Science.gov

Sample records for accurate field measurements

  1. Magnetic field models of nine CP stars from "accurate" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole models of magnetic fields in nine CP stars are constructed based on the measurements of metal lines taken from the literature, and performed by the LSD method with an accuracy of 10-80 G. The model parameters are compared with the parameters obtained for the same stars from the hydrogen line measurements. For six out of nine stars the same type of structure was obtained. Some parameters, such as the field strength at the poles B p and the average surface magnetic field B s differ considerably in some stars due to differences in the amplitudes of phase dependences B e (Φ) and B s (Φ), obtained by different authors. It is noted that a significant increase in the measurement accuracy has little effect on the modelling of the large-scale structures of the field. By contrast, it is more important to construct the shape of the phase dependence based on a fairly large number of field measurements, evenly distributed by the rotation period phases. It is concluded that the Zeeman component measurement methods have a strong effect on the shape of the phase dependence, and that the measurements of the magnetic field based on the lines of hydrogen are more preferable for modelling the large-scale structures of the field.

  2. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  3. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation. PMID:27517769

  4. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. C.; Ghafur, O.; Khurmi, C.; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J. E.; Laban, D. E.; Pullen, M. G.; Bartschat, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Wells, D.; Quiney, H. M.; Tong, X. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.; Kielpinski, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  5. Accurate measurement of interferometer group delay using field-compensated scanning white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian

    2010-10-10

    Interferometers are key elements in radial velocity (RV) experiments in astronomy observations, and accurate calibration of the group delay of an interferometer is required for high precision measurements. A novel field-compensated white light scanning Michelson interferometer is introduced as an interferometer calibration tool. The optical path difference (OPD) scanning was achieved by translating a compensation prism, such that even if the light source were in low spatial coherence, the interference stays spatially phase coherent over a large interferometer scanning range. In the wavelength region of 500-560 nm, a multimode fiber-coupled LED was used as the light source, and high optical efficiency was essential in elevating the signal-to-noise ratio of the interferogram signal. The achromatic OPD scanning required a one-time calibration, and two methods using dual-laser wavelength references and an iodine absorption spectrum reference were employed and cross-verified. In an experiment measuring the group delay of a fixed Michelson interferometer, Fourier analysis was employed to process the interferogram data. The group delay was determined at an accuracy of 1×10(-5), and the phase angle precision was typically 2.5×10(-6) over the wide wavelength region.

  6. Clinical use of diodes and micro-chambers to obtain accurate small field output factor measurements.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Charles, P H; Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crowe, S B; Langton, C M; Thwaites, D I; Trapp, J V

    2015-06-01

    There have been substantial advances in small field dosimetry techniques and technologies, over the last decade, which have dramatically improved the achievable accuracy of small field dose measurements. This educational note aims to help radiation oncology medical physicists to apply some of these advances in clinical practice. The evaluation of a set of small field output factors (total scatter factors) is used to exemplify a detailed measurement and simulation procedure and as a basis for discussing the possible effects of simplifying that procedure. Field output factors were measured with an unshielded diode and a micro-ionisation chamber, at the centre of a set of square fields defined by a micro-multileaf collimator. Nominal field sizes investigated ranged from 6 × 6 to 98 × 98 mm(2). Diode measurements in fields smaller than 30 mm across were corrected using response factors calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the diode geometry and daisy-chained to match micro-chamber measurements at intermediate field sizes. Diode measurements in fields smaller than 15 mm across were repeated twelve times over three separate measurement sessions, to evaluate the reproducibility of the radiation field size and its correspondence with the nominal field size. The five readings that contributed to each measurement on each day varied by up to 0.26  %, for the "very small" fields smaller than 15 mm, and 0.18 % for the fields larger than 15 mm. The diode response factors calculated for the unshielded diode agreed with previously published results, within uncertainties. The measured dimensions of the very small fields differed by up to 0.3 mm, across the different measurement sessions, contributing an uncertainty of up to 1.2 % to the very small field output factors. The overall uncertainties in the field output factors were 1.8 % for the very small fields and 1.1 % for the fields larger than 15 mm across. Recommended steps for acquiring small field output

