such as the balance between dynamic and magnetic pressure</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8532497','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8532497"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">event</span> structure on retrospective duration judgments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boltz, M G</p> <p>1995-10-01</p> <p>Two experiments examined whether varying degrees of <span class="hlt">event</span> coherence influence the remembering of an <span class="hlt">event</span>'s actual duration. Relying on musical compositions (Experiment 1) or filmed narratives (Experiment 2) as experimental stimuli, the underlying hierarchy of information within <span class="hlt">events</span> (i.e., melodic intervals or story elements) was either attentionally highlighted or obscured by placing a varying number of accents (i.e., prolonged notes or commercial breaks) at <span class="hlt">locations</span> that either coincided or conflicted with grammatical phrase boundaries. When subjects were unexpectedly asked to judge the actual duration of <span class="hlt">events</span>, through a reproduction (Experiment 1) or verbal estimation (Experiment 2) task, duration estimates became more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and less variable when the pattern of accentuation increasingly outlined the <span class="hlt">events</span>' nested relationships. Conversely, when the <span class="hlt">events</span>' organization was increasingly obscured through accentuation, time judgments not only became less <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and more variable, but were consistently overestimated. These findings support a theoretical framework emphasizing the effects of <span class="hlt">event</span> structure on attending and remembering activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23082236','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23082236"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Perception.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Events</span> are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of <span class="hlt">events</span> capture their spatiotemporal <span class="hlt">location</span>, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of <span class="hlt">events</span> and how they are constructed and updated. <span class="hlt">Event</span> representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual <span class="hlt">events</span> are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of <span class="hlt">events</span>. <span class="hlt">Event</span> representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete <span class="hlt">events</span>. The construction of a series of <span class="hlt">event</span> representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3472805','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3472805"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Perception</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Events</span> are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of <span class="hlt">events</span> capture their spatiotemporal <span class="hlt">location</span>, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of <span class="hlt">events</span> and how they are constructed and updated. <span class="hlt">Event</span> representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual <span class="hlt">events</span> are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of <span class="hlt">events</span>. <span class="hlt">Event</span> representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete <span class="hlt">events</span>. The construction of a series of <span class="hlt">event</span> representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010mom..book..173M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010mom..book..173M"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> Privacy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong</p> <p></p> <p>With rapid development of sensor and wireless mobile devices, it is easy to access mobile users' <span class="hlt">location</span> information anytime and anywhere. On one hand, LBS is becoming more and more valuable and important. On the other hand, <span class="hlt">location</span> privacy issues raised by such applications have also gained more attention. However, due to the specificity of <span class="hlt">location</span> information, traditional privacy-preserving techniques in data publishing cannot be used. In this chapter, we will introduce <span class="hlt">location</span> privacy, and analyze the challenges of <span class="hlt">location</span> privacy-preserving, and give a survey of existing work including the system architecture, <span class="hlt">location</span> anonymity and query processing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S33B2526S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S33B2526S"><span>Tectonic tremor <span class="hlt">locations</span> using template matching of low frequency earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Skoumal, R.; Colella, H. V.; Holtkamp, S. G.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Schlanser, K. M.; Shelly, D. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Tectonic (non-volcanic) tremor is difficult to <span class="hlt">locate</span> due to its emergent nature, but critical to assess what impact it has on the plate interface slip budget. Recent studies have found that tectonic tremor is primarily composed of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes, such that identifying individual low frequency earthquakes can provide opportunities to improve source characterizations. This study seeks to refine the tremor source <span class="hlt">locations</span> by stacking families of similar low frequency earthquakes to enhance the signal to noise ratio and clarify P- and S-wave arrivals, and to better characterize the time history of specific "famlies" of tremor <span class="hlt">events</span>. Short, well-defined tremor bursts identified from previous source <span class="hlt">location</span> analysis are used to define template waveforms that are cross-correlated over several years of recording. Since multi-station template matching algorithms are particularly sensitive to source <span class="hlt">location</span>, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> time histories of <span class="hlt">event</span> families can be produced. These time histories provide an important additional constraint on episodic tremor and slip <span class="hlt">events</span> (and an independent test of both procedures) since they do not depend on station amplitudes as more traditional techniques do, which may impart a detection bias. Stacking similar <span class="hlt">events</span> clarifies arrival times that are then used to refine the source <span class="hlt">locations</span>. This approach is being applied to the Oaxaca region of Mexico and southern Cascadia, where lower network density has limited detailed tremor source <span class="hlt">location</span> analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMPP21B2237D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMPP21B2237D"><span>Towards an <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Orbital Calibration of Late Miocene Climate <span class="hlt">Events</span>: Insights From a High-Resolution Chemo- and Magnetostratigraphy (8-6 Ma) from Equatorial Pacific IODP Sites U1337 and U1338</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Drury, A. J.; Westerhold, T.; Frederichs, T.; Wilkens, R.; Channell, J. E. T.; Evans, H. F.; Hodell, D. A.; John, C. M.; Lyle, M. W.; Roehl, U.; Tian, J.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In the 8-6 Ma interval, the late Miocene is characterised by a long-term -0.3 ‰ reduction in benthic foraminiferal δ18O and distinctive short-term δ18O cycles, possibly related to dynamic Antarctic ice sheet variability. In addition, the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (LMCIS) marks a permanent long-term -1 ‰ shift in oceanic δ13CDIC, which is the largest, long-term perturbation in the global marine carbon cycle since the mid Miocene Monterey excursion. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> age control is crucial to investigate the origin of the δ18O cyclicity and determine the precise onset of the LMCIS. The current Geological Time Scale in the 8-6 Ma interval is constructed using astronomical tuning of sedimentary cycles in Mediterranean outcrops. However, outside of the Mediterranean, a comparable high-resolution chemo-, magneto-, and cyclostratigraphy at a single DSDP/ODP/IODP site does not exist. Generating an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> astronomically-calibrated chemo- and magneto-stratigraphy in the 8-6 Ma interval became possible with retrieval of equatorial Pacific IODP Sites U1337 and U1338, as both sites have sedimentation rates ~2 cm/kyr, high biogenic carbonate content, and magnetic polarity stratigraphies. Here we present high-resolution correlation of Sites U1337 and U1338 using Milankovitch-related cycles in core images and X-ray fluorescence core scanning data. By combining inclination and declination data from ~400 new discrete samples with shipboard measurements, we are able to identify 14 polarity reversals at Site U1337 from the young end of Chron C3An.1n (~6.03 Ma) to the onset of Chron C4n.2n (~8.11 Ma). New high-resolution (<1.5 kyr) stable isotope records from Site U1337 correlate highly with Site U1338 records, enabling construction of a high-resolution stack. Initial orbital tuning of the U1337-U1338 records show that the δ18O cyclicity is obliquity driven, indicating high-latitude climate forcing. The LMCIS starts ~7.55 Ma and is anchored in Chron C4n.1n, which is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T53A2679M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.T53A2679M"><span>Improved phase arrival estimate and <span class="hlt">location</span> for local earthquakes in South Korea</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Morton, E. A.; Rowe, C. A.; Begnaud, M. L.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Korean Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and the Korean Meteorological Agency (KMA) regularly report local (distance < ~1200 km) seismicity recorded with their networks; we obtain preliminary <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> estimates as well as waveform data, but no phase arrivals are reported, so the data are not immediately useful for earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span>. Our goal is to identify seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> that are sufficiently well-<span class="hlt">located</span> to provide <span class="hlt">accurate</span> seismic travel-time information for <span class="hlt">events</span> within the KIGAM and KMA networks, and also recorded by some regional stations. Toward that end, we are using a combination of manual phase identification and arrival-time picking, with waveform cross-correlation, to cluster <span class="hlt">events</span> that have occurred in close proximity to one another, which allows for improved phase identification by comparing the highly correlating waveforms. We cross-correlate the known <span class="hlt">events</span> with one another on 5 seismic stations and cluster <span class="hlt">events</span> that correlate above a correlation coefficient threshold of 0.7, which reveals few clusters containing few <span class="hlt">events</span> each. The small number of repeating <span class="hlt">events</span> suggests that the online catalogs have had mining and quarry blasts removed before publication, as these can contribute significantly to repeating seismic sources in relatively aseismic regions such as South Korea. The dispersed source <span class="hlt">locations</span> in our catalog, however, are ideal for seismic velocity modeling by providing superior sampling through the dense seismic station arrangement, which produces favorable <span class="hlt">event</span>-to-station ray path coverage. Following careful manual phase picking on 104 <span class="hlt">events</span> chosen to provide adequate ray coverage, we re-<span class="hlt">locate</span> the <span class="hlt">events</span> to obtain improved source coordinates. The re-<span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">events</span> are used with Thurber's Simul2000 pseudo-bending local tomography code to estimate the crustal structure on the Korean Peninsula, which is an important contribution to ongoing calibration for <span class="hlt">events</span> of interest in the region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970009636','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970009636"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Finite Difference Algorithms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Goodrich, John W.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce <span class="hlt">accurate</span> results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910011517','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910011517"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> monotone cubic interpolation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Huynh, Hung T.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PEPI..264...35C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PEPI..264...35C"><span>Back azimuth constrained double-difference seismic <span class="hlt">location</span> and tomography for downhole microseismic monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Yukuan; Zhang, Haijiang; Miao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yinsheng; Liu, Qiang</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>We have developed a new seismic tomography method, back azimuth constrained double-difference (DD) seismic tomography, which is suitable for downhole microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing. The new method simultaneously <span class="hlt">locates</span> microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> and determines three-dimensional (3D) Vp and Vs models for the fracturing zone using differential arrival times from pairs of <span class="hlt">events</span> and <span class="hlt">event</span> back azimuths in addition to absolute arrival times. Compared to the existing DD <span class="hlt">location</span> and tomography method, our method incorporates back azimuth information to better constrain microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> in the case of poor spatial station coverage such as the linear downhole seismic array generally used for microseismic monitoring. By incorporating the relative arrival time and back azimuth information of <span class="hlt">events</span>, the extended DD method can provide better relative <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span>, and thus can better characterize the fracture distribution. In addition to microseismic <span class="hlt">locations</span>, seismic velocity anomalies determined around the fracturing zone may also provide valuable information for fracture development. Due to the existence of fractures and fluids, the seismic velocity is expected to be lower in the fractured zone compared to the surrounding regions. Therefore the area of low seismic velocity anomaly may be used as a proxy for the stimulated reservoir volume. We have applied the new method to a downhole microseismic dataset from shale gas hydraulic fracturing. The microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> are more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> relocated than the conventional grid search <span class="hlt">location</span> method, and they are generally associated with low velocity anomalies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900019364','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900019364"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> quantum chemical calculations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently <span class="hlt">accurate</span> result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform <span class="hlt">accurate</span> calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821298','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821298"><span>Distributed Pedestrian Detection Alerts Based on Data Fusion with <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Localization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>García, Fernando; Jiménez, Felipe; Anaya, José Javier; Armingol, José María; Naranjo, José Eugenio; de la Escalera, Arturo</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Among Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) pedestrian detection is a common issue due to the vulnerability of pedestrians in the <span class="hlt">event</span> of accidents. In the present work, a novel approach for pedestrian detection based on data fusion is presented. Data fusion helps to overcome the limitations inherent to each detection system (computer vision and laser scanner) and provides <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and trustable tracking of any pedestrian movement. The application is complemented by an efficient communication protocol, able to alert vehicles in the surroundings by a fast and reliable communication. The combination of a powerful <span class="hlt">location</span>, based on a GPS with inertial measurement, and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> obstacle localization based on data fusion has allowed <span class="hlt">locating</span> the detected pedestrians with high accuracy. Tests proved the viability of the detection system and the efficiency of the communication, even at long distances. By the use of the alert communication, dangerous situations such as occlusions or misdetections can be avoided. PMID:24008284</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24008284','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24008284"><span>Distributed pedestrian detection alerts based on data fusion with <span class="hlt">accurate</span> localization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>García, Fernando; Jiménez, Felipe; Anaya, José Javier; Armingol, José María; Naranjo, José Eugenio; de la Escalera, Arturo</p> <p>2013-09-04</p> <p>Among Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) pedestrian detection is a common issue due to the vulnerability of pedestrians in the <span class="hlt">event</span> of accidents. In the present work, a novel approach for pedestrian detection based on data fusion is presented. Data fusion helps to overcome the limitations inherent to each detection system (computer vision and laser scanner) and provides <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and trustable tracking of any pedestrian movement. The application is complemented by an efficient communication protocol, able to alert vehicles in the surroundings by a fast and reliable communication. The combination of a powerful <span class="hlt">location</span>, based on a GPS with inertial measurement, and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> obstacle localization based on data fusion has allowed <span class="hlt">locating</span> the detected pedestrians with high accuracy. Tests proved the viability of the detection system and the efficiency of the communication, even at long distances. By the use of the alert communication, dangerous situations such as occlusions or misdetections can be avoided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?direntryid=326770&keyword=land%20and%20waste%20management&subject=land%20and%20waste%20management%20research&showcriteria=2&fed_org_id=111&datebeginpublishedpresented=03/10/2012&dateendpublishedpresented=03/10/2017&sortby=pubdateyear','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?direntryid=326770&keyword=land%20and%20waste%20management&subject=land%20and%20waste%20management%20research&showcriteria=2&fed_org_id=111&datebeginpublishedpresented=03/10/2012&dateendpublishedpresented=03/10/2017&sortby=pubdateyear"><span>BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS <span class="hlt">ACCURATELY</span> ESTIMATE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DPPNP6114K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DPPNP6114K"><span>Separatrix <span class="hlt">location</span> in NSTX</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kelly, Frederick; Maingi, Rajesh; Maqueda, Ricky; Menard, Jon; Leblanc, Ben; Bell, Ron; Paul, Stephen</p> <p>2008-11-01</p> <p>The separatrix <span class="hlt">location</span> and corresponding plasma parameters in NSTX were estimated for H-mode discharge 117125 containing both MARFEs and ELMs and for Type V ELMy H-mode discharge 128337. Since equilibrium reconstructions with LRDFIT did not <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> the LFS separatrix, a method based on the strong electron parallel heat conductivity was used to map the LFS magnetic flux surfaces to the HFS since the innermost Thomson scattering measurement of Te(R) is the most <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. During a MARFE or at MARFE onset in NSTX shot 117125, this method estimated the electron temperature at the LFS separatrix, Te,sep, to vary between 31 and 41 eV. At times with no MARFE or ELM, Te,sep ranged between 41 and 93 eV. These Te,sep values compare well with Te,sep values (28-35 eV) in TEXTOR just before MARFE onset.^1 In NSTX shot 128337 late in the Type V ELMy phase, Te,sep was estimated to be ˜100 eV. These separatrix <span class="hlt">locations</span> place the Er well outside the separatrix. [1] F.A. Kelly, W.M. Stacey, J. Rapp and M. Brix, Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 3382.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3837..202H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3837..202H"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> spectral color measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.</p> <p>1999-08-01</p> <p>Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940006503&hterms=sonar&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dsonar','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940006503&hterms=sonar&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dsonar"><span>Underwater hydrophone <span class="hlt">location</span> survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cecil, Jack B.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) is a U.S. Navy test range <span class="hlt">located</span> on Andros Island, Bahamas, and a Division of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), Newport, RI. The Headquarters of AUTEC is <span class="hlt">located</span> at a facility in West Palm Beach, FL. AUTEC's primary mission is to provide the U.S. Navy with a deep-water test and evaluation facility for making underwater acoustic measurements, testing and calibrating sonars, and providing <span class="hlt">accurate</span> underwater, surface, and in-air tracking data on surface ships, submarines, aircraft, and weapon systems. Many of these programs are in support of Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW), undersea research and development programs, and Fleet assessment and operational readiness trials. Most tests conducted at AUTEC require precise underwater tracking (plus or minus 3 yards) of multiple acoustic signals emitted with the correct waveshape and repetition criteria from either a surface craft or underwater vehicle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA286889','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA286889"><span>Improving Seismic <span class="hlt">Event</span> Characterisation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-07-22</p> <p>according to age, four regions of low volcanic and earthquake activity, in addition to a region termed tectonic continent where activity is high. We... Queensland . 0 * il-’gme 7.2 shows tire <span class="hlt">locations</span> of <span class="hlt">events</span> whichl have been used. Ti1𔃼 <span class="hlt">events</span> l:cI , ’"re,: hcc.eI with a inininmm of fcu; iecords</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19464292','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19464292"><span>Heterogeneity of nervous system mitochondria: <span class="hlt">location</span>, <span class="hlt">location</span>, <span class="hlt">location</span>!</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dubinsky, Janet M</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Mitochondrial impairments have been associated with many neurological disorders, from inborn errors of metabolism or genetic disorders to age and environmentally linked diseases of aging (DiMauro S., Schon E.A. 2008. Mitochondrial disorders in the nervous system. Annu. Rev., Neurosci. 31, 91-123.). In these disorders, specific nervous system components or brain regions appear to be initially more susceptible to the triggering <span class="hlt">event</span> or pathological process. Such regional variation in susceptibility to multiple types of stressors raises the possibility that inherent differences in mitochondrial function may mediate some aspect of pathogenesis. Regional differences in the distribution or number of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzyme activities, enzyme expression levels, mitochondrial genes or availability of necessary metabolites become attractive explanations for selective vulnerability of a nervous system structure. While regionally selective mitochondrial vulnerability has been documented, regional variations in other cellular and tissue characteristics may also contribute to metabolic impairment. Such environmental variables include high tonic firing rates, neurotransmitter phenotype, <span class="hlt">location</span> of mitochondria within a neuron, or the varied tissue perfusion pressure of different cerebral arterial branches. These contextual variables exert regionally distinct regulatory influences on mitochondria to tune their energy production to local demands. Thus to understand variations in mitochondrial functioning and consequent selective vulnerability to injury, the organelle must be placed within the context of its cellular, functional, developmental and neuroanatomical environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ISPAr.XL4d..57Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ISPAr.XL4d..57Z"><span>Pan-information <span class="hlt">Location</span> Map</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, X. Y.; Guo, W.; Huang, L.; Hu, T.; Gao, W. X.</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>A huge amount of information, including geographic, environmental, socio-economic, personal and social network information, has been generated from diverse sources. Most of this information exists separately and is disorderly even if some of it is about the same person, feature, phenomenon or <span class="hlt">event</span>. Users generally need to collect related information from different sources and then utilize them in applications. An automatic mechanism, therefore, for establishing a connection between potentially-related information will profoundly expand the usefulness of this huge body of information. A connection tie is semantic <span class="hlt">location</span> describing semantically concepts and attributes of <span class="hlt">locations</span> as well as relationships between <span class="hlt">locations</span>, since 80% of information contains some kind of geographic reference but not all of geographic reference has explicit geographic coordinates. Semantic <span class="hlt">location</span> is an orthogonal form of <span class="hlt">location</span> representation which can be represented as domain ontology or UML format. Semantic <span class="hlt">location</span> associates various kinds of information about a same object to provide timely information services according to users' demands, habits, preferences and applications. Based on this idea, a Pan-Information <span class="hlt">Location</span> Map (PILM) is proposed as a new-style 4D map to associates semantic <span class="hlt">location</span>-based information dynamically to organize and consolidate the locality and characteristics of corresponding features and <span class="hlt">events</span>, and delivers on-demand information with a User-Adaptive Smart Display (UASD).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/63026','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/63026"><span>Synchronized sampling improves fault <span class="hlt">location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.</p> <p>1995-04-01</p> <p>Transmission line faults must be <span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">accurately</span> to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault <span class="hlt">locators</span>. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault <span class="hlt">location</span> <span class="hlt">accurately</span>, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault <span class="hlt">location</span> <span class="hlt">accurately</span> before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault <span class="hlt">location</span> that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSM.S32A..05A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSM.S32A..05A"><span>Improving the Level of Seismic Hazard Parameters in Saudi Arabia Using Earthquake <span class="hlt">Location</span> and Magnitude Calibration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Al-Amri, A. M.; Rodgers, A. J.</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Saudi Arabia is an area, which is characterized very poorly seismically and for which little existing data is available. While for the most parts, particularly, Arabian Shield and Arabian Platform are aseismic, the area is ringed with regional seismic sources in the tectonically active areas of Iran and Turkey to the northeast, the Red Sea Rift bordering the Shield to the southwest, and the Dead Sea Transform fault zone to the north. Therefore, this paper aims to improve the level of seismic hazard parameters by improving earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude estimates with the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN). We analyzed earthquake data, travel times and seismic waveform data from the SANDSN. KACST operates the 38 station SANDSN, consisting of 27 broadband and 11 short-period stations. The SANDSN has good signal detection capabilities because the sites are relatively quiet. Noise surveys at a few stations indicate that seismic noise levels at SANDSN stations are quite low for frequencies between 0.1 and 1.0 Hz, however cultural noise appears to affect some stations at frequencies above 1.0 Hz. <span class="hlt">Locations</span> of regional earthquakes estimated by KACST were compared with <span class="hlt">locations</span> from global bulletins. Large differences between KACST and global catalog <span class="hlt">locations</span> are likely the result of inadequacies of the global average earth model (iasp91) used by the KACST system. While this model is probably adequate for <span class="hlt">locating</span> distant (teleseismic) <span class="hlt">events</span> in continental regions, it leads to large <span class="hlt">location</span> errors, as much as 50-100 km, for regional <span class="hlt">events</span>. We present detailed analysis of some <span class="hlt">events</span> and Dead Sea explosions where we found gross errors in estimated <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Velocity models are presented that should improve estimated <span class="hlt">locations</span> of regional <span class="hlt">events</span> in three specific regions: 1. Gulf of Aqabah - Dead Sea region 2. Arabian Shield and 3. Arabian Platform. Recently, these models are applied to the SANDSN to improve local and teleseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020015803&hterms=Schrodinger&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DSchrodinger','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020015803&hterms=Schrodinger&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DSchrodinger"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Evaluation of Quantum Integrals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24835126','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24835126"><span>Toward long-term and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> augmented-reality for monocular endoscopic videos.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Puerto-Souza, Gustavo A; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Mariottini, Gian-Luca</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>By overlaying preoperative radiological 3-D models onto the intraoperative laparoscopic video, augmented-reality (AR) displays promise to increase surgeons' visual awareness of high-risk surgical targets (e.g., the <span class="hlt">location</span> of a tumor). Existing AR surgical systems lack in robustness and accuracy because of the many challenges in endoscopic imagery, such as frequent changes in illumination, rapid camera motions, prolonged organ occlusions, and tissue deformations. The frequent occurrence of these <span class="hlt">events</span> can cause the loss of image (anchor) points, and thus, the loss of the AR display after a few frames. In this paper, we present the design of a new AR system that represents a first step toward long term and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> augmented surgical display for monocular (calibrated and uncalibrated) endoscopic videos. Our system uses correspondence-search methods, and a new weighted sliding-window registration approach, to automatically and <span class="hlt">accurately</span> recover the overlay by predicting the image <span class="hlt">locations</span> of a high number of anchor points that were lost after a sudden image change. The effectiveness of the proposed system in maintaining a long term (over 2 min) and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> (less than 1 mm) augmentation has been documented over a set of real partial-nephrectomy laparascopic videos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGE....13..805Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGE....13..805Z"><span>Downhole microseismic monitoring for low signal-to-noise ratio <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Hang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Microseismic monitoring plays an important role in the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas/oil production. The accuracy of <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> is an essential issue in microseismic monitoring. The data obtained from downhole monitoring system usually show a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the recorded data from the surface. For small microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span>, however, P waves recorded in a downhole array may be very weak, while S waves are generally dominant and strong. Numerical experiments suggest that inverting S-wave arrival times alone is not sufficient to constrain <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span>. In this study, we perform extensive <span class="hlt">location</span> tests with various noise effects using a grid search method that matches the travel time data of the S wave across a recording array. We conclude that fitting S-wave travel time data along with at least one P-wave travel time of the same <span class="hlt">event</span> can significantly improve <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy. In practice, picking S-wave arrival time data and at least one P-wave pick is possible for many small <span class="hlt">events</span>. We demonstrate that fitting the combination of the travel time data is a robust approach, which can help increase the number of microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> to be <span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">accurately</span> during hydraulic fracturing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19298961','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19298961"><span>Activating <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world <span class="hlt">events</span>, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized <span class="hlt">events</span> that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) <span class="hlt">event</span> nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those <span class="hlt">events</span>; (2) <span class="hlt">location</span> nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those <span class="hlt">locations</span>; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that <span class="hlt">event</span>-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983Tecto...2..529C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983Tecto...2..529C"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Source Depths and Focal Mechanisms of Shallow Earthquakes in Western South America and in the New Hebrides Island Arc</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chinn, Douglas S.; Isacks, Bryan L.</p> <p>1983-12-01</p> <p>Synthetic seismograms are matched to long-period P waveforms in order to obtain <span class="hlt">accurate</span> depths of shallow earthquakes with known focal mechanisms. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> depths are obtained for a large sample of moderate-sized (6 < Ms < 7) <span class="hlt">events</span> which produced relatively simple P waveforms and do not require intensive analysis. The estimated error in the determination of depth is about ±5 km or less for most of the <span class="hlt">events</span> considered. The procedure is applied to two suites of <span class="hlt">events</span>, one in South America (83 <span class="hlt">events</span>) and one in the New Hebrides (61 <span class="hlt">events</span>). In these two areas of contrasting styles of subduction, the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> depths provide new information on the bending of descending plates near trenches, the seismicity and tectonics of the upper plate, and the geometry and structure of the zone of contact between the upper and descending plates. Depths of suboceanic earthquakes which occurred near the trench and which have either tensional and compressional horizontal stress axes agree well with Chapple and Forsyth's (1979) preferred model of a bending elastic-perfectly plastic plate. However, an unusually deep <span class="hlt">event</span> occurred beneath the Fiji plateau in an area of young ocean floor supposed to have been formed by sea floor spreading processes only since late Miocene time. The calculated depth of the <span class="hlt">event</span>, 48 km, places it below the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary derived from thermal models. Vertical cross sections through the shallow parts of the subduction zones show that most of the earthquakes with thrust faulting focal mechanisms can be interpreted to be interplate <span class="hlt">events</span> <span class="hlt">located</span> in a thin (<10 km thick) curved zone of contact dipping arcward or landward from the trench axis. However, a few <span class="hlt">events</span> with focal mechanisms similar to the interplate <span class="hlt">events</span> do not fit on the inferred thin zone of contact. These <span class="hlt">events</span> would be accommodated by an interplate zone 15 km thick. In both subduction zones, interplate <span class="hlt">events</span> occur at depths between about 15 and 50 km. However, the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/768890','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/768890"><span>UTILIZING RESULTS FROM INSAR TO DEVELOP SEISMIC <span class="hlt">LOCATION</span> BENCHMARKS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>M. BEGNAUD; ET AL</p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>Obtaining <span class="hlt">accurate</span> seismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> is one of the most important goals for monitoring detonations of underground nuclear teats. This is a particular challenge at small magnitudes where the number of recording stations may be less than 20. Although many different procedures are being developed to improve seismic <span class="hlt">location</span>, most procedures suffer from inadequate testing against <span class="hlt">accurate</span> information about a seismic <span class="hlt">event</span>. <span class="hlt">Events</span> with well-defined attributes, such as latitude, longitude, depth and origin time, are commonly referred to as ground truth (GT). Ground truth comes in many forms and with many different levels of accuracy. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide independent and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> information (ground truth) regarding ground surface deformation and/or rupture. Relating surface deformation to seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> is trivial when <span class="hlt">events</span> are large and create a significant surface rupture, such as for the M{sub w} = 7.5 <span class="hlt">event</span> that occurred in the remote northern region of the Tibetan plateau in 1997. The <span class="hlt">event</span>, which was a vertical strike slip even appeared anomalous in nature due to the lack of large aftershocks and had an associated surface rupture of over 180 km that was identified and modeled using InSAR. The east-west orientation of the fault rupture provides excellent ground truth for latitude, but is of limited use for longitude. However, a secondary rupture occurred 50 km south of the main shock rupture trace that can provide ground truth with accuracy within 5 km. The smaller, 5-km-long secondary rupture presents a challenge for relating the deformation to a seismic <span class="hlt">event</span>. The rupture is believed to have a thrust mechanism; the dip of the fimdt allows for some separation between the secondary rupture trace and its associated <span class="hlt">event</span> epicenter, although not as much as is currently observed from catalog <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Few <span class="hlt">events</span> within the time period of the InSAR analysis are candidates for the secondary rupture. Of these, we have</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6965147','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6965147"><span>Magnetic ranging tool <span class="hlt">accurately</span> guides replacement well</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )</p> <p>1992-12-21</p> <p>This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which <span class="hlt">accurately</span> guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole <span class="hlt">location</span> in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017HMT....53..887J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017HMT....53..887J"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>In this paper, two <span class="hlt">accurate</span> methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple <span class="hlt">located</span> in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED351854.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED351854.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Locative</span> Inversion in Cantonese.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mok, Sui-Sang</p> <p></p> <p>This study investigates the phenomenon of "<span class="hlt">Locative</span> Inversion" in Cantonese. The term "<span class="hlt">Locative</span> Inversion" indicates that the <span class="hlt">locative</span> phrase (LP) syntactic process in Cantonese and the appears at the sentence-initial position and its logical subject occurs postverbally. It is demonstrated that this <span class="hlt">Locative</span> Inversion is a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Movement+AND+spatial+AND+development&pg=2&id=EJ775654','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Movement+AND+spatial+AND+development&pg=2&id=EJ775654"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span>, <span class="hlt">Location</span>, <span class="hlt">Location</span>: Development of Spatiotemporal Sequence Learning in Infancy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kirkham, Natasha Z.; Slemmer, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Daniel C.; Johnson, Scott P.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>We investigated infants' sensitivity to spatiotemporal structure. In Experiment 1, circles appeared in a statistically defined spatial pattern. At test 11-month-olds, but not 8-month-olds, looked longer at a novel spatial sequence. Experiment 2 presented different color/shape stimuli, but only the <span class="hlt">location</span> sequence was violated during test;…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JChEd..86..285W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JChEd..86..285W"><span>CHED <span class="hlt">Events</span>: Salt Lake City</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wink, Donald J.</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>The Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings planned for the Spring 2009 ACS Meeting in Salt Lake City will be in the Marriott City Center Hotel. Check the <span class="hlt">location</span> of other CHED <span class="hlt">events</span>, the CHED Social <span class="hlt">Event</span>, the Undergraduate Program, Sci-Mix, etc. because many will be in the Salt Palace Convention Center.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3577..243F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3577..243F"><span>Improved integrated sniper <span class="hlt">location</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Figler, Burton D.; Spera, Timothy J.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>In July of 1995, Lockheed Martin IR Imaging Systems, of Lexington, Massachusetts began the development of an integrated sniper <span class="hlt">location</span> system for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and for the Department of the Navy's Naval Command Control & Ocean Surveillance Center, RDTE Division in San Diego, California. The I-SLS integrates acoustic and uncooled infrared sensing technologies to provide an affordable and highly effective sniper detection and <span class="hlt">location</span> capability. This system, its performance and results from field tests at Camp Pendleton, California, in October 1996 were described in a paper presented at the November 1996 SPIE Photonics East Symposium1 on Enabling Technologies for Law Enforcement and Security. The I-SLS combines an acoustic warning system with an uncooled infrared warning system. The acoustic warning system has been developed by SenTech, Inc., of Lexington, Massachusetts. This acoustic warning system provides sniper detection and coarse <span class="hlt">location</span> information based upon the muzzle blast of the sniper's weapon and/or upon the shock wave produced by the sniper's bullet, if the bullet is supersonic. The uncooled infrared warning system provides sniper detection and fine <span class="hlt">location</span> information based upon the weapon's muzzle flash. In addition, the uncooled infrared warning system can provide thermal imagery that can be used to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> and identify the sniper. Combining these two technologies improves detection probability, reduces false alarm rate and increases utility. In the two years since the last report of the integrated sniper <span class="hlt">location</span> system, improvements have been made and a second field demonstration was planned. In this paper, we describe the integrated sniper <span class="hlt">location</span> system modifications in preparation for the new field demonstration. In addition, fundamental improvements in the uncooled infrared sensor technology continue to be made. These improvements include higher sensitivity (lower minimum resolvable temperature</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3812589','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3812589"><span>Sudden <span class="hlt">Event</span> Recognition: A Survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Event</span> recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and robust approach is necessary to enable <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden <span class="hlt">event</span>, which is a subset of an abnormal <span class="hlt">event</span> in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden <span class="hlt">event</span> over a general anomalous <span class="hlt">event</span>; (2) frameworks used in sudden <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition. PMID:23921828</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S53A2776W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S53A2776W"><span>Migration Based <span class="hlt">Event</span> Detection and Automatic P- and S-Phase Picking in Hengill, Southwest Iceland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wagner, F.; Tryggvason, A.; Gudmundsson, O.; Roberts, R.; Bodvarsson, R.; Fehler, M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Automatic detection of seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> is a complicated process. Common procedures depend on the detection of seismic phases (e.g. P and S) in single trace analyses and their correct association with <span class="hlt">locatable</span> point sources. The <span class="hlt">event</span> detection threshold is thus directly related to the single trace detection threshold. Highly sensitive phase detectors detect low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) phases but also produce a low percentage of <span class="hlt">locatable</span> <span class="hlt">events</span>. Short inter-<span class="hlt">event</span> times of only a few seconds, which is not uncommon during seismic or volcanic crises, is a complication to any <span class="hlt">event</span> association algorithm. We present an <span class="hlt">event</span> detection algorithm based on seismic migration of trace attributes into an a-priori three-dimensional (3D) velocity model. We evaluate its capacity as automatic detector compared to conventional methods. Detecting <span class="hlt">events</span> using seismic migration removes the need for phase association. The <span class="hlt">event</span> detector runs on a stack of time shifted traces, which increases S/N and thus allows for a low detection threshold. Detected <span class="hlt">events</span> come with an origin time and a <span class="hlt">location</span> estimate, enabling a focused trace analysis, including P- and S-phase recognition, to discard false detections and build a basis for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> automatic phase picking. We apply the migration based detection algorithm to data from a semi-permanent seismic network at Hengill, an active volcanic region with several geothermal production sites in southwest Iceland. The network includes 26 stations with inter-station distances down to 5 km. Results show a high success rate compared to the manually picked catalogue (up to 90% detected). New detections, that were missed by the standard detection routine, show a generally good ratio of true to false alarms, i.e. most of the new <span class="hlt">events</span> are <span class="hlt">locatable</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24908476','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24908476"><span>Sleeping at work: not all about <span class="hlt">location</span>, <span class="hlt">location</span>, <span class="hlt">location</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jay, Sarah M; Aisbett, Brad; Sprajcer, Madeline; Ferguson, Sally A</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Working arrangements in industries that use non-standard hours sometimes necessitate an 'onsite' workforce where workers sleep in accommodation within or adjacent to the workplace. Of particular relevance to these workers is the widely held (and largely anecdotal) assumption that sleep at home is better than sleep away, particularly when away for work. This narrative review explores the idea that sleep outcomes in these unique work situations are the product of an interaction between numerous factors including timing and duration of breaks, commute length, sleeping environment (noise, movement, vibration, light), circadian phase, demographic factors and familiarity with the sleep <span class="hlt">location</span>. Based on the data presented in this review, it is our contention that the <span class="hlt">location</span> of sleep, whilst important, is secondary to other factors such as the timing and duration of sleep periods. We suggest that future research should include measures that allow conceptualisation of other critical factors such as familiarity with the sleeping environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730023602','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730023602"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span>, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The design and performance is described of an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic '<span class="hlt">locator</span>' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon <span class="hlt">location</span> to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28269301','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28269301"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> upper body rehabilitation system using kinect.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sinha, Sanjana; Bhowmick, Brojeshwar; Chakravarty, Kingshuk; Sinha, Aniruddha; Das, Abhijit</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The growing importance of Kinect as a tool for clinical assessment and rehabilitation is due to its portability, low cost and markerless system for human motion capture. However, the accuracy of Kinect in measuring three-dimensional body joint center <span class="hlt">locations</span> often fails to meet clinical standards of accuracy when compared to marker-based motion capture systems such as Vicon. The length of the body segment connecting any two joints, measured as the distance between three-dimensional Kinect skeleton joint coordinates, has been observed to vary with time. The orientation of the line connecting adjoining Kinect skeletal coordinates has also been seen to differ from the actual orientation of the physical body segment. Hence we have proposed an optimization method that utilizes Kinect Depth and RGB information to search for the joint center <span class="hlt">location</span> that satisfies constraints on body segment length and as well as orientation. An experimental study have been carried out on ten healthy participants performing upper body range of motion exercises. The results report 72% reduction in body segment length variance and 2° improvement in Range of Motion (ROM) angle hence enabling to more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurements for upper limb exercises.