  7. A novel method to predict visual field progression more accurately, using intraocular pressure measurements in glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Ryo; Fujino, Yuri; Murata, Hiroshi; Miki, Atsuya; Tanito, Masaki; Mizoue, Shiro; Mori, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Yamashita, Takehiro; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Shoji, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Visual field (VF) data were retrospectively obtained from 491 eyes in 317 patients with open angle glaucoma who had undergone ten VF tests (Humphrey Field Analyzer, 24-2, SITA standard). First, mean of total deviation values (mTD) in the tenth VF was predicted using standard linear regression of the first five VFs (VF1-5) through to using all nine preceding VFs (VF1-9). Then an ‘intraocular pressure (IOP)-integrated VF trend analysis’ was carried out by simply using time multiplied by IOP as the independent term in the linear regression model. Prediction errors (absolute prediction error or root mean squared error: RMSE) for predicting mTD and also point wise TD values of the tenth VF were obtained from both approaches. The mTD absolute prediction errors associated with the IOP-integrated VF trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-6 through to VF1-8 were used (p < 0.05). The point wise RMSEs from the IOP-integrated trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-5 through to VF1-9 were used (p < 0.05). This was especially the case when IOP was measured more frequently. Thus a significantly more accurate prediction of VF progression is possible using a simple trend analysis that incorporates IOP measurements. PMID:27562553

  8. A novel method to predict visual field progression more accurately, using intraocular pressure measurements in glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Visual field (VF) data were retrospectively obtained from 491 eyes in 317 patients with open angle glaucoma who had undergone ten VF tests (Humphrey Field Analyzer, 24-2, SITA standard). First, mean of total deviation values (mTD) in the tenth VF was predicted using standard linear regression of the first five VFs (VF1-5) through to using all nine preceding VFs (VF1-9). Then an 'intraocular pressure (IOP)-integrated VF trend analysis' was carried out by simply using time multiplied by IOP as the independent term in the linear regression model. Prediction errors (absolute prediction error or root mean squared error: RMSE) for predicting mTD and also point wise TD values of the tenth VF were obtained from both approaches. The mTD absolute prediction errors associated with the IOP-integrated VF trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-6 through to VF1-8 were used (p < 0.05). The point wise RMSEs from the IOP-integrated trend analysis were significantly smaller than those from the standard trend analysis when VF1-5 through to VF1-9 were used (p < 0.05). This was especially the case when IOP was measured more frequently. Thus a significantly more accurate prediction of VF progression is possible using a simple trend analysis that incorporates IOP measurements. PMID:27562553

  9. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  10. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  11. Role of Photoexcitation and Field Ionization in the Measurement of Accurate Oxide Stoichiometry by Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Hess, Wayne P.; Perea, Daniel E.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-03-06

    Pulsed lasers extend the high spatial and mass resolution of atom probe tomography (APT) to non-conducting materials, such as oxides. For prototypical metal oxide MgO, measured stoichiometry depends strongly upon pulse energy and applied voltage. Very low laser energies (0.02 pJ) and high electric fields yield optimal stoichiometric accuracy, attributed to the field-dependent ionization of photo-desorbed O or O2 neutrals. This emphasizes the importance of considering electronic excitations in APT analysis of oxides ionic materials.

  12. Role of Photoexcitation and Field Ionization in the Measurement of Accurate Oxide Stoichiometry by Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, A; Colby, R; Hess, W P; Perea, D E; Thevuthasan, S

    2013-03-21

    The addition of pulsed lasers to atom probe tomography (APT) extends its high spatial and mass resolution capability to nonconducting materials, such as oxides. For a prototypical metal oxide, MgO, the measured stoichiometry depends strongly on the laser pulse energy and applied voltage. Very low laser energies (0.02 pJ) and high electric fields yield optimal stoichiometric accuracy. Correlated APT and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to establish the high density of corner and terrace sites on MgO sample surfaces before and after APT. For MgO, long-lifetime photoexcited holes localized at oxygen corner sites can assist in the creation of oxygen neutrals that may spontaneously desorb either as atomic O or as molecular O2. The observed trends are best explained by the relative field-dependent ionization of photodesorbed O or O2 neutrals. These results emphasize the importance of considering electronic excitations in APT analysis of oxide materials.

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  16. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  17. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  18. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  19. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  20. Finite Element Modelling of a Field-Sensed Magnetic Suspended System for Accurate Proximity Measurement Based on a Sensor Fusion Algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Amor; Sarjaš, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The presented paper describes accurate distance measurement for a field-sensed magnetic suspension system. The proximity measurement is based on a Hall effect sensor. The proximity sensor is installed directly on the lower surface of the electro-magnet, which means that it is very sensitive to external magnetic influences and disturbances. External disturbances interfere with the information signal and reduce the usability and reliability of the proximity measurements and, consequently, the whole application operation. A sensor fusion algorithm is deployed for the aforementioned reasons. The sensor fusion algorithm is based on the Unscented Kalman Filter, where a nonlinear dynamic model was derived with the Finite Element Modelling approach. The advantage of such modelling is a more accurate dynamic model parameter estimation, especially in the case when the real structure, materials and dimensions of the real-time application are known. The novelty of the paper is the design of a compact electro-magnetic actuator with a built-in low cost proximity sensor for accurate proximity measurement of the magnetic object. The paper successively presents a modelling procedure with the finite element method, design and parameter settings of a sensor fusion algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter and, finally, the implementation procedure and results of real-time operation. PMID:27649197

  1. Finite Element Modelling of a Field-Sensed Magnetic Suspended System for Accurate Proximity Measurement Based on a Sensor Fusion Algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Amor; Sarjaš, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The presented paper describes accurate distance measurement for a field-sensed magnetic suspension system. The proximity measurement is based on a Hall effect sensor. The proximity sensor is installed directly on the lower surface of the electro-magnet, which means that it is very sensitive to external magnetic influences and disturbances. External disturbances interfere with the information signal and reduce the usability and reliability of the proximity measurements and, consequently, the whole application operation. A sensor fusion algorithm is deployed for the aforementioned reasons. The sensor fusion algorithm is based on the Unscented Kalman Filter, where a nonlinear dynamic model was derived with the Finite Element Modelling approach. The advantage of such modelling is a more accurate dynamic model parameter estimation, especially in the case when the real structure, materials and dimensions of the real-time application are known. The novelty of the paper is the design of a compact electro-magnetic actuator with a built-in low cost proximity sensor for accurate proximity measurement of the magnetic object. The paper successively presents a modelling procedure with the finite element method, design and parameter settings of a sensor fusion algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter and, finally, the implementation procedure and results of real-time operation. PMID:27649197

  2. Finite Element Modelling of a Field-Sensed Magnetic Suspended System for Accurate Proximity Measurement Based on a Sensor Fusion Algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Amor; Sarjaš, Andrej

    2016-09-15

    The presented paper describes accurate distance measurement for a field-sensed magnetic suspension system. The proximity measurement is based on a Hall effect sensor. The proximity sensor is installed directly on the lower surface of the electro-magnet, which means that it is very sensitive to external magnetic influences and disturbances. External disturbances interfere with the information signal and reduce the usability and reliability of the proximity measurements and, consequently, the whole application operation. A sensor fusion algorithm is deployed for the aforementioned reasons. The sensor fusion algorithm is based on the Unscented Kalman Filter, where a nonlinear dynamic model was derived with the Finite Element Modelling approach. The advantage of such modelling is a more accurate dynamic model parameter estimation, especially in the case when the real structure, materials and dimensions of the real-time application are known. The novelty of the paper is the design of a compact electro-magnetic actuator with a built-in low cost proximity sensor for accurate proximity measurement of the magnetic object. The paper successively presents a modelling procedure with the finite element method, design and parameter settings of a sensor fusion algorithm with Unscented Kalman Filter and, finally, the implementation procedure and results of real-time operation.