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740020296','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740020296"><span>On numerically <span class="hlt">accurate</span> finite element</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows <span class="hlt">accurate</span> computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADP204450','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADP204450"><span>Wavefield Synthetics in 3D and Fully Automatic <span class="hlt">Event</span> <span class="hlt">Locations</span>,</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-08-14</p> <p>approximation (Ryzhikov and Troyan 1992 a,b) and presuming linearity of w with respect to f, we may rewrite eq.(11) for dimensionless values I = f/fm...production, Bull.Seism.Soc.Am, 83, 660-679. Ryzhikov, G.A. and Troyan , V.N., 1992a. Diffraction tomography. Part 1: Construction and in- terpretation...Ryzhikov, G.A. and Troyan , V.N., 1992b. Diffraction tomography. Part 2: Reconstruction al- gorithm with statistical regularization, in Proceedings of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3314399','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3314399"><span><span class="hlt">EVENT</span> SEGMENTATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Swallow, Khena M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>One way to understand something is to break it up into parts. New research indicates that segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful <span class="hlt">events</span> is a core component of ongoing perception, with consequences for memory and learning. Behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation is automatic and that people spontaneously segment activity into hierarchically organized parts and sub-parts. This segmentation depends on the bottom-up processing of sensory features such as movement, and on the top-down processing of conceptual features such as actors’ goals. How people segment activity affects what they remember later; as a result, those who identify appropriate <span class="hlt">event</span> boundaries during perception tend to remember more and learn more proficiently. PMID:22468032</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9450G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9450G"><span>Travel-time source-specific station correction improves <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Giuntini, Alessandra; Materni, Valerio; Chiappini, Stefano; Carluccio, Roberto; Console, Rodolfo; Chiappini, Massimo</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span> are crucial for investigating seismogenic processes, as well as for applications like verifying compliance to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy is related to the degree of knowledge about the 3-D structure of seismic wave velocity in the Earth. It is well known that modeling errors of calculated travel times may have the effect of shifting the computed epicenters far from the real <span class="hlt">locations</span> by a distance even larger than the size of the statistical error ellipses, regardless of the accuracy in picking seismic phase arrivals. The consequences of large mislocations of seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> in the context of the CTBT verification is particularly critical in order to trigger a possible On Site Inspection (OSI). In fact, the Treaty establishes that an OSI area cannot be larger than 1000 km2, and its larger linear dimension cannot be larger than 50 km. Moreover, depth accuracy is crucial for the application of the depth <span class="hlt">event</span> screening criterion. In the present study, we develop a method of source-specific travel times corrections based on a set of well <span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">events</span> recorded by dense national seismic networks in seismically active regions. The applications concern seismic sequences recorded in Japan, Iran and Italy. We show that mislocations of the order of 10-20 km affecting the epicenters, as well as larger mislocations in hypocentral depths, calculated from a global seismic network and using the standard IASPEI91 travel times can be effectively removed by applying source-specific station corrections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3478812','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3478812"><span>Sensor-Generated Time Series <span class="hlt">Events</span>: A Definition Language</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Anguera, Aurea; Lara, Juan A.; Lizcano, David; Martínez, Maria Aurora; Pazos, Juan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>There are now a great many domains where information is recorded by sensors over a limited time period or on a permanent basis. This data flow leads to sequences of data known as time series. In many domains, like seismography or medicine, time series analysis focuses on particular regions of interest, known as <span class="hlt">events</span>, whereas the remainder of the time series contains hardly any useful information. In these domains, there is a need for mechanisms to identify and <span class="hlt">locate</span> such <span class="hlt">events</span>. In this paper, we propose an <span class="hlt">events</span> definition language that is general enough to be used to easily and naturally define <span class="hlt">events</span> in time series recorded by sensors in any domain. The proposed language has been applied to the definition of time series <span class="hlt">events</span> generated within the branch of medicine dealing with balance-related functions in human beings. A device, called posturograph, is used to study balance-related functions. The platform has four sensors that record the pressure intensity being exerted on the platform, generating four interrelated time series. As opposed to the existing ad hoc proposals, the results confirm that the proposed language is valid, that is generally applicable and <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, for identifying the <span class="hlt">events</span> contained in the time series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4863853','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4863853"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Cross Sections for Microanalysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rez, Peter</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>To calculate the intensity of x-ray emission in electron beam microanalysis requires a knowledge of the energy distribution of the electrons in the solid, the energy variation of the ionization cross section of the relevant subshell, the fraction of ionizations <span class="hlt">events</span> producing x rays of interest and the absorption coefficient of the x rays on the path to the detector. The theoretical predictions and experimental data available for ionization cross sections are limited mainly to K shells of a few elements. Results of systematic plane wave Born approximation calculations with exchange for K, L, and M shell ionization cross sections over the range of electron energies used in microanalysis are presented. Comparisons are made with experimental measurement for selected K shells and it is shown that the plane wave theory is not appropriate for overvoltages less than 2.5 V. PMID:27446747</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+media+AND+marketing+AND+facebook&pg=2&id=EJ932068','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+media+AND+marketing+AND+facebook&pg=2&id=EJ932068"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span>, <span class="hlt">Location</span>, <span class="hlt">Location</span>: Where Do <span class="hlt">Location</span>-Based Services Fit into Your Institution's Social Media Mix?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nekritz, Tim</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Foursquare is a <span class="hlt">location</span>-based social networking service that allows users to share their <span class="hlt">location</span> with friends. Some college administrators have been thinking about whether and how to take the leap into <span class="hlt">location</span>-based services, which are also known as geosocial networking services. These platforms, which often incorporate gaming elements like…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=locative&pg=4&id=ED375673','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=locative&pg=4&id=ED375673"><span><span class="hlt">Locatives</span> in Kpelle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kuha, Mai</p> <p></p> <p>This paper examines the differences between <span class="hlt">locative</span> expressions in Kpelle and English, based on the dialect of one native speaker of Kpelle. It discusses the crucial role of the reference object in defining the meaning of <span class="hlt">locatives</span> in Kpelle, in contrast to English, where the characteristics of the object to be <span class="hlt">located</span> are less important. An…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19683556','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19683556"><span>High-resolution ERP mapping of cortical activation related to implicit object-<span class="hlt">location</span> memory.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Murphy, Jonathan S; Wynne, Ciara E; O'Rourke, Edel M; Commins, Seán; Roche, Richard A P</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>High-density <span class="hlt">event</span>-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during an object recognition task which involved task-irrelevant changes in the <span class="hlt">location</span> of studied objects. Participants categorised objects as studied or novel while data were analysed to ascertain the effect of the <span class="hlt">location</span> changes on performance and waveform topography. Our results indicate that humans can classify objects faster and more <span class="hlt">accurately</span> when using implicit spatial memory. Individual differences observed in object recognition proficiency were absent if objects were presented in their 'correct' <span class="hlt">location</span>. In a second experiment we replicated the behavioural findings while manipulating viewpoint to discount scene recognition as an underlying factor. We propose a model which includes activation of the right medial temporal lobe prior to P300 elicitation to account for the prophylactic effect of implicit processing on object recognition. Hemispheric differences in parietal componentry dependant on sex of participant were also observed and are discussed in relation to differential strategies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Denning&pg=2&id=EJ830150','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Denning&pg=2&id=EJ830150"><span>Transformational <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Transformational <span class="hlt">Events</span> is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22707921','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22707921"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> ab Initio Spin Densities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus</p> <p>2012-06-12</p> <p>We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7568588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7568588"><span>Memory for parking <span class="hlt">location</span> in large lots.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Means, L W; Lutz, J; Long, T E; High, K M</p> <p>1995-06-01</p> <p>The recall of automobile parking <span class="hlt">location</span> was assessed over five consecutive workdays. Completed data from 36 women and 19 men provided measures of accuracy and a survey of specific strategies. Analysis showed a significant recency effect with memory for the most recent parking <span class="hlt">locations</span> being superior. Less variation in parking <span class="hlt">location</span> and shorter distance from parking <span class="hlt">location</span> to building entrance were associated with better recall. Contrary to prevalent belief, older subjects had more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> recall. Older subjects parked closer to the entrance and used fewer spaces which were also <span class="hlt">located</span> closer together. The most frequently reported strategy was "favorite <span class="hlt">location</span>" which was used more often by older subjects. Whereas laboratory tasks show memory deficits with increasing age, some studies in the natural environment have exhibited less such decline; the current data showed an actual improvement. It may be that older people adopt and practice compensatory strategies in the natural environment while laboratory tasks give little opportunity for establishing or practicing such devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/105082','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/105082"><span>Transionospheric chirp <span class="hlt">event</span> classifier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Freeman, M.J.</p> <p>1995-09-01</p> <p>In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means -- this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might ``see`` thousands of <span class="hlt">events</span> per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of <span class="hlt">accurately</span> analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our <span class="hlt">Event</span> Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995STIN...9616994A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995STIN...9616994A"><span>Transionospheric chirp <span class="hlt">event</span> classifier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Argo, P. E.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Freeman, M. J.</p> <p></p> <p>In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means - this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might 'see' thousands of <span class="hlt">events</span> per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of <span class="hlt">accurately</span> analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our <span class="hlt">Event</span> Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24832231','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24832231"><span>TE-<span class="hlt">Locate</span>: A Tool to <span class="hlt">Locate</span> and Group Transposable Element Occurrences Using Paired-End Next-Generation Sequencing Data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Platzer, Alexander; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Long, Quan</p> <p>2012-09-12</p> <p>Transposable elements (TEs) are common mobile DNA elements present in nearly all genomes. Since the movement of TEs within a genome can sometimes have phenotypic consequences, an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> report of TE actions is desirable. To this end, we developed TE-<span class="hlt">Locate</span>, a computational tool that uses paired-end reads to identify the novel <span class="hlt">locations</span> of known TEs. TE-<span class="hlt">Locate</span> can utilize either a database of TE sequences, or annotated TEs within the reference sequence of interest. This makes TE-<span class="hlt">Locate</span> useful in the search for any mobile sequence, including retrotransposed gene copies. One major concern is to act on the correct hierarchy level, thereby avoiding an incorrect calling of a single insertion as multiple <span class="hlt">events</span> of TEs with high sequence similarity. We used the (super)family level, but TE-<span class="hlt">Locate</span> can also use any other level, right down to the individual transposable element. As an example of analysis with TE-<span class="hlt">Locate</span>, we used the Swedish population in the 1,001 Arabidopsis genomes project, and presented the biological insights gained from the novel TEs, inducing the association between different TE superfamilies. The program is freely available, and the URL is provided in the end of the paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cash+AND+receipt&id=EJ424430','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cash+AND+receipt&id=EJ424430"><span>Cash Control for Ticketed <span class="hlt">Events</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Strickland, Rodney</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Outlines procedures that will provide a school with the ability to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> record and account for the sales and cash receipts for a ticketed <span class="hlt">event</span>. Two sample box office reconciliation sheets and one box office issue sheet illustrate the procedures. (MLF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26121526','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26121526"><span>Extracting Time-<span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit <span class="hlt">location</span>, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript <span class="hlt">accurately</span> extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact <span class="hlt">location</span> and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact <span class="hlt">locations</span> on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which <span class="hlt">accurate</span> kinematics need to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA510224','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA510224"><span>Rare <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>terrorists are likely to acquire and use WMDs over the next ten years. • Provide means to target areas, entities and persons facilitating adver - sary WMD...complicated and unpredictable to begin with, but also that human adver - saries (unlike physical disasters) will react and adapt to our planning to try to make...virulent vaccine strain (Keim et al., 2001). The latter might not be regarded as a bioterrorism <span class="hlt">event</span>, even though it caused seven deaths and incited</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr49B2..543K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr49B2..543K"><span>Semantic <span class="hlt">Location</span> Extraction from Crowdsourced Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Koswatte, S.; Mcdougall, K.; Liu, X.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Crowdsourced Data (CSD) has recently received increased attention in many application areas including disaster management. Convenience of production and use, data currency and abundancy are some of the key reasons for attracting this high interest. Conversely, quality issues like incompleteness, credibility and relevancy prevent the direct use of such data in important applications like disaster management. Moreover, <span class="hlt">location</span> information availability of CSD is problematic as it remains very low in many crowd sourced platforms such as Twitter. Also, this recorded <span class="hlt">location</span> is mostly related to the mobile device or user <span class="hlt">location</span> and often does not represent the <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span>. In CSD, <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> is discussed descriptively in the comments in addition to the recorded <span class="hlt">location</span> (which is generated by means of mobile device's GPS or mobile communication network). This study attempts to semantically extract the CSD <span class="hlt">location</span> information with the help of an ontological Gazetteer and other available resources. 2011 Queensland flood tweets and Ushahidi Crowd Map data were semantically analysed to extract the <span class="hlt">location</span> information with the support of Queensland Gazetteer which is converted to an ontological gazetteer and a global gazetteer. Some preliminary results show that the use of ontologies and semantics can improve the accuracy of place name identification of CSD and the process of <span class="hlt">location</span> information extraction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25603168','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25603168"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> structure and cognitive control.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Reimer, Jason F; Radvansky, Gabriel A; Lorsbach, Thomas C; Armendarez, Joseph J</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate <span class="hlt">events</span>. The aim of the present study was to examine whether <span class="hlt">event</span> structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of <span class="hlt">events</span> within the AX-CPT by shifting the spatial <span class="hlt">location</span> of cues and probes on a computer screen. When <span class="hlt">location</span> shifts were present, a pattern of AX-CPT performance consistent with enhanced cognitive control was found. To test whether the <span class="hlt">location</span> shift effects were caused by the presence of <span class="hlt">event</span> boundaries per se, other aspects of the AX-CPT were manipulated, such as the color of cues and probes and the inclusion of a distractor task during the cue-probe delay. Changes in cognitive control were not found under these conditions, suggesting that the <span class="hlt">location</span> shift effects were specifically related to the formation of separate <span class="hlt">event</span> models. Together, these results can be accounted for by the <span class="hlt">Event</span> Horizon Model and a representation-based theory of cognitive control, and suggest that cognitive control can be influenced by the surrounding environmental structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020078320','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020078320"><span>System and Method of <span class="hlt">Locating</span> Lightning Strikes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Starr, Stanley O. (Inventor)</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A system and method of determining <span class="hlt">locations</span> of lightning strikes has been described. The system includes multiple receivers <span class="hlt">located</span> around an area of interest, such as a space center or airport. Each receiver monitors both sound and electric fields. The detection of an electric field pulse and a sound wave are used to calculate an area around each receiver in which the lighting is detected. A processor is coupled to the receivers to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> determine the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the lighting strike. The processor can manipulate the receiver data to compensate for environmental variables such as wind, temperature, and humidity. Further, each receiver processor can discriminate between distant and local lightning strikes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1233336','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1233336"><span>Assessment of User Home <span class="hlt">Location</span> Geoinference Methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harrison, Joshua J.; Bell, Eric B.; Corley, Courtney D.; Dowling, Chase P.; Cowell, Andrew J.</p> <p>2015-05-29</p> <p>This study presents an assessment of multiple approaches to determine the home and/or other important <span class="hlt">locations</span> to a Twitter user. In this study, we present a unique approach to the problem of geotagged data sparsity in social media when performing geoinferencing tasks. Given the sparsity of explicitly geotagged Twitter data, the ability to perform <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and reliable user geolocation from a limited number of geotagged posts has proven to be quite useful. In our survey, we have achieved accuracy rates of over 86% in matching Twitter user profile <span class="hlt">locations</span> with their inferred home <span class="hlt">locations</span> derived from geotagged posts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872479','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872479"><span>Reversible micromachining <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>This invention provides a device which includes a <span class="hlt">locator</span>, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the <span class="hlt">locator</span> and a retainer ring. The <span class="hlt">locator</span> has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the <span class="hlt">locator</span>. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the <span class="hlt">locator</span>. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a <span class="hlt">locator</span> and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the <span class="hlt">locator</span> (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the <span class="hlt">locator</span> is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the <span class="hlt">locator</span> can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/678593','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/678593"><span>Reversible micromachining <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.</p> <p>1999-08-31</p> <p>This invention provides a device which includes a <span class="hlt">locator</span>, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the <span class="hlt">locator</span> and a retainer ring. The <span class="hlt">locator</span> has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the <span class="hlt">locator</span>. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the <span class="hlt">locator</span>. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a <span class="hlt">locator</span> and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the <span class="hlt">locator</span> (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the <span class="hlt">locator</span> is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the <span class="hlt">locator</span> can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27410567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27410567"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> method for computing correlated color temperature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Changjun; Cui, Guihua; Melgosa, Manuel; Ruan, Xiukai; Zhang, Yaoju; Ma, Long; Xiao, Kaida; Luo, M Ronnier</p> <p>2016-06-27</p> <p>For the correlated color temperature (CCT) of a light source to be estimated, a nonlinear optimization problem must be solved. In all previous methods available to compute CCT, the objective function has only been approximated, and their predictions have achieved limited accuracy. For example, different unacceptable CCT values have been predicted for light sources <span class="hlt">located</span> on the same isotemperature line. In this paper, we propose to compute CCT using the Newton method, which requires the first and second derivatives of the objective function. Following the current recommendation by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) for the computation of tristimulus values (summations at 1 nm steps from 360 nm to 830 nm), the objective function and its first and second derivatives are explicitly given and used in our computations. Comprehensive tests demonstrate that the proposed method, together with an initial estimation of CCT using Robertson's method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 58, 1528-1535 (1968)], gives highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> predictions below 0.0012 K for light sources with CCTs ranging from 500 K to 10<sup>6</sup> K.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1049779','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1049779"><span>Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized <span class="hlt">Locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Horey, James L; Forrest, Stephanie; Groat, Michael</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that <span class="hlt">accurately</span> report a person's <span class="hlt">location</span>. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave <span class="hlt">location</span>-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for <span class="hlt">location</span> aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is <span class="hlt">accurate</span> enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874789','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874789"><span>Reversible micromachining <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">locator</span> with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The <span class="hlt">locator</span> has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the <span class="hlt">locator</span> and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the <span class="hlt">locator</span>. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the <span class="hlt">locator</span>. The <span class="hlt">locator</span> can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the <span class="hlt">locator</span> so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the <span class="hlt">locator</span>, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740004799','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740004799"><span>Automatic vehicle <span class="hlt">location</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hansen, G. R., Jr. (Inventor)</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>An automatic vehicle detection system is disclosed, in which each vehicle whose <span class="hlt">location</span> is to be detected carries active means which interact with passive elements at each <span class="hlt">location</span> to be identified. The passive elements comprise a plurality of passive loops arranged in a sequence along the travel direction. Each of the loops is tuned to a chosen frequency so that the sequence of the frequencies defines the <span class="hlt">location</span> code. As the vehicle traverses the sequence of the loops as it passes over each loop, signals only at the frequency of the loop being passed over are coupled from a vehicle transmitter to a vehicle receiver. The frequencies of the received signals in the receiver produce outputs which together represent a code of the traversed <span class="hlt">location</span>. The code <span class="hlt">location</span> is defined by a painted pattern which reflects light to a vehicle carried detector whose output is used to derive the code defined by the pattern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6478K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6478K"><span>Automatic <span class="hlt">Event</span> Bulletin Built By Waveform Cross Correlation Using The Global Grid Of Master <span class="hlt">Events</span> With Adjustable Templates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kitov, Ivan; Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We built an automatic seismic <span class="hlt">event</span> bulletin for the whole globe using waveform cross correlation at array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). To detect signals and associate them into robust <span class="hlt">event</span> hypotheses in an automatic pipeline we created a global grid (GG) of master <span class="hlt">events</span> with a diversity of waveform templates. For the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the GG provide an almost uniform distribution of monitoring capabilities and adjustable templates. For seismic areas, we select high quality signals at IMS stations from earthquakes. For test sites, signals from UNEs are best templates. Global detection and association with cross correlation technique for research and monitoring purposes demands templates from master <span class="hlt">events</span> outside the regions of natural seismicity and test sites. We populate aseismic areas with masters having synthetic templates calculated for predefined sets of IMS array stations. We applied various technologies to synthesize most representative signals for cross correlation and tested them using the Reviewed <span class="hlt">Event</span> Bulletin (REB) issued by the International Data Centre (IDC). At first, we tested these global sets of master <span class="hlt">events</span> and synthetic templates using IMS seismic data for February 13, 2013 and demonstrated excellent detection and <span class="hlt">location</span> capability. Then, using the REB and cross correlation bulletins (XSELs) experienced analysts from the IDC compared the relative performance of various templates and built reliable sets of <span class="hlt">events</span> and detections for machine learning. In this study, we carefully compile global training sets for machine learning in order to establish statistical decision lines between reliable and unreliable <span class="hlt">event</span> hypotheses, then apply classification procedures to the intermediate automatic cross correlation bulletin based on the GG, and compile the final XSEL, which is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and has lower detection threshold than the REB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S53B2824R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S53B2824R"><span>Automatic <span class="hlt">Event</span> Bulletin Built by Waveform Cross Correlation Using the Global Grid of Master <span class="hlt">Events</span> with Adjustable Templates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rozhkov, M.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We built an automatic seismic <span class="hlt">event</span> bulletin for the whole globe using waveform cross correlation at array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). To detect signals and associate them into robust <span class="hlt">event</span> hypotheses in an automatic pipeline we created a global grid (GG) of master <span class="hlt">events</span> with a diversity of waveform templates. For the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the GG provides an almost uniform distribution of monitoring capabilities and adjustable templates. For seismic areas, we select high quality signals at IMS stations from earthquakes. For test sites, signals from UNEs are best templates. Global detection and association with cross correlation technique for research and monitoring purposes demands templates from master <span class="hlt">events</span> outside the regions of natural seismicity and test sites. We populate aseismic areas with masters having synthetic templates calculated for predefined sets of IMS array stations. We applied various technologies to synthesize most representative signals for cross correlation and tested them using the Reviewed <span class="hlt">Event</span> Bulletin (REB) issued by the International Data Centre (IDC). At first, we tested these global sets of master <span class="hlt">events</span> and synthetic templates using IMS seismic data for February 13, 2013 and demonstrated excellent detection and <span class="hlt">location</span> capability. Then, using the REB and cross correlation bulletins (XSELs) experienced analysts from the IDC compared the relative performance of various templates and built reliable sets of <span class="hlt">events</span> and detections for machine learning. In this study, we carefully compile global training sets for machine learning in order to establish statistical decision lines between reliable and unreliable <span class="hlt">event</span> hypotheses, then apply classification procedures to the intermediate automatic cross correlation bulletin based on the GG, and compile the final XSEL, which is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and has lower detection threshold than the REB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S11B1017F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.S11B1017F"><span>Regional Seismic Travel-Time Prediction, Uncertainty, and <span class="hlt">Location</span> Improvement in Western Eurasia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Flanagan, M. P.; Myers, S. C.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p> sample WENA1.0 and therefore provide an unbiased assessment of <span class="hlt">location</span> performance. A statistically significant sample is achieved by generating 500 <span class="hlt">location</span> realizations based on 5 <span class="hlt">events</span> with <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy between 1 km and 5 km. Each realization is a randomly selected <span class="hlt">event</span> with <span class="hlt">location</span> determined by randomly selecting 5 stations from the available network. In 340 cases (68% of the instances), <span class="hlt">locations</span> are improved, and average mislocation is reduced from 31 km to 26 km. Preliminary test of uncertainty estimates suggest that our uncertainty model produces <span class="hlt">location</span> uncertainty ellipses that are representative of <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy. These results highlight the importance of <span class="hlt">accurate</span> GT datasets in assessing regional travel-time models and demonstrate that an a priori 3D model can markedly improve our ability to <span class="hlt">locate</span> small magnitude <span class="hlt">events</span> in a regional monitoring context. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48, Contribution UCRL-CONF-206386.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090039404','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090039404"><span>Sensors <span class="hlt">Locate</span> Radio Interference</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx <span class="hlt">Location</span> System (LLS) to <span class="hlt">locate</span> electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the interfering emitter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..209.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..209."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(2), February 29, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15189431','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15189431"><span>Electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gordon, M P J; Chandler, N P</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p>Prior to root canal treatment at least one undistorted radiograph is required to assess canal morphology. The apical extent of instrumentation and the final root filling have a role in treatment success, and are primarily determined radiographically. Electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span> reduce the number of radiographs required and assist where radiographic methods create difficulty. They may also indicate cases where the apical foramen is some distance from the radiographic apex. Other roles include the detection of root canal perforation. A review of the literature focussed first on the subject of electronic apex <span class="hlt">location</span>. A second review used the names of apex <span class="hlt">location</span> devices. From the combined searches, 113 pertinent articles in English were found. This paper reviews the development, action, use and types of electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/smart-location-mapping','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/smart-location-mapping"><span>Smart <span class="hlt">Location</span> Mapping</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Smart <span class="hlt">Location</span> Database, Access to Jobs and Workers via Transit, and National Walkability Index tools can help assess indicators related to the built environment, transit accessibility, and walkability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/radiation/uranium-location-database-compilation','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/radiation/uranium-location-database-compilation"><span>Uranium <span class="hlt">Location</span> Database Compilation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>EPA has compiled mine <span class="hlt">location</span> information from federal, state, and Tribal agencies into a single database as part of its investigation into the potential environmental hazards of wastes from abandoned uranium mines in the western United States.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150016392','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150016392"><span>Lunar Impact Flash <span class="hlt">Locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash <span class="hlt">location</span>. A process for <span class="hlt">locating</span> the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Event&id=EJ995758','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Event&id=EJ995758"><span>The Challenges of On-Campus Recruitment <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McCoy, Amy</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>On-campus admissions <span class="hlt">events</span> are the secret weapon that colleges and universities use to convince students to apply and enroll. On-campus <span class="hlt">events</span> vary depending on the size, <span class="hlt">location</span>, and type of institution; they include campus visitations, open houses, preview days, scholarship <span class="hlt">events</span>, admitted student <span class="hlt">events</span>, and summer yield <span class="hlt">events</span>. These events…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000PhyEd..35....7.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000PhyEd..35....7."><span><span class="hlt">Events</span> diary</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p> as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this <span class="hlt">event</span> on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS <span class="hlt">events</span> may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other <span class="hlt">events</span> 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMAE13B3375A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMAE13B3375A"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> accuracy evaluation of lightning <span class="hlt">location</span> systems using natural lightning flashes recorded by a network of high-speed cameras</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alves, J.; Saraiva, A. C. V.; Campos, L. Z. D. S.; Pinto, O., Jr.; Antunes, L.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>This work presents a method for the evaluation of <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy of all Lightning <span class="hlt">Location</span> System (LLS) in operation in southeastern Brazil, using natural cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes. This can be done through a multiple high-speed cameras network (RAMMER network) installed in the Paraiba Valley region - SP - Brazil. The RAMMER network (Automated Multi-camera Network for Monitoring and Study of Lightning) is composed by four high-speed cameras operating at 2,500 frames per second. Three stationary black-and-white (B&W) cameras were situated in the cities of São José dos Campos and Caçapava. A fourth color camera was mobile (installed in a car), but operated in a fixed <span class="hlt">location</span> during the observation period, within the city of São José dos Campos. The average distance among cameras was 13 kilometers. Each RAMMER sensor position was determined so that the network can observe the same lightning flash from different angles and all recorded videos were GPS (Global Position System) time stamped, allowing comparisons of <span class="hlt">events</span> between cameras and the LLS. The RAMMER sensor is basically composed by a computer, a Phantom high-speed camera version 9.1 and a GPS unit. The lightning cases analyzed in the present work were observed by at least two cameras, their position was visually triangulated and the results compared with BrasilDAT network, during the summer seasons of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013. The visual triangulation method is presented in details. The calibration procedure showed an accuracy of 9 meters between the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> GPS position of the object triangulated and the result from the visual triangulation method. Lightning return stroke positions, estimated with the visual triangulation method, were compared with LLS <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Differences between solutions were not greater than 1.8 km.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..757.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..757."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (6), June 30, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-005 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69.1668.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69.1668."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 25(10), October 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-010 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1 . Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69R.587.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69R.587."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(3), March 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..849.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..849."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (7), July 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-007 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..133.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..133."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (1), January 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-001 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69Q1599.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69Q1599."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(9), September 30, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-013 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..695.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988EOSTr..69..695."><span>Geophysical <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (5), May 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-004 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/ia/accurate-land-company-inc-acadia-subdivision-plat-1-and-plat-2','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/ia/accurate-land-company-inc-acadia-subdivision-plat-1-and-plat-2"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Land Company, Inc., Acadia Subdivision, Plat 1 and Plat 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Land Company, Inc., a business <span class="hlt">located</span> at 12035 University Ave., Suite 100, Clive, IA 50235, for alleged viola</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S53I..03D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S53I..03D"><span>Integrating USArray and Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network Data to Establish Central US Catalog <span class="hlt">Location</span> and Magnitude Sensitivities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>DeShon, H. R.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network (CNMSN) monitors earthquake activity in the central US. The network provides excellent coverage of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) but has fewer regional stations <span class="hlt">located</span> outside of the Mississippi embayment. The Earthscope Transportable Array (TA), however, temporarily expands earthquake identification and <span class="hlt">location</span> ability as it marches through this region and in particular, adds valuable information for earthquakes <span class="hlt">located</span> at the edges of the current network. Prior to the CNMSN, the Central Missouri Valley network reported <span class="hlt">locations</span> for the central US using a more diffuse regional station spacing, and, in fact, that catalog reported many more earthquakes outside of the embayment and along the northern stretches of the NMSZ. Here, I have integrated TA waveform and phase data of central US earthquakes provided by the ANF with like data from the CNMSN. All waveform data of reported <span class="hlt">events</span> from both networks is reviewed and phases combined. The integrated data is used to relocate central US seismicity, with analysis to date focused on activity in and north of the NMSZ. <span class="hlt">Events</span> are relocated using HYPOELLIPSE and HYPOINVERSE following current CNMSN <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude procedures, which are undergoing a transition during 2012. I test earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude sensitivity to station distribution inside and outside of the embayment via jackknife testing. I will present results for <span class="hlt">events</span> recorded from July 2011 through mid-November 2012. The study will allow us to 1) understand if the differences in seismicity pattern between the Central Missouri Valley catalog (1974-1994) and the CNMSN catalog (1995-present) are a function of station distribution, 2) provide more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimates of earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span> outside of the Mississippi embayment, and 3) assess how changes in CNMSN processing effect catalog <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude estimates in the central US.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27442843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27442843"><span>Human Rights <span class="hlt">Event</span> Detection from Heterogeneous Social Media Graphs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Feng; Neill, Daniel B</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Human rights organizations are increasingly monitoring social media for identification, verification, and documentation of human rights violations. Since manual extraction of <span class="hlt">events</span> from the massive amount of online social network data is difficult and time-consuming, we propose an approach for automated, large-scale discovery and analysis of human rights-related <span class="hlt">events</span>. We apply our recently developed Non-Parametric Heterogeneous Graph Scan (NPHGS), which models social media data such as Twitter as a heterogeneous network (with multiple different node types, features, and relationships) and detects emerging patterns in the network, to identify and characterize human rights <span class="hlt">events</span>. NPHGS efficiently maximizes a nonparametric scan statistic (an aggregate measure of anomalousness) over connected subgraphs of the heterogeneous network to identify the most anomalous network clusters. It summarizes each <span class="hlt">event</span> with information such as type of <span class="hlt">event</span>, geographical <span class="hlt">locations</span>, time, and participants, and provides documentation such as links to videos and news reports. Building on our previous work that demonstrates the utility of NPHGS for civil unrest prediction and rare disease outbreak detection, we present an analysis of human rights <span class="hlt">events</span> detected by NPHGS using two years of Twitter data from Mexico. NPHGS was able to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> detect relevant clusters of human rights-related tweets prior to international news sources, and in some cases, prior to local news reports. Analysis of social media using NPHGS could enhance the information-gathering missions of human rights organizations by pinpointing specific abuses, revealing <span class="hlt">events</span> and details that may be blocked from traditional media sources, and providing evidence of emerging patterns of human rights violations. This could lead to more timely, targeted, and effective advocacy, as well as other potential interventions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730024376','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730024376"><span>RFI emitter <span class="hlt">location</span> techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rao, B. L. J.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the <span class="hlt">location</span> of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter <span class="hlt">location</span> within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6528676','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6528676"><span>Marine cable <span class="hlt">location</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zachariadis, R.G.</p> <p>1984-05-01</p> <p>An acoustic positioning system <span class="hlt">locates</span> a marine cable at an exploration site, such cable employing a plurality of hydrophones at spaced-apart positions along the cable. A marine vessel measures water depth to the cable as the vessel passes over the cable and interrogates the hydrophones with sonar pulses along a slant range as the vessel travels in a parallel and horizontally offset path to the cable. The <span class="hlt">location</span> of the hydrophones is determined from the recordings of water depth and slant range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983914','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983914"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> reconstruction for line source releases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zajic, Dragan; Brown, Michael J; Williams, Michael D</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The goal of source inversion, also called <span class="hlt">event</span> reconstruction, is the calculation of source parameters from information obtained by network of concentration (or dosage) and meteorological sensors. Source parameters include source <span class="hlt">location</span> and strength, but in certain cases there could be more than one source so the inversion procedure could deal with determination of number of sources, as well. In a case of limited time period pollutant emission <span class="hlt">events</span>, as for example during accidents or intentional releases, it is of great use to estimate starting and ending times of the <span class="hlt">event</span>. This kind of research is very useful for estimating the source parameters of industrial pollutants since it provides important information for regulation purposes. Also it provides information to fast responders in a case of accidental pollutant releases or for homeland security needs when chemical, biological or radiological agent is deliberately released. Development of faster and more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> algorithms is very important since it could help reduce the populace's exposure to dangerous airborne contaminants, plan evacuation routes, and help assess the magnitude of clean up. During the last decade, the large number of research papers in area of source inversion was published where many different approaches were used. Most of the source inversion work publish to date apply to point source releases. The forward dispersion models used range from fast Gaussian plume and puff codes that enable almost instantaneous calculations of concentrations and dosages to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes that provide more detailed and precise calculation but at the same time are expensive with respect to time and computer resources. The optimization methods were often used and examples are simulated annealing and genetic algorithms.