  3. Autonomous Instrumentation for Fast, Continuous and Accurate Isotopic Measurements of Water Vapor (δ18O, δ 2H, H2O) in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, J. S.; Dong, F.; Owano, T. G.; Baer, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    Stable isotopes of water vapor are powerful tracers to investigate the hydrological cycle and ecological processes. Therefore, continuous, in-situ and accurate measurements of δ18O and δ2H are critical to advance the understanding of water-cycle dynamics worldwide. Furthermore, the combination of meteorological techniques and high-frequency isotopic water measurements can provide detailed time-resolved information on the eco-physiological performance of plants and enable improved understanding of water fluxes at ecosystem scales. In this work, we present recent development and field deployment of a novel Water Vapor Isotope Measurement System (WVIMS) capable of simultaneous in situ measurements of δ18O and δ2H and water mixing ratio (H2O) with high precision, accuracy and speed (up to 10 Hz measurement rate). The WVIMS consists of an Analyzer (Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy, and a Standard Source (Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source), based on quantitative evaporation of a liquid water standard (with known isotopic content), and operates in a dual-inlet configuration. The WVIMS automatically controls the entire sample and data collection, data analysis and calibration process to allow for continuous, autonomous unattended long-term operation. The WVIMS has been demonstrated for accurate (i.e. fully calibrated) measurements ranging from 500 ppmv (typical of arctic environments) to over 30,000 ppmv (typical of tropical environments) in air. Dual-inlet operation, which involves regular calibration with isotopic water vapor reference standards, essentially eliminates measurement drift, ensures data reliability, and allows operation over an extremely wide ambient temperature range (5-45C). This presentation will include recent measurements recorded using the WVIMS in plant growth chambers and in arctic environments. The availability of this new instrumentation provides new opportunities for detailed continuous

  4. How accurately can subject-specific finite element models predict strains and strength of human femora? Investigation using full-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Väänänen, Sami P; Ristinmaa, Matti; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-03-21

    Subject-specific finite element models have been proposed as a tool to improve fracture risk assessment in individuals. A thorough laboratory validation against experimental data is required before introducing such models in clinical practice. Results from digital image correlation can provide full-field strain distribution over the specimen surface during in vitro test, instead of at a few pre-defined locations as with strain gauges. The aim of this study was to validate finite element models of human femora against experimental data from three cadaver femora, both in terms of femoral strength and of the full-field strain distribution collected with digital image correlation. The results showed a high accuracy between predicted and measured principal strains (R(2)=0.93, RMSE=10%, 1600 validated data points per specimen). Femoral strength was predicted using a rate dependent material model with specific strain limit values for yield and failure. This provided an accurate prediction (<2% error) for two out of three specimens. In the third specimen, an accidental change in the boundary conditions occurred during the experiment, which compromised the femoral strength validation. The achieved strain accuracy was comparable to that obtained in state-of-the-art studies which validated their prediction accuracy against 10-16 strain gauge measurements. Fracture force was accurately predicted, with the predicted failure location being very close to the experimental fracture rim. Despite the low sample size and the single loading condition tested, the present combined numerical-experimental method showed that finite element models can predict femoral strength by providing a thorough description of the local bone mechanical response. PMID:26944687

  5. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  6. Preparation and accurate measurement of pure ozone.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christof; Simone, Daniela; Guinet, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    Preparation of high purity ozone as well as precise and accurate measurement of its pressure are metrological requirements that are difficult to meet due to ozone decomposition occurring in pressure sensors. The most stable and precise transducer heads are heated and, therefore, prone to accelerated ozone decomposition, limiting measurement accuracy and compromising purity. Here, we describe a vacuum system and a method for ozone production, suitable to accurately determine the pressure of pure ozone by avoiding the problem of decomposition. We use an inert gas in a particularly designed buffer volume and can thus achieve high measurement accuracy and negligible degradation of ozone with purities of 99.8% or better. The high degree of purity is ensured by comprehensive compositional analyses of ozone samples. The method may also be applied to other reactive gases. PMID:21456766

  7. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  8. Undulator Field Integral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-07

    The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note describes the design of the coil measurement system.