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20160301','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20160301"><span>RTbox: a device for highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> response time measurements.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Xiangrui; Liang, Zhen; Kleiner, Mario; Lu, Zhong-Lin</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Although computer keyboards and mice are frequently used in measuring response times (RTs), the accuracy of these measurements is quite low. Specialized RT collection devices must be used to obtain more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurements. However, all the existing devices have some shortcomings. We have developed and implemented a new, commercially available device, the RTbox, for highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> RT measurements. The RTbox has its own microprocessor and high-resolution clock. It can record the identities and timing of button <span class="hlt">events</span> with high accuracy, unaffected by potential timing uncertainty or biases during data transmission and processing in the host computer. It stores button <span class="hlt">events</span> until the host computer chooses to retrieve them. The asynchronous storage greatly simplifies the design of user programs. The RTbox can also receive and record external signals as triggers and can measure RTs with respect to external <span class="hlt">events</span>. The internal clock of the RTbox can be synchronized with the computer clock, so the device can be used without external triggers. A simple USB connection is sufficient to integrate the RTbox with any standard computer and operating system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://edg.epa.gov/metadata/catalog/search/resource/details.page?uuid=%7B2E4A8313-B6C8-4638-B683-7F8445101725%7D','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://edg.epa.gov/metadata/catalog/search/resource/details.page?uuid=%7B2E4A8313-B6C8-4638-B683-7F8445101725%7D"><span>Uranium <span class="hlt">Location</span> Database</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A GIS compiled <span class="hlt">locational</span> database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata was cooperatively compiled from Federal and State agency data sets and enables the user to conduct geographic and analytical studies on mine impacts on the public and environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27274920','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27274920"><span>Optimal Facility-<span class="hlt">Location</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Goldman, A J</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Dr. Christoph Witzgall, the honoree of this Symposium, can count among his many contributions to applied mathematics and mathematical operations research a body of widely-recognized work on the optimal <span class="hlt">location</span> of facilities. The present paper offers to non-specialists a sketch of that field and its evolution, with emphasis on areas most closely related to Witzgall's research at NBS/NIST.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740000230','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740000230"><span>Particle impact <span class="hlt">location</span> detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Auer, S. O.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Detector includes delay lines connected to each detector surface strip. When several particles strike different strips simultaneously, pulses generated by each strip are time delayed by certain intervals. Delay time for each strip is known. By observing time delay in pulse, it is possible to <span class="hlt">locate</span> strip that is struck by particle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=158564&keyword=statistics+AND+web&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77815044&CFTOKEN=57235372','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=158564&keyword=statistics+AND+web&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77815044&CFTOKEN=57235372"><span><span class="hlt">LOCATING</span> AREAS OF CONCERN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A simple method to <span class="hlt">locate</span> changes in vegetation cover, which can be used to identify areas under stress. The method only requires inexpensive NDVI data. The use of remotely sensed data is far more cost-effective than field studies and can be performed more quickly. Local knowledg...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyEd..52a3007K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyEd..52a3007K"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> gravitational potential energy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Keeports, David</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Where does gravitational potential energy reside when a ball is in the air? The perfectly correct answer is that it is <span class="hlt">located</span> in the ball-Earth system. Still, mechanical energy conservation problems are routinely solved by assigning a potential energy to the ball alone. Provided here is a proof that such an assignment introduces only an entirely undetectable error.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/home.asp"><span>VA Health Care Facilities <span class="hlt">Locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... VA » <span class="hlt">Locations</span> » Find <span class="hlt">Locations</span> <span class="hlt">Locations</span> Find <span class="hlt">Locations</span> The javascript used here is for validation purpose only. Your browser doesn't seem to support javascript or has it disabled. This site is a ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28398117','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28398117"><span>Reconstructing the times of past and future personal <span class="hlt">events</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ben Malek, Hédi; Berna, Fabrice; D'Argembeau, Arnaud</p> <p>2017-04-11</p> <p>Humans have the remarkable ability to mentally travel through past and future times. However, while memory for the times of past <span class="hlt">events</span> has been much investigated, little is known about how imagined future <span class="hlt">events</span> are temporally <span class="hlt">located</span>. Using a think-aloud protocol, we found that the temporal <span class="hlt">location</span> of past and future <span class="hlt">events</span> is rarely directly accessed, but instead mostly relies on reconstructive and inferential strategies. References to lifetime periods and factual knowledge (about the self, others, and the world) were most frequently used to determine the temporal <span class="hlt">location</span> of both past and future <span class="hlt">events</span>. <span class="hlt">Event</span> details (e.g., places, persons, or weather conditions) were also used, but mainly for past <span class="hlt">events</span>. Finally, the results showed that <span class="hlt">events</span> whose temporal <span class="hlt">location</span> was directly accessed were judged more important for personal goals. Together, these findings shed new light on the mechanisms involved in <span class="hlt">locating</span> personal <span class="hlt">events</span> in past and future times.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23942350','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23942350"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> segmentation ability uniquely predicts <span class="hlt">event</span> memory.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sargent, Jesse Q; Zacks, Jeffrey M; Hambrick, David Z; Zacks, Rose T; Kurby, Christopher A; Bailey, Heather R; Eisenberg, Michelle L; Beck, Taylor M</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Memory for everyday <span class="hlt">events</span> plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. <span class="hlt">Event</span> memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful <span class="hlt">events</span> a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between <span class="hlt">event</span> perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79years old segmented movies of everyday <span class="hlt">events</span> and attempted to remember the <span class="hlt">events</span> afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday <span class="hlt">events</span>. <span class="hlt">Event</span> segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in <span class="hlt">event</span> memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1817420O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1817420O"><span>Automatic processing of induced <span class="hlt">events</span> in the geothermal reservoirs Landau and Insheim, Germany</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Olbert, Kai; Küperkoch, Ludger; Meier, Thomas</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Induced <span class="hlt">events</span> can be a risk to local infrastructure that need to be understood and evaluated. They represent also a chance to learn more about the reservoir behavior and characteristics. Prior to the analysis, the waveform data must be processed consistently and <span class="hlt">accurately</span> to avoid erroneous interpretations. In the framework of the MAGS2 project an automatic off-line <span class="hlt">event</span> detection and a phase onset time determination algorithm are applied to induced seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> in geothermal systems in Landau and Insheim, Germany. The off-line detection algorithm works based on a cross-correlation of continuous data taken from the local seismic network with master <span class="hlt">events</span>. It distinguishes <span class="hlt">events</span> between different reservoirs and within the individual reservoirs. Furthermore, it provides a <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude estimation. Data from 2007 to 2014 are processed and compared with other detections using the SeisComp3 cross correlation detector and a STA/LTA detector. The detected <span class="hlt">events</span> are analyzed concerning spatial or temporal clustering. Furthermore the number of <span class="hlt">events</span> are compared to the existing detection lists. The automatic phase picking algorithm combines an AR-AIC approach with a cost function to find precise P1- and S1-phase onset times which can be used for localization and tomography studies. 800 induced <span class="hlt">events</span> are processed, determining 5000 P1- and 6000 S1-picks. The phase onset times show a high precision with mean residuals to manual phase picks of 0s (P1) to 0.04s (S1) and standard deviations below ±0.05s. The received automatic picks are applied to relocate a selected number of <span class="hlt">events</span> to evaluate influences on the <span class="hlt">location</span> precision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.S51B1010M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFM.S51B1010M"><span>Three-dimensional Probabilistic Earthquake <span class="hlt">Location</span> Applied to 2002-2003 Mt. Etna Eruption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mostaccio, A.; Tuve', T.; Zuccarello, L.; Patane', D.; Saccorotti, G.; D'Agostino, M.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>Recorded seismicity for the Mt. Etna volcano, occurred during the 2002-2003 eruption, has been relocated using a probabilistic, non-linear, earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> approach. We used the software package NonLinLoc (Lomax et al., 2000) adopting the 3D velocity model obtained by Cocina et al., 2005. We applied our data through different algorithms: (1) via a grid-search; (2) via a Metropolis-Gibbs; and (3) via an Oct-tree. The Oct-Tree algorithm gives efficient, faster and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> mapping of the PDF (Probability Density Function) of the earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> problem. More than 300 seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> were analyzed in order to compare non-linear <span class="hlt">location</span> results with the ones obtained by using traditional, linearized earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm such as Hypoellipse, and a 3D linearized inversion (Thurber, 1983). Moreover, we compare 38 focal mechanisms, chosen following stricta criteria selection, with the ones obtained by the 3D and 1D results. Although the presented approach is more of a traditional relocation application, probabilistic earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> could be used in routinely survey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://edg.epa.gov/metadata/catalog/search/resource/details.page?uuid=%7BE9C96806-73EE-42C4-B65A-973EA91D77FB%7D','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://edg.epa.gov/metadata/catalog/search/resource/details.page?uuid=%7BE9C96806-73EE-42C4-B65A-973EA91D77FB%7D"><span>Aquatic Nuisance Species <span class="hlt">Locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Data in this map has been collected by the United States Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program <span class="hlt">located</span> in Gainesville, Florida (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/default.aspx). This dataset may have some inaccuracies and is only current to June 15, 2012. The species identified in this dataset are not inclusive of all aquatic nuisance species, but rather a subset identified to be at risk for transport by recreational activities such as boating and angling. Additionally, the <span class="hlt">locations</span> where organisims have been identified are also not inclusive and should be treated as a guide. Organisms are limited to the following: American bullfrog, Asian clam, Asian shore crab, Asian tunicate, Australian spotted jellyfish, Chinese mitten crab, New Zealand mudsnail, Colonial sea squirt, Alewife, Bighead carp, Black carp, Flathead catfish, Grass carp, Green crab, Lionfish, Northern snakehead, Quagga mussel, Round Goby, Ruffe, Rusty crayfish, Sea lamprey, Silver carp, Spiny water flea, Veined rapa whelk, Zebra mussel</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1037749','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1037749"><span>Electric current <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>King, Paul E [Corvallis, OR; Woodside, Charles Rigel [Corvallis, OR</p> <p>2012-02-07</p> <p>The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for <span class="hlt">location</span> of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector <span class="hlt">location</span> based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8768E..0ML','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8768E..0ML"><span>The application of fuzzy neural network in distribution center <span class="hlt">location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Yongpan; Liu, Yong</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>In this paper, the establishment of the fuzzy neural network model for logistics distribution center <span class="hlt">location</span> applied the fuzzy method to the input value of BP algorithm and took the experts' evaluation value as the expected output. At the same time, using the network learning to get the optimized selection and furthermore get a more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> evaluation to the programs of <span class="hlt">location</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1324257','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1324257"><span>Coso MT Site <span class="hlt">Locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p>Doug Blankenship</p> <p>2011-05-04</p> <p>This data includes the <span class="hlt">locations</span> of the MT data collected in and around the Coso Geothermal field that covered the West Flank area. These are the data that the 3D MT models were created from that were discussed in Phase 1 of the West Flank FORGE project. The projected coordinate system is NAD 1927 State Plane California IV FIPS 0404 and the Projection is Lambert Conformal Conic. Units are in feet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920000189&hterms=ferrofluid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dferrofluid','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920000189&hterms=ferrofluid&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dferrofluid"><span>Magnetic <span class="hlt">Location</span> Indicator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stegman, Thomas W.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Ferrofluidic device indicates point of highest magnetic-flux density in workspace. Consists of bubble of ferrofluid in immiscible liquid carrier in clear plastic case. Used in flat block or tube. Axes of centering circle on flat-block version used to mark <span class="hlt">location</span> of maximum flux density when bubble in circle. Device used to find point on wall corresponding to known point on opposite side of wall.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970041408','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970041408"><span>Ammonia Leak <span class="hlt">Locator</span> Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and <span class="hlt">located</span> before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and <span class="hlt">locate</span> ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-<span class="hlt">location</span> instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-<span class="hlt">location</span> instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8999277','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8999277"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> the stranger rapist.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Davies, A; Dale, A</p> <p>1996-04-01</p> <p>As part of a larger project evaluating aspects of offender profiling, an initial study was undertaken of the geographic aspects of approximately 300 sexual offences carried out by 79 stranger rapists. The objective was to focus further research on the topic into potentially useful channels, but information thought to be of immediate use to investigating officers was also produced. It was ascertained that at least one-fifth of the sample of stranger rapists were itinerant to a greater or lesser extent. Analysis of the cases where both the offender's address and the <span class="hlt">location</span> where he approached the victim were known, indicated that the majority of attacks (75 per cent) were initiated within five miles of the offenders' homes. The apparent reasons for victims being approached unusually far away included targeting of <span class="hlt">locations</span> where numbers of suitable victims were available; raping during relatively sophisticated property offences; 'prowling' or 'hunting' over large areas by subjects who spent considerable amounts of time so doing; access to transport; and familiarity with widely dispersed neighbourhoods, often due to the offender having lived in two or more <span class="hlt">locations</span>. As a result of this work, future research on the geography of rape will be directed towards those aspects of the offences which have been identified as relevant to the distance between an offender's base and the site where he approached his victim.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..93c3006P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..93c3006P"><span>Record-breaking <span class="hlt">events</span> during the compressive failure of porous materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pál, Gergő; Raischel, Frank; Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Kun, Ferenc; Main, Ian G.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">accurate</span> understanding of the interplay between random and deterministic processes in generating extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> is of critical importance in many fields, from forecasting extreme meteorological <span class="hlt">events</span> to the catastrophic failure of materials and in the Earth. Here we investigate the statistics of record-breaking <span class="hlt">events</span> in the time series of crackling noise generated by local rupture <span class="hlt">events</span> during the compressive failure of porous materials. The <span class="hlt">events</span> are generated by computer simulations of the uniaxial compression of cylindrical samples in a discrete element model of sedimentary rocks that closely resemble those of real experiments. The number of records grows initially as a decelerating power law of the number of <span class="hlt">events</span>, followed by an acceleration immediately prior to failure. The distribution of the size and lifetime of records are power laws with relatively low exponents. We demonstrate the existence of a characteristic record rank k*, which separates the two regimes of the time evolution. Up to this rank deceleration occurs due to the effect of random disorder. Record breaking then accelerates towards macroscopic failure, when physical interactions leading to spatial and temporal correlations dominate the <span class="hlt">location</span> and timing of local ruptures. The size distribution of records of different ranks has a universal form independent of the record rank. Subsequences of <span class="hlt">events</span> that occur between consecutive records are characterized by a power-law size distribution, with an exponent which decreases as failure is approached. High-rank records are preceded by smaller <span class="hlt">events</span> of increasing size and waiting time between consecutive <span class="hlt">events</span> and they are followed by a relaxation process. As a reference, surrogate time series are generated by reshuffling the <span class="hlt">event</span> times. The record statistics of the uncorrelated surrogates agrees very well with the corresponding predictions of independent identically distributed random variables, which confirms that temporal and spatial</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22163972','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22163972"><span>Trust index based fault tolerant multiple <span class="hlt">event</span> localization algorithm for WSNs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xu, Xianghua; Gao, Xueyong; Wan, Jian; Xiong, Naixue</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the use of wireless sensor networks for multiple <span class="hlt">event</span> source localization using binary information from the sensor nodes. The <span class="hlt">events</span> could continually emit signals whose strength is attenuated inversely proportional to the distance from the source. In this context, faults occur due to various reasons and are manifested when a node reports a wrong decision. In order to reduce the impact of node faults on the accuracy of multiple <span class="hlt">event</span> localization, we introduce a trust index model to evaluate the fidelity of information which the nodes report and use in the <span class="hlt">event</span> detection process, and propose the Trust Index based Subtract on Negative Add on Positive (TISNAP) localization algorithm, which reduces the impact of faulty nodes on the <span class="hlt">event</span> localization by decreasing their trust index, to improve the accuracy of <span class="hlt">event</span> localization and performance of fault tolerance for multiple <span class="hlt">event</span> source localization. The algorithm includes three phases: first, the sink identifies the cluster nodes to determine the number of <span class="hlt">events</span> occurred in the entire region by analyzing the binary data reported by all nodes; then, it constructs the likelihood matrix related to the cluster nodes and estimates the <span class="hlt">location</span> of all <span class="hlt">events</span> according to the alarmed status and trust index of the nodes around the cluster nodes. Finally, the sink updates the trust index of all nodes according to the fidelity of their information in the previous reporting cycle. The algorithm improves the accuracy of localization and performance of fault tolerance in multiple <span class="hlt">event</span> source localization. The experiment results show that when the probability of node fault is close to 50%, the algorithm can still <span class="hlt">accurately</span> determine the number of the <span class="hlt">events</span> and have better accuracy of localization compared with other algorithms.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26368483','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26368483"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> adjoint design sensitivities for nano metal optics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hansen, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus</p> <p>2015-09-07</p> <p>We present a method for obtaining <span class="hlt">accurate</span> numerical design sensitivities for metal-optical nanostructures. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis, long used in fluid mechanics and mechanical engineering for both optimization and structural analysis, is beginning to be used for nano-optics design, but it fails for sharp-cornered metal structures because the numerical error in electromagnetic simulations of metal structures is highest at sharp corners. These <span class="hlt">locations</span> feature strong field enhancement and contribute strongly to design sensitivities. By using high-accuracy FEM calculations and rounding sharp features to a finite radius of curvature we obtain highly-<span class="hlt">accurate</span> design sensitivities for 3D metal devices. To provide a bridge to the existing literature on adjoint methods in other fields, we derive the sensitivity equations for Maxwell's equations in the PDE framework widely used in fluid mechanics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRB..11512329W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRB..11512329W"><span>Source <span class="hlt">location</span> of the 19 February 2008 Oregon bolide using seismic networks and infrasound arrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walker, Kristoffer T.; Hedlin, Michael A. H.; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Vergoz, Julien; Le Pichon, Alexis; Drob, Douglas P.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>On 19 February 2008 a bolide traveled across the sky along a southern trajectory ending in a terminal burst above Oregon. The <span class="hlt">event</span> was well recorded by the USArray, other seismic networks, four infrasound arrays, and several video cameras. We compare the results of <span class="hlt">locating</span> the burst using these different sensor networks. Specifically, we reverse time migrate acoustic-to-seismic coupled signals recorded by the USArray out to 800 km range to image the source in 2-D space and time. We also apply a grid search over source altitude and time, minimizing the misfit between observed and predicted arrival times using 3-D ray tracing with a high-resolution atmospheric velocity model. Our seismic and video results suggest a point source rather than a line source associated with a hypersonic trajectory. We compare the seismic source <span class="hlt">locations</span> to those obtained by using different combinations of observed infrasound array signal back azimuths and arrival times. We find that all <span class="hlt">locations</span> are consistent. However, the seismic <span class="hlt">location</span> is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than the infrasound <span class="hlt">locations</span> due to the larger number of seismic sensors, a more favorable seismic source-receiver geometry, and shorter ranges to the seismometers. For the infrasound array <span class="hlt">locations</span>, correcting for the wind improved the accuracy, but implementing arrival times while increasing the precision reduced the accuracy presumably due to limitations of the source <span class="hlt">location</span> method and/or atmospheric velocity model. We show that despite known complexities associated with acoustic-to-seismic coupling, aboveground infrasound sources can be <span class="hlt">located</span> with dense seismic networks with remarkably high accuracy and precision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874047','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874047"><span>Machine tool <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hanlon, John A.; Gill, Timothy J.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Machine tools can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measured and positioned on manufacturing machines within very small tolerances by use of an autocollimator on a 3-axis mount on a manufacturing machine and positioned so as to focus on a reference tooling ball or a machine tool, a digital camera connected to the viewing end of the autocollimator, and a marker and measure generator for receiving digital images from the camera, then displaying or measuring distances between the projection reticle and the reference reticle on the monitoring screen, and relating the distances to the actual position of the autocollimator relative to the reference tooling ball. The images and measurements are used to set the position of the machine tool and to measure the size and shape of the machine tool tip, and examine cutting edge wear. patent</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19660000253','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19660000253"><span>Mill profiler machines soft materials <span class="hlt">accurately</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rauschl, J. A.</p> <p>1966-01-01</p> <p>Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can <span class="hlt">accurately</span> control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Event&pg=2&id=ED519209','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Event&pg=2&id=ED519209"><span>Creating Special <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>deLisle, Lee</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>"Creating Special <span class="hlt">Events</span>" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and <span class="hlt">events</span> for students who seek a career in <span class="hlt">event</span> management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and <span class="hlt">events</span> and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of <span class="hlt">event</span> management. The book presents <span class="hlt">event</span> management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1194861','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1194861"><span>Auditory <span class="hlt">location</span> as an encoding dimension.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Weeks, R A</p> <p>1975-05-01</p> <p>In two experiments, subjects were given five successive short-term memory tests. In Experiment 1, recall was not significantly facilitated when memory material in the final test was delivered to the ear opposite to the one that received the memory material in the four preceding tests. In Experiment 2, <span class="hlt">events</span> were presented from two differentially <span class="hlt">located</span> speakers rather than through headphones. A shift across speakers on the final test did produce proactive interference release. These findings suggest spatial <span class="hlt">location</span> as a potential encoding dimension of verbal material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/1013313','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/1013313"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> waterfowl observations on aerial surveys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Butler, W.I.; Hodges, J.I.; Stehn, R.A.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>We modified standard aerial survey data collection to obtain the geographic <span class="hlt">location</span> for each waterfowl observation on surveys in Alaska during 1987-1993. Using transect navigation with CPS (global positioning system), data recording on continuously running tapes, and a computer data input program, we <span class="hlt">located</span> observations with an average deviation along transects of 214 m. The method provided flexibility in survey design and data analysis. Although developed for geese nesting near the coast of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the methods are widely applicable and were used on other waterfowl surveys in Alaska to map distribution and relative abundance of waterfowl. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> data with GIS analysis and display may improve precision and usefulness of data from any aerial transect survey.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020090817','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020090817"><span>Sonar <span class="hlt">Locator</span> Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>An underwater <span class="hlt">locator</span> device called a Pinger is attached to an airplane's flight recorder for recovery in case of a crash. Burnett Electronics Pinger Model 512 resulted from a Burnett Electronics Laboratory, Inc./Langley Research Center contract for development of a search system for underwater mines. The Pinger's battery-powered transmitter is activated when immersed in water, and sends multidirectional signals for up to 500 hours. When a surface receiver picks up the signal, a diver can retrieve the pinger and the attached airplane flight recorder. Other pingers are used to track whales, mark underwater discoveries and assist oil drilling vessels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6538656','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6538656"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> of Planet X</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Harrington, R.S.</p> <p>1988-10-01</p> <p>Observed positions of Uranus and Neptune along with residuals in right ascension and declination are used to constrain the <span class="hlt">location</span> of a postulated tenth planet. The residuals are converted into residuals in ecliptic longitude and latitude. The results are then combined into seasonal normal points, producing average geocentric residuals spaced slightly more than a year apart that are assumed to represent the equivalent heliocentric average residuals for the observed oppositions. Such a planet is found to most likely reside in the region of Scorpius, with considerably less likelihood that it is in Taurus. 8 references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150021386','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150021386"><span>Lunar Impact Flash <span class="hlt">Locations</span> from NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p> dependent upon LRO finding a fresh impact crater associated with one of the impact flashes recorded by Earth-based instruments, either the bright <span class="hlt">event</span> of March 2013 or any other in the database of impact observations. To find the crater, LRO needed an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> area to search. This Technical Memorandum (TM) describes the geolocation technique developed to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> determine the impact flash <span class="hlt">location</span>, and by association, the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the crater, thought to lie directly beneath the brightest portion of the flash. The workflow and software tools used to geolocate the impact flashes are described in detail, along with sources of error and uncertainty and a case study applying the workflow to the bright impact flash in March 2013. Following the successful geolocation of the March 2013 flash, the technique was applied to all impact flashes detected by the MEO between November 7, 2005, and January 3, 2014.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A41G0144B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A41G0144B"><span>Surface Properties Associated With Dust Storm Plume's Point-Source <span class="hlt">Locations</span> In The Border Region Of The US And Mexico</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bleiweiss, M. P.; DuBois, D. W.; Flores, M. I.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Dust storms in the border region of the Southwest US and Northern Mexico are a serious problem for air quality (PM10 exceedances), health (Valley Fever is pandemic in the region) and transportation (road closures and deadly traffic accidents). In order to better understand the phenomena, we are attempting to identify critical characteristics of dust storm sources so that, possibly, one can perform more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> predictions of <span class="hlt">events</span> and, thus, mitigate some of the deleterious effects. Besides the emission mechanisms for dust storm production that are tied to atmospheric dynamics, one must know those <span class="hlt">locations</span> whose source characteristics can be tied to dust production and, therefore, identify <span class="hlt">locations</span> where a dust storm is eminent under favorable atmospheric dynamics. During the past 13 years, we have observed, on satellite imagery, more than 500 dust <span class="hlt">events</span> in the region and are in the process of identifying the source regions for the dust plumes that make up an <span class="hlt">event</span>. Where satellite imagery exists with high spatial resolution (less than or equal to 250m), dust 'plumes' appear to be made up of individual and merged plumes that are emitted from a 'point source' (smaller than the resolution of the imagery). In particular, we have observed <span class="hlt">events</span> from the ASTER sensor whose spatial resolution is 15m as well as Landsat whose spatial resolution is 30m. Tying these source <span class="hlt">locations</span> to surface properties such as NDVI, albedo, and soil properties (percent sand, silt, clay, and gravel; soil moisture; etc.) will identify regions with enhanced capability to produce a dust storm. This, along with atmospheric dynamics, will allow the forecast of dust <span class="hlt">events</span>. The analysis of 10 <span class="hlt">events</span> from the period 2004-2013, for which we have identified 1124 individual plumes, will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4721751','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4721751"><span>Calibration Techniques for <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shortis, Mark</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimates of <span class="hlt">locations</span> and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26690172','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26690172"><span>Calibration Techniques for <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shortis, Mark</p> <p>2015-12-07</p> <p>Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimates of <span class="hlt">locations</span> and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4307536','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4307536"><span>METHOD OF <span class="hlt">LOCATING</span> GROUNDS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Macleish, K.G.</p> <p>1958-02-11</p> <p>ABS>This patent presents a method for <span class="hlt">locating</span> a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of <span class="hlt">locating</span> the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5321050','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5321050"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Automated Apnea Analysis in Preterm Infants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vergales, Brooke D.; Paget-Brown, Alix O.; Lee, Hoshik; Guin, Lauren E.; Smoot, Terri J.; Rusin, Craig G.; Clark, Matthew T.; Delos, John B.; Fairchild, Karen D.; Lake, Douglas E.; Moorman, Randall; Kattwinkel, John</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Objective In 2006 the apnea of prematurity (AOP) consensus group identified inaccurate counting of apnea episodes as a major barrier to progress in AOP research. We compare nursing records of AOP to <span class="hlt">events</span> detected by a clinically validated computer algorithm that detects apnea from standard bedside monitors. Study Design Waveform, vital sign, and alarm data were collected continuously from all very low-birth-weight infants admitted over a 25-month period, analyzed for central apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) <span class="hlt">events</span>, and compared with nursing documentation collected from charts. Our algorithm defined apnea as > 10 seconds if accompanied by bradycardia and desaturation. Results Of the 3,019 nurse-recorded <span class="hlt">events</span>, only 68% had any algorithm-detected ABD <span class="hlt">event</span>. Of the 5,275 algorithm-detected prolonged apnea <span class="hlt">events</span> > 30 seconds, only 26% had nurse-recorded documentation within 1 hour. Monitor alarms sounded in only 74% of <span class="hlt">events</span> of algorithm-detected prolonged apnea <span class="hlt">events</span> > 10 seconds. There were 8,190,418 monitor alarms of any description throughout the neonatal intensive care unit during the 747 days analyzed, or one alarm every 2 to 3 minutes per nurse. Conclusion An automated computer algorithm for continuous ABD quantitation is a far more reliable tool than the medical record to address the important research questions identified by the 2006 AOP consensus group. PMID:23592319</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cosp...41E2160Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016cosp...41E2160Z"><span>On the <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Prediction of CME Arrival At the Earth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Jie; Hess, Phillip</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We will discuss relevant issues regarding the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> prediction of CME arrival at the Earth, from both observational and theoretical points of view. In particular, we clarify the importance of separating the study of CME ejecta from the ejecta-driven shock in interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). For a number of CME-ICME <span class="hlt">events</span> well observed by SOHO/LASCO, STEREO-A and STEREO-B, we carry out the 3-D measurements by superimposing geometries onto both the ejecta and sheath separately. These measurements are then used to constrain a Drag-Based Model, which is improved through a modification of including height dependence of the drag coefficient into the model. Combining all these factors allows us to create predictions for both fronts at 1 AU and compare with actual in-situ observations. We show an ability to predict the sheath arrival with an average error of under 4 hours, with an RMS error of about 1.5 hours. For the CME ejecta, the error is less than two hours with an RMS error within an hour. Through using the best observations of CMEs, we show the power of our method in <span class="hlt">accurately</span> predicting CME arrival times. The limitation and implications of our <span class="hlt">accurate</span> prediction method will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.555a2040G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhCS.555a2040G"><span>Detecting and characterising ramp <span class="hlt">events</span> in wind power time series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gallego, Cristóbal; Cuerva, Álvaro; Costa, Alexandre</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>In order to implement <span class="hlt">accurate</span> models for wind power ramp forecasting, ramps need to be previously characterised. This issue has been typically addressed by performing binary ramp/non-ramp classifications based on ad-hoc assessed thresholds. However, recent works question this approach. This paper presents the ramp function, an innovative wavelet- based tool which detects and characterises ramp <span class="hlt">events</span> in wind power time series. The underlying idea is to assess a continuous index related to the ramp intensity at each time step, which is obtained by considering large power output gradients evaluated under different time scales (up to typical ramp durations). The ramp function overcomes some of the drawbacks shown by the aforementioned binary classification and permits forecasters to easily reveal specific features of the ramp behaviour observed at a wind farm. As an example, the daily profile of the ramp-up and ramp-down intensities are obtained for the case of a wind farm <span class="hlt">located</span> in Spain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGE....13..964I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGE....13..964I"><span>Automated SVD filtering of time-frequency distribution for enhancing the SNR of microseismic/microquake <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Iqbal, Naveed; Zerguine, Azzedine; Kaka, SanLinn; Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Recently, there has been a growing interest in continuous passive recording of passive microseismic experiments during reservoir fluid-injection monitoring, hydraulic-fracture monitoring and fault-movement monitoring, to name a few. The ability to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> detect and analyze microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> generated by these activities is valuable in monitoring them. However, microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> usually have very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially when monitoring sensors (receivers) are <span class="hlt">located</span> at the surface where coherent and non-coherent noise sources are overwhelming. Therefore, enhancing the SNR of the microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> will improve the localization process over the reservoir. In this study, a new method of enhancing the microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> is presented which relies on one trace per receiver record unlike other methods. The proposed method relies on a time-frequency representation and noise eliminating process which uses the singular-value decomposition (SVD) technique. Furthermore, the SVD is applied on the matrix representing the time-frequency decomposition of a trace. More importantly, an automated SVD filtering is proposed, so the SVD filtering becomes observation-driven instead of user-defined. Finally, it is shown that the proposed technique gives promising results with very low SNR, making it suitable to <span class="hlt">locate</span> passive microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> even if the sensors are <span class="hlt">located</span> on the surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050000869&hterms=identit&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Didentit*','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050000869&hterms=identit&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Didentit*"><span>Close binding of identity and <span class="hlt">location</span> in visual feature perception</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Johnston, J. C.; Pashler, H.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The binding of identity and <span class="hlt">location</span> information in disjunctive feature search was studied. Ss searched a heterogeneous display for a color or a form target, and reported both target identity and <span class="hlt">location</span>. To avoid better than chance guessing of target identity (by choosing the target less likely to have been seen), the difficulty of the two targets was equalized adaptively; a mathematical model was used to quantify residual effects. A spatial layout was used that minimized postperceptual errors in reporting <span class="hlt">location</span>. Results showed strong binding of identity and <span class="hlt">location</span> perception. After correction for guessing, no perception of identity without <span class="hlt">location</span> was found. A weak trend was found for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> perception of target <span class="hlt">location</span> without identity. We propose that activated features generate attention-calling "interrupt" signals, specifying only <span class="hlt">location</span>; attention then retrieves the properties at that <span class="hlt">location</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10172053','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10172053"><span>Rare <span class="hlt">event</span> simulation in radiation transport</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kollman, Craig</p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p>This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare <span class="hlt">events</span> or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular <span class="hlt">location</span>. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare <span class="hlt">event</span> calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiple by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep the estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive ``learning`` algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1000392','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1000392"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mao, Stan</p> <p>2010-12-13</p> <p>The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various <span class="hlt">locations</span> along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this <span class="hlt">event</span>, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED384085.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED384085.pdf"><span>Assessing Special <span class="hlt">Events</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Neff, Bonita Dostal</p> <p></p> <p>Special <span class="hlt">events</span> defined as being "newsworthy <span class="hlt">events</span>" are becoming a way of American life. They are also a means for making a lot of money. Examples of special <span class="hlt">events</span> that are cited most frequently are often the most minor of <span class="hlt">events</span>; e.g., the open house, the new business opening day gala, or a celebration of some <span class="hlt">event</span> in an organization.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6089985','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6089985"><span>Atom <span class="hlt">location</span> by electron channeling analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pennycook, S.J.</p> <p>1984-07-01</p> <p>For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to <span class="hlt">accurate</span> microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice <span class="hlt">location</span> of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice <span class="hlt">location</span> studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly <span class="hlt">located</span> with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871158','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871158"><span>Method and apparatus for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Parvin, Bahram A.; Maestre, Marcos F.; Fish, Richard H.; Johnston, William E.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>An apparatus using electrophoresis provides <span class="hlt">accurate</span> manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations add reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/541734','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/541734"><span>Method and apparatus for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> manipulating an object during microelectrophoresis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Parvin, B.A.; Maestre, M.F.; Fish, R.H.; Johnston, W.E.</p> <p>1997-09-23</p> <p>An apparatus using electrophoresis provides <span class="hlt">accurate</span> manipulation of an object on a microscope stage for further manipulations and reactions. The present invention also provides an inexpensive and easily accessible means to move an object without damage to the object. A plurality of electrodes are coupled to the stage in an array whereby the electrode array allows for distinct manipulations of the electric field for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> manipulations of the object. There is an electrode array control coupled to the plurality of electrodes for manipulating the electric field. In an alternative embodiment, a chamber is provided on the stage to hold the object. The plurality of electrodes are positioned in the chamber, and the chamber is filled with fluid. The system can be automated using visual servoing, which manipulates the control parameters, i.e., x, y stage, applying the field, etc., after extracting the significant features directly from image data. Visual servoing includes an imaging device and computer system to determine the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the object. A second stage having a plurality of tubes positioned on top of the second stage, can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> positioned by visual servoing so that one end of one of the plurality of tubes surrounds at least part of the object on the first stage. 11 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821069','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3821069"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts <span class="hlt">Event</span> Memory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Memory for everyday <span class="hlt">events</span> plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. <span class="hlt">Event</span> memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful <span class="hlt">events</span> a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between <span class="hlt">event</span> perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday <span class="hlt">events</span> and attempted to remember the <span class="hlt">events</span> afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday <span class="hlt">events</span>. <span class="hlt">Event</span> segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in <span class="hlt">event</span> memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000085974','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000085974"><span>Object <span class="hlt">Locating</span> System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>A portable system is provided that is operational for determining, with three dimensional resolution, the position of a buried object or approximately positioned object that may move in space or air or gas. The system has a plurality of receivers for detecting the signal front a target antenna and measuring the phase thereof with respect to a reference signal. The relative permittivity and conductivity of the medium in which the object is <span class="hlt">located</span> is used along with the measured phase signal to determine a distance between the object and each of the plurality of receivers. Knowing these distances. an iteration technique is provided for solving equations simultaneously to provide position coordinates. The system may also be used for tracking movement of an object within close range of the system by sampling and recording subsequent position of the object. A dipole target antenna. when positioned adjacent to a buried object, may be energized using a separate transmitter which couples energy to the target antenna through the medium. The target antenna then preferably resonates at a different frequency, such as a second harmonic of the transmitter frequency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850056798&hterms=1062&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231062','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850056798&hterms=1062&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231062"><span>AOTV bow shock <span class="hlt">location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Desautel, D.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Hypersonic bow-shock <span class="hlt">location</span> and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCoPh.314..538S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCoPh.314..538S"><span>Bayesian analysis of rare <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Straub, Daniel; Papaioannou, Iason; Betz, Wolfgang</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>In many areas of engineering and science there is an interest in predicting the probability of rare <span class="hlt">events</span>, in particular in applications related to safety and security. Increasingly, such predictions are made through computer models of physical systems in an uncertainty quantification framework. Additionally, with advances in IT, monitoring and sensor technology, an increasing amount of data on the performance of the systems is collected. This data can be used to reduce uncertainty, improve the probability estimates and consequently enhance the management of rare <span class="hlt">events</span> and associated risks. Bayesian analysis is the ideal method to include the data into the probabilistic model. It ensures a consistent probabilistic treatment of uncertainty, which is central in the prediction of rare <span class="hlt">events</span>, where extrapolation from the domain of observation is common. We present a framework for performing Bayesian updating of rare <span class="hlt">event</span> probabilities, termed BUS. It is based on a reinterpretation of the classical rejection-sampling approach to Bayesian analysis, which enables the use of established methods for estimating probabilities of rare <span class="hlt">events</span>. By drawing upon these methods, the framework makes use of their computational efficiency. These methods include the First-Order Reliability Method (FORM), tailored importance sampling (IS) methods and Subset Simulation (SuS). In this contribution, we briefly review these methods in the context of the BUS framework and investigate their applicability to Bayesian analysis of rare <span class="hlt">events</span> in different settings. We find that, for some applications, FORM can be highly efficient and is surprisingly <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, enabling Bayesian analysis of rare <span class="hlt">events</span> with just a few model evaluations. In a general setting, BUS implemented through IS and SuS is more robust and flexible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1017089','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1017089"><span>Separation of Benign and Malicious Network <span class="hlt">Events</span> for <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Malware Family Classification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-09-28</p> <p>malware at runtime, including memory access patterns, network traces, OS system calls, file system changes, and registry modifica- tions. Static...statistical features extracted from either static bi- naries [2–4], or from artifacts collected during the execution of the binary [5, 6]. These traces...same features extracted from mixed traffic that is collected on user machines, since these machines generate traffic containing both malware- and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19710000048','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19710000048"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> pointing of tungsten welding electrodes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ziegelmeier, P.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Thoriated-tungsten is pointed <span class="hlt">accurately</span> and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740014366','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740014366"><span>Skylab short-lived <span class="hlt">event</span> alert program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Citron, R. A.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>During the three manned Skylab missions, the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena (CSLP) reported a total of 39 significant <span class="hlt">events</span> to the Johnson Space Center (JSC) as part of the Skylab Short-Lived <span class="hlt">Event</span> Alert Program. The telegraphed daily status reports included the names and <span class="hlt">locations</span> of the <span class="hlt">events</span>, the track number and revolution number during which the <span class="hlt">event</span> could be observed, the time (GMT) to within plus or minus 2 sec when Skylab was closest to the <span class="hlt">event</span> area, and the light condition (daylight or darkness) at that time and place. The messages sent to JSC during the Skylab 4 mission also included information pertaining to ground-truth studies and observations being conducted on the <span class="hlt">events</span>. Photographic priorities were assigned for each <span class="hlt">event</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22266088','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22266088"><span>Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal <span class="hlt">location</span> analysis acoustic emission source <span class="hlt">location</span> for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys</p> <p>2014-02-12</p> <p>Source <span class="hlt">location</span> is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source <span class="hlt">location</span> technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal <span class="hlt">Location</span> (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source <span class="hlt">location</span> was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar <span class="hlt">location</span> test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source <span class="hlt">location</span> methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering <span class="hlt">location</span> methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT <span class="hlt">location</span> method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=exercise+AND+skin&id=EJ990084','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=exercise+AND+skin&id=EJ990084"><span>Feedback about More <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> versus Less <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> rather than less <span class="hlt">accurate</span> trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193..263F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoJI.193..263F"><span>Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> in a 3-D a priori velocity model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>To improve earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span>, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the <span class="hlt">event</span> position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> 70 per cent of <span class="hlt">events</span> in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">located</span> 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> within a 1-DVM almost never allows <span class="hlt">accurate</span> hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality <span class="hlt">location</span> uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 <span class="hlt">events</span> (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 <span class="hlt">events</span> coincides with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26353123','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26353123"><span>A Unified Framework for <span class="hlt">Event</span> Summarization and Rare <span class="hlt">Event</span> Detection from Multiple Views.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kwon, Junseok; Lee, Kyoung Mu</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>A novel approach for <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization and rare <span class="hlt">event</span> detection is proposed. Unlike conventional methods that deal with <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization and rare <span class="hlt">event</span> detection independently, our method solves them in a single framework by transforming them into a graph editing problem. In our approach, a video is represented by a graph, each node of which indicates an <span class="hlt">event</span> obtained by segmenting the video spatially and temporally. The edges between nodes describe the relationship between <span class="hlt">events</span>. Based on the degree of relations, edges have different weights. After learning the graph structure, our method finds subgraphs that represent <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization and rare <span class="hlt">events</span> in the video by editing the graph, that is, merging its subgraphs or pruning its edges. The graph is edited to minimize a predefined energy model with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The energy model consists of several parameters that represent the causality, frequency, and significance of <span class="hlt">events</span>. We design a specific energy model that uses these parameters to satisfy each objective of <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization and rare <span class="hlt">event</span> detection. The proposed method is extended to obtain <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization and rare <span class="hlt">event</span> detection results across multiple videos captured from multiple views. For this purpose, the proposed method independently learns and edits each graph of individual videos for <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization or rare <span class="hlt">event</span> detection. Then, the method matches the extracted multiple graphs to each other, and constructs a single composite graph that represents <span class="hlt">event</span> summarization or rare <span class="hlt">events</span> from multiple views. Experimental results show that the proposed approach <span class="hlt">accurately</span> summarizes multiple videos in a fully unsupervised manner. Moreover, the experiments demonstrate that the approach is advantageous in detecting rare transition of <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/634151','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/634151"><span>Identifying structures in clouds of induced microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fehler, M.; House, L.; Phillips, W.S.</p> <p>1997-07-01</p> <p>A method for finding improved relative <span class="hlt">locations</span> of microearthquakes accompanying fluid production and injection is presented. The method is based on the assumption that the microearthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span> are more clustered than found when <span class="hlt">events</span> are <span class="hlt">located</span> using conventional techniques. By allowing the rms misfit between measured arrival times and predicted arrival times to increase if <span class="hlt">events</span> move closer together, the authors find that there is more structure in the pattern of seismic <span class="hlt">locations</span>. The method is demonstrated using a dataset of microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing. The authors find that structures found using relative arrival times of <span class="hlt">events</span> having similar waveforms to find improved relative <span class="hlt">locations</span> of <span class="hlt">events</span> can also be recovered using the new inversion method but without the laborious repicking procedure. The method provides improved relative <span class="hlt">locations</span> and hence, an improved image of the structure within the seismic zone that may allow for a better relation between microearthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span> and zones of increased fluid permeability to be found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ChOpL...4..712Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ChOpL...4..712Q"><span>New method for lightning <span class="hlt">location</span> using optical ground wire</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qin, Zhaoyu; Cheng, Zhaogu; Zhang, Zhiping; Zhu, Jianqiang; Li, Feng</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>A new technology of lightning <span class="hlt">location</span> is described, which is based on detecting the state of polarization (SOP) fluctuation of the laser light in the optic ground wire (OPGW). Compared with the conventional lightning <span class="hlt">location</span> method, the new method is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, more stable, and cheaper. Theories of Stokes parameters and Poincare sphere are introduced to analyze the SOP at the lightning strike point. It can be concluded that although the initial points of SOP on the Poincare sphere are random, the SOP fluctuation generated by lightning strike can still be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> identified by detecting the velocity of polarization motion. A new algorithm to quantify the velocity is also introduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MSSP...72..513A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MSSP...72..513A"><span>Acoustic emission source <span class="hlt">location</span> in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very <span class="hlt">accurate</span> non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to <span class="hlt">locate</span> AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to <span class="hlt">locate</span> AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to <span class="hlt">locate</span> subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to <span class="hlt">locate</span> the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated <span class="hlt">events</span> at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source <span class="hlt">location</span>. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of <span class="hlt">locating</span> AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3961348','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3961348"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that <span class="hlt">accurate</span> tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5464945','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5464945"><span>New model <span class="hlt">accurately</span> predicts reformate composition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )</p> <p>1994-01-31</p> <p>Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that <span class="hlt">accurately</span> predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6337E..02M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6337E..02M"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian</p> <p>2006-08-01</p> <p>We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which <span class="hlt">accurately</span> predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24651081','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24651081"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that <span class="hlt">accurate</span> tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/799047','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/799047"><span>An <span class="hlt">Accurate</span>, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bane, Karl LF</p> <p>2002-05-23</p> <p>Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910008673&hterms=registration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dregistration','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910008673&hterms=registration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dregistration"><span>An <span class="hlt">accurate</span> registration technique for distorted images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930057681&hterms=contact+angle&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcontact%2Bangle','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930057681&hterms=contact+angle&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dcontact%2Bangle"><span>On <span class="hlt">accurate</span> determination of contact angle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Concus, P.; Finn, R.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IAUFM..29A.247B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IAUFM..29A.247B"><span>The Chelyabinsk <span class="hlt">event</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borovička, Jiří</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>On February 15, 2013, 3:20 UT, an asteroid of the size of about 19 meters and mass of 12,000 metric tons entered the Earth's atmosphere unexpectedly near the border of Kazakhstan and Russia. It was the largest confirmed Earth impactor since the Tunguska <span class="hlt">event</span> in 1908. The body moved approximately westwards with a speed of 19 km s-1, on a trajectory inclined 18 degrees to the surface, creating a fireball of steadily increasing brightness. Eleven seconds after the first sightings, the fireball reached its maximum brightness. At that point, it was <span class="hlt">located</span> less than 40 km south from Chelyabinsk, a Russian city of population more than one million, at an altitude of 30 km. For people directly underneath, the fireball was 30 times brighter than the Sun. The cosmic body disrupted into fragments; the largest of them was visible for another five seconds before it disappeared at an altitude of 12.5 km, when it was decelerated to 3 km s-1. Fifty six second later, that ~600 kg fragment landed in Lake Chebarkul and created a 8 m wide hole in the ice. Small meteorites landed in an area 80 km long and several km wide and caused no damage. The meteorites were classified as LL ordinary chondrites and were interesting by the presence of two phases, light and dark. More material remained, however, in the atmosphere forming a dust trail up to 2 km wide and extending along the fireball trajectory from altitude 18 to 70 km. The dust then circled the Earth within few days and formed a ring around the northern hemisphere. In Chelyabinsk and its surroundings a very strong blast wave arrived 90 - 150 s after the fireball passage (depending on <span class="hlt">location</span>). The wave was produced by the supersonic flight of the body and broke ~10% of windows in Chelyabinsk (~40% of buildings were affected). More than 1600 people were injured, mostly from broken glass. The whole <span class="hlt">event</span> was well documented by video cameras, seismic and infrasonic records, and satellite observations. The total energy was 500 kT TNT</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IAUGA..2248073B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IAUGA..2248073B"><span>The Chelyabinsk <span class="hlt">event</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borovička, Jiri</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>On February 15, 2013, 3:20 UT, an asteroid of the size of about 19 meters and mass of 12,000 metric tons entered the Earth's atmosphere unexpectedly near the border of Kazakhstan and Russia. It was the largest confirmed Earth impactor since the Tunguska <span class="hlt">event</span> in 1908. The body moved approximately westwards with a speed of 19 km/s, on a trajectory inclined 18 degrees to the surface, creating a fireball of steadily increasing brightness. Eleven seconds after the first sightings, the fireball reached its maximum brightness. At that point, it was <span class="hlt">located</span> less than 40 km south from Chelyabinsk, a Russian city of population more than one million, at an altitude of 30 km. For people directly underneath, the fireball was 30 times brighter than the Sun. The cosmic body disrupted into fragments; the largest of them was visible for another five seconds before it disappeared at an altitude of 12.5 km, when it was decelerated to 3 km/s. Fifty six second later, that ~ 600 kg fragment landed in Lake Chebarkul and created an 8 m wide hole in the ice. More material remained, however, in the atmosphere forming a dust trail up to 2 km wide and extending along the fireball trajectory from altitude 18 to 70 km. People observing the dust trail from Chelyabinsk and other places were surprised by the arrival of a very strong blast wave 90 - 150 s after the fireball passage (depending on <span class="hlt">location</span>). The wave, produced by the supersonic flight of the body, broke ~10% of windows in Chelyabinsk (~40% of buildings were affected). More than 1600 people were injured, mostly from broken glass. Small meteorites landed in an area 60 km long and several km wide and caused no damage. The meteorites were classified as LL ordinary chondrites and were interesting by the presence of two phases, light and dark. The dust left in the atmosphere circled the Earth within few days and formed a ring around the northern hemisphere.The whole <span class="hlt">event</span> was well documented by video cameras, seismic and infrasonic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S44B..07R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S44B..07R"><span>The use of waveform cross correlation for creation of an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> catalogue of mining explosions within the Russian platform using joint capabilities of seismic array Miknevo and IMS arrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rozhkov, M.; Kitov, I.; Sanina, I.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>For seismic monitoring, the task of finding and indentifying the sources of various seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> is getting more and more difficult when the size (magnitude, yield, energy) of these <span class="hlt">events</span> decreases. Firstly, the number of seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> dramatically increases with falling magnitude - approximately by an order of magnitude per unit of seismic magnitude. Secondly, mining explosions become detectable and represent one of the biggest challenges for monitoring for magnitudes below 3.5 to 4.0. In the current study of mining activity within the Russian platform, we use the advantages of <span class="hlt">location</span> and historical bulletins/catalogues of mining explosions recorded by small-aperture seismic array Mikhnevo (MHVAR) and extensive data from several IMS arrays at regional and far regional distances from the studied area. The Institute of Geosphere Dynamics (IDG) of the Russian Academy of Sciences runs seismic array MHVAR (54.950 N; 37.767 E) since 2004. Approximately 50 areas with different levels of mining activity have been identified by MHVAR and reported in the IDG catalogue as mining <span class="hlt">events</span>. Signals from select mining <span class="hlt">events</span> detected by MHVAR are sought at IMS arrays. Continuous data from MHVAR and IMS arrays (e.g. AKASG) are processed jointly using waveform cross correlation technique. This technique allows reducing the detection threshold of repeated <span class="hlt">events</span> by an order of magnitude as well as <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locating</span> and identifying mining explosions. To achieve the highest performance of cross correlation, we have selected the best sets of waveform templates recorded from a carefully tested set of master <span class="hlt">events</span> for each of the studied mines. We also test the possibility to use the Principal and Independent Component Analysis to produce sets of synthetic templates, which best fit the whole set of master <span class="hlt">events</span> for a given mine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=single-event&pg=7&id=EJ342620','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=single-event&pg=7&id=EJ342620"><span>Learning to Describe <span class="hlt">Events</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Duchan, Judith Felson</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The article discusses language structures of three hierarchical levels of <span class="hlt">event</span> descriptions: (1) single-action <span class="hlt">events</span> (semantic relations, aspectual meaning and lexical verbs or verb phrases, (2) <span class="hlt">event</span> relations (tense markers, conjunctions, adverbs, perfect tense); (3) <span class="hlt">event</span> schemas (lexical terms and phrases marking beginnings and endings). A…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12882413','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12882413"><span>Determination of precipitating <span class="hlt">events</span> in the suicide of psychiatric patients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maltsberger, John T; Hendin, Herbert; Haas, Ann Pollinger; Lipschitz, Alan</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Data from therapists who were treating patients when they killed themselves were used to provide information about precipitating <span class="hlt">events</span> that was missing from accounts obtained from suicide victims' relatives and friends. Among 26 patient suicides studied, the therapists identified a precipitating <span class="hlt">event</span> in 25 cases; in 19 of these, supporting evidence linked the identified <span class="hlt">event</span> to the suicide. A schema was developed that identifies nine types of evidence provided by therapists in determining that an <span class="hlt">event</span> precipitated the suicide. Use of the schema is likely to improve <span class="hlt">accurate</span> identification of <span class="hlt">events</span> that precipitate patient suicides, and distinguish them from unrelated coterminous <span class="hlt">events</span> or suicide risk factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SMaS...22c5001D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SMaS...22c5001D"><span>An algorithm for LQ optimal actuator <span class="hlt">location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Darivandi, Neda; Morris, Kirsten; Khajepour, Amir</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">locations</span> of the control hardware are typically a design variable in controller design for distributed parameter systems. In order to obtain the most efficient control system, the <span class="hlt">locations</span> of control hardware as well as the feedback gain should be optimized. These optimization problems are generally non-convex. In addition, the models for these systems typically have a large number of degrees of freedom. Consequently, existing optimization schemes for optimal actuator placement may be inaccurate or computationally impractical. In this paper, the feedback control is chosen to be an optimal linear quadratic regulator. The optimal actuator <span class="hlt">location</span> problem is reformulated as a convex optimization problem. A subgradient-based optimization scheme which leads to the global solution of the problem is used to optimize actuator <span class="hlt">locations</span>. The optimization algorithm is applied to optimize the placement of piezoelectric actuators in vibration control of flexible structures. This method is compared with a genetic algorithm, and is observed to be faster and more <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. Experiments are performed to verify the efficacy of optimal actuator placement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060017826&hterms=ecg&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Decg','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060017826&hterms=ecg&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Decg"><span>High Frequency QRS ECG <span class="hlt">Accurately</span> Detects Cardiomyopathy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most <span class="hlt">accurate</span> ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% <span class="hlt">accurate</span> for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less <span class="hlt">accurate</span> (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less <span class="hlt">accurate</span> in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.C11D0543C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.C11D0543C"><span>Global Seismic <span class="hlt">Event</span> Detection Using Surface Waves: 15 Possible Antarctic Glacial Sliding <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.; Walker, K. T.; Fricker, H. A.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>To identify overlooked or anomalous seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> not listed in standard catalogs, we have developed an algorithm to detect and <span class="hlt">locate</span> global seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> using intermediate-period (35-70s) surface waves. We apply our method to continuous vertical-component seismograms from the global seismic networks as archived in the IRIS UV FARM database from 1997 to 2007. We first bandpass filter the seismograms, apply automatic gain control, and compute envelope functions. We then examine 1654 target <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> defined at 5 degree intervals and stack the seismogram envelopes along the predicted Rayleigh-wave travel times. The resulting function has spatial and temporal peaks that indicate possible seismic <span class="hlt">events</span>. We visually check these peaks using a graphical user interface to eliminate artifacts and assign an overall reliability grade (A, B or C) to the new <span class="hlt">events</span>. We detect 78% of <span class="hlt">events</span> in the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. However, we also find 840 new <span class="hlt">events</span> not listed in the PDE, ISC and REB catalogs. Many of these new <span class="hlt">events</span> were previously identified by Ekstrom (2006) using a different Rayleigh-wave detection scheme. Most of these new <span class="hlt">events</span> are <span class="hlt">located</span> along oceanic ridges and transform faults. Some new <span class="hlt">events</span> can be associated with volcanic eruptions such as the 2000 Miyakejima sequence near Japan and others with apparent glacial sliding <span class="hlt">events</span> in Greenland (Ekstrom et al., 2003). We focus our attention on 15 <span class="hlt">events</span> detected from near the Antarctic coastline and relocate them using a cross-correlation approach. The <span class="hlt">events</span> occur in 3 groups which are well-separated from areas of cataloged earthquake activity. We speculate that these are iceberg calving and/or glacial sliding <span class="hlt">events</span>, and hope to test this by inverting for their source mechanisms and examining remote sensing data from their source regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015TCD.....9.4925F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015TCD.....9.4925F"><span>Time forecast of a break-off <span class="hlt">event</span> from a hanging glacier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Faillettaz, J.; Funk, M.; Vagliasindi, M.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>A cold hanging glacier <span class="hlt">located</span> on the south face of the Grandes Jorasses (Mont Blanc, Italy) broke off on the 23 and 29 September 2014 with a total estimated ice volume of 105 000 m3. Thanks to very <span class="hlt">accurate</span> surface displacement measurements taken right up to the final break-off, this <span class="hlt">event</span> could be successfully predicted 10 days in advance, enabling local authorities to take the necessary safety measures. The break-off <span class="hlt">event</span> also confirmed that surface displacements experience a power law acceleration along with superimposed log-periodic oscillations prior to the final rupture. This paper describes the methods used to achieve a satisfactory time forecast in real time and demonstrates, using a retrospective analysis, their potential for the development of early-warning systems in real time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016TCry...10.1191F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016TCry...10.1191F"><span>Time forecast of a break-off <span class="hlt">event</span> from a hanging glacier</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Faillettaz, Jérome; Funk, Martin; Vagliasindi, Marco</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>A cold hanging glacier <span class="hlt">located</span> on the south face of the Grandes Jorasses (Mont Blanc, Italy) broke off on the 23 and 29 September 2014 with a total estimated ice volume of 105 000 m3. Thanks to <span class="hlt">accurate</span> surface displacement measurements taken up to the final break-off, this <span class="hlt">event</span> was successfully predicted 10 days in advance, enabling local authorities to take the necessary safety measures. The break-off <span class="hlt">event</span> also confirmed that surface displacements experienced a power law acceleration along with superimposed log-periodic oscillations prior to the final rupture. This paper describes the methods used to achieve a satisfactory time forecast in real time and demonstrates, using a retrospective analysis, their potential for the development of early-warning systems in real time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1122921','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1122921"><span>Tools for <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> and Efficient Analysis of Complex Evolutionary Mechanisms in Microbial Genomes. Final Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nakhleh, Luay</p> <p>2014-03-12</p> <p>I proposed to develop computationally efficient tools for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> detection and reconstruction of microbes' complex evolutionary mechanisms, thus enabling rapid and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> annotation, analysis and understanding of their genomes. To achieve this goal, I proposed to address three aspects. (1) Mathematical modeling. A major challenge facing the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> detection of HGT is that of distinguishing between these two <span class="hlt">events</span> on the one hand and other <span class="hlt">events</span> that have similar "effects." I proposed to develop a novel mathematical approach for distinguishing among these <span class="hlt">events</span>. Further, I proposed to develop a set of novel optimization criteria for the evolutionary analysis of microbial genomes in the presence of these complex evolutionary <span class="hlt">events</span>. (2) Algorithm design. In this aspect of the project, I proposed to develop an array of e cient and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> algorithms for analyzing microbial genomes based on the formulated optimization criteria. Further, I proposed to test the viability of the criteria and the accuracy of the algorithms in an experimental setting using both synthetic as well as biological data. (3) Software development. I proposed the nal outcome to be a suite of software tools which implements the mathematical models as well as the algorithms developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4863153','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4863153"><span>The FLUKA Code: An <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T.; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P. W.; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G.; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R.; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both 4He and 12C ion beams. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth–dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence <span class="hlt">events</span>. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features. PMID:27242956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5066912','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5066912"><span><span class="hlt">ACCURATE</span> CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so <span class="hlt">accurate</span> solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare <span class="hlt">events</span> can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks. PMID:27761104</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27242956','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27242956"><span>The FLUKA Code: An <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Simulation Tool for Particle Therapy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Julia; Boehlen, Till T; Cerutti, Francesco; Chin, Mary P W; Dos Santos Augusto, Ricardo; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ortega, Pablo G; Kozłowska, Wioletta; Magro, Giuseppe; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia; Sala, Paola R; Schoofs, Philippe; Tessonnier, Thomas; Vlachoudis, Vasilis</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Monte Carlo (MC) codes are increasingly spreading in the hadrontherapy community due to their detailed description of radiation transport and interaction with matter. The suitability of a MC code for application to hadrontherapy demands <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and reliable physical models capable of handling all components of the expected radiation field. This becomes extremely important for correctly performing not only physical but also biologically based dose calculations, especially in cases where ions heavier than protons are involved. In addition, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> prediction of emerging secondary radiation is of utmost importance in innovative areas of research aiming at in vivo treatment verification. This contribution will address the recent developments of the FLUKA MC code and its practical applications in this field. Refinements of the FLUKA nuclear models in the therapeutic energy interval lead to an improved description of the mixed radiation field as shown in the presented benchmarks against experimental data with both (4)He and (12)C ion beams. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> description of ionization energy losses and of particle scattering and interactions lead to the excellent agreement of calculated depth-dose profiles with those measured at leading European hadron therapy centers, both with proton and ion beams. In order to support the application of FLUKA in hospital-based environments, Flair, the FLUKA graphical interface, has been enhanced with the capability of translating CT DICOM images into voxel-based computational phantoms in a fast and well-structured way. The interface is capable of importing also radiotherapy treatment data described in DICOM RT standard. In addition, the interface is equipped with an intuitive PET scanner geometry generator and automatic recording of coincidence <span class="hlt">events</span>. Clinically, similar cases will be presented both in terms of absorbed dose and biological dose calculations describing the various available features.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27761104','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27761104"><span><span class="hlt">ACCURATE</span> CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so <span class="hlt">accurate</span> solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare <span class="hlt">events</span> can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=locative&pg=2&id=EJ750940','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=locative&pg=2&id=EJ750940"><span>Verb Aspect and the Activation of <span class="hlt">Event</span> Knowledge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ferretti, Todd R.; Kutas, Marta; McRae, Ken</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The authors show that verb aspect influences the activation of <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge with 4 novel results. First, common <span class="hlt">locations</span> of <span class="hlt">events</span> (e.g., arena) are primed following verbs with imperfective aspect (e.g., was skating) but not verbs with perfect aspect (e.g., had skated). Second, people generate more <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositional phrases as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090011282','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090011282"><span>Impact-<span class="hlt">Locator</span> Sensor Panels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Christiansen, Eric L.; Byers, Terry; Gibbons, Frank</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Electronic sensor systems for detecting and <span class="hlt">locating</span> impacts of rapidly moving particles on spacecraft have been invented. Systems of this type could also be useful on Earth in settings in which the occurrence of impacts and/or the <span class="hlt">locations</span> of impacts are not immediately obvious and there are requirements to detect and quickly <span class="hlt">locate</span> impacts to prevent or minimize damage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1253486','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1253486"><span>DIORAMA <span class="hlt">Location</span> Type User's Guide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Terry, James Russell</p> <p>2015-01-29</p> <p>The purpose of this report is to present the current design and implementation of the DIORAMA <span class="hlt">location</span> type object (<span class="hlt">Location</span>Type) and to provide examples and use cases. The <span class="hlt">Location</span>Type object is included in the diorama-app package in the diorama::types namespace. Abstractly, the object is intended to capture the full time history of the <span class="hlt">location</span> of an object or reference point. For example, a <span class="hlt">location</span> may be speci ed as a near-Earth orbit in terms of a two-line element set, in which case the <span class="hlt">location</span> type is capable of propagating the orbit both forward and backward in time to provide a <span class="hlt">location</span> for any given time. Alternatively, the <span class="hlt">location</span> may be speci ed as a xed set of geodetic coordinates (latitude, longitude, and altitude), in which case the geodetic <span class="hlt">location</span> of the object is expected to remain constant for all time. From an implementation perspective, the <span class="hlt">location</span> type is de ned as a union of multiple independent objects defi ned in the DIORAMA tle library. Types presently included in the union are listed and described in subsections below, and all conversions or transformation between these <span class="hlt">location</span> types are handled by utilities provided by the tle library with the exception of the \\special-values" <span class="hlt">location</span> type.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871393','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/871393"><span>Spring loaded <span class="hlt">locator</span> pin assembly</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This invention deals with spring loaded <span class="hlt">locator</span> pins. <span class="hlt">Locator</span> pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a <span class="hlt">locator</span> hole on the work piece.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/321233','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/321233"><span>Spring loaded <span class="hlt">locator</span> pin assembly</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.</p> <p>1998-03-03</p> <p>This invention deals with spring loaded <span class="hlt">locator</span> pins. <span class="hlt">Locator</span> pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a <span class="hlt">locator</span> hole on the work piece. 5 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4511001B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4511001B"><span>The Chelyabinsk Airburst <span class="hlt">Event</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boslough, Mark</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>On Feb. 15, 2013, an asteroid exploded about 40 km from the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. Its proximity led to many injuries and widespread blast damage, but also yielded a plethora of data, providing means to determine the projectile size and entry parameters, and develop a self-consistent model. We will present results of the first physics simulations to be initialized with <span class="hlt">accurate</span> energy deposition derived from observations. The best estimate of the explosive yield is 400-500 kilotons, making Chelyabinsk the most powerful such <span class="hlt">event</span> observed since Tunguska (3-5 megatons). Analysis of video combined with subsequent on-site stellar calibrations enable precise estimates of entry velocity (19 km/s), angle (17° elevation) and altitude of peak brightness (29 km). This implies a pre-entry diameter of ~20 m and mass of ~1200 tonnes. Satellite sensors recorded the emission peak at 03:20:33 UT, with a total radiated energy of 3.75×1014 J 90 kilotons). A typical bolide luminous efficiency of 20% implies a total energy of ~450 kilotons, consistent with infrasound and other observations. The maximum radiant intensity was 2.7×1013 W/ster, corresponding to a magnitude of -28. The shallow entry angle led to a long bolide duration (16.5 s) and energy was deposited over 100s of km leading to an extended, near-horizontal, linear explosion. The blast was distributed over a large area, and was much weaker than for a steep entry and a more concentrated explosion closer to the surface. The orientation also led to different phenomena than expected for a more vertical entry. There was no ballistic plume as observed from SL9 impacts (45°) or calculated for Tunguska 35°). Instead, buoyant instabilities grew into mushroom clouds and bifurcated the trail into two contra-rotating vortices. Chelyabinsk and Tunguska are “once-per-century” and “once-per-millennium” <span class="hlt">events</span>, respectively. These outliers imply that the frequency of large airbursts is underestimated. Models also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820005596','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820005596"><span>Interpolating for the <span class="hlt">location</span> of remote sensor data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Puccinelli, E. F.; Kornfield, J.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>An interpolation algorithm is presented as a practical alternative to common interpolation and approximation methods when applied to the problem of determining the <span class="hlt">location</span> of remote sensor data. This algorithm is based upon knowledge of the geometry of the problem and is shown to be inherently more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than common interpolation schemes which may be applied to all types of data. A practical <span class="hlt">location</span> problem is used to demonstrate its accuracy and computational cost.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26905891','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26905891"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> influential nodes via dynamics-sensitive centrality.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao</p> <p>2016-02-24</p> <p>With great theoretical and practical significance, <span class="hlt">locating</span> influential nodes of complex networks is a promising issue. In this paper, we present a dynamics-sensitive (DS) centrality by integrating topological features and dynamical properties. The DS centrality can be directly applied in <span class="hlt">locating</span> influential spreaders. According to the empirical results on four real networks for both susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) and susceptible-infected (SI) spreading models, the DS centrality is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than degree, k-shell index and eigenvector centrality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S13B2837H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S13B2837H"><span>Seismicity in Pennsylvania: Evidence for Anthropogenic <span class="hlt">Events</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Homman, K.; Nyblade, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The deployment and operation of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) and the PASEIS (XY) seismic networks in Pennsylvania during 2013 and 2014 provide a unique opportunity for investigating the seismicity of Pennsylvania. These networks, along with several permanent stations in Pennsylvania, resulted in a total of 104 seismometers in and around Pennsylvania that have been used in this study. <span class="hlt">Event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> were first obtained with Antelope Environmental Monitoring Software using P-wave arrival times. Arrival times were hand picked using a 1-5 Hz bandpass filter to within 0.1 seconds. <span class="hlt">Events</span> were then relocated using a velocity model developed for Pennsylvania and the HYPOELLIPSE <span class="hlt">location</span> code. In this study, 1593 seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> occurred between February 2013 and December 2014 in Pennsylvania. These <span class="hlt">events</span> ranged between magnitude (ML) 1.04 and 2.89 with an average MLof 1.90. <span class="hlt">Locations</span> of the <span class="hlt">events</span> occur across the state in many areas where no seismicity has been previously reported. Preliminary results indicate that most of these <span class="hlt">events</span> are related to mining activity. Additional work using cross-correlation techniques is underway to examine a number of <span class="hlt">event</span> clusters for evidence of hydraulic fracturing or wastewater injection sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRD..121.8913M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRD..121.8913M"><span>Isotopic signature of extreme precipitation <span class="hlt">events</span> in the western U.S. and associated phases of Arctic and tropical climate modes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCabe-Glynn, Staryl; Johnson, Kathleen R.; Strong, Courtenay; Zou, Yuhao; Yu, Jin-Yi; Sellars, Scott; Welker, Jeffrey M.