  9. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  10. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  11. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  12. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  13. EMR Gage Would Measure Coal Thickness Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. D.; Rollwitz, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests indicate electron magnetic resonance (EMR) would be effective in measuring thickness of coal overlying rock substrate. In prototype dual-frequency EMR system, Sample is irradiated by two radio frequencies. Signals are mixed, producing sum and difference output frequencies that are detected by receiver. Magnetic field is varied to scan resonant spot through sample. In system designed for field use, electromagnet is U-shaped, so that sample can be adjacent to, rather than inside the probe. Same coil is used for transmitting and receiving.

  14. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  15. Accurate measurement in the field of the earth of the general-relativistic precession of the LAGEOS II pericenter and new constraints on non-newtonian gravity.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, David M; Peron, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The pericenter shift of a binary system represents a suitable observable to test for possible deviations from the newtonian inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions between macroscopic objects. We analyzed 13 years of tracking data of the LAGEOS satellites with GEODYN II software but with no models for general relativity. From the fit of LAGEOS II pericenter residuals we have been able to obtain a 99.8% agreement with the predictions of Einstein's theory. This result may be considered as a 99.8% measurement in the field of the Earth of the combination of the γ and β parameters of general relativity, and it may be used to constrain possible deviations from the inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions parametrized by a Yukawa-like potential with strength α and range λ. We obtained |α| ≲ 1 × 10(-11), a huge improvement at a range of about 1 Earth radius.

  16. Accurate Measurement in the Field of the Earth of the General-Relativistic Precession of the LAGEOS II Pericenter and New Constraints on Non-Newtonian Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, David M.; Peron, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The pericenter shift of a binary system represents a suitable observable to test for possible deviations from the Newtonian inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions between macroscopic objects. We analyzed 13 years of tracking data of the LAGEOS satellites with GEODYN II software but with no models for general relativity. From the fit of LAGEOS II pericenter residuals we have been able to obtain a 99.8% agreement with the predictions of Einstein’s theory. This result may be considered as a 99.8% measurement in the field of the Earth of the combination of the γ and β parameters of general relativity, and it may be used to constrain possible deviations from the inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions parametrized by a Yukawa-like potential with strength α and range λ. We obtained |α|≲1×10-11, a huge improvement at a range of about 1 Earth radius.

  17. A unique, accurate LWIR optics measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantone, Stephen D.; Orband, Daniel G.

    2011-05-01

    A compact low-cost LWIR test station has been developed that provides real time MTF testing of IR optical systems and EO imaging systems. The test station is intended to be operated by a technician and can be used to measure the focal length, blur spot size, distortion, and other metrics of system performance. The challenges and tradeoffs incorporated into this instrumentation will be presented. The test station performs the measurement of an IR lens or optical system's first order quantities (focal length, back focal length) including on and off-axis imaging performance (e.g., MTF, resolution, spot size) under actual test conditions to enable the simulation of their actual use. Also described is the method of attaining the needed accuracies so that derived calculations like focal length (EFL = image shift/tan(theta)) can be performed to the requisite accuracy. The station incorporates a patented video capture technology and measures MTF and blur characteristics using newly available lowcost LWIR cameras. This allows real time determination of the optical system performance enabling faster measurements, higher throughput and lower cost results than scanning systems. Multiple spectral filters are also accommodated within the test stations which facilitate performance evaluation under various spectral conditions.

  18. Modified algesimeter provides accurate depth measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Algesimeter which incorporates a standard sensory needle with a sensitive micrometer, measures needle point depth penetration in pain tolerance research. This algesimeter provides an inexpensive, precise instrument with assured validity of recordings in those biomedical areas with a requirement for repeated pain detection or ascertaining pain sensitivity.