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Extreme precipitation <span class="hlt">events</span>, commonly associated with "Atmospheric Rivers," are projected to increase in frequency and severity in western North America; however, the intensity and landfall position are difficult to forecast <span class="hlt">accurately</span>. As the isotopic signature of precipitation has been widely utilized as a tracer of the hydrologic cycle and could potentially provide information about key physical processes, we utilize both climate and precipitation isotope data to investigate these <span class="hlt">events</span> in California from 2001 to 2011. Although individual <span class="hlt">events</span> have extreme isotopic signatures linked to associated circulation anomalies, the composite across all <span class="hlt">events</span> unexpectedly resembles the weighted mean for the entire study period, reflecting diverse moisture trajectories and associated teleconnection phases. We document that 90% of <span class="hlt">events</span> reaching this <span class="hlt">location</span> occurred during the negative Arctic Oscillation, suggesting a possible link with higher-latitude warming. We also utilize precipitation data of extreme precipitation <span class="hlt">events</span> across the entire western U.S. to investigate the relationships between key tropical and Arctic climate modes known to influence precipitation in this region. Results indicate that the wettest conditions occur when the negative Arctic Oscillation, negative Pacific/North American pattern, and positive Southern Oscillation are in sync and that precipitation has increased in the southwestern U.S. and decreased in the northwestern U.S. relative to this phase combination's 1979-2011 climatology. Furthermore, the type of El Niño-Southern Oscillation <span class="hlt">event</span>, Central Pacific or Eastern Pacific, influences the occurrence, landfall <span class="hlt">location</span>, and isotopic composition of precipitation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T32C..03V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T32C..03V"><span>The complex architecture of the 2009 MW 6.1 L'Aquila normal fault system (Central Italy) as imaged by 64,000 high-resolution aftershock <span class="hlt">locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Valoroso, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Di Stefano, R.; Piccinini, D.; Schaff, D. P.; Waldhauser, F.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>On April 6th 2009, a MW 6.1 normal faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in Central Italy. We present high-precision hypocenter <span class="hlt">locations</span> of an extraordinary dataset composed by 64,000 earthquakes recorded at a very dense seismic network of 60 stations operating for 9 months after the main <span class="hlt">event</span>. <span class="hlt">Events</span> span in magnitude (ML) between -0.9 to 5.9, reaching a completeness magnitude of 0.7. The dataset has been processed by integrating an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> automatic picking procedure together with cross-correlation and double-difference relative <span class="hlt">location</span> methods. The combined use of these procedures results in earthquake relative <span class="hlt">location</span> uncertainties in the range of a few meters to tens of meters, comparable/lower than the spatial dimension of the earthquakes themselves). This data set allows us to image the complex inner geometry of individual faults from the kilometre to meter scale. The aftershock distribution illuminates the anatomy of the en-echelon fault system composed of two major faults. The mainshock breaks the entire upper crust from 10 km depth to the surface along a 14-km long normal fault. A second segment, <span class="hlt">located</span> north of the normal fault and activated by two Mw>5 <span class="hlt">events</span>, shows a striking listric geometry completely blind. We focus on the analysis of about 300 clusters of co-<span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">events</span> to characterize the mechanical behavior of the different portions of the fault system. The number of <span class="hlt">events</span> in each cluster ranges from 4 to 24 <span class="hlt">events</span> and they exhibit strongly correlated seismograms at common stations. They mostly occur where secondary structures join the main fault planes and along unfavorably oriented segments. Moreover, larger clusters nucleate on secondary faults <span class="hlt">located</span> in the overlapping area between the two main segments, where the rate of earthquake production is very high with a long-lasting seismic decay.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19670000562','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19670000562"><span>Instrument <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measures weld angle and offset</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Boyd, W. G.</p> <p>1967-01-01</p> <p>Weld angle is measured to the nearest arc minute and offset to one thousandth of an inch by an instrument designed to use a reference plane at two <span class="hlt">locations</span> on a test coupon. A special table for computation has been prepared for use with the instrument.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10951363','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10951363"><span>3-D AE visualization of bone-cement fatigue <span class="hlt">locations</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qi, G; Pujol, J; Fan, Z</p> <p>2000-11-01</p> <p>This study addresses the visualization of crack <span class="hlt">locations</span> in bone-cement material using a three-dimensional acoustic emission source <span class="hlt">location</span> technique. Computer software based on an earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> technique was developed to determine AE source <span class="hlt">locations</span> and was used to investigate material cracks formed at the tip of a notch in bone cement. The computed <span class="hlt">locations</span> show that the cracks form linear features with dimensions between 0.1 and 0.2 mm although larger linear features (almost 3.5 mm) also are present. There is a difference of about 2.5 mm between the average of the <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span>, and the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the tip of the notch is 2.5 mm, which may be due to the finite size of the sensors (5 mm in diameter).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr49B2..509G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ISPAr49B2..509G"><span>Efficient and <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Indoor Localization Using Landmark Graphs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gu, F.; Kealy, A.; Khoshelham, K.; Shang, J.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Indoor localization is important for a variety of applications such as <span class="hlt">location</span>-based services, mobile social networks, and emergency response. Fusing spatial information is an effective way to achieve <span class="hlt">accurate</span> indoor localization with little or with no need for extra hardware. However, existing indoor localization methods that make use of spatial information are either too computationally expensive or too sensitive to the completeness of landmark detection. In this paper, we solve this problem by using the proposed landmark graph. The landmark graph is a directed graph where nodes are landmarks (e.g., doors, staircases, and turns) and edges are accessible paths with heading information. We compared the proposed method with two common Dead Reckoning (DR)-based methods (namely, Compass + Accelerometer + Landmarks and Gyroscope + Accelerometer + Landmarks) by a series of experiments. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 73% accuracy with a positioning error less than 2.5 meters, which outperforms the other two DR-based methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2336927','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2336927"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> superimposition of perimetry data onto fundus photographs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bek, T; Lund-Andersen, H</p> <p>1990-02-01</p> <p>A technique for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> superimposition of computerized perimetry data onto the corresponding retinal <span class="hlt">locations</span> seen on fundus photographs was developed. The technique was designed to take into account: 1) that the photographic field of view of the fundus camera varies with ametropia-dependent camera focusing 2) possible distortion by the fundus camera, and 3) that corrective lenses employed during perimetry magnify or minify the visual field. The technique allowed an overlay of perimetry data of the central 60 degrees of the visual field onto fundus photographs with an accuracy of 0.5 degree. The correlation of localized retinal morphology to localized retinal function was therefore limited by the spatial resolution of the computerized perimetry, which was 2.5 degrees in the Dicon AP-2500 perimeter employed for this study. The theoretical assumptions of the technique were confirmed by comparing visual field records to fundus photographs from patients with morphologically well-defined non-functioning lesions in the retina.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JMEP...22.1907L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JMEP...22.1907L"><span>Method for <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Surface Temperature Measurements During Fast Induction Heating</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Larregain, Benjamin; Vanderesse, Nicolas; Bridier, Florent; Bocher, Philippe; Arkinson, Patrick</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>A robust method is proposed for the measurement of surface temperature fields during induction heating. It is based on the original coupling of temperature-indicating lacquers and a high-speed camera system. Image analysis tools have been implemented to automatically extract the temporal evolution of isotherms. This method was applied to the fast induction treatment of a 4340 steel spur gear, allowing the full history of surface isotherms to be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> documented for a sequential heating, i.e., a medium frequency preheating followed by a high frequency final heating. Three isotherms, i.e., 704, 816, and 927°C, were acquired every 0.3 ms with a spatial resolution of 0.04 mm per pixel. The information provided by the method is described and discussed. Finally, the transformation temperature Ac1 is linked to the temperature on specific <span class="hlt">locations</span> of the gear tooth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.2699D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.2699D"><span>Robust and <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Seismic(acoustic) Ray Tracer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Debski, W.; Ando, M.</p> <p></p> <p>Recent development of high resolution seismic tomography as well as a need for a high precision seismic (acoustic) source <span class="hlt">locations</span> calls for robust and very precise numeri- cal methods of an estimation of seismic (acoustic) travel times and ray paths. Here we present a method based on a parametrisation of the ray path by a series of the Cheby- shev polynomials. This pseudo-spectral method, combined with the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> Gauss- Lobbato integration procedure allows to reach a very high relative travel time accu- racy t/t 10-7. At the same time use of the Genetic Algorithm based optimizer (Evolutionary Algorithm) assures an extreme robustness which allows the method to be used in complicated 3D geological structures like multi-fault areas, mines, or real engineering applications, constructions, etc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940012409','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940012409"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> upwind methods for the Euler equations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Huynh, Hung T.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PEPI..261....3W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PEPI..261....3W"><span>Automatic microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> detection by band-limited phase-only correlation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wu, Shaojiang; Wang, Yibo; Zhan, Yi; Chang, Xu</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Identification and detection of microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> is a significant issue in source <span class="hlt">locations</span> and source mechanism analysis. The number of the records is notably large, especially in the case of some real-time monitoring, and while the majority of microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> are highly weak and sparse, automatic algorithms are indispensable. In this study, we introduce an effective method for the identification and detection of microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> by judging whether the P-wave phase exists in a local segment from a single three-component microseismic records. The new judging algorithm consists primarily of the following key steps: 1) transform the waveform time series into time-varying spectral representations using the S-transform; 2) calculate the similarity of the frequency content in the time-frequency domain using the phase-only correlation function; and 3) identify the P-phase by the combination analysis between any two components. The proposed algorithm is compared to a similar approach using the cross-correlation in the time domain between any two components and later tested with synthetic microseismic datasets and real field-recorded datasets. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is able to distinguish similar and dissimilar waveforms, even for low signal noise ratio and emergent <span class="hlt">events</span>, which is important for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and rapid selection of microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> from a large number of records. This method can be applied to other geophysical analyses based on the waveform data.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25525971','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25525971"><span>Metamemory appraisals in autobiographical <span class="hlt">event</span> recall.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Scoboria, Alan; Talarico, Jennifer M; Pascal, Lisa</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Two studies examined whether belief in the occurrence of <span class="hlt">events</span>, recollecting <span class="hlt">events</span>, and belief in the accuracy of recollections are distinct aspects of autobiographical remembering. In Study 1, 299 student participants received a cue to recall five childhood <span class="hlt">events</span>, after which they rated each <span class="hlt">event</span> on these constructs and other characteristics associated with remembering. Structural equation modelling revealed that variance in ratings was best explained by the three anticipated latent variables. In Study 2, an online sample of 1026 adults recalled and rated a childhood <span class="hlt">event</span> and an <span class="hlt">event</span> about which they were somehow uncertain. Confirmatory modelling replicated the three latent variables. The relationship of key predictors (perceptual detail, spatial detail, re-experiencing, and <span class="hlt">event</span> plausibility) to the latent variables confirmed the distinction. These studies demonstrate that belief in occurrence and belief in accuracy appraisals are distinct, the former indexing the truth status of the <span class="hlt">event</span> and the latter the degree to which the <span class="hlt">event</span> representation <span class="hlt">accurately</span> reflects prior experience. Further, they suggest that belief in accuracy indexes the monitoring of the quality of recollections.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EOSTr..87..584S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EOSTr..87..584S"><span>The first <span class="hlt">accurate</span> description of an aurora</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schröder, Wilfried</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first <span class="hlt">accurate</span> description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhDT.........6B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhDT.........6B"><span>Determining <span class="hlt">accurate</span> distances to nearby galaxies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bonanos, Alceste Zoe</p> <p>2005-11-01</p> <p>Determining <span class="hlt">accurate</span> distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine <span class="hlt">accurate</span> distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11366835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11366835"><span>New law requires 'medically <span class="hlt">accurate</span>' lesson plans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>1999-09-17</p> <p>The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4621428','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4621428"><span>Episodes, <span class="hlt">events</span>, and models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Harrison, Anthony M.; Trafton, J. Gregory</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of <span class="hlt">events</span>. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation is automatic, and that <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation yields mental simulations of <span class="hlt">events</span>. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct <span class="hlt">event</span> models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation and <span class="hlt">event</span> model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of <span class="hlt">event</span> segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5916..323S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5916..323S"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> 3D quantification of the bronchial parameters in MDCT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Saragaglia, A.; Fetita, C.; Preteux, F.; Brillet, P. Y.; Grenier, P. A.</p> <p>2005-08-01</p> <p>The assessment of bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling in asthma plays a crucial role in better understanding such a disease and evaluating therapeutic responses. Today, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) makes it possible to perform an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimation of bronchial parameters (lumen and wall areas) by allowing a quantitative analysis in a cross-section plane orthogonal to the bronchus axis. This paper provides the tools for such an analysis by developing a 3D investigation method which relies on 3D reconstruction of bronchial lumen and central axis computation. Cross-section images at bronchial <span class="hlt">locations</span> interactively selected along the central axis are generated at appropriate spatial resolution. An automated approach is then developed for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> segmenting the inner and outer bronchi contours on the cross-section images. It combines mathematical morphology operators, such as "connection cost", and energy-controlled propagation in order to overcome the difficulties raised by vessel adjacencies and wall irregularities. The segmentation accuracy was validated with respect to a 3D mathematically-modeled phantom of a pair bronchus-vessel which mimics the characteristics of real data in terms of gray-level distribution, caliber and orientation. When applying the developed quantification approach to such a model with calibers ranging from 3 to 10 mm diameter, the lumen area relative errors varied from 3.7% to 0.15%, while the bronchus area was estimated with a relative error less than 5.1%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950005402','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950005402"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> interlaminar stress recovery from finite element analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tessler, Alexander; Riggs, H. Ronald</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The accuracy and robustness of a two-dimensional smoothing methodology is examined for the problem of recovering <span class="hlt">accurate</span> interlaminar shear stress distributions in laminated composite and sandwich plates. The smoothing methodology is based on a variational formulation which combines discrete least-squares and penalty-constraint functionals in a single variational form. The smoothing analysis utilizes optimal strains computed at discrete <span class="hlt">locations</span> in a finite element analysis. These discrete strain data are smoothed with a smoothing element discretization, producing superior accuracy strains and their first gradients. The approach enables the resulting smooth strain field to be practically C1-continuous throughout the domain of smoothing, exhibiting superconvergent properties of the smoothed quantity. The continuous strain gradients are also obtained directly from the solution. The recovered strain gradients are subsequently employed in the integration o equilibrium equations to obtain <span class="hlt">accurate</span> interlaminar shear stresses. The problem is a simply-supported rectangular plate under a doubly sinusoidal load. The problem has an exact analytic solution which serves as a measure of goodness of the recovered interlaminar shear stresses. The method has the versatility of being applicable to the analysis of rather general and complex structures built of distinct components and materials, such as found in aircraft design. For these types of structures, the smoothing is achieved with 'patches', each patch covering the domain in which the smoothed quantity is physically continuous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S33B2756A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S33B2756A"><span>Testing and Development of the Onsite Earthquake Early Warning Algorithm to Reduce <span class="hlt">Event</span> Uncertainties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Andrews, J. R.; Cochran, E. S.; Hauksson, E.; Felizardo, C.; Liu, T.; Ross, Z.; Heaton, T. H.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Primary metrics for measuring earthquake early warning (EEW) system and algorithm performance are the rate of false alarms and the uncertainty in earthquake parameters. The Onsite algorithm, currently one of three EEW algorithms implemented in ShakeAlert, uses the ground-motion period parameter (τc) and peak initial displacement parameter (Pd) to estimate the magnitude and expected ground shaking of an ongoing earthquake. It is the only algorithm originally designed to issue single station alerts, necessitating that results from individual stations be as reliable and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> as possible.The ShakeAlert system has been undergoing testing on continuous real-time data in California for several years, and the latest version of the Onsite algorithm for several months. This permits analysis of the response to a range of signals, from environmental noise to hardware testing and maintenance procedures to moderate or large earthquake signals at varying distances from the networks. We find that our existing discriminator, relying only on τc and Pd, while performing well to exclude large teleseismic <span class="hlt">events</span>, is less effective for moderate regional <span class="hlt">events</span> and can also incorrectly exclude data from local <span class="hlt">events</span>. Motivated by these experiences, we use a collection of waveforms from potentially problematic 'noise' <span class="hlt">events</span> and real earthquakes to explore methods to discriminate real and false <span class="hlt">events</span>, using the ground motion and period parameters available in Onsite's processing methodology. Once an <span class="hlt">event</span> is correctly identified, a magnitude and <span class="hlt">location</span> estimate is critical to determining the expected ground shaking. Scatter in the measured parameters translates to higher than desired uncertainty in Onsite's current calculations We present an overview of alternative methods, including incorporation of polarization information, to improve parameter determination for a test suite including both large (M4 to M7) <span class="hlt">events</span> and three years of small to moderate <span class="hlt">events</span> across California.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MNRAS.415..306M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011MNRAS.415..306M"><span>An <span class="hlt">accurate</span> position for the black hole candidate XTE J1752-223: re-interpretation of the VLBI data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Jonker, P. G.; Ratti, E. M.; Torres, M. A. P.; Brocksopp, C.; Yang, J.; Morrell, N. I.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Using high-precision astrometric optical observations from the Walter Baade Magellan Telescope in conjunction with high-resolution very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) radio imaging with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), we have <span class="hlt">located</span> the core of the X-ray binary system XTE J1752-223. Compact radio emission from the core was detected following the state transition from the soft to the hard X-ray state. Its position to the south-east of all previously detected jet components mandated a re-analysis of the existing VLBI data. Our analysis suggests that the outburst comprised at least two ejection <span class="hlt">events</span> prior to 2010 February 26. No radio-emitting components were detected to the south-east of the core at any epoch, suggesting that the receding jets were Doppler-deboosted below our sensitivity limit. From the ratio of the brightness of the detected components to the measured upper limits for the receding ejecta, we constrain the jet speed β > 0.66 and the inclination angle to the line of sight θ < 49°. Assuming that the initial ejection <span class="hlt">event</span> occurred at the transition from the hard intermediate state to the soft intermediate state, an initial period of ballistic motion followed by a Sedov phase (i.e. self-similar adiabatic expansion) appears to fit the motion of the ejecta better than a uniform deceleration model. The <span class="hlt">accurate</span> core <span class="hlt">location</span> can provide a long time baseline for a future proper motion determination should the system show a second outburst, providing insights into the formation mechanism of the compact object.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013615','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1013615"><span>Low latency counter <span class="hlt">event</span> indication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina</p> <p>2010-08-24</p> <p>A hybrid counter array device for counting <span class="hlt">events</span> with interrupt indication includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each for counting signals representing <span class="hlt">event</span> occurrences and providing a first count value representing lower order bits. An overflow bit device associated with each respective counter device is additionally set in response to an overflow condition. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory <span class="hlt">locations</span> in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory <span class="hlt">location</span> for storing a second count value representing higher order bits. An operatively coupled control device monitors each associated overflow bit device and initiates incrementing a second count value stored at a corresponding memory <span class="hlt">location</span> in response to a respective overflow bit being set. The incremented second count value is compared to an interrupt threshold value stored in a threshold register, and, when the second counter value is equal to the interrupt threshold value, a corresponding "interrupt arm" bit is set to enable a fast interrupt indication. On a subsequent roll-over of the lower bits of that counter, the interrupt will be fired.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/984518','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/984518"><span>Low latency counter <span class="hlt">event</span> indication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina</p> <p>2008-09-16</p> <p>A hybrid counter array device for counting <span class="hlt">events</span> with interrupt indication includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each for counting signals representing <span class="hlt">event</span> occurrences and providing a first count value representing lower order bits. An overflow bit device associated with each respective counter device is additionally set in response to an overflow condition. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory <span class="hlt">locations</span> in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory <span class="hlt">location</span> for storing a second count value representing higher order bits. An operatively coupled control device monitors each associated overflow bit device and initiates incrementing a second count value stored at a corresponding memory <span class="hlt">location</span> in response to a respective overflow bit being set. The incremented second count value is compared to an interrupt threshold value stored in a threshold register, and, when the second counter value is equal to the interrupt threshold value, a corresponding "interrupt arm" bit is set to enable a fast interrupt indication. On a subsequent roll-over of the lower bits of that counter, the interrupt will be fired.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15005407','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15005407"><span>Grid-Search <span class="hlt">Location</span> Methods for Ground-Truth Collection from Local and Regional Seismic Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schultz, C A; Rodi, W; Myers, S C</p> <p>2003-07-24</p> <p>The objective of this project is to develop improved seismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> techniques that can be used to generate more and better quality reference <span class="hlt">events</span> using data from local and regional seismic networks. Their approach is to extend existing methods of multiple-<span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> with more general models of the errors affecting seismic arrival time data, including picking errors and errors in model-based travel-times (path corrections). Toward this end, they are integrating a grid-search based algorithm for multiple-<span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> (GMEL) with a new parameterization of travel-time corrections and new kriging method for estimating the correction parameters from observed travel-time residuals. Like several other multiple-<span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithms, GMEL currently assumes <span class="hlt">event</span>-independent path corrections and is thus restricted to small <span class="hlt">event</span> clusters. The new parameterization assumes that travel-time corrections are a function of both the <span class="hlt">event</span> and station <span class="hlt">location</span>, and builds in source-receiver reciprocity and correlation between the corrections from proximate paths as constraints. The new kriging method simultaneously interpolates travel-time residuals from multiple stations and <span class="hlt">events</span> to estimate the correction parameters as functions of position. They are currently developing the algorithmic extensions to GMEL needed to combine the new parameterization and kriging method with the simultaneous <span class="hlt">location</span> of <span class="hlt">events</span>. The result will be a multiple-<span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> method which is applicable to non-clustered, spatially well-distributed <span class="hlt">events</span>. They are applying the existing components of the new multiple-<span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> method to a data set of regional and local arrival times from Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions with known origin parameters. Preliminary results show the feasibility and potential benefits of combining the <span class="hlt">location</span> and kriging techniques. They also show some preliminary work on generalizing of the error model used in GMEL with the use of mixture</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19908352','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19908352"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An <span class="hlt">accurate</span> taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22382025','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22382025"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> shear measurement with faint sources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>For cosmic shear to become an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured <span class="hlt">accurately</span> in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7667E..0SM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7667E..0SM"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> pose estimation for forensic identification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain <span class="hlt">accurate</span> far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be <span class="hlt">accurate</span>, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8394E..07V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8394E..07V"><span>Sparse and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> high resolution SAR imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139b4103B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JChPh.139b4103B"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between <span class="hlt">accurate</span> projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S43D2502H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S43D2502H"><span>Investigating Virtual Receiver Geometries for Improving Microseismic <span class="hlt">Locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Horowitz, F. G.; Brown, L. D.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Recently, Curtis et al. (2009) demonstrated a new technique from seismic interferometry where real seismic sources can be signal processed into virtual seismic receivers. Here, we report results of a numerical investigation of the effectiveness of this technique to improve <span class="hlt">locations</span> of microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span> by placing virtual receivers in the interior of a swarm of <span class="hlt">events</span>. We compare the performance of double difference <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithms with and without the presence of virtual receivers at hypocentric <span class="hlt">locations</span>. So that we retain full control over all parameters of interest, the seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> are simulated using 3D wave propagation codes with a realistic distribution of seismic velocities. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting, and applications will be discussed. Reference: Curtis, A., Nicolson, H., Halliday, D., Trampert, J., & Baptie, B. (2009). Virtual seismometers in the subsurface of the Earth from seismic interferometry. Nature Geoscience, 2 (10), 700-704.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/SafetyAvailability/ReportaProblem/VaccineAdverseEvents/default.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/SafetyAvailability/ReportaProblem/VaccineAdverseEvents/default.htm"><span>Vaccine Adverse <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse <span class="hlt">Events</span> Vaccine Adverse <span class="hlt">Events</span> Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26PSL.432..133H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015E%26PSL.432..133H"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> focal depth determination of oceanic earthquakes using water-column reverberation and some implications for the shrinking plate hypothesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Jianping; Niu, Fenglin; Gordon, Richard G.; Cui, Chao</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Investigation of oceanic earthquakes is useful for constraining the lateral and depth variations of the stress and strain-rate fields in oceanic lithosphere, and the thickness of the seismogenic layer as a function of lithosphere age, thereby providing us with critical insight into thermal and dynamic processes associated with the cooling and evolution of oceanic lithosphere. With the goal of estimating hypocentral depths more <span class="hlt">accurately</span>, we observe clear water reverberations after the direct P wave on teleseismic records of oceanic earthquakes and develop a technique to estimate earthquake depths by using these reverberations. The Z-H grid search method allows the simultaneous determination of the sea floor depth (H) and earthquake depth (Z) with an uncertainty less than 1 km, which compares favorably with alternative approaches. We apply this method to two closely <span class="hlt">located</span> earthquakes beneath the eastern Pacific. These earthquakes occurred in ∼25 Ma-old lithosphere and were previously estimated to have similar depths of ∼10-12 km. We find that the two <span class="hlt">events</span> actually occurred at dissimilar depths of 2.5 km and 16.8 km beneath the seafloor, respectively, within the oceanic crust and lithospheric mantle. The shallow and deep <span class="hlt">events</span> are determined to be a thrust and normal earthquake, respectively, indicating that the stress field within the oceanic lithosphere changes from horizontal deviatoric compression to horizontal deviatoric tension as depth increases, which is consistent with the prediction of lithospheric cooling models. Furthermore, we show that the P-axis of the newly investigated thrust-faulting earthquake is perpendicular to that of the previously studied thrust <span class="hlt">event</span>, consistent with the predictions of the shrinking-plate hypothesis.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA156004','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA156004"><span><span class="hlt">LOCAT</span> - A Data Retrieval Program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-12-01</p> <p>STANDARSIA1 3 -A Suznn Y4Sl ’ś’. Doc 0 006 U m Nalionai Deftense U’" Defence nationale <span class="hlt">LOCAT</span> -A DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAM by Suzanne Y. Slinn SA RSA T Project...2.1 DESIGN PHILOSOPHY...................2 2.2 SATELLITE AND <span class="hlt">LOCATION</span> SOFT KEY DISPLAY .. .. ........ 3 2.3...<span class="hlt">LOCAT</span> -Calling Sequence .. .. ...... ........ 2 FIGURE 2: SAT/LOC Soft Key Display .. .. ...... ..... 3 FIGURE 3 : Frequency Soft Key Display</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008epsc.conf..331H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008epsc.conf..331H"><span>First LOCSMITH <span class="hlt">locations</span> of deep moonquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hempel, S.; Knapmeyer, M.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Oberst, J.</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>Introduction Several thousand seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> were recorded by the Apollo seismic network from 19691977. Different types of <span class="hlt">events</span> can be distinguished: meteoroid impacts, thermal quakes and internally caused moonquakes. The latter subdivide into shallow (100 to 300km) and deep moonquakes (700 to 1100km), which are by far the most common <span class="hlt">events</span>. The deep quakes would be no immediate danger to inhabitated stations on the Earth's Moon because of their relatively low magnitude and great depth. However, they bear important information on lunar structure and evolution, and their distribution probably reflects their source mechanism. In this study, we reinvestigate <span class="hlt">location</span> patterns of deep lunar quakes. LOCSMITH The core of this study is a new <span class="hlt">location</span> method (LOCSMITH, [1]). This algorithm uses time intervals rather than time instants as input, which contain the dedicated arrival with probability 1. LOCSMITH models and compares theoretical and actual travel times on a global scale and uses an adaptive grid to search source <span class="hlt">locations</span> compatible with all observations. The output is a set of all possible hypocenters for the considered region of repeating, tidally triggered moonquake activity, called clusters. The shape and size of these sets gives a better estimate of the <span class="hlt">location</span> uncertainty than the formal standard deviations returned by classical methods. This is used for grading of deep moonquake clusters according to the currently available data quality. Classification of deep moonquakes As first step, we establish a reciprocal dependence of size and shape of LOCSMITH <span class="hlt">location</span> clouds on number of arrivals. Four different shapes are recognized, listed here in an order corresponding to decreasing spatial resolution: 1. "Balls", which are well defined and relatively small types of sets resembling the commonly assumed error ellipsoid. These are found in the best cases with many observations. <span class="hlt">Locations</span> in this shape are obtained for clusters 1, 18 or 33, these were already</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA488389','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA488389"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Logic Assistant (Elan)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-07-14</p> <p>as a basis for Phase II research. 2 Background 2.1 <span class="hlt">Event</span> logic 2.1.1 <span class="hlt">Event</span> structures Intuitively, an <span class="hlt">event</span> structure is an abstract algebraic ...Theoretical Computer Science, 149:257–298, 1995. [2] Uri Abraham. Models for Concurrency, volume 11 of Algebra , Logic and Applications Series. Gordon...the ordering of <span class="hlt">events</span> in a distributed system. Comms. ACM, 21(7):558–65, 1978. [28] Leslie Lamport. Hybrid systems in TLA+. In Grossman , Nerode, Ravn</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-02/pdf/2012-10671.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-02/pdf/2012-10671.pdf"><span>77 FR 26056 - <span class="hlt">Locate</span>Plus Holdings Corporation; Order of Suspension of Trading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-05-02</p> <p>...: 2012-10671] SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] <span class="hlt">Locate</span>Plus Holdings Corporation; Order... there is a lack of current and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> information concerning the securities of <span class="hlt">Locate</span>Plus Holdings Corporation (``<span class="hlt">Locate</span>Plus'') because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended March...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6262963','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6262963"><span>Evaluation of workplace air monitoring <span class="hlt">locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stoetzel, G.A.; Cicotte, G.R.; Lynch, T.P. ); Aldrich, L.K. )</p> <p>1991-10-01</p> <p>Current federal guidance on occupational radiation protection recognizes the importance of conducting air flow studies to assist in the placement of air sampling and monitoring equipment. In support of this, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has provided technical assistance to Westinghouse Hanford Company for the purpose of evaluating the adequacy of air sampling and monitoring <span class="hlt">locations</span> at selected Hanford facilities. Qualitative air flow studies were performed using smoke aerosols to visually determine air movement. Three examples are provided of how air flow studies results, along with information on the purpose of the air sample being collected, were used as a guide in placing the air samplers and monitors. Preparatory steps in conducting an air flow study should include: (1) identifying type of work performed in the work area including any actual or potential release points; (2) determining the amounts of radioactive material available for release and its chemical and physical form; (3) obtaining <span class="hlt">accurate</span> work area descriptions and diagrams; (4) identifying the <span class="hlt">location</span> of existing air samplers and monitors; (5) documenting physical and ventilation configurations; (6) notifying appropriate staff of the test; and (7) obtaining necessary equipment and supplies. The primary steps in conducting an air flow study are measurements of air velocities in the work area, release of the smoke aerosol at selected <span class="hlt">locations</span> in the work area and the observation of air flow patterns, and finally evaluation and documentation of the results. 2 refs., 3 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5747.1484F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5747.1484F"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> articular cartilage in MR images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik; Pettersen, Paola; Olsen, Ole F.; Nielsen, Mads; Christiansen, Claus</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> computation of the thickness of the articular cartilage is of great importance when diagnosing and monitoring the progress of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. A fully automated cartilage assessment method is preferable compared to methods using manual interaction in order to avoid inter- and intra-observer variability. As a first step in the cartilage assessment, we present an automatic method for <span class="hlt">locating</span> articular cartilage in knee MRI using supervised learning. The next step will be to fit a variable shape model to the cartilage, initiated at the <span class="hlt">location</span> found using the method presented in this paper. From the model, disease markers will be extracted for the quantitative evaluation of the cartilage. The cartilage is <span class="hlt">located</span> using an ANN-classifier, where every voxel is classified as cartilage or non-cartilage based on prior knowledge of the cartilage structure. The classifier is tested using leave-one-out-evaluation, and we found the average sensitivity and specificity to be 91.0% and 99.4%, respectively. The center of mass calculated from voxels classified as cartilage are similar to the corresponding values calculated from manual segmentations, which confirms that this method can find a good initial position for a shape model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA475386','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA475386"><span>Survey of <span class="hlt">Event</span> Processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>In the past decade, <span class="hlt">event</span> processing technology has exploded from research at universities to a number of commercial products. In this paper, <span class="hlt">event</span>... processing technology will be reviewed, starting with the motivations behind its development and ending with a look into the future of <span class="hlt">event</span> processing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5444072','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5444072"><span>Apparatus for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measuring high temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Smith, D.D.</p> <p></p> <p>The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865490','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865490"><span>Apparatus for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measuring high temperatures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Smith, Douglas D.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JEI....25f1620H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JEI....25f1620H"><span>LSM: perceptually <span class="hlt">accurate</span> line segment merging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually <span class="hlt">accurate</span> line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174649','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1174649"><span>Highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> articulated coordinate measuring machine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.</p> <p>2003-12-30</p> <p>Disclosed is a highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920039545&hterms=heat+shock+method&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dheat%2Bshock%2Bmethod','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920039545&hterms=heat+shock+method&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dheat%2Bshock%2Bmethod"><span>Practical aspects of spatially high <span class="hlt">accurate</span> methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The computational qualities of high order spatially <span class="hlt">accurate</span> methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5080976','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5080976"><span>Toward <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable <span class="hlt">accurate</span> comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19277570','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19277570"><span>Obtaining <span class="hlt">accurate</span> translations from expressed sequence tags.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wasmuth, James; Blaxter, Mark</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The genomes of an increasing number of species are being investigated through the generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). However, ESTs are prone to sequencing errors and typically define incomplete transcripts, making downstream annotation difficult. Annotation would be greatly improved with robust polypeptide translations. Many current solutions for EST translation require a large number of full-length gene sequences for training purposes, a resource that is not available for the majority of EST projects. As part of our ongoing EST programs investigating these "neglected" genomes, we have developed a polypeptide prediction pipeline, prot4EST. It incorporates freely available software to produce final translations that are more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than those derived from any single method. We describe how this integrated approach goes a long way to overcoming the deficit in training data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000000444','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000000444"><span>Micron <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800051366&hterms=radio+wave+uses&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dradio%2Bwave%2Buses','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800051366&hterms=radio+wave+uses&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dradio%2Bwave%2Buses"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> radio positions with the Tidbinbilla interferometer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Batty, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rayner, P. T.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The Tidbinbilla interferometer (Batty et al., 1977) is designed specifically to provide <span class="hlt">accurate</span> radio position measurements of compact radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere with high sensitivity. The interferometer uses the 26-m and 64-m antennas of the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The two antennas are separated by 200 m on a north-south baseline. By utilizing the existing antennas and the low-noise traveling-wave masers at 2.29 GHz, it has been possible to produce a high-sensitivity instrument with a minimum of capital expenditure. The north-south baseline ensures that a good range of UV coverage is obtained, so that sources lying in the declination range between about -80 and +30 deg may be observed with nearly orthogonal projected baselines of no less than about 1000 lambda. The instrument also provides high-accuracy flux density measurements for compact radio sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890029931&hterms=Fraunhofer+diffraction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DFraunhofer%2Bdiffraction','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890029931&hterms=Fraunhofer+diffraction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DFraunhofer%2Bdiffraction"><span>No effect of diffraction on Pluto-Charon mutual <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tholen, D. J.; Hubbard, W. B.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Mulholland and Gustafson (1987) made the interesting suggestion that observations of Pluto-Charon mutual <span class="hlt">events</span> might show significant dependence on both wavelength and telescope aperture because of diffraction effects. In this letter, observations are presented that show the predicted effects to be absent and demonstrate that the parameters of the system are such that the <span class="hlt">events</span> can be <span class="hlt">accurately</span> analyzed with geometrical optics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050187005','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050187005"><span>Modal Acoustic Emission Used at Elevated Temperatures to Detect Damage and Failure <span class="hlt">Location</span> in Ceramic Matrix Composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morscher, Gregory N.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for elevated-temperature engine applications. A leading material system in this class of materials is silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites. Unfortunately, the nonoxide fibers, matrix, and interphase (boron nitride in this system) can react with oxygen or water vapor in the atmosphere, leading to strength degradation of the composite at elevated temperatures. For this study, constant-load stress-rupture tests were performed in air at temperatures ranging from 815 to 960 C until failure. From these data, predictions can be made for the useful life of such composites under similar stressed-oxidation conditions. During these experiments, the sounds of failure <span class="hlt">events</span> (matrix cracking and fiber breaking) were monitored with a modal acoustic emission (AE) analyzer through transducers that were attached at the ends of the tensile bars. Such failure <span class="hlt">events</span>, which are caused by applied stress and oxidation reactions, cause these composites to fail prematurely. Because of the nature of acoustic waveform propagation in thin tensile bars, the <span class="hlt">location</span> of individual source <span class="hlt">events</span> and the eventual failure <span class="hlt">event</span> could be detected <span class="hlt">accurately</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12747164','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12747164"><span>The high cost of <span class="hlt">accurate</span> knowledge.