  19. Accurate Measurement of Bone Density with QCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Matsubara, Miki; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of bone density measurement with a new OCT technology. A phantom was fabricated using two materials, a water-equivalent compound and hydroxyapatite (HA), combined in precise proportions (QRM GrnbH, Germany). The phantom was designed to have the approximate physical size and range in bone density as a human calcaneus, with regions of 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/cc HA. The phantom was scanned at 80, 120 and 140 KVp with a GE CT/i HiSpeed Advantage scanner. A ring of highly attenuating material (polyvinyl chloride or teflon) was slipped over the phantom to alter the image by introducing non-axi-symmetric beam hardening. Images were corrected with a new OCT technology using an estimate of the effective X-ray beam spectrum to eliminate beam hardening artifacts. The algorithm computes the volume fraction of HA and water-equivalent matrix in each voxel. We found excellent agreement between expected and computed HA volume fractions. Results were insensitive to beam hardening ring material, HA concentration, and scan voltage settings. Data from all 3 voltages with a best fit linear regression are displays.

  20. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  1. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into "unsaturated" and "saturated" category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  2. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into “unsaturated” and “saturated” category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  3. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  4. Slim hole MWD tool accurately measures downhole annular pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, B.; Delahaye, T. )

    1994-02-14

    Measurement-while-drilling of downhole pressure accurately determines annular pressure losses from circulation and drillstring rotation and helps monitor swab and surge pressures during tripping. In early 1993, two slim-hole wells (3.4 in. and 3 in. diameter) were drilled with continuous real-time electromagnetic wave transmission of downhole temperature and annular pressure. The data were obtained during all stages of the drilling operation and proved useful for operations personnel. The use of real-time measurements demonstrated the characteristic hydraulic effects of pressure surges induced by drillstring rotation in the small slim-hole annulus under field conditions. The interest in this information is not restricted to the slim-hole geometry. Monitoring or estimating downhole pressure is a key element for drilling operations. Except in special cases, no real-time measurements of downhole annular pressure during drilling and tripping have been used on an operational basis. The hydraulic effects are significant in conventional-geometry wells (3 1/2-in. drill pipe in a 6-in. hole). This paper describes the tool and the results from the field test.

  5. Accurately measuring MPI broadcasts in a computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    Karonis N T; de Supinski, B R

    1999-05-06

    An MPI library's implementation of broadcast communication can significantly affect the performance of applications built with that library. In order to choose between similar implementations or to evaluate available libraries, accurate measurements of broadcast performance are required. As we demonstrate, existing methods for measuring broadcast performance are either inaccurate or inadequate. Fortunately, we have designed an accurate method for measuring broadcast performance, even in a challenging grid environment. Measuring broadcast performance is not easy. Simply sending one broadcast after another allows them to proceed through the network concurrently, thus resulting in inaccurate per broadcast timings. Existing methods either fail to eliminate this pipelining effect or eliminate it by introducing overheads that are as difficult to measure as the performance of the broadcast itself. This problem becomes even more challenging in grid environments. Latencies a long different links can vary significantly. Thus, an algorithm's performance is difficult to predict from it's communication pattern. Even when accurate pre-diction is possible, the pattern is often unknown. Our method introduces a measurable overhead to eliminate the pipelining effect, regardless of variations in link latencies. choose between different available implementations. Also, accurate and complete measurements could guide use of a given implementation to improve application performance. These choices will become even more important as grid-enabled MPI libraries [6, 7] become more common since bad choices are likely to cost significantly more in grid environments. In short, the distributed processing community needs accurate, succinct and complete measurements of collective communications performance. Since successive collective communications can often proceed concurrently, accurately measuring them is difficult. Some benchmarks use knowledge of the communication algorithm to predict the

  6. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  7. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  8. Accurate Insertion Loss Measurements of the Juno Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Chen, Jacqueline; Hodges, Richard; Demas, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two independent methods for estimating the insertion loss of patch array antennas that were developed for the Juno Microwave Radiometer instrument. One method is based principally on pattern measurements while the other method is based solely on network analyzer measurements. The methods are accurate to within 0.1 dB for the measured antennas and show good agreement (to within 0.1dB) of separate radiometric measurements.