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus</p> <p>2003-05-01</p> <p>Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how <span class="hlt">accurate</span> senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PApGe.139..609D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PApGe.139..609D"><span>Improvements in mining induced microseismic source <span class="hlt">locations</span> at the Lucky Friday mine using an automated whole-waveform analysis system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dodge, Douglas A.; Sprenke, Kenneth F.</p> <p>1992-09-01</p> <p>For years, severe rockburst problems at the Lucky Friday mine in northern Idaho have been a persistent safety hazard and an impediment to production. An MP250 based microseismic monitoring system, which uses simple voltage threshold picking of first arrivals, has been used in this mine since 1973 to provide source <span class="hlt">locations</span> and energy estimates of seismic <span class="hlt">events</span>. Recently, interest has been expressed in developing a whole waveform microseismic monitoring system for the mine to provide more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> source <span class="hlt">locations</span> and information about source characteristics. For this study, we have developed a prototype whole-waveform microseismic monitoring system based on a 80386 computer equipped with a 50 kHz analog-digital convertor board. The software developed includes a data collection program, a data analysis program, and an <span class="hlt">event</span> detection program. Whole-waveform data collected and analyzed using this system during a three-day test have been employed to investigate sources of error in the hypocenter <span class="hlt">location</span> process and to develop an automatic phase picker appropriate for microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span>. Comparison of hypocenter estimates produced by the MP250 system to those produced by the whole-waveform system shows that significant timing errors are common in the MP250 system and that these errors caused a large part of the scatter evident in the daily activity plots produced at the mine. Simulations and analysis of blast data show that analytical control over the solutions is strongly influenced by the array geometry. Within the geophone array, large errors in the velocity model or moderate timing errors may result in small changes in the solution, but outside the array, the solution is very sensitive to small changes in the data. Our whole-waveform detection program picks <span class="hlt">event</span> onset times and determines <span class="hlt">event</span> durations by analysis of a segmented envelope function (SEF) derived from the microseismic signal. The detection program has been tested by comparing its arrival time</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AtmRe.182..256G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AtmRe.182..256G"><span>Analysis of a localized flash-flood <span class="hlt">event</span> over the central Mediterranean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gascón, E.; Laviola, S.; Merino, A.; Miglietta, M. M.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>On 3 July 2006, an exceptionally heavy convective rainfall affected a small area in Calabria, Italy. A rainfall amount of 202 mm was recorded in 2.5 h, producing considerable damage and causing a localized flash flood. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to analyze the instability present in the <span class="hlt">event</span> and the related triggering mechanisms. The high-resolution simulation is able to correctly identify the position of the precipitation peak and to clarify the mesoscale processes involved, although it significantly underestimates the total amount of precipitation. Some sensitivity experiments confirm the importance of the choice of planetary boundary layer and microphysics parameterization schemes for a correct simulation of the <span class="hlt">event</span>, showing a strong sensitivity to these numerical tests. Also, the need for high horizontal resolution emerges clearly: an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> representation of the orography at small scales, is required to simulate the <span class="hlt">event</span> in its correct <span class="hlt">location</span>. Instability indices identified an extremely favorable environment for convection development, with very high values of CAPE and high moisture content at low levels. The low mountains near the rainfall peak play an important role in triggering the release of instability and controlling the <span class="hlt">location</span> of rainfall; in particular, the peculiar morphology of the orography creates low-level wind convergence and provides the uplift necessary for the air parcels to reach the level of free convection. In this framework, nondimensional parameters, such as the Froude number, have been calculated to better understand the interaction of the flow with the orography.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CoPhC.187..106Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015CoPhC.187..106Z"><span>Approaching system equilibrium with <span class="hlt">accurate</span> or not <span class="hlt">accurate</span> feedback information in a two-route system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide <span class="hlt">accurate</span> information to travelers and our simulation results show that <span class="hlt">accurate</span> information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with <span class="hlt">accurate</span> information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeoJI.176..107Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GeoJI.176..107Z"><span>Applying InSAR technique to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> relocate the epicentre for the 1999 Ms = 5.6 Kuqa earthquake in Xinjiang province, China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zha, Xianjie; Fu, Rongshan; Dai, Zhiyang; Jing, Ping; Ni, Sidao; Huang, Jinshui</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The 1999 Ms = 5.6 Kuqa earthquake occurred in a seismically active belt between the Tianshan Mountain and the Traim basin. Because of the sparse seismic network and complex crustal structure, it is very difficult to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> the epicentre for this <span class="hlt">event</span> using seismic waves. The epicentres <span class="hlt">located</span> by different research groups vary over a spatial range of 20-40km. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a geodetic technique with fine spatial resolution, good precision and wide coverage. An interferometric map of the epicentral region constrains the epicentre of this <span class="hlt">event</span>. The arid climate and sparsely vegetation in the Kuqa region provide excellent conditions for InSAR studies. In this paper, we firstly construct a interferogram to map the coseismic deformation field due to the 1999 Kuqa earthquake using a coseismic interferometric pair of radar images acquired by the ESA ERS-2 satellite. Then, we develop a new geocoding method and apply it to the interferogram. Next, we infer the geometry of the seismogenic fault according to its focal mechanism and tectonic setting. To model the interferogram, we assume a dislocation buried in a uniform elastic half-space. Finally, we infer the epicentre of this earthquake to be <span class="hlt">located</span> at (82.80°E, 41.92°N), which is close to the results of the National Earthquake Information Center of USGS and China Earthquake Administration. The epicentre <span class="hlt">location</span> inferred from InSAR falls in the six-level isoseismal contour described by Xinjiang earthquake administration using the field investigations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/492166','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/492166"><span>Automated fault <span class="hlt">location</span> and diagnosis on electric power distribution feeders</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhu, J.; Lubkeman, D.L.; Girgis, A.A.</p> <p>1997-04-01</p> <p>This paper presents new techniques for <span class="hlt">locating</span> and diagnosing faults on electric power distribution feeders. The proposed fault <span class="hlt">location</span> and diagnosis scheme is capable of <span class="hlt">accurately</span> identifying the <span class="hlt">location</span> of a fault upon its occurrence, based on the integration of information available from disturbance recording devices with knowledge contained in a distribution feeder database. The developed fault <span class="hlt">location</span> and diagnosis system can also be applied to the investigation of temporary faults that may not result in a blown fuse. The proposed fault <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm is based on the steady-state analysis of the faulted distribution network. To deal with the uncertainties inherent in the system modeling and the phasor estimation, the fault <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm has been adapted to estimate fault regions based on probabilistic modeling and analysis. Since the distribution feeder is a radial network, multiple possibilities of fault <span class="hlt">locations</span> could be computed with measurements available only at the substation. To identify the actual fault <span class="hlt">location</span>, a fault diagnosis algorithm has been developed to prune down and rank the possible fault <span class="hlt">locations</span> by integrating the available pieces of evidence. Testing of the developed fault <span class="hlt">location</span> and diagnosis system using field data has demonstrated its potential for practical use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8755E..0BK','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8755E..0BK"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span>-assured, multifactor authentication on smartphones via LTE communication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuseler, Torben; Lami, Ihsan A.; Al-Assam, Hisham</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>With the added security provided by LTE, geographical <span class="hlt">location</span> has become an important factor for authentication to enhance the security of remote client authentication during mCommerce applications using Smartphones. Tight combination of geographical <span class="hlt">location</span> with classic authentication factors like PINs/Biometrics in a real-time, remote verification scheme over the LTE layer connection assures the authenticator about the client itself (via PIN/biometric) as well as the client's current <span class="hlt">location</span>, thus defines the important aspects of "who", "when", and "where" of the authentication attempt without eaves dropping or man on the middle attacks. To securely integrate <span class="hlt">location</span> as an authentication factor into the remote authentication scheme, client's <span class="hlt">location</span> must be verified independently, i.e. the authenticator should not solely rely on the <span class="hlt">location</span> determined on and reported by the client's Smartphone. The latest wireless data communication technology for mobile phones (4G LTE, Long-Term Evolution), recently being rolled out in various networks, can be employed to enhance this <span class="hlt">location</span>-factor requirement of independent <span class="hlt">location</span> verification. LTE's Control Plane LBS provisions, when integrated with user-based authentication and independent source of localisation factors ensures secure efficient, continuous <span class="hlt">location</span> tracking of the Smartphone. This feature can be performed during normal operation of the LTE-based communication between client and network operator resulting in the authenticator being able to verify the client's claimed <span class="hlt">location</span> more securely and <span class="hlt">accurately</span>. Trials and experiments show that such algorithm implementation is viable for nowadays Smartphone-based banking via LTE communication.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1714330L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1714330L"><span>Forecaster's dilemma: Extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> and forecast evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lerch, Sebastian; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis; Ravazzolo, Francesco; Gneiting, Tilmann</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>In discussions of the quality of forecasts in the media and public, attention often focuses on the predictive performance in the case of extreme <span class="hlt">events</span>. Intuitively, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> predictions on the subset of extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> seem to suggest better predictive ability. However, it can be demonstrated that restricting conventional forecast verification methods to subsets of observations might have unexpected and undesired effects and may discredit even the most skillful forecasters. Hand-picking extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> is incompatible with the theoretical assumptions of established forecast verification methods, thus confronting forecasters with what we refer to as the forecaster's dilemma. For probabilistic forecasts, weighted proper scoring rules provide suitable alternatives for forecast evaluation with an emphasis on extreme <span class="hlt">events</span>. Using theoretical arguments, simulation experiments and a case study on probabilistic forecasts of wind speed over Germany, we illustrate the forecaster's dilemma and the use of weighted proper scoring rules.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/952876','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/952876"><span>Mobile Alternative Fueling Station <span class="hlt">Locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station <span class="hlt">Locator</span> is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile <span class="hlt">locator</span> allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=effects+AND+migration&pg=3&id=EJ734967','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=effects+AND+migration&pg=3&id=EJ734967"><span>Educational Attainment and Residential <span class="hlt">Location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sander, William</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The effects of residential <span class="hlt">location</span> at age 16 and current residential <span class="hlt">location</span> on measures of educational attainment are estimated. Particular attention is given to the effects of migration and family background on educational outcomes. It is shown that central cities and suburbs of large metropolitan areas in the United States have significantly…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Circulatory+AND+system&pg=2&id=EJ840200','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Circulatory+AND+system&pg=2&id=EJ840200"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> Information within Extended Hypermedia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cromley, Jennifer G.; Azevedo, Roger</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>New literacies researchers have identified a core set of strategies for <span class="hlt">locating</span> information, one of which is "reading a Web page to <span class="hlt">locate</span> information that might be present there" (Leu et al. in: Rush, Eakle, Berger (eds) "Secondary school reading and writing: What research reveals for classroom practices," 2007, p. 46). Do middle-school, high…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=locative&pg=4&id=EJ405425','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=locative&pg=4&id=EJ405425"><span><span class="hlt">Locative</span> Terms and Warlpiri Acquisition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bavin, Edith L.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Focuses on the influence of language specific properties in the acquisition of <span class="hlt">locative</span> expressions. Some of the claims from literature on the acquisition of <span class="hlt">locative</span> expressions are discussed and data from the acquisition of Warlpiri are presented and discussed in terms of these claims. (Author/CB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865926','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865926"><span>Precision zero-home <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Stone, William J.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A zero-home <span class="hlt">locator</span> includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home <span class="hlt">location</span> is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6751700','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6751700"><span>Precision zero-home <span class="hlt">locator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Stone, W.J.</p> <p>1983-10-31</p> <p>A zero-home <span class="hlt">locator</span> includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home <span class="hlt">location</span> is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750023749','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750023749"><span>Higher order <span class="hlt">accurate</span> partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-<span class="hlt">accurate</span> explicit numerical technique</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Graves, R. A., Jr.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The previously obtained second-order-<span class="hlt">accurate</span> partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-<span class="hlt">accurate</span> partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA563496','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA563496"><span>Utilizing Twitter to <span class="hlt">Locate</span> or Track an Object of Interest</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>network. The model for this participatory action is termed “Peer Production” [11]. In the <span class="hlt">event</span> of a disaster, people share information on social networks...This research defines a method that was shown to be effective in utilizing social network data (Twitter) to <span class="hlt">locate</span> and track a person of interest. A...movement of people. This research defines a method that was shown to be effective in utilizing social network data (Twitter) to <span class="hlt">locate</span> and track a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3161374','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3161374"><span>Optimization of preventive health care facility <span class="hlt">locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility <span class="hlt">Location</span> (PHCFL) problem is to identify optimal <span class="hlt">locations</span> for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying <span class="hlt">locations</span> for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of the preventive health care services. First, people should have more flexibility to select service <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Second, each preventive health care facility needs to have a minimum number of clients in order to retain accreditation. Results This paper presents a new methodology for solving the PHCFL problem. In order to capture the characteristics of preventive health care services, we define a new accessibility measurement that combines the two-step floating catchment area method, distance factor, and the Huff-based competitive model. We assume that the accessibility of preventive health care services is a major determinant for participation in the service. Based on the new accessibility measurement, the PHCFL problem is formalized as a bi-objective model based on efficiency and coverage. The bi-objective model is solved using the Interchange algorithm. In order to accelerate the solving process, we implement the Interchange algorithm by building two new data structures, which captures the spatial structure of the PHCFL problem. In addition, in order to measure the spatial barrier between clients and preventive health care facilities <span class="hlt">accurately</span> and dynamically, this paper estimates travelling distance and travelling time by calling the Google Maps Application Programming Interface (API). Conclusions Experiments based on a real application for the Alberta breast cancer screening program show that our work can increase the accessibility of breast cancer screening services in the province. PMID:20298608</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC41D1115A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMGC41D1115A"><span>The Challenges from Extreme Climate <span class="hlt">Events</span> for Sustainable Development in Amazonia: the Acre State Experience</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Araújo, M. D. N. M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In the past ten years Acre State, <span class="hlt">located</span> in Brazil´s southwestern Amazonia, has confronted sequential and severe extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> in the form of droughts and floods. In particular, the droughts and forest fires of 2005 and 2010, the 2012 flood within Acre, the 2014 flood of the Madeira River which isolated Acre for two months from southern Brazil, and the most severe flooding throughout the state in 2015 shook the resilience of Acrean society. The accumulated costs of these <span class="hlt">events</span> since 2005 have exceeded 300 million dollars. For the last 17 years, successive state administrations have been implementing a socio-environmental model of development that strives to link sustainable economic production with environmental conservation, particularly for small communities. In this context, extreme climate <span class="hlt">events</span> have interfered significantly with this model, increasing the risks of failure. The impacts caused by these <span class="hlt">events</span> on development in the state have been exacerbated by: a) limitations in monitoring; b) extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> outside of Acre territory (Madeira River Flood) affecting transportation systems; c) absence of reliable information for decision-making; and d) bureaucratic and judicial impediments. Our experience in these <span class="hlt">events</span> have led to the following needs for scientific input to reduce the risk of disasters: 1) better monitoring and forecasting of deforestation, fires, and hydro-meteorological variables; 2) ways to increase risk perception in communities; 3) approaches to involve more effectively local and regional populations in the response to disasters; 4) more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurements of the economic and social damages caused by these disasters. We must improve adaptation to and mitigation of current and future extreme climate <span class="hlt">events</span> and implement a robust civil defense, adequate to these new challenges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNH51E1952L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNH51E1952L"><span>Combined Approach to the Analysis of Rainfall Super-Extremes in <span class="hlt">Locations</span> with Limited Observational Records.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lakshmi, V.; Libertino, A.; Sharma, A.; Claps, P.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The prospect of climatic change and its impacts have brought spatial statistics of extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> into sharper focus. The so-called "water bombs" are predicted to become more frequent in the extra-tropical regions, and, actually, they raise serious concerns in some regions of the Mediterranean area. However, quantitative statistical methods to properly account for the probability of occurrence of these super-extreme <span class="hlt">events</span> are still lacking, due to their rare occurrence and to the limited spatial scale at which these <span class="hlt">events</span> occur. In order to overcome the lack of data, we propose at first to exploit the information derived from remote sensed datasets. Despite the coarser resolution, these databases are able to provide information continuous in space and time, overcoming the problems related to the discontinuous nature of rainfall measurements. We propose to apply such a kind of approach with the adoption of a Bayesian framework, aimed at combining local measurements with climatic regional information, conditioning the exceedance probability on the large and mesoscale characteristics of the system. The case study refers to an area <span class="hlt">located</span> in the North-West of Italy, historically affected by extraordinary precipitation <span class="hlt">events</span>. We use a dataset of daily at-gauge rainfall measurements extracted from the NOAA GHCN-Daily dataset, combined with the ones provided by some local Environmental Agencies. Daily estimations from the TRMM are adopted too. First, we identify the most intense <span class="hlt">events</span> occurred in the area, combining the information from the different datasets. Analysing the related synoptic conditions with the reanalysis of the ECMWF, we then define the conditional variables and the hierarchical relationships between the <span class="hlt">events</span> and their type. Different climatic configurations that combined with the local morphology and the seasonal condition of the Mediterranean Sea can triggers very intense precipitation <span class="hlt">events</span> are identified. The results, compared with those</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNG13A1866Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMNG13A1866Z"><span>Quantification of the Impact of Seismic Anisotropy in Microseismic <span class="hlt">Location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, H. W.; Jing, H.; Li, A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Microseismic imaging is commonly used to monitor hydraulic fracturing processes and identify fracture networks. However, microseismic <span class="hlt">locations</span> could be biased if seismic anisotropy, which is ubiquitous in sedimentary rocks due to either layered bedding or fracturing, is unaccounted in velocity models. To quantitatively assess such biases, we have applied a nonlinear <span class="hlt">location</span> method to synthetic traveltime data in seven models from isotropy to different levels of anisotropy cases, including vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) and horizontal transverse isotropy (HTI). Synthetic waveforms are recorded at two vertical receiver arrays in a three-layer velocity model using a pseudo-spectral method. Both P and S wave arrivals are used to <span class="hlt">locate</span> three <span class="hlt">events</span> assuming an effective isotropic velocity model. The average <span class="hlt">location</span> error is 59 m for isotropic case, and is 156 m (158 m), 237 m (244 m), and 258 m (265 m) for 5%, 10% and 15% VTI (HTI) cases, respectively. These results suggest that even 5% seismic anisotropy, if not properly accounted, can cause significant biases in microseismic <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Therefore, our future work will solve seismic anisotropy jointly while <span class="hlt">locating</span> microseismic <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T23C2419W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T23C2419W"><span>Absolute <span class="hlt">Locations</span> of Repeating Mw 5.5 - 6.0 Earthquakes on Discovery Transform Fault, EPR</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wolfson, M. L.; Boettcher, M. S.; McGuire, J. J.; Collins, J. A.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p> this study. To compare absolute <span class="hlt">locations</span> of the repeating <span class="hlt">events</span> to the high-resolution bathymetric data, it was necessary to perform a relative relocation of the earthquake centroids. We used <span class="hlt">events</span> from the NOAA hydroacoustic catalog, which have positional accuracies of ~2 km [Fox et al., 2001], to determine <span class="hlt">accurate</span> absolute <span class="hlt">locations</span> for the Mw 5.5 - 6.0 <span class="hlt">events</span>. Initial results show that there are at least 5 distinct rupture patches on Discovery, including the 4 repeating patches found previously, with a mean spacing of 13 km. The repeat time between <span class="hlt">events</span> in each repeating rupture patch is 5 - 6 years. The relocation technique placed each group within ~7 km of the fault trace. Three of the rupture groups <span class="hlt">locate</span> on the western segment of Discovery; one on the edge of the lozenge-shaped valley, one in the splay zone, and one near the ITSC. Using the catalog of over 24,000 0≤Mw≤4.6 <span class="hlt">events</span> recorded during our 2008 ocean bottom seismometer deployment on Discovery, we find that microseismicity on Discovery roughly clusters in the areas between the large-<span class="hlt">events</span>, suggesting that the frictional properties differ significantly between the large-<span class="hlt">event</span> rupture patches and the regions of abundant microseismicity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6243017','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6243017"><span><span class="hlt">Locator</span> continuously records pipeline depth readings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fedde, P.A.; Patterson, C.</p> <p>1988-08-29</p> <p>Texas Gas Transmission Corp., Owensboro, Ky., has helped develop and test a pipeline-depth <span class="hlt">locator</span> which is <span class="hlt">accurate</span> to +-1.5 in. for lines buried as deep as 6 ft. It also continuously records pipeline depth. Development of the instrument came in response to regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), which require pipeline companies to maintain adequate cover over their buried lines and equipment. The result is that frequent surveys must determine if construction, terracing, or land-leveling activity has removed cover from the pipelines. With the instrument, a three-man crew can survey approximately 6 miles of pipeline/10-hr. working day.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDG39005W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDG39005W"><span>Does a pneumotach <span class="hlt">accurately</span> characterize voice function?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Walters, Gage; Krane, Michael</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>A study is presented which addresses how a pneumotach might adversely affect clinical measurements of voice function. A pneumotach is a device, typically a mask, worn over the mouth, in order to measure time-varying glottal volume flow. By measuring the time-varying difference in pressure across a known aerodynamic resistance element in the mask, the glottal volume flow waveform is estimated. Because it adds aerodynamic resistance to the vocal system, there is some concern that using a pneumotach may not <span class="hlt">accurately</span> portray the behavior of the voice. To test this hypothesis, experiments were performed in a simplified airway model with the principal dimensions of an adult human upper airway. A compliant constriction, fabricated from silicone rubber, modeled the vocal folds. Variations of transglottal pressure, time-averaged volume flow, model vocal fold vibration amplitude, and radiated sound with subglottal pressure were performed, with and without the pneumotach in place, and differences noted. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JQSRT.187..150Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JQSRT.187..150Y"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> thermoplasmonic simulation of metallic nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yu, Da-Miao; Liu, Yan-Nan; Tian, Fa-Lin; Pan, Xiao-Min; Sheng, Xin-Qing</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Thermoplasmonics leads to enhanced heat generation due to the localized surface plasmon resonances. The measurement of heat generation is fundamentally a complicated task, which necessitates the development of theoretical simulation techniques. In this paper, an efficient and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> numerical scheme is proposed for applications with complex metallic nanostructures. Light absorption and temperature increase are, respectively, obtained by solving the volume integral equation (VIE) and the steady-state heat diffusion equation through the method of moments (MoM). Previously, methods based on surface integral equations (SIEs) were utilized to obtain light absorption. However, computing light absorption from the equivalent current is as expensive as O(NsNv), where Ns and Nv, respectively, denote the number of surface and volumetric unknowns. Our approach reduces the cost to O(Nv) by using VIE. The accuracy, efficiency and capability of the proposed scheme are validated by multiple simulations. The simulations show that our proposed method is more efficient than the approach based on SIEs under comparable accuracy, especially for the case where many incidents are of interest. The simulations also indicate that the temperature profile can be tuned by several factors, such as the geometry configuration of array, beam direction, and light wavelength.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28071901','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28071901"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Theoretical Thermochemistry for Fluoroethyl Radicals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ganyecz, Ádám; Kállay, Mihály; Csontos, József</p> <p>2017-02-09</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">accurate</span> coupled-cluster (CC) based model chemistry was applied to calculate reliable thermochemical quantities for hydrofluorocarbon derivatives including radicals 1-fluoroethyl (CH3-CHF), 1,1-difluoroethyl (CH3-CF2), 2-fluoroethyl (CH2F-CH2), 1,2-difluoroethyl (CH2F-CHF), 2,2-difluoroethyl (CHF2-CH2), 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl (CF3-CH2), 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl (CF3-CHF), and pentafluoroethyl (CF3-CF2). The model chemistry used contains iterative triple and perturbative quadruple excitations in CC theory, as well as scalar relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections. To obtain heat of formation values with better than chemical accuracy perturbative quadruple excitations and scalar relativistic corrections were inevitable. Their contributions to the heats of formation steadily increase with the number of fluorine atoms in the radical reaching 10 kJ/mol for CF3-CF2. When discrepancies were found between the experimental and our values it was always possible to resolve the issue by recalculating the experimental result with currently recommended auxiliary data. For each radical studied here this study delivers the best heat of formation as well as entropy data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19368406','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19368406"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> methods for large molecular systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gordon, Mark S; Mullin, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Spencer R; Roskop, Luke B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Boatz, Jerry A</p> <p>2009-07-23</p> <p>Three exciting new methods that address the <span class="hlt">accurate</span> prediction of processes and properties of large molecular systems are discussed. The systematic fragmentation method (SFM) and the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method both decompose a large molecular system (e.g., protein, liquid, zeolite) into small subunits (fragments) in very different ways that are designed to both retain the high accuracy of the chosen quantum mechanical level of theory while greatly reducing the demands on computational time and resources. Each of these methods is inherently scalable and is therefore eminently capable of taking advantage of massively parallel computer hardware while retaining the accuracy of the corresponding electronic structure method from which it is derived. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a sophisticated approach for the prediction of nonbonded and intermolecular interactions. Therefore, the EFP method provides a way to further reduce the computational effort while retaining accuracy by treating the far-field interactions in place of the full electronic structure method. The performance of the methods is demonstrated using applications to several systems, including benzene dimer, small organic species, pieces of the alpha helix, water, and ionic liquids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25000518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25000518"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter</p> <p>2015-03-05</p> <p>Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being <span class="hlt">accurate</span> to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4633988','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4633988"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23842195','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23842195"><span>Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring: how <span class="hlt">accurate</span> is enough?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rice, Mark J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Evaluating the accuracy of medical devices has traditionally been a blend of statistical analyses, at times without contextualizing the clinical application. There have been a number of recent publications on the accuracy of a continuous noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device, the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-oximeter, focusing on the traditional statistical metrics of bias and precision. In this review, which contains material presented at the Innovations and Applications of Monitoring Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Ventilation (IAMPOV) Symposium at Yale University in 2012, we critically investigated these metrics as applied to the new technology, exploring what is required of a noninvasive hemoglobin monitor and whether the conventional statistics adequately answer our questions about clinical accuracy. We discuss the glucose error grid, well known in the glucose monitoring literature, and describe an analogous version for hemoglobin monitoring. This hemoglobin error grid can be used to evaluate the required clinical accuracy (±g/dL) of a hemoglobin measurement device to provide more conclusive evidence on whether to transfuse an individual patient. The important decision to transfuse a patient usually requires both an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> hemoglobin measurement and a physiologic reason to elect transfusion. It is our opinion that the published accuracy data of the Masimo Radical-7 is not good enough to make the transfusion decision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1452062','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1452062"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span>, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require <span class="hlt">accurate</span> measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24962141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24962141"><span>Fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> exhaled breath ammonia measurement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H</p> <p>2014-06-11</p> <p>This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of <span class="hlt">accurately</span> measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NDS...119..338S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NDS...119..338S"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Fission Data for Nuclear Safety</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20189956','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20189956"><span>Emotional memory persists longer than <span class="hlt">event</span> memory.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition performance for <span class="hlt">event</span> memory differs from that for emotional memory. Although <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition deteriorated equally for episodes that were or were not emotionally salient, emotional recognition remained high for only stimuli related to emotional episodes. Recognition performance pertaining to delayed emotional memory is an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> predictor of the context of past episodes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AdWR...87...92T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AdWR...87...92T"><span>Multi-<span class="hlt">event</span> universal kriging (MEUK)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tonkin, Matthew J.; Kennel, Jonathan; Huber, William; Lambie, John M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Multi-<span class="hlt">event</span> universal kriging (MEUK) is a method of interpolation that creates a series of maps, each corresponding to a specific sampling "<span class="hlt">event</span>", which exhibit spatial relationships that persist over time. MEUK is computed using minimum-variance unbiased linear prediction from data obtained via a sequence of <span class="hlt">events</span>. MEUK assumes multi-<span class="hlt">event</span> data can be described by a sum of (a) spatial trends that vary over time, (b) spatial trends that are invariant over time, and (c) spatially- and temporally-stationary correlation among the residuals from the combination of these trends. The fundamental advance made by MEUK versus traditional universal kriging (UK) lies with the generalized least squares (GLS) model and the multi-<span class="hlt">event</span> capability it facilitates, rather than in the geostatistics, although it is shown how use of MEUK can greatly reduce predictive variances versus UK. For expediency, MEUK assumes a spatial covariance that does not change over time - although it does not have to - which is an advantage over space-time methods that employ a full space-time covariance function. MEUK can be implemented with large multi-<span class="hlt">event</span> datasets, as demonstrated by application to a large water level dataset. Often, MEUK enables the stable solution of multiple <span class="hlt">events</span> for similar computational effort as for a single <span class="hlt">event</span>. MEUK provides an efficient basis for developing "wheel-and-axle" monitoring strategies [32] that combines frequently sampled <span class="hlt">locations</span> used monitor changes over time with many more <span class="hlt">locations</span> sampled periodically to provide synoptic depictions. MEUK can aid in the identification of the core monitoring <span class="hlt">locations</span>, allowing for reduced sampling frequency elsewhere. Although MEUK can incorporate longitudinal variograms as in other space-time methods, doing so reduces the computational advantages of MEUK.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70021589','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70021589"><span>Experiences with information <span class="hlt">locator</span> services</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Christian, E.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Over the last few years, governments and other organizations have been using new technologies to create networked Information <span class="hlt">Locator</span> Services that help people find information resources. These services not only enhance access to information, but also are designed to support fundamental information policy principles. This article relates experiences in developing and promoting services interoperable with the Global Information <span class="hlt">Locator</span> Service standard that has now been adopted and promoted in many forums worldwide. The article describes sample implementations and touches on the strategic choices made in public policy, standards, and technology. Ten recommendations are offered for successful implementation of an Information <span class="hlt">Locator</span> Service. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA204353','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA204353"><span>Determination of the Best Ground Penetrating Radar Source Signal Type for the <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> <span class="hlt">Location</span> of Underground Utilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-09-01</p> <p>of RF modulation used by the GPR. :n essence , this is a key performance criterion of any GPR system. 3.3 DESIGNLNG THE GPR SYSTEM This section...emulsion of oil , water, and salt to achieve the required properties of the model dielectric. Dr. Glenn Smith of the Georgia Institute of Technology has...emulsion created for use in the liquid tank could be made to model selected soil dielectrics. Dr. Smith uses a high-grade, light mineral oil , water, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28269392','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28269392"><span>Identifying the number and <span class="hlt">location</span> of body worn sensors to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> classify walking, transferring and sedentary activities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aziz, Omar; Robinovitch, Stephen N; Park, Edward J</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>In order to perform fall risk assessments using wearable inertial sensors in older adults in their natural settings where falls are likely to occur, a first step is to automatically segment and classify sensor signals of human movements into the known `activities of interest'. Sensor data from such activities can later be used through quantitative and qualitative analysis for differentiating fallers from non-fallers. In this study, ten young adults participated in experimental trials involving several variations of walking, transferring and sedentary activities. Data from tri-axial accelerometers and gyroscopes were used to classify the aforementioned three categories using a multiclass support vector machine algorithm. Our results showed 100% accuracy in distinguishing walking, transferring and sedentary activities using data from a three-sensor combination of sternum and both ankles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Rate+AND+Displacement&pg=2&id=EJ918669','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Rate+AND+Displacement&pg=2&id=EJ918669"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Memory for Object <span class="hlt">Location</span> by Individuals with Intellectual Disability: Absolute Spatial Tagging Instead of Configural Processing?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Giuliani, Fabienne; Favrod, Jerome; Grasset, Francois; Schenk, Francoise</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Using head-mounted eye tracker material, we assessed spatial recognition abilities (e.g., reaction to object permutation, removal or replacement with a new object) in participants with intellectual disabilities. The "Intellectual Disabilities (ID)" group (n = 40) obtained a score totalling a 93.7% success rate, whereas the "Normal Control" group…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21516934','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21516934"><span>Creating an integrated historical record of extreme particulate air pollution <span class="hlt">events</span> in Australian cities from 1994 to 2007.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Johnston, Fay H; Hanigan, Ivan C; Henderson, Sarah B; Morgan, Geoffrey G; Portner, Talia; Williamson, Grant J; Bowman, David M J S</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Epidemiological studies of exposure to vegetation fire smoke are often limited by the availability of <span class="hlt">accurate</span> exposure data. This paper describes a systematic framework for retrospectively identifying the cause of air pollution <span class="hlt">events</span> to facilitate a long, multicenter analysis of the public health effects of vegetation fire smoke pollution in Australia. Pollution <span class="hlt">events</span> were statistically defined as any day at or above the 95th percentile of the 24-hr average concentration of particulate matter (PM). These were identified for six cities from three distinct ecoclimatic regions of Australia. The dates of each <span class="hlt">event</span> were then crosschecked against a range of information sources, including online newspaper archives, government and research agency records, satellite imagery, and aerosol optical thickness measures to identify the cause for the excess particulate pollution. Pollution <span class="hlt">events</span> occurred most frequently during summer for cities in subtropical and arid regions and during winter for cities in temperate regions. A cause for high PM on 67% of days examined in the city of Sydney was found, and 94% of these could be attributed to landscape fire smoke. Results were similar for cities in other subtropical and arid <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Identification of the cause of pollution <span class="hlt">events</span> was much lower in colder temperate regions where fire activity is less frequent. Bushfires were the most frequent cause of extreme pollution <span class="hlt">events</span> in cities <span class="hlt">located</span> in subtropical and arid regions of Australia. Although identification of pollution episodes was greatly improved by the use of multiple sources of information, satellite imagery was the most useful tool for identifying bushfire smoke pollution <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2755440','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2755440"><span>Dialogue on private <span class="hlt">events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Palmer, David C.; Eshleman, John; Brandon, Paul; Layng, T. V. Joe; McDonough, Christopher; Michael, Jack; Schoneberger, Ted; Stemmer, Nathan; Weitzman, Ray; Normand, Matthew</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>In the fall of 2003, the authors corresponded on the topic of private <span class="hlt">events</span> on the listserv of the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group. Extracts from that correspondence raised questions about the role of response amplitude in determining units of analysis, whether private <span class="hlt">events</span> can be investigated directly, and whether covert behavior differs from other behavior except in amplitude. Most participants took a cautious stance, noting not only conceptual pitfalls and empirical difficulties in the study of private <span class="hlt">events</span>, but doubting the value of interpretive exercises about them. Others argued that despite such obstacles, in domains where experimental analyses cannot be done, interpretation of private <span class="hlt">events</span> in the light of laboratory principles is the best that science can offer. One participant suggested that the notion that private <span class="hlt">events</span> can be behavioral in nature be abandoned entirely; as an alternative, the phenomena should be reinterpreted only as physiological <span class="hlt">events</span>. PMID:22477293</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IAUGA..2255789B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IAUGA..2255789B"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> orbit propagation with planetary close encounters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baù, Giulio; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Guerra, Francesca</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>We tackle the problem of <span class="hlt">accurately</span> propagating the motion of those small bodies that undergo close approaches with a planet. The literature is lacking on this topic and the reliability of the numerical results is not sufficiently discussed. The high-frequency components of the perturbation generated by a close encounter makes the propagation particularly challenging both from the point of view of the dynamical stability of the formulation and the numerical stability of the integrator. In our approach a fixed step-size and order multistep integrator is combined with a regularized formulation of the perturbed two-body problem. When the propagated object enters the region of influence of a celestial body, the latter becomes the new primary body of attraction. Moreover, the formulation and the step-size will also be changed if necessary. We present: 1) the restarter procedure applied to the multistep integrator whenever the primary body is changed; 2) new analytical formulae for setting the step-size (given the order of the multistep, formulation and initial osculating orbit) in order to control the accumulation of the local truncation error and guarantee the numerical stability during the propagation; 3) a new definition of the region of influence in the phase space. We test the propagator with some real asteroids subject to the gravitational attraction of the planets, the Yarkovsky and relativistic perturbations. Our goal is to show that the proposed approach improves the performance of both the propagator implemented in the OrbFit software package (which is currently used by the NEODyS service) and of the propagator represented by a variable step-size and order multistep method combined with Cowell's formulation (i.e. direct integration of position and velocity in either the physical or a fictitious time).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014hst..prop13804M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014hst..prop13804M"><span>Important Nearby Galaxies without <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Distances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McQuinn, Kristen</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.