  9. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  10. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  11. Accurate calculation of field and carrier distributions in doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenji; Tang, Jianping; Yu, Hongchun; Wang, Yanguo

    2012-06-01

    We use the numerical squeezing algorithm(NSA) combined with the shooting method to accurately calculate the built-in fields and carrier distributions in doped silicon films (SFs) in the micron and sub-micron thickness range and results are presented in graphical form for variety of doping profiles under different boundary conditions. As a complementary approach, we also present the methods and the results of the inverse problem (IVP) - finding out the doping profile in the SFs for given field distribution. The solution of the IVP provides us the approach to arbitrarily design field distribution in SFs - which is very important for low dimensional (LD) systems and device designing. Further more, the solution of the IVP is both direct and much easy for all the one-, two-, and three-dimensional semiconductor systems. With current efforts focused on the LD physics, knowing of the field and carrier distribution details in the LD systems will facilitate further researches on other aspects and hence the current work provides a platform for those researches.

  12. A novel technique for highly accurate gas exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkenings, R. K.; Jähne, B. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Heidelberg Aeolotron is a circular wind-wave facility for investigating air-sea gas exchange. In this contribution a novel technique for measuring highly accurate transfer velocities k of mass transfer will be presented. Traditionally, in mass balance techniques the constant of decay for gas concentrations over time is measured. The major drawback of this concept is the long time constant. At low wind speeds and a water height greater than 1 m the period of observation has to be several days. In a gas-tight facility such as the Aeolotron, the transfer velocity k can be computed from the concentration in the water body and the change of concentration in the gas space. Owing to this fact, transfer velocities are gained while greatly reducing the measuring times to less than one hour. The transfer velocity k of a tracer can be parameterized as k=1/β \\cdot u_* \\cdot Sc^n, with the Schmidt Number Sc, shear velocity u_* and the dimensionless transfer resistance β. The Schmidt Number exponent n can be derived from simultaneous measurements of different tracers. Since these tracers are of different Schmidt number, the shear velocity is not needed. To allow for Schmidt numbers spanning a hole decade, in our experiments He, H_2, N_2O and F12 are used. The relative accuracy of measuring the transfer velocity was improved to less than 2%. In 9 consecutive experiments conducted at a wind speed of 6.2 m/s, the deviation of the Schmidt number exponent was found to be just under 0.02. This high accuracy will allow precisely determining the transition of the Schmidt number exponent from n=2/3 to n=0.5 from a flat to wavy water surface. In order to quantify gas exchange not only the wind speed is important. Surfactants have a pronounced effect on the wave field and lead to a drastic reduction in the transfer velocity. In the Aeolotron measurements were conducted with a variety of measuring devices, ranging from an imaging slope gauge (ISG) to thermal techniques with IR

  13. Monitoring circuit accurately measures movement of solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Solenoid operated valve in a control system powered by direct current issued to accurately measure the valve travel. This system is currently in operation with a 28-vdc power system used for control of fluids in liquid rocket motor test facilities.

  14. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  15. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  16. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  17. Toward more accurate loss tangent measurements in reentrant cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R. D.

    1980-05-01

    Karpova has described an absolute method for measurement of dielectric properties of a solid in a coaxial reentrant cavity. His cavity resonance equation yields very accurate results for dielectric constants. However, he presented only approximate expressions for the loss tangent. This report presents more exact expressions for that quantity and summarizes some experimental results.

  18. Accurately measuring volcanic plume velocity with multiple UV spectrometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Jones, G.; Horton, K.A.; Elias, T.; Garbeil, H.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Sutton, A.J.; Harris, A.J.L.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental problem with all ground-based remotely sensed measurements of volcanic gas flux is the difficulty in accurately measuring the velocity of the gas plume. Since a representative wind speed and direction are used as proxies for the actual plume velocity, there can be considerable uncertainty in reported gas flux values. Here we present a method that uses at least two time-synchronized simultaneously recording UV spectrometers (FLYSPECs) placed a known distance apart. By analyzing the time varying structure of SO2 concentration signals at each instrument, the plume velocity can accurately be determined. Experiments were conducted on Ki??lauea (USA) and Masaya (Nicaragua) volcanoes in March and August 2003 at plume velocities between 1 and 10 m s-1. Concurrent ground-based anemometer measurements differed from FLYSPEC-measured plume speeds by up to 320%. This multi-spectrometer method allows for the accurate remote measurement of plume velocity and can therefore greatly improve the precision of volcanic or industrial gas flux measurements. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  19. Accurate MTF measurement in digital radiography using noise response