<span class="hlt">Accurate</span> distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.9244D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.9244D"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> paleointensities - the multi-method approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Groot, Lennart</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7572E..06M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7572E..06M"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> glucose detection in a small etalon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Martini, Joerg; Kuebler, Sebastian; Recht, Michael; Torres, Francisco; Roe, Jeffrey; Kiesel, Peter; Bruce, Richard</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>We are developing a continuous glucose monitor for subcutaneous long-term implantation. This detector contains a double chamber Fabry-Perot-etalon that measures the differential refractive index (RI) between a reference and a measurement chamber at 850 nm. The etalon chambers have wavelength dependent transmission maxima which dependent linearly on the RI of their contents. An RI difference of ▵n=1.5.10-6 changes the spectral position of a transmission maximum by 1pm in our measurement. By sweeping the wavelength of a single-mode Vertical-Cavity-Surface-Emitting-Laser (VCSEL) linearly in time and detecting the maximum transmission peaks of the etalon we are able to measure the RI of a liquid. We have demonstrated accuracy of ▵n=+/-3.5.10-6 over a ▵n-range of 0 to 1.75.10-4 and an accuracy of 2% over a ▵nrange of 1.75.10-4 to 9.8.10-4. The accuracy is primarily limited by the reference measurement. The RI difference between the etalon chambers is made specific to glucose by the competitive, reversible release of Concanavalin A (ConA) from an immobilized dextran matrix. The matrix and ConA bound to it, is positioned outside the optical detection path. ConA is released from the matrix by reacting with glucose and diffuses into the optical path to change the RI in the etalon. Factors such as temperature affect the RI in measurement and detection chamber equally but do not affect the differential measurement. A typical standard deviation in RI is +/-1.4.10-6 over the range 32°C to 42°C. The detector enables an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> glucose specific concentration measurement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMIN33D..02W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMIN33D..02W"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p> and IKONOS imagery and the 3-D volume estimates. The combination of these then allow for a rapid and hopefully very <span class="hlt">accurate</span> estimation of biomass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PMB....61..625V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PMB....61..625V"><span>How flatbed scanners upset <span class="hlt">accurate</span> film dosimetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1221578','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1221578"><span>Towards <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hammond, Simon David</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18249423','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18249423"><span>Neural correlates of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noordzij, Matthijs L; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W; Ramsey, Nick F; Postma, Albert</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Locative</span> prepositions might be special linguistic modifiers because they form a natural link between verbal and visual-spatial information. In the present fMRI study we found evidence that understanding categorical spatial relations expressed in language with <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions such as "to the left of" and "to the right of" were reliably associated with cerebral activity in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG) <span class="hlt">located</span> in the left inferior parietal lobe. The higher activity associated with spatial as compared to non-spatial sentences in this region was not dependent on the context (verbal or visual-spatial) in which the sentence was read. Therefore, the function of this activity appears to be to create a general, amodal representation of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions that allow for flexible comparisons to either verbal or visual-spatial material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3668402','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3668402"><span><span class="hlt">Locative</span> inferences in medical texts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mayer, P S; Bailey, G H; Mayer, R J; Hillis, A; Dvoracek, J E</p> <p>1987-06-01</p> <p>Medical research relies on epidemiological studies conducted on a large set of clinical records that have been collected from physicians recording individual patient observations. These clinical records are recorded for the purpose of individual care of the patient with little consideration for their use by a biostatistician interested in studying a disease over a large population. Natural language processing of clinical records for epidemiological studies must deal with temporal, <span class="hlt">locative</span>, and conceptual issues. This makes text understanding and data extraction of clinical records an excellent area for applied research. While much has been done in making temporal or conceptual inferences in medical texts, parallel work in <span class="hlt">locative</span> inferences has not been done. This paper examines the <span class="hlt">locative</span> inferences as well as the integration of temporal, <span class="hlt">locative</span>, and conceptual issues in the clinical record understanding domain by presenting an application that utilizes two key concepts in its parsing strategy--a knowledge-based parsing strategy and a minimal lexicon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3498041','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3498041"><span>Determinants of first practice <span class="hlt">location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Raghavan, Malathi; Fleisher, William; Downs, Allan; Martin, Bruce; Sandham, J. Dean</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Objective To help understand physician movement out of Manitoba by determining the factors that influence Manitoba medical graduates’ choices about practice <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Design Cross-sectional, within-stage, mixed-model survey. Setting Manitoba. Participants All University of Manitoba medical graduates from classes 1998 to 2009 for whom we had valid contact information (N = 912 of 943 graduates) were invited in August 2009 to participate in a survey. Main outcome measures Demographic information; ratings, on a 5-point scale, of the importance when choosing first practice <span class="hlt">locations</span> of 12 practice characteristics, 3 recruitment strategies, and 4 <span class="hlt">location</span> characteristics listed in the survey; free-text narratives on unlisted factors; and estimates of likely practice <span class="hlt">location</span> upon completion of training for recent graduates still in residency training. Results Completed surveys were received from 331 (35.1%) graduates of the surveyed classes, 162 (53.3%) of whom chose Manitoba for their first practice <span class="hlt">location</span>. Multiple regression analyses indicated that graduates choosing Manitoba for their first practice <span class="hlt">location</span> were significantly more likely to have done their residency training in Manitoba (P < .05), whether or not they gave a high rating to the importance of being near family and friends. Also, graduates choosing Manitoba were significantly more likely to be recent graduates (P = .007) and less likely to be members of a visible minority (P = .018). These associations were robust even when analyses were restricted to responses from practitioners without cause to estimate practice <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Early self-selection of graduates during entry into specific residency programs, results of the residency match process, and “putting down roots” during residency years were 3 important interrelated themes identified through qualitative analyses. Conclusion Residency education in Manitoba is the overwhelming factor influencing graduates’ choice of Manitoba as</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17642131','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17642131"><span>Six rules for <span class="hlt">accurate</span> effective forecasting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saffo, Paul</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The primary goal of forecasting is to identify the full range of possibilities facing a company, society, or the world at large. In this article, Saffo demythologizes the forecasting process to help executives become sophisticated and participative consumers of forecasts, rather than passive absorbers. He illustrates how to use forecasts to at once broaden understanding of possibilities and narrow the decision space within which one must exercise intuition. The <span class="hlt">events</span> of 9/11, for example, were a much bigger surprise than they should have been. After all, airliners flown into monuments were the stuff of Tom Clancy novels in the 1990s, and everyone knew that terrorists had a very personal antipathy toward the World Trade Center. So why was 9/11 such a surprise? What can executives do to avoid being blind-sided by other such wild cards, be they radical shifts in markets or the seemingly sudden emergence of disruptive technologies? In describing what forecasters are trying to achieve, Saffo outlines six simple, commonsense rules that smart managers should observe as they embark on a voyage of discovery with professional forecasters. Map a cone of uncertainty, he advises, look for the S curve, embrace the things that don't fit, hold strong opinions weakly, look back twice as far as you look forward, and know when not to make a forecast.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3664801','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3664801"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> detection of differential RNA processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Drewe, Philipp; Stegle, Oliver; Hartmann, Lisa; Kahles, André; Bohnert, Regina; Wachter, Andreas; Borgwardt, Karsten; Rätsch, Gunnar</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Deep transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) has become a vital tool for studying the state of cells in the context of varying environments, genotypes and other factors. RNA-Seq profiling data enable identification of novel isoforms, quantification of known isoforms and detection of changes in transcriptional or RNA-processing activity. Existing approaches to detect differential isoform abundance between samples either require a complete isoform annotation or fall short in providing statistically robust and calibrated significance estimates. Here, we propose a suite of statistical tests to address these open needs: a parametric test that uses known isoform annotations to detect changes in relative isoform abundance and a non-parametric test that detects differential read coverages and can be applied when isoform annotations are not available. Both methods account for the discrete nature of read counts and the inherent biological variability. We demonstrate that these tests compare favorably to previous methods, both in terms of accuracy and statistical calibrations. We use these techniques to analyze RNA-Seq libraries from Arabidopsis thaliana and Drosophila melanogaster. The identified differential RNA processing <span class="hlt">events</span> were consistent with RT–qPCR measurements and previous studies. The proposed toolkit is available from http://bioweb.me/rdiff and enables in-depth analyses of transcriptomes, with or without available isoform annotation. PMID:23585274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9658E..0XB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9658E..0XB"><span>Automatic classification and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> size measurement of blank mask defects</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span> and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect <span class="hlt">location</span>, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780009122','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780009122"><span>Method of fan sound mode structure determination computer program user's manual: Microphone <span class="hlt">location</span> program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pickett, G. F.; Wells, R. A.; Love, R. A.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>A computer user's manual describing the operation and the essential features of the microphone <span class="hlt">location</span> program is presented. The Microphone <span class="hlt">Location</span> Program determines microphone <span class="hlt">locations</span> that ensure <span class="hlt">accurate</span> and stable results from the equation system used to calculate modal structures. As part of the computational procedure for the Microphone <span class="hlt">Location</span> Program, a first-order measure of the stability of the equation system was indicated by a matrix 'conditioning' number.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2312645','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2312645"><span><span class="hlt">Locative</span> terms and Warlpiri acquisition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bavin, E L</p> <p>1990-02-01</p> <p>Cognitive complexity and complexity of linguistic structure have been found to influence the order of acquisition of <span class="hlt">locatives</span>. In Warlpiri, <span class="hlt">locative</span> terms are nominals and they are used in combination with a <span class="hlt">locative</span> case marker on the reference object; directional affixes may be added to them. Data from a series of tests of Warlpiri children's comprehension and production of the Warlpiri expressions that may be translated as 'in', 'on', 'under', 'in front of', 'behind' and 'between' indicate that the <span class="hlt">locative</span> case forms are used first without the more specific <span class="hlt">locative</span> nominals; young children distinguish an 'up-down' dimension but not 'in', and the reference object influences how the <span class="hlt">locative</span> term is interpreted; kamparru-pirdangirli ('front-behind') is not one dimension for children aged four to five years; kulkurru 'between' is understood before kamparru 'front' and pirdangirli 'behind'; the use of features on a reference object for orientation develops at around six, but the orientation of the reference object, as well as features on the placed object may affect interpretation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1339075','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1339075"><span>Automatic Distribution Network Reconfiguration: An <span class="hlt">Event</span>-Driven Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ding, Fei; Jiang, Huaiguang; Tan, Jin</p> <p>2016-11-14</p> <p>This paper proposes an <span class="hlt">event</span>-driven approach for reconfiguring distribution systems automatically. Specifically, an optimal synchrophasor sensor placement (OSSP) is used to reduce the number of synchrophasor sensors while keeping the whole system observable. Then, a wavelet-based <span class="hlt">event</span> detection and <span class="hlt">location</span> approach is used to detect and <span class="hlt">locate</span> the <span class="hlt">event</span>, which performs as a trigger for network reconfiguration. With the detected information, the system is then reconfigured using the hierarchical decentralized approach to seek for the new optimal topology. In this manner, whenever an <span class="hlt">event</span> happens the distribution network can be reconfigured automatically based on the real-time information that is observable and detectable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/940768','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/940768"><span>Detrecting and <span class="hlt">Locating</span> Partial Discharges in Transformers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shourbaji, A.; Richards, R.; Kisner, R. A.; Hardy, J.</p> <p>2005-02-04</p> <p>A collaborative research between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the American Electric Power (AEP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the State of Ohio Energy Office (OEO) has been formed to conduct a feasibility study to detect and <span class="hlt">locate</span> partial discharges (PDs) inside large transformers. The success of early detection of the PDs is necessary to avoid costly catastrophic failures that can occur if the process of PD is ignored. The detection method under this research is based on an innovative technology developed by ORNL researchers using optical methods to sense the acoustical energy produced by the PDs. ORNL researchers conducted experimental studies to detect PD using an optical fiber as an acoustic sensor capable of detecting acoustical disturbances at any point along its length. This technical approach also has the potential to <span class="hlt">locate</span> the point at which the PD was sensed within the transformer. Several optical approaches were experimentally investigated, including interferometric detection of acoustical disturbances along the sensing fiber, light detection and ranging (LIDAR) techniques using frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW), frequency modulated (FM) laser with a multimode fiber, FM laser with a single mode fiber, and amplitude modulated (AM) laser with a multimode fiber. The implementation of the optical fiber-based acoustic measurement technique would include installing a fiber inside a transformer allowing real-time detection of PDs and determining their <span class="hlt">locations</span>. The fibers are nonconductive and very small (core plus cladding are diameters of 125 μm for single-mode fibers and 230 μm for multimode fibers). The research identified the capabilities and limitations of using optical technology to detect and <span class="hlt">locate</span> sources of acoustical disturbances such as in PDs in large transformers. Amplitude modulation techniques showed the most promising results and deserve further research to better quantify the technique’s sensitivity</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1201557-progress-fast-accurate-multi-scale-climate-simulations','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1201557-progress-fast-accurate-multi-scale-climate-simulations"><span>Progress in fast, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> multi-scale climate simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Collins, W. D.; Johansen, H.; Evans, K. J.; ...</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to contribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth with these computational improvements include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme <span class="hlt">events</span>, an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enablingmore » improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allowing more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, partnerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures such as many-core processors and GPUs. As a result, approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1201557','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1201557"><span>Progress in fast, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> multi-scale climate simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Collins, W. D.; Johansen, H.; Evans, K. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Caldwell, P. M.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to contribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth with these computational improvements include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme <span class="hlt">events</span>, an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enabling improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allowing more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, partnerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures such as many-core processors and GPUs. As a result, approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1185917','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1185917"><span>Progress in Fast, <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Multi-scale Climate Simulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Collins, William D; Johansen, Hans; Evans, Katherine J; Woodward, Carol S.; Caldwell, Peter</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to con- tribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme <span class="hlt">events</span>, an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enabling improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allow more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, part- nerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures, such as many-core processors and GPUs, so that these approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999AAS...195.9201C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999AAS...195.9201C"><span>Stonehenge: A Simple and <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Predictor of Lunar Eclipses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Challener, S.</p> <p>1999-12-01</p> <p>Over the last century, much has been written about the astronomical significance of Stonehenge. The rage peaked in the mid to late 1960s when new computer technology enabled astronomers to make the first complete search for celestial alignments. Because there are hundreds of rocks or holes at Stonehenge and dozens of bright objects in the sky, the quest was fraught with obvious statistical problems. A storm of controversy followed and the subject nearly vanished from print. Only a handful of these alignments remain compelling. Today, few astronomers and still fewer archaeologists would argue that Stonehenge served primarily as an observatory. Instead, Stonehenge probably served as a sacred meeting place, which was consecrated by certain celestial <span class="hlt">events</span>. These would include the sun's risings and settings at the solstices and possibly some lunar risings as well. I suggest that Stonehenge was also used to predict lunar eclipses. While Hawkins and Hoyle also suggested that Stonehenge was used in this way, their methods are complex and they make use of only early, minor, or outlying areas of Stonehenge. In contrast, I suggest a way that makes use of the imposing, central region of Stonehenge; the area built during the final phase of activity. To predict every lunar eclipse without predicting eclipses that do not occur, I use the less familiar lunar cycle of 47 lunar months. By moving markers about the Sarsen Circle, the Bluestone Circle, and the Bluestone Horseshoe, all umbral lunar eclipses can be predicted <span class="hlt">accurately</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.664g2035B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.664g2035B"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Reconstruction Techniques in NOvA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Baird, M.; Bian, J.; Messier, M.; Niner, E.; Rocco, D.; Sachdev, K.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The NOvA experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment utilizing the NuMI beam generated at Fermilab. The experiment will measure the oscillations within a muon neutrino beam in a 300 ton Near Detector <span class="hlt">located</span> underground at Fermilab and a functionally-identical 14 kiloton Far Detector placed 810 km away. The detectors are liquid scintillator tracking calorimeters with a fine-grained cellular structure that provides a wealth of information for separating the different particle track and shower topologies. Each detector has its own challenges with the Near Detector seeing multiple overlapping neutrino interactions in each <span class="hlt">event</span> and the Far Detector having a large background of cosmic rays due to being <span class="hlt">located</span> on the surface. A series of pattern recognition techniques have been developed to go from <span class="hlt">event</span> records, to spatially and temporally separating individual interactions, to vertexing and tracking, and particle identification. This combination of methods to achieve the full <span class="hlt">event</span> reconstruction will be discussed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAG...136....1W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JAG...136....1W"><span>Modeling and <span class="hlt">locating</span> underground water pipe leak with microseismic data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Jing; Liu, Jiangping; Liu, Hao; Tian, Zhijian; Cheng, Fei</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Traditional pipeline leak <span class="hlt">locating</span> methods require that geophones have to be placed on the pipe wall. While if the exact <span class="hlt">location</span> of the pipeline is unknown, the leaks may not be identified <span class="hlt">accurately</span>. To solve this problem, considering the characteristics of pipeline leak, a continuous random seismic source model is proposed and geological models are established. Based on the two dimensional (2D) viscoacoustic equations and the staggered grid finite-difference (FD) algorithm, the microseismic wave field generated by a leaking pipe is modeled. Cross-correlation analysis and the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm are employed to obtain the time difference and the leak <span class="hlt">location</span>. Analysis and discussions of the effects of number of recorded traces, survey layout, and offset and trace interval on the accuracy of the estimated <span class="hlt">location</span> are also conducted. Simulation and data field experiment results indicate that: (1) A continuous random source can realistically represent the leak microseismic wave field in a simulation using 2D viscoacoustic equations and staggered grid FD algorithm. (2) For the leak microseismic wave field, the cross-correlation method is effective for calculating time difference of the direct wave relative to the reference trace. However, outside the refraction blind zone, accuracy of the time difference is reduced by the effects of refracted wave. (3) The SA algorithm based upon time difference, helps to identify the leak <span class="hlt">location</span> effectively, even in the presence of noise. Estimation of the horizontal distance is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than that of the depth, and the <span class="hlt">locating</span> errors increase with increasing number of traces and offset. Moreover, in the refraction blind zone, trace interval has almost no impact on the accuracy of the <span class="hlt">location</span> estimate. And the symmetrical array provides a higher estimate accuracy than the asymmetrical array. (4) The acquisition method of time difference based on the microseismic theory and SA algorithm has a great potential</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec100-1101.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title33-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title33-vol1-sec100-1101.pdf"><span>33 CFR 100.1101 - Southern California Annual Marine <span class="hlt">Events</span> for the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>.... 2. California Half Ironman Triathlon Sponsor World Triathlon Corporation. <span class="hlt">Event</span> Description Swimming... Triathlon Sponsor Lagardere Unlimited Upsolut USAT LLC. <span class="hlt">Event</span> Description Swimming Portion of Triathlon Race.... <span class="hlt">Event</span> Description Swimming Portion of Triathlon Race. Date Weekend in March. <span class="hlt">Location</span> Mission Bay,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4042S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.4042S"><span>An <span class="hlt">event</span> database for rotational seismology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Salvermoser, Johannes; Hadziioannou, Celine; Hable, Sarah; Chow, Bryant; Krischer, Lion; Wassermann, Joachim; Igel, Heiner</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The ring laser sensor (G-ring) <span class="hlt">located</span> at Wettzell, Germany, routinely observes earthquake-induced rotational ground motions around a vertical axis since its installation in 2003. Here we present results from a recently installed <span class="hlt">event</span> database which is the first that will provide ring laser <span class="hlt">event</span> data in an open access format. Based on the GCMT <span class="hlt">event</span> catalogue and some search criteria, seismograms from the ring laser and the collocated broadband seismometer are extracted and processed. The ObsPy-based processing scheme generates plots showing waveform fits between rotation rate and transverse acceleration and extracts characteristic wavefield parameters such as peak ground motions, noise levels, Love wave phase velocities and waveform coherence. For each <span class="hlt">event</span>, these parameters are stored in a text file (json dictionary) which is easily readable and accessible on the website. The database contains >10000 <span class="hlt">events</span> starting in 2007 (Mw>4.5). It is updated daily and therefore provides recent <span class="hlt">events</span> at a time lag of max. 24 hours. The user interface allows to filter <span class="hlt">events</span> for epoch, magnitude, and source area, whereupon the <span class="hlt">events</span> are displayed on a zoomable world map. We investigate how well the rotational motions are compatible with the expectations from the surface wave magnitude scale. In addition, the website offers some python source code examples for downloading and processing the openly accessible waveforms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21931906D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21931906D"><span>Campaigns to Monitor Predicted Mesolensing <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Di Stefano, Rosanne; Lepine, S.; Matthews, J.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>When a nearby high-proper-motion star moves in front of a crowded stellar field, there is a high probability that it will lens one of the background stars. Lensing <span class="hlt">events</span> can, in fact, be predicted. This makes it important to answer the question: when a lensing <span class="hlt">event</span> is predicted, how best to plan an observing campaign to study the <span class="hlt">event</span> and extract the parameters of the lens? How can we use such campaigns to discover planets or to compute the probability that the lens star has planets? We will discuss the specific example of the mesolens VB 10, which will have lensed a background star in December of 2011. Although the predicted low magnification and the presence of the Sun near the <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">location</span> will have made conditions less than ideal for the study of this <span class="hlt">event</span>, constraints on planets may have been derived by the time of the talk. Whatever the results,we will discuss what we learned by planning for this first-ever predicted mesolensing <span class="hlt">event</span>. We will discuss the prospects for future predictions of individual <span class="hlt">events</span> and of statistical predictions of multiple high-probability <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/837497','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/837497"><span>Features, <span class="hlt">Events</span>, and Processes: Disruptive <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>J. King</p> <p>2004-03-31</p> <p>The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, <span class="hlt">events</span>, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive <span class="hlt">events</span> (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1018764','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1018764"><span><span class="hlt">Event-by-Event</span> Fission with FREYA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Randrup, J; Vogt, R</p> <p>2010-11-09</p> <p>The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction <span class="hlt">Event</span> Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission <span class="hlt">events</span>, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. The presentation first discusses the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended up to energies where pre-equilibrium emission becomes significant and one or more neutrons may be emitted prior to fission. Concentrating on {sup 239}Pu(n,f), we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also briefly suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcGeo..64.2382D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcGeo..64.2382D"><span>The New Algorithm for Fast Probabilistic Hypocenter <span class="hlt">Locations</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dębski, Wojciech; Klejment, Piotr</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The spatial <span class="hlt">location</span> of sources of seismic waves is one of the first tasks when transient waves from natural (uncontrolled) sources are analysed in many branches of physics, including seismology, oceanology, to name a few. It is well recognised that there is no single universal <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm which performs equally well in all situations. Source activity and its spatial variability in time, the geometry of recording network, the complexity and heterogeneity of wave velocity distribution are all factors influencing the performance of <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithms. In this paper we propose a new <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithm which exploits the reciprocity and time-inverse invariance property of the wave equation. Basing on these symmetries and using a modern finite-difference-type eikonal solver, we have developed a new very fast algorithm performing the full probabilistic (Bayesian) source <span class="hlt">location</span>. We illustrate an efficiency of the algorithm performing an advanced error analysis for 1647 seismic <span class="hlt">events</span> from the Rudna copper mine operating in southwestern Poland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140005563','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140005563"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> the LCROSS Impact Craters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Marshall, William; Shirley, Mark; Moratto, Zachary; Colaprete, Anthony; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Hensley, Scott; Wilson, Barbara; Slade, Martin; Kennedy, Brian; Gurrola, Eric; Harcke, Leif</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The Lunar CRater Observations and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket stage into a permanently shadowed region near the lunar south pole. The Sheperding Spacecraft (SSC) separated approx. 9 hours before impact and performed a small braking maneuver in order to observe the Centaur impact plume, looking for evidence of water and other volatiles, before impacting itself. This paper describes the registration of imagery of the LCROSS impact region from the mid- and near-infrared cameras onboard the SSC, as well as from the Goldstone radar. We compare the Centaur impact features, positively identified in the first two, and with a consistent feature in the third, which are interpreted as a 20 m diameter crater surrounded by a 160 m diameter ejecta region. The images are registered to Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) topographical data which allows determination of the impact <span class="hlt">location</span>. This <span class="hlt">location</span> is compared with the impact <span class="hlt">location</span> derived from ground-based tracking and propagation of the spacecraft's trajectory and with <span class="hlt">locations</span> derived from two hybrid imagery/trajectory methods. The four methods give a weighted average Centaur impact <span class="hlt">location</span> of -84.6796 deg, -48.7093 deg, with a 1s uncertainty of 115 m along latitude, and 44 m along longitude, just 146 m from the target impact site. Meanwhile, the trajectory-derived SSC impact <span class="hlt">location</span> is -84.719 deg, -49.61 deg, with a 1 alpha uncertainty of 3 m along the Earth vector and 75 m orthogonal to that, 766 m from the target <span class="hlt">location</span> and 2.803 km south-west of the Centaur impact. We also detail the Centaur impact angle and SSC instrument pointing errors. Six high-level LCROSS mission requirements are shown to be met by wide margins. We hope that these results facilitate further analyses of the LCROSS experiment data and follow-up observations of the impact region</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://metastaticniche.cancer.gov/location-and-venue','NCI'); return false;" href="https://metastaticniche.cancer.gov/location-and-venue"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> and Venue | The Metastatic Niche: Models, Mechanisms and Targeting Targets into Therapeutics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Location</span> and Venue **<span class="hlt">EVENT</span> CHANGE OF <span class="hlt">LOCATION</span>:  **Building 10 (Clinical Center) - Masur Auditorium** Helpful links to <span class="hlt">locate</span> the Masur Auditorium on the NIH campus:  https://www.ors.od.nih.gov/maps/Pages/NIH-Visitor-Map.aspx</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70042312','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70042312"><span>Intensity, magnitude, <span class="hlt">location</span> and attenuation in India for felt earthquakes since 1762</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Szeliga, Walter; Hough, Susan; Martin, Stacey; Bilham, Roger</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A comprehensive, consistently interpreted new catalog of felt intensities for India (Martin and Szeliga, 2010, this issue) includes intensities for 570 earthquakes; instrumental magnitudes and <span class="hlt">locations</span> are available for 100 of these <span class="hlt">events</span>. We use the intensity values for 29 of the instrumentally recorded <span class="hlt">events</span> to develop new intensity versus attenuation relations for the Indian subcontinent and the Himalayan region. We then use these relations to determine the <span class="hlt">locations</span> and magnitudes of 234 historical <span class="hlt">events</span>, using the method of Bakun and Wentworth (1997). For the remaining 336 <span class="hlt">events</span>, intensity distributions are too sparse to determine magnitude or <span class="hlt">location</span>. We evaluate magnitude and <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy of newly <span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">events</span> by comparing the instrumental- with the intensity-derived <span class="hlt">location</span> for 29 calibration <span class="hlt">events</span>, for which more than 15 intensity observations are available. With few exceptions, most intensity-derived <span class="hlt">locations</span> lie within a fault length of the instrumentally determined <span class="hlt">location</span>. For <span class="hlt">events</span> in which the azimuthal distribution of intensities is limited, we conclude that the formal error bounds from the regression of Bakun and Wentworth (1997) do not reflect the true uncertainties. We also find that the regression underestimates the uncertainties of the <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude of the 1819 Allah Bund earthquake, for which a <span class="hlt">location</span> has been inferred from mapped surface deformation. Comparing our inferred attenuation relations to those developed for other regions, we find that attenuation for Himalayan <span class="hlt">events</span> is comparable to intensity attenuation in California (Bakun and Wentworth, 1997), while intensity attenuation for cratonic <span class="hlt">events</span> is higher than intensity attenuation reported for central/eastern North America (Bakun et al., 2003). Further, we present evidence that intensities of intraplate earthquakes have a nonlinear dependence on magnitude such that attenuation relations based largely on small-to-moderate earthquakes may significantly</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037226','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70037226"><span>Intensity, magnitude, <span class="hlt">location</span>, and attenuation in India for felt earthquakes since 1762</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Szeliga, W.; Hough, S.; Martin, S.; Bilham, R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A comprehensive, consistently interpreted new catalog of felt intensities for India (Martin and Szeliga, 2010, this issue) includes intensities for 570 earth-quakes; instrumental magnitudes and <span class="hlt">locations</span> are available for 100 of these <span class="hlt">events</span>. We use the intensity values for 29 of the instrumentally recorded <span class="hlt">events</span> to develop new intensity versus attenuation relations for the Indian subcontinent and the Himalayan region. We then use these relations to determine the <span class="hlt">locations</span> and magnitudes of 234 historical <span class="hlt">events</span>, using the method of Bakun and Wentworth (1997). For the remaining 336 <span class="hlt">events</span>, intensity distributions are too sparse to determine magnitude or <span class="hlt">location</span>. We evaluate magnitude and <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy of newly <span class="hlt">located</span> <span class="hlt">events</span> by comparing the instrumental-with the intensity-derived <span class="hlt">location</span> for 29 calibration <span class="hlt">events</span>, for which more than 15 intensity observations are available. With few exceptions, most intensity-derived <span class="hlt">locations</span> lie within a fault length of the instrumentally determined <span class="hlt">location</span>. For <span class="hlt">events</span> in which the azimuthal distribution of intensities is limited, we conclude that the formal error bounds from the regression of Bakun and Wentworth (1997) do not reflect the true uncertainties. We also find that the regression underestimates the uncertainties of the <span class="hlt">location</span> and magnitude of the 1819 Allah Bund earthquake, for which a <span class="hlt">location</span> has been inferred from mapped surface deformation. Comparing our inferred attenuation relations to those developed for other regions, we find that attenuation for Himalayan <span class="hlt">events</span> is comparable to intensity attenuation in California (Bakun and Wentworth, 1997), while intensity attenuation for cratonic <span class="hlt">events</span> is higher than intensity attenuation reported for central/eastern North America (Bakun et al., 2003). Further, we present evidence that intensities of intraplate earth-quakes have a nonlinear dependence on magnitude such that attenuation relations based largely on small-to-moderate earthquakes may significantly</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22609244','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22609244"><span>Preschoolers' fantasy-reality distinctions of emotional <span class="hlt">events</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carrick, Nathalie; Ramirez, Madisenne</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Research suggests that emotions influence children's ability to discern fantasy from reality; however, reasons for this association remain unknown. The current research sought to better understand the mechanisms underlying children's distinctions by examining the roles discrete emotions and context have in 3- to 5-year-olds' evaluations of fantasy and reality. In Study 1, children's fantasy-reality distinctions of images depicting happy, frightening, or sad <span class="hlt">events</span> were obtained under two conditions: Children responded freely or were motivated to respond <span class="hlt">accurately</span>. When responding freely, older children reported that happy and sad fantastic and real <span class="hlt">events</span> could occur but frightening <span class="hlt">events</span> could not. When motivated to respond <span class="hlt">accurately</span>, children's accuracy improved for fantasy but not for reality. Study 2 examined real <span class="hlt">events</span> exclusively and found that children may lack the knowledge that frightening, but not happy or sad, real <span class="hlt">events</span> can occur. The findings provide new insight into how emotions affect children's fantasy-reality distinctions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/838332','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/838332"><span>Features, <span class="hlt">Events</span>, and Processes: Disruptive <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>P. Sanchez</p> <p>2004-11-08</p> <p>The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive <span class="hlt">events</span> features, <span class="hlt">events</span>, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive <span class="hlt">events</span>, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S13D4522C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S13D4522C"><span>Improved Epicentral <span class="hlt">Locations</span> for Earthquakes Near Explorer Ridge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Clemens-Sewall, D.; Trehu, A. M.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The tectonics and structure of the Explorer region, which is the northern boundary of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, help to inform our assessments of the seismic hazard in the Pacific Northwest. Our understanding of this tectonically complex area is largely based on morphology of the seafloor from swath bathymetric data, potential field anomalies, and the calculated <span class="hlt">locations</span> of contemporary earthquakes in the region. However, the Navy Sound Surveillance System hydrophone network, the Canadian National Seismic Network, the U.S. Advanced National Seismic System, and the Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor Catalog report significantly different epicentral <span class="hlt">locations</span> for swarms of earthquakes near Explorer Ridge in August and October 2008. We relocated the larger (M>5) earthquakes in the August 2008 swarm using data from both U.S. and Canadian networks to improve azimuthal coverage. Absolute <span class="hlt">locations</span> were determined for the largest <span class="hlt">events</span> in the swarm, and the smaller <span class="hlt">events</span> were relocated relative to the largest using a double difference method. To better understand why the <span class="hlt">locations</span> from land-based seismic networks differ from those computed from the hydrophone arrays, we also examine T-phases from regional <span class="hlt">events</span> recorded on Ocean Bottom Seismometers from the COLZA and Cascadia Initiative experiments and evaluate the potential for using T-phases to improve the epicentral <span class="hlt">locations</span> of submarine earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1034027.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1034027.pdf"><span>Committed Sport <span class="hlt">Event</span> Volunteers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting <span class="hlt">event</span>. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon <span class="hlt">event</span> and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hay&pg=5&id=EJ834962','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hay&pg=5&id=EJ834962"><span>Activating <span class="hlt">Event</span> Knowledge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world <span class="hlt">events</span>, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized <span class="hlt">events</span> that they denote or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SpWea...810003L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SpWea...810003L"><span>Contrasting Large Solar <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lanzerotti, Louis J.</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>After an unusually long solar minimum, solar cycle 24 is slowly beginning. A large coronal mass ejection (CME) from sunspot 1092 occurred on 1 August 2010, with effects reaching Earth on 3 August and 4 August, nearly 38 years to the day after the huge solar <span class="hlt">event</span> of 4 August 1972. The prior <span class="hlt">event</span>, which those of us engaged in space research at the time remember well, recorded some of the highest intensities of solar particles and rapid changes of the geomagnetic field measured to date. What can we learn from the comparisons of these two <span class="hlt">events</span>, other than their essentially coincident dates? One lesson I took away from reading press coverage and Web reports of the August 2010 <span class="hlt">event</span> is that the scientific community and the press are much more aware than they were nearly 4 decades ago that solar <span class="hlt">events</span> can wreak havoc on space-based technologies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24203230','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24203230"><span>Processing <span class="hlt">locational</span> and orientational information.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maki, R H; Maki, W S; Marsh, L G</p> <p>1977-09-01</p> <p>In choice reaction time (RT) tasks, college students verified the truth of displays expressing spatial relations between two objects. The relations werelocational (A is left of B) ororientational (A and B are horizontal). The objects were names of states in the United States, symbols, or letter arrays. The objects were memorized prior to the display (states and letters) or were presented as part of the display (symbols and letters). In the <span class="hlt">location</span> tasks with both states and symbols, <span class="hlt">locatives</span> were spatial (right, left, above, below) or compass (north, south, east, west). Distance between states was also varied. When <span class="hlt">location</span> was judged, horizontally aligned stimuli resulted in slower responses than vertically aligned stimuli, independently of materials and <span class="hlt">locative</span> set. Reaction time was inversely related to distance. When orientation was judged, responses to horizontal pairs of states were slower than responses to vertical pairs of states, responses to horizontal pairs of letters were faster than responses to vertical pairs, and RT did not depend upon the orientation of symbols. This pattern of results suggests that orientational judgments are influenced by type of materials and the entext to which the material has been encoded (i.e., memorized). <span class="hlt">Locational</span> judgments reflect a potent source of difficulty not present in orientation tasks, namely, telling left from right. Alternative explanations of the right-left effect are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=url&pg=5&id=EJ611747','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=url&pg=5&id=EJ611747"><span>URLs: Uniform Resource <span class="hlt">Locators</span> or Unreliable Resource <span class="hlt">Locators</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Germain, Carol Anne</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This research studies the accessibility of 64 URLs (Uniform Resource <span class="hlt">Locators</span>) cited in 31 academic journal articles. Discusses the role of citations as scholarly links and examines results of this longitudinal study that found an increasing decline in the availability of URL citations to World Wide Web sties. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/LRW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5486V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5486V"><span>An automatic procedure for high-resolution earthquake <span class="hlt">locations</span>: a case study from the TABOO near fault observatory (Northern Apennines, Italy)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Valoroso, Luisa; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Di Stefano, Raffaele; Latorre, Diana; Piccinini, Davide</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The characterization of the geometry, kinematics and rheology of fault zones by seismological data depends on our capability of <span class="hlt">accurately</span> <span class="hlt">locate</span> the largest number of low-magnitude seismic <span class="hlt">events</span>. To this aim, we have been working for the past three years to develop an advanced modular earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> procedure able to automatically retrieve high-resolution earthquakes catalogues directly from continuous waveforms data. We use seismograms recorded at about 60 seismic stations <span class="hlt">located</span> both at surface and at depth. The network covers an area of about 80x60 km with a mean inter-station distance of 6 km. These stations are part of a Near fault Observatory (TABOO; http://taboo.rm.ingv.it/), consisting of multi-sensor stations (seismic, geodetic, geochemical and electromagnetic). This permanent scientific infrastructure managed by the INGV is devoted to studying the earthquakes preparatory phase and the fast/slow (i.e., seismic/aseismic) deformation process active along the Alto Tiberina fault (ATF) <span class="hlt">located</span> in the northern Apennines (Italy). The ATF is potentially one of the rare worldwide examples of active low-angle (< 15°) normal fault accommodating crustal extension and characterized by a regular occurrence of micro-earthquakes. The modular procedure combines: i) a sensitive detection algorithm optimized to declare low-magnitude <span class="hlt">events</span>; ii) an <span class="hlt">accurate</span> picking procedure that provides consistently weighted P- and S-wave arrival times, P-wave first motion polarities and the maximum waveform amplitude for local magnitude calculation; iii) both linearized iterative and non-linear global-search earthquake <span class="hlt">location</span> algorithms to compute <span class="hlt">accurate</span> absolute <span class="hlt">locations</span> of single-<span class="hlt">events</span> in a 3D geological model (see Latorre et al. same session); iv) cross-correlation and double-difference <span class="hlt">location</span> methods to compute high-resolution relative <span class="hlt">event</span> <span class="hlt">locations</span>. This procedure is now running off-line with a delay of 1 week to the real-time. We are now implementing this</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26451814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26451814"><span>Concurrent and <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Short Read Mapping on Multicore Processors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martínez, Héctor; Tárraga, Joaquín; Medina, Ignacio; Barrachina, Sergio; Castillo, Maribel; Dopazo, Joaquín; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We introduce a parallel aligner with a work-flow organization for fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> mapping of RNA sequences on servers equipped with multicore processors. Our software, HPG Aligner SA (HPG Aligner SA is an open-source application. The software is available at http://www.opencb.org, exploits a suffix array to rapidly map a large fraction of the RNA fragments (reads), as well as leverages the accuracy of the Smith-Waterman algorithm to deal with conflictive reads. The aligner is enhanced with a careful strategy to detect splice junctions based on an adaptive division of RNA reads into small segments (or seeds), which are then mapped onto a number of candidate alignment <span class="hlt">locations</span>, providing crucial information for the successful alignment of the complete reads. The experimental results on a platform with Intel multicore technology report the parallel performance of HPG Aligner SA, on RNA reads of 100-400 nucleotides, which excels in execution time/sensitivity to state-of-the-art aligners such as TopHat 2+Bowtie 2, MapSplice, and STAR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985pggp.rept..405S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985pggp.rept..405S"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> albedos of the brightest regions on Io</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Simonelli, D. P.; Veverka, J.</p> <p>1985-04-01</p> <p>The brightest, coldest areas on Io, the white regions, may act as cold traps for SO2 gas, and thus have an important role in governing the pressure, diurnal variation, and flow of the satellite's tenuous SO2 atmosphere. Therefore, it is essential to derive <span class="hlt">accurate</span> albedos for the brightest regions, where the necessary albedos are those in the energy balance equation of the surface used to compute temperatures. Forty-one of the brightest of the white areas, each 60 to 120 km on a side were studied. The simplest way to estimate the required energy balance albedo for each region is to determine the Bond slbedo of a planet covered with that type of material. This process is outlined and resulting albedos are given. with the exception of several darker regions on the poorly-resolved post eclipse face of Io, typical albedos are 0.6 to 0.7. The brightest areas studied are <span class="hlt">located</span> in the cluster of white regions east of Prometheus (longitudes 90 to 40 deg W). It is possible using Voyager data and fits to Hapke's equation to derive albedos for the bright regions without making any assumptions about the phase integrals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.1499R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SoPh..289.1499R"><span>Very Fast and <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Azimuth Disambiguation of Vector Magnetograms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rudenko, G. V.; Anfinogentov, S. A.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>We present a method for fast and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> azimuth disambiguation of vector magnetogram data regardless of the <span class="hlt">location</span> of the analyzed region on the solar disk. The direction of the transverse field is determined with the principle of minimum deviation of the field from the reference (potential) field. The new disambiguation (NDA) code is examined on the well-known models of Metcalf et al. ( Solar Phys. 237, 267, 2006) and Leka et al. ( Solar Phys. 260, 83, 2009), and on an artificial model based on the observed magnetic field of AR 10930 (Rudenko, Myshyakov, and Anfinogentov, Astron. Rep. 57, 622, 2013). We compare Hinode/SOT-SP vector magnetograms of AR 10930 disambiguated with three codes: the NDA code, the nonpotential magnetic-field calculation (NPFC: Georgoulis, Astrophys. J. Lett. 629, L69, 2005), and the spherical minimum-energy method (Rudenko, Myshyakov, and Anfinogentov, Astron. Rep. 57, 622, 2013). We then illustrate the performance of NDA on SDO/HMI full-disk magnetic-field observations. We show that our new algorithm is more than four times faster than the fastest algorithm that provides the disambiguation with a satisfactory accuracy (NPFC). At the same time, its accuracy is similar to that of the minimum-energy method (a very slow algorithm). In contrast to other codes, the NDA code maintains high accuracy when the region to be analyzed is very close to the limb.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3483628','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3483628"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Reading with Sequential Presentation of Single Letters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Price, Nicholas S. C.; Edwards, Gemma L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Rapid, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> reading is possible when isolated, single words from a sentence are sequentially presented at a fixed spatial <span class="hlt">location</span>. We investigated if reading of words and sentences is possible when single letters are rapidly presented at the fovea under user-controlled or automatically controlled rates. When tested with complete sentences, trained participants achieved reading rates of over 60 wpm and accuracies of over 90% with the single letter reading (SLR) method and naive participants achieved average reading rates over 30 wpm with greater than 90% accuracy. Accuracy declined as individual letters were presented for shorter periods of time, even when the overall reading rate was maintained by increasing the duration of spaces between words. Words in the lexicon that occur more frequently were identified with higher accuracy and more quickly, demonstrating that trained participants have lexical access. In combination, our data strongly suggest that comprehension is possible and that SLR is a practicable form of reading under conditions in which normal scanning of text is not possible, or for scenarios with limited spatial and temporal resolution such as patients with low vision or prostheses. PMID:23115548</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23115548','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23115548"><span><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> reading with sequential presentation of single letters.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Price, Nicholas S C; Edwards, Gemma L</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Rapid, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> reading is possible when isolated, single words from a sentence are sequentially presented at a fixed spatial <span class="hlt">location</span>. We investigated if reading of words and sentences is possible when single letters are rapidly presented at the fovea under user-controlled or automatically controlled rates. When tested with complete sentences, trained participants achieved reading rates of over 60 wpm and accuracies of over 90% with the single letter reading (SLR) method and naive participants achieved average reading rates over 30 wpm with greater than 90% accuracy. Accuracy declined as individual letters were presented for shorter periods of time, even when the overall reading rate was maintained by increasing the duration of spaces between words. Words in the lexicon that occur more frequently were identified with higher accuracy and more quickly, demonstrating that trained participants have lexical access. In combination, our data strongly suggest that comprehension is possible and that SLR is a practicable form of reading under conditions in which normal scanning of text is not possible, or for scenarios with limited spatial and temporal resolution such as patients with low vision or prostheses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26543243','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26543243"><span>An <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Timing Alignment Method with Time-to-Digital Converter Linearity Calibration for High-Resolution TOF PET.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; An, Shaohui; Lu, Xingyu; Dong, Yun; Liu, Shitao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Wong, Wai-Hoi</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> PET system timing alignment minimizes the coincidence time window and therefore reduces random <span class="hlt">events</span> and improves image quality. It is also critical for time-of-flight (TOF) image reconstruction. Here, we use a thin annular cylinder (shell) phantom filled with a radioactive source and <span class="hlt">located</span> axially and centrally in a PET camera for the timing alignment of a TOF PET system. This timing alignment method involves measuring the time differences between the selected coincidence detector pairs, calibrating the differential and integral nonlinearity of the time-to-digital converter (TDC) with the same raw data and deriving the intrinsic time biases for each detector using an iterative algorithm. The raw time bias for each detector is downloaded to the front-end electronics and the residual fine time bias can be applied during the TOF list-mode reconstruction. Our results showed that a timing alignment accuracy of better than ±25 ps can be achieved, and a preliminary timing resolution of 473 ps (full width at half maximum) was measured in our prototype TOF PET/CT system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4629519','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4629519"><span>An <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> Timing Alignment Method with Time-to-Digital Converter Linearity Calibration for High-Resolution TOF PET</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; An, Shaohui; Lu, Xingyu; Dong, Yun; Liu, Shitao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Wong, Wai-Hoi</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Accurate</span> PET system timing alignment minimizes the coincidence time window and therefore reduces random <span class="hlt">events</span> and improves image quality. It is also critical for time-of-flight (TOF) image reconstruction. Here, we use a thin annular cylinder (shell) phantom filled with a radioactive source and <span class="hlt">located</span> axially and centrally in a PET camera for the timing alignment of a TOF PET system. This timing alignment method involves measuring the time differences between the selected coincidence detector pairs, calibrating the differential and integral nonlinearity of the time-to-digital converter (TDC) with the same raw data and deriving the intrinsic time biases for each detector using an iterative algorithm. The raw time bias for each detector is downloaded to the front-end electronics and the residual fine time bias can be applied during the TOF list-mode reconstruction. Our results showed that a timing alignment accuracy of better than ±25 ps can be achieved, and a preliminary timing resolution of 473 ps (full width at half maximum) was measured in our prototype TOF PET/CT system. PMID:26543243</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980000559','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980000559"><span>An Impact-<span class="hlt">Location</span> Estimation Algorithm for Subsonic Uninhabited Aircraft</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Teets, Edward</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>An impact-<span class="hlt">location</span> estimation algorithm is being used at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to support range safety for uninhabited aerial vehicle flight tests. The algorithm computes an impact <span class="hlt">location</span> based on the descent rate, mass, and altitude of the vehicle and current wind information. The predicted impact <span class="hlt">location</span> is continuously displayed on the range safety officer's moving map display so that the flightpath of the vehicle can be routed to avoid ground assets if the flight must be terminated. The algorithm easily adapts to different vehicle termination techniques and has been shown to be <span class="hlt">accurate</span> to the extent required to support range safety for subsonic uninhabited aerial vehicles. This paper describes how the algorithm functions, how the algorithm is used at NASA Dryden, and how various termination techniques are handled by the algorithm. Other approaches to predicting the impact <span class="hlt">location</span> and the reasons why they were not selected for real-time implementation are also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..468..434H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..468..434H"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> the source of spreading in temporal networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Qiangjuan; Zhao, Chengli; Zhang, Xue; Yi, Dongyun</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The topological structure of many real networks changes with time. Thus, <span class="hlt">locating</span> the sources of a temporal network is a creative and challenging problem, as the enormous size of many real networks makes it unfeasible to observe the state of all nodes. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to solve this problem, named the backward temporal diffusion process. The proposed algorithm calculates the shortest temporal distance to <span class="hlt">locate</span> the transmission source. We assume that the spreading process can be modeled as a simple diffusion process and by consensus dynamics. To improve the <span class="hlt">location</span> accuracy, we also adopt four strategies to select which nodes should be observed by ranking their importance in the temporal network. Our paper proposes a highly <span class="hlt">accurate</span> method for <span class="hlt">locating</span> the source in temporal networks and is, to the best of our knowledge, a frontier work in this field. Moreover, our framework has important significance for controlling the transmission of diseases or rumors and formulating immediate immunization strategies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4699171','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4699171"><span>Dissociation between <span class="hlt">location</span> and shape in visual space</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Loomis, Jack M.; Philbeck, John W.; Zahorik, Pavel</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>There are often large perceptual distortions of shapes lying on the ground plane, even in well-lit environments. These distortions occur under conditions for which the perception of <span class="hlt">location</span> is <span class="hlt">accurate</span>. Four hypotheses are considered for reconciling these seemingly paradoxical results, after which 2 experiments are reported that lend further support to one of them–that perception of shape and perception of <span class="hlt">location</span> are sometimes dissociable. The 2 experiments show that whereas perception of <span class="hlt">location</span> does not depend on whether viewing is monocular or binocular (when other distance cues are abundant), perception of shape becomes more veridical when viewing is binocular. This means that perception of shape is not fully constrained by the perceived <span class="hlt">locations</span> of the vertices that define the shape. PMID:12421065</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120009445','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120009445"><span>Wireless Damage <span class="hlt">Location</span> Sensing System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant Douglas (Inventor)</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A wireless damage <span class="hlt">location</span> sensing system uses a geometric-patterned wireless sensor that resonates in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field to generate a harmonic response that will experience a change when the sensor experiences a change in its geometric pattern. The sensing system also includes a magnetic field response recorder for wirelessly transmitting the time-varying magnetic field and for wirelessly detecting the harmonic response. The sensing system compares the actual harmonic response to a plurality of predetermined harmonic responses. Each predetermined harmonic response is associated with a severing of the sensor at a corresponding known <span class="hlt">location</span> thereof so that a match between the actual harmonic response and one of the predetermined harmonic responses defines the known <span class="hlt">location</span> of the severing that is associated therewith.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2956322','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2956322"><span>Developing a Disease Outbreak <span class="hlt">Event</span> Corpus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kawazoe, Ai; Chanlekha, Hutchatai; Collier, Nigel</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background In recent years, there has been a growth in work on the use of information extraction technologies for tracking disease outbreaks from online news texts, yet publicly available evaluation standards (and associated resources) for this new area of research have been noticeably lacking. Objective This study seeks to create a “gold standard” data set against which to test how <span class="hlt">accurately</span> disease outbreak information extraction systems can identify the semantics of disease outbreak <span class="hlt">events</span>. Additionally, we hope that the provision of an annotation scheme (and associated corpus) to the community will encourage open evaluation in this new and growing application area. Methods We developed an annotation scheme for identifying infectious disease outbreak <span class="hlt">events</span> in news texts. An event─in the context of our annotation scheme─consists minimally of geographical (eg, country and province) and disease name information. However, the scheme also allows for the rich encoding of other domain salient concepts (eg, international travel, species, and food contamination). Results The work resulted in a 200-document corpus of <span class="hlt">event</span>-annotated disease outbreak reports that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of <span class="hlt">event</span> detection algorithms (in this case, for the BioCaster biosurveillance online news information extraction system). In the 200 documents, 394 distinct <span class="hlt">events</span> were identified (mean 1.97 <span class="hlt">events</span> per document, range 0-25 <span class="hlt">events</span> per document). We also provide a download script and graphical user interface (GUI)-based <span class="hlt">event</span> browsing software to facilitate corpus exploration. Conclusion In summary, we present an annotation scheme and corpus that can be used in the evaluation of disease outbreak <span class="hlt">event</span> extraction algorithms. The annotation scheme and corpus were designed both with the particular evaluation requirements of the BioCaster system in mind as well as the wider need for further evaluation resources in this growing research area. PMID:20876049</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21038229','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21038229"><span>Neuroanatomical correlates of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tranel, Daniel; Kemmerer, David</p> <p>2004-10-01</p> <p>Very little research has explored which neural systems may be important for retrieving the meanings of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions (e.g., in, on, around). To begin to address this knowledge gap, we conducted a lesion study in which we tested the hypothesis that processing the meanings of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions depends on neural structures in the left inferior prefrontal cortex and left inferior parietal cortex. Seventy-eight subjects with focal, stable lesions to various parts of the telencephalon and a comparison group of 60 normal participants were studied with tasks that require production, comprehension, and semantic analysis of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions. In support of our hypothesis, we found that in subjects with impaired knowledge of <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions, the highest region of lesion overlap was in the left frontal operculum and the left supramarginal gyrus, and in the white matter subjacent to these two areas. In a second study, focused on six subjects who had pervasive defects for <span class="hlt">locative</span> preposition knowledge, we confirmed that such defects were associated specifically with damage to the posterior left frontal operculum, white matter subjacent to this region, and white matter underneath the inferior parietal operculum. These subjects did not have basic impairments in spatial processing or working memory, and they had relatively well-preserved processing of conceptual knowledge for actions and various categories of concrete entities (e.g., persons, animals, tools). All six subjects, however, had defects in naming actions, and some of them also had defective naming of some categories of concrete entities. Overall, the findings converge nicely with recent results from functional imaging approaches, and with classic studies from the aphasia-based literature, and suggest that the left inferior prefrontal and left inferior parietal regions have crucial-albeit not exclusive-roles in processing knowledge associated with <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27705859','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27705859"><span>Web Video <span class="hlt">Event</span> Recognition by Semantic Analysis From Ubiquitous Documents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Litao; Yang, Yang; Huang, Zi; Wang, Peng; Song, Jingkuan; Shen, Heng Tao</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>In recent years, the task of <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition from videos has attracted increasing interest in multimedia area. While most of the existing research was mainly focused on exploring visual cues to handle relatively small-granular <span class="hlt">events</span>, it is difficult to directly analyze video content without any prior knowledge. Therefore, synthesizing both the visual and semantic analysis is a natural way for video <span class="hlt">event</span> understanding. In this paper, we study the problem of Web video <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition, where Web videos often describe large-granular <span class="hlt">events</span> and carry limited textual information. Key challenges include how to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> represent <span class="hlt">event</span> semantics from incomplete textual information and how to effectively explore the correlation between visual and textual cues for video <span class="hlt">event</span> understanding. We propose a novel framework to perform complex <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition from Web videos. In order to compensate the insufficient expressive power of visual cues, we construct an <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge base by deeply mining semantic information from ubiquitous Web documents. This <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge base is capable of describing each <span class="hlt">event</span> with comprehensive semantics. By utilizing this base, the textual cues for a video can be significantly enriched. Furthermore, we introduce a two-view adaptive regression model, which explores the intrinsic correlation between the visual and textual cues of the videos to learn reliable classifiers. Extensive experiments on two real-world video data sets show the effectiveness of our proposed framework and prove that the <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge base indeed helps improve the performance of Web video <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28114069','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28114069"><span>Web Video <span class="hlt">Event</span> Recognition by Semantic Analysis from Ubiquitous Documents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Litao; Yang, Yang; Huang, Zi; Wang, Peng; Song, Jingkuan; Shen, Heng</p> <p>2016-09-27</p> <p>In recent years, the task of <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition from videos has attracted increasing interest in multimedia area. While most of the existing research was mainly focused on exploring visual cues to handle relatively small-granular <span class="hlt">events</span>, it is difficult to directly analyse video content without any prior knowledge. Therefore, synthesizing both the visual and semantic analysis is a natural way for video <span class="hlt">event</span> understanding. In this paper, we study the problem of web video <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition, where web videos often describe largegranular <span class="hlt">events</span> and carry limited textual information. Key challenges include how to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> represent <span class="hlt">event</span> semantics from incomplete textual information and how to effectively explore the correlation between visual and textual cues for video <span class="hlt">event</span> understanding. We propose a novel framework to perform complex <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition from web videos. In order to compensate the insufficient expressive power of visual cues, we construct an <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge base by deeply mining semantic information from ubiquitous web documents. This <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge base is capable of describing each <span class="hlt">event</span> with comprehensive semantics. By utilizing this base, the textual cues for a video can be significantly enriched. Furthermore, we introduce a two-view adaptive regression model which explores the intrinsic correlation between the visual and textual cues of the videos to learn reliable classifiers. Extensive experiments on two real-world video datasets show the effectiveness of our proposed framework and prove that the <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge base indeed helps improve the performance of web video <span class="hlt">event</span> recognition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA241605','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA241605"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> Technologies for Apparel Assembly</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1991-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">LOCATION</span> TECHNOLOGIES FOR - APPAREL ASSEMBLY! *AD-A241 60 𔃿U iI iI ll I / ! II!’I ’II IBy: Wayne C. Tincher Douglas M. Moore Wayne Daley GEORGIA...lassifi cation) <span class="hlt">Location</span> Technologies for Apparel Assembly 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S( Tincher, Wayne C.; MOore, Douglas M..; Daley, Wzyne 13a TYPE OF...COSATi CODES 18 SIBJECT TERMS (Continue on rev’erse if neceisary and todentify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP 13 08 Apparel , AtmioMachine Vision</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940017223','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940017223"><span>Single <span class="hlt">event</span> phenomena: Testing and prediction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kinnison, James D.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Highly integrated microelectronic devices are often used to increase the performance of satellite systems while reducing the system power dissipation, size, and weight. However, these devices are usually more susceptible to radiation than less integrated devices. In particular, the problem of sensitivity to single <span class="hlt">event</span> upset and latchup is greatly increased as the integration level is increased. Therefore, a method for <span class="hlt">accurately</span> evaluating the susceptibility of new devices to single <span class="hlt">event</span> phenomena is critical to qualifying new components for use in space systems. This evaluation includes testing devices for upset or latchup and extrapolating the results of these tests to the orbital environment. Current methods for testing devices for single <span class="hlt">event</span> effects are reviewed, and methods for upset rate prediction, including a new technique based on Monte Carlo simulation, are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24808513','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24808513"><span>Asynchronous <span class="hlt">event</span>-based binocular stereo matching.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rogister, Paul; Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Lichtsteiner, Patrick; Delbruck, Tobi</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>We present a novel <span class="hlt">event</span>-based stereo matching algorithm that exploits the asynchronous visual <span class="hlt">events</span> from a pair of silicon retinas. Unlike conventional frame-based cameras, recent artificial retinas transmit their outputs as a continuous stream of asynchronous temporal <span class="hlt">events</span>, in a manner similar to the output cells of the biological retina. Our algorithm uses the timing information carried by this representation in addressing the stereo-matching problem on moving objects. Using the high temporal resolution of the acquired data stream for the dynamic vision sensor, we show that matching on the timing of the visual <span class="hlt">events</span> provides a new solution to the real-time computation of 3-D objects when combined with geometric constraints using the distance to the epipolar lines. The proposed algorithm is able to filter out incorrect matches and to <span class="hlt">accurately</span> reconstruct the depth of moving objects despite the low spatial resolution of the sensor. This brief sets up the principles for further <span class="hlt">event</span>-based vision processing and demonstrates the importance of dynamic information and spike timing in processing asynchronous streams of visual <span class="hlt">events</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-25/pdf/2012-1502.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-01-25/pdf/2012-1502.pdf"><span>77 FR 3800 - <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-25</p> <p>... COMMISSION <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order In the Matter of <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> NDE & Docket: 150... request ADR with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, on August 9, 2011, <span class="hlt">Accurate</span> NDE requested ADR to resolve this matter with the NRC. On September 28,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15980709','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15980709"><span>An evaluation of root ZX and elements diagnostic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tselnik, Marat; Baumgartner, J Craig; Marshall, J Gordon</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of the Root ZX and Elements Diagnostic electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span> under clinical conditions. Thirty-six teeth planned for extraction were used. Each tooth was decoronated, coronally flared with Orifice Shapers, and irrigated with 2.6% sodium hypochlorite. Working lengths were measured with K-files using both electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span>. The files were cemented at the last measured working length and the teeth were extracted. The apical 4-mm of each canal were exposed and photographed under 15x and 30x magnification. Images of each apex were projected and the distance from the file tip to the minor diameter was determined. The mean distances from the file tip to the minor diameter were 0.346 mm for the Elements Diagnostic and 0.410-mm for the Root ZX beyond the minor constriction. In <span class="hlt">locating</span> the minor constriction the Root ZX was <span class="hlt">accurate</span> 75% of the time to +/-0.5 mm, 83.3% +/-0.75 mm, and 88.9% to +/-1 mm. The Elements Diagnostic was <span class="hlt">accurate</span> 75% of the time to +/-0.5 mm, 88.9% to +/-0.75 mm, and 91.7% to +/-1 mm. There was no statistically significant difference between the accuracy of the two electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span> in <span class="hlt">locating</span> the minor diameter (p < 0.05).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764903','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764903"><span><span class="hlt">Locating</span> influential nodes via dynamics-sensitive centrality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Jian-Guo; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>With great theoretical and practical significance, <span class="hlt">locating</span> influential nodes of complex networks is a promising issue. In this paper, we present a dynamics-sensitive (DS) centrality by integrating topological features and dynamical properties. The DS centrality can be directly applied in <span class="hlt">locating</span> influential spreaders. According to the empirical results on four real networks for both susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) and susceptible-infected (SI) spreading models, the DS centrality is more <span class="hlt">accurate</span> than degree, k-shell index and eigenvector centrality. PMID:26905891</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26ES...46a2025W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26ES...46a2025W"><span>Text Content Pushing Technology Research Based on <span class="hlt">Location</span> and Topic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wei, Dongqi; Wei, Jianxin; Wumuti, Naheman; Jiang, Baode</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In the field, geological workers usually want to obtain related geological background information in the working area quickly and <span class="hlt">accurately</span>. This information exists in the massive geological data, text data is described in natural language accounted for a large proportion. This paper studied <span class="hlt">location</span> information extracting method in the mass text data; proposed a geographic location—geological content—geological content related algorithm based on Spark and Mapreduce2, finally classified content by using KNN, and built the content pushing system based on <span class="hlt">location</span> and topic. It is running in the geological survey cloud, and we have gained a good effect in testing by using real geological data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4721795','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4721795"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Coverage Detection and <span class="hlt">Event</span> Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When <span class="hlt">events</span> are found to have possibly occurred, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">event</span> coverage should be detected, and potential <span class="hlt">event</span> sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects <span class="hlt">event</span> coverage and determines <span class="hlt">event</span> sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible <span class="hlt">events</span> corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the <span class="hlt">event</span> coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. <span class="hlt">Event</span> sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady. PMID:26694394</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26694394','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26694394"><span><span class="hlt">Event</span> Coverage Detection and <span class="hlt">Event</span> Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When <span class="hlt">events</span> are found to have possibly occurred, <span class="hlt">accurate</span> <span class="hlt">event</span> coverage should be detected, and potential <span class="hlt">event</span> sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects <span class="hlt">event</span> coverage and determines <span class="hlt">event</span> sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible <span class="hlt">events</span> corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the <span class="hlt">event</span> coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. <span class="hlt">Event</span> sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430239','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430239"><span>Automatic <span class="hlt">location</span> of disruption times in JET.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical <span class="hlt">events</span> known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of <span class="hlt">locating</span> the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to <span class="hlt">locate</span> the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23875553','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23875553"><span>Identification of the "minimal triangle" and other common <span class="hlt">event-to-event</span> transitions in conflict and containment incidents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bowers, Len; James, Karen; Quirk, Alan; Wright, Steve; Williams, Hilary; Stewart, Duncan</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Although individual conflict and containment <span class="hlt">events</span> among acute psychiatric inpatients have been studied in some detail, the relationship of these <span class="hlt">events</span> to each other has not. In particular, little is known about the temporal order of <span class="hlt">events</span> for individual patients. This study aimed to identify the most common pathways from <span class="hlt">event</span> to <span class="hlt">event</span>. A sample of 522 patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in 31 hospital <span class="hlt">locations</span> in London and the surrounding areas during 2009-2010. Data on the order of conflict and containment <span class="hlt">events</span> were collected for the first two weeks of admission from patients' case notes. <span class="hlt">Event-to-event</span> transitions were tabulated and depicted diagrammatically. <span class="hlt">Event</span> types were tested for their most common temporal placing in sequences of <span class="hlt">events</span>. Most conflict and containment occurs within and between <span class="hlt">events</span> of the minimal triangle (verbal aggression, de-escalation, and PRN medication), and the majority of these <span class="hlt">event</span> sequences conclude in no further <span class="hlt">events</span>; a minority transition to other, more severe, <span class="hlt">events</span>. Verbal abuse and medication refusal were more likely to start sequences of disturbed behaviour. Training in the prevention and management of violence needs to acknowledge that a gradual escalation of patient behaviour does not always occur. Verbal aggression is a critical initiator of conflict <span class="hlt">events</span>, and requires more detailed and sustained research on optimal management and prevention strategies. Similar research is required into medication refusal by inpatients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=optometrist&pg=3&id=EJ155312','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=optometrist&pg=3&id=EJ155312"><span>Predictors of Rural Practice <span class="hlt">Location</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kegel-Flom, Penelope</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>Attitudes toward the urban environment and place of origin were found to be the best predictors of an optometrist's practice <span class="hlt">location</span>. Findings of this study imply that optometry students most likely to enter rural practice can be objectively identified early in their training and that the predictive equation presented may be useful in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=64744&keyword=Iron+AND+steel&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=88745014&CFTOKEN=38528600','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=64744&keyword=Iron+AND+steel&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=88745014&CFTOKEN=38528600"><span><span class="hlt">LOCATING</span> LEAKS WITH ACOUSTIC TECHNOLOGY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Many water distribution systems in this country are almost 100 years old. About 26 percent of piping in these systems is made of unlined cast iron or steel and is in poor condition. Many methods that <span class="hlt">locate</span> leaks in these pipes are time-consuming, costly, disruptive to operations...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16728251','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16728251"><span>The ability of two apex <span class="hlt">locators</span> to <span class="hlt">locate</span> the apical foramen: an in vitro study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>D'Assunção, Fábio Luiz Cunha; de Albuquerque, Diana Santana; de Queiroz Ferreira, Linalda Correia</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of the Root-ZX and Novapex electronic apex <span class="hlt">locators</span> (EALs) in <span class="hlt">locating</span> the apical foramen. Forty extracted human teeth were used. The coronal portion of each canal was flared using Gates Glidden drill. Canals were irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. The actual length (AL) and electronic length (EL) measurements were made on each specimen separately with both devices with an aid of a K-type file. The results obtained with each EAL were compared with the corresponding control length. The statistical analysis of the results showed EAL reliability in detecting the apical foramen to 89.7% for the Root-ZX and 82.1% for the Novapex, taking the tolerance of +/-0.5 mm into account. A paired sample t test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the accuracy of the devices (p = 0.4305). The results of this study indicate that the Root-ZX and Novapex are useful and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> devices for the apical foramen <span class="hlt">location</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040201021','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040201021"><span>Source Identification and <span class="hlt">Location</span> Techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weir, Donald; Bridges, James; Agboola, Femi; Dougherty, Robert</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Mr. Weir presented source <span class="hlt">location</span> results obtained from an engine test as part of the Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts program. Two types of microphone arrays were used in this program to determine the jet noise source distribution for the exhaust from a 4.3 bypass ratio turbofan engine. One was a linear array of 16 microphones <span class="hlt">located</span> on a 25 ft. sideline and the other was a 103 microphone 3-D "cage" array in the near field of the jet. Data were obtained from a baseline nozzle and from numerous nozzle configuration using chevrons and/or tabs to reduce the jet noise. Mr. Weir presented data from two configurations: the baseline nozzle and a nozzle configuration with chevrons on both the core and bypass nozzles. This chevron configuration had achieved a jet noise reduction of 4 EPNdB in small scale tests conducted at the Glenn Research Center. IR imaging showed that the chevrons produced significant improvements in mixing and greatly reduced the length of the jet potential core. Comparison of source <span class="hlt">location</span> data from the 1-D phased array showed a shift of the noise sources towards the nozzle and clear reductions of the sources due to the noise reduction devices. Data from the 3-D array showed a single source at a frequency of 125 Hz. <span class="hlt">located</span> several diameters downstream from the nozzle exit. At 250 and 400 Hz., multiple sources, periodically spaced, appeared to exist downstream of the nozzle. The trend of source <span class="hlt">location</span> moving toward the nozzle exit with increasing frequency was also observed. The 3-D array data also showed a reduction in source strength with the addition of chevrons. The overall trend of source <span class="hlt">location</span> with frequency was compared for the two arrays and with classical experience. Similar trends were observed. Although overall trends with frequency and addition of suppression devices were consistent between the data from the 1-D and the 3-D arrays, a comparison of the details of the inferred source <span class="hlt">locations</span> did show differences. A</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984SPIE..449...82Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984SPIE..449...82Z"><span><span class="hlt">Location</span> Of A Vehicle With A Laser Range Finder</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhao, C. J.; Monchaud, S.; Marce, L.; Julliere, M.</p> <p>1984-02-01</p> <p>Absolute <span class="hlt">location</span> of a mobile robot is necessary to improve the autonomy of vehicle built for hostile environments. We are developing a scanning laser range finder based on triangulation to get range data about the edges of a cylindrical polyhedral world. From the matching between the measurements and data computed from a model of the a priori known environment, the position of the robot is deduced <span class="hlt">accurately</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMSH33B2465M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFMSH33B2465M"><span>Comparison of the 26 May 2012 SEP <span class="hlt">Event</span> with the 3 November 2011 SEP <span class="hlt">Event</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Makela, P. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Thakur, N.; Xie, H.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We compare the solar and interplanetary <span class="hlt">events</span> associated with two large solar energetic particle (SEP) <span class="hlt">events</span> on 26 May 2012 and 3 November 2011. Both SEP <span class="hlt">events</span> were detected at three longitudinally widely separated <span class="hlt">locations</span> by STEREO A and B spacecraft (more than 100 deg away from Earth) and the Wind and SOHO spacecraft near Earth. In Earth view, the November 2011 eruption occurred far behind the east limb at N09E154, whereas the May 2012 eruption occurred closer to the west limb at N15W121, suggesting that SEPs accelerated during the 2012 <span class="hlt">event</span> might have easier access to Earth. Even though the 2012 <span class="hlt">event</span> was more intense in the GOES >10 MeV proton channel (peak intensity 14 pfu) than the 2011 <span class="hlt">event</span> (peak intensity 4 pfu), we find that the latter <span class="hlt">event</span> was more intense at higher energies (> 40 MeV). Also, the initial rise at lower energies was slightly faster for the 2011 <span class="hlt">event</span> as measured by SOHO/ERNE. In addition, the CME associated with the May 2012 <span class="hlt">event</span> was faster with an estimated space speed of ~2029 km/s than that in the November 2011 <span class="hlt">event</span> (1188 km/s). STEREO/EUVI images of the associated post-eruption arcades (PEAs) indicate that their orientations were different: the PEA of the May 2012 <span class="hlt">event</span> had a high inclination (north-south), while the inclination of the PEA of the 2011 <span class="hlt">event</span> was more moderate. Differences in the flux rope orientation may also have effect on the longitudinal extent of the SEP <span class="hlt">events</span>. These observations suggest that the dependence of solar proton intensities on the observer's longitudinal distance from the solar source is more complex than traditionally assumed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5116083','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5116083"><span>Carbene footprinting <span class="hlt">accurately</span> maps binding sites in protein–ligand and protein–protein interactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the <span class="hlt">location</span> of a carbohydrate substrate was <span class="hlt">accurately</span> mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were <span class="hlt">located</span> to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation. PMID:27848959</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27848959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27848959"><span>Carbene footprinting <span class="hlt">accurately</span> maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G; Moses, John E; Oldham, Neil J</p> <p>2016-11-16</p> <p>Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the <span class="hlt">location</span> of a carbohydrate substrate was <span class="hlt">accurately</span> mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were <span class="hlt">located</span> to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatCo...713288M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatCo...713288M"><span>Carbene footprinting <span class="hlt">accurately</span> maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the <span class="hlt">location</span> of a carbohydrate substrate was <span class="hlt">accurately</span> mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were <span class="hlt">located</span> to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and <span class="hlt">accurate</span> identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17201561','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17201561"><span>Verb aspect and the activation of <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ferretti, Todd R; Kutas, Marta; McRae, Ken</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The authors show that verb aspect influences the activation of <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge with 4 novel results. First, common <span class="hlt">locations</span> of <span class="hlt">events</span> (e.g., arena) are primed following verbs with imperfective aspect (e.g., was skating) but not verbs with perfect aspect (e.g., had skated). Second, people generate more <span class="hlt">locative</span> prepositional phrases as completions to sentence fragments with imperfective than those with perfect aspect. Third, the amplitude of the N400 component to <span class="hlt">location</span> nouns varies as a function of aspect and typicality, being smallest for imperfective sentences with highly expected <span class="hlt">locations</span> and largest for imperfective sentences with less expected <span class="hlt">locations</span>. Fourth, the amplitude of a sustained frontal negativity spanning prepositional phrases is larger following perfect than following imperfective aspect. Taken together, these findings suggest a dynamic interplay between <span class="hlt">event</span> knowledge and the linguistic stream.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.cancer.gov/about-nci/organization/ccg/news-events','NCI'); return false;" href="https://www.cancer.gov/about-nci/organization/ccg/news-events"><span>CCG - News & <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and <span class="hlt">events</span> featuring CCG.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.cancer.gov/research/key-initiatives/ras/outreach/events','NCI'); return false;" href="https://www.cancer.gov/research/key-initiatives/ras/outreach/events"><span>RAS Initiative - <span class="hlt">Events</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple <span class="hlt">events</span> with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Engine+AND+types&pg=5&id=EJ657664','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Engine+AND+types&pg=5&id=EJ657664"><span>Special <span class="hlt">Event</span> Production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Currents, 2002</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Offers a descriptive table of software that helps higher education institutions orchestrate <span class="hlt">events</span>. Information includes vendor, contact, software, price, database engine/server platform, specific features, and client type. (EV)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/radnet/historical-radiological-event-monitoring','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/radnet/historical-radiological-event-monitoring"><span>Historical Radiological <span class="hlt">Event</span> Monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>During and after radiological <span class="hlt">events</span> EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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