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors describe a new technique to determine the system presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) in digital radiography using only the detector noise response. Methods: A cascaded-linear systems analysis was used to develop an exact relationship between the two-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) and the presampled MTF for a generalized detector system. This relationship was then utilized to determine the two-dimensional presampled MTF. For simplicity, aliasing of the correlated noise component of the NPS was assumed to be negligible. Accuracy of this method was investigated using simulated images from a simple detector model in which the “true” MTF was known exactly. Measurements were also performed on three detector technologies (an x-ray image intensifier, an indirect flat panel detector, and a solid state x-ray image intensifier), and the results were compared using the standard edge-response method. Flat-field and edge images were acquired and analyzed according to guidelines set forth by the International Electrotechnical Commission, using the RQA 5 spectrum. Results: The presampled MTF determined using the noise-response method for the simulated detector system was in close agreement with the true MTF with an averaged percent difference of 0.3% and a maximum difference of 1.1% observed at the Nyquist frequency (fN). The edge-response method of the simulated detector system also showed very good agreement at lower spatial frequencies (less than 0.5 fN) with an averaged percent difference of 1.6% but showed significant discrepancies at higher spatial frequencies (greater than 0.5 fN) with an averaged percent difference of 17%. Discrepancies were in part a result of noise in the edge image and phasing errors. For all three detector systems, the MTFs obtained using the two methods were found to be in good agreement at spatial frequencies less than 0.5 fN with an averaged percent difference of 3.4%. Above 0.5 fN, differences increased to

  20. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  1. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  2. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  3. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  4. A method for accurate temperature measurement using infrared thermal camera.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Sudo, Takayuki; Okubo, Shuichi; Komatsubara, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-08-01

    The temperature distribution on a centre-holed thin foil of molybdenum, used as a sample and heated using a sample-heating holder for electron microscopy, was measured using an infrared thermal camera. The temperature on the heated foil area located near the heating stage of the heating holder is almost equal to the temperature on the heating stage. However, during the measurement of the temperature at the edge of the hole of the foil located farthest from the heating stage, a drop in temperature should be taken into consideration; however, so far, no method has been developed to locally measure the temperature distribution on the heated sample. In this study, a method for the accurate measurement of temperature distribution on heated samples for electron microscopy is discussed.

  5. Accurate measurements of dynamics and reproducibility in small genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubuis, Julien O; Samanta, Reba; Gregor, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression has become a central tool for understanding genetic networks. In many systems, the only viable way to measure protein levels is by immunofluorescence, which is notorious for its limited accuracy. Using the early Drosophila embryo as an example, we show that careful identification and control of experimental error allows for highly accurate gene expression measurements. We generated antibodies in different host species, allowing for simultaneous staining of four Drosophila gap genes in individual embryos. Careful error analysis of hundreds of expression profiles reveals that less than ∼20% of the observed embryo-to-embryo fluctuations stem from experimental error. These measurements make it possible to extract not only very accurate mean gene expression profiles but also their naturally occurring fluctuations of biological origin and corresponding cross-correlations. We use this analysis to extract gap gene profile dynamics with ∼1 min accuracy. The combination of these new measurements and analysis techniques reveals a twofold increase in profile reproducibility owing to a collective network dynamics that relays positional accuracy from the maternal gradients to the pair-rule genes. PMID:23340845

  6. Accurate Runout Measurement for HDD Spinning Motors and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Bi, Chao; Lin, Song

    As hard disk drive (HDD) areal density increases, its track width becomes smaller and smaller and so is non-repeatable runout. HDD industry needs more accurate and better resolution runout measurements of spinning spindle motors and media platters in both axial and radial directions. This paper introduces a new system how to precisely measure the runout of HDD spinning disks and motors through synchronously acquiring the rotor position signal and the displacements in axial or radial directions. In order to minimize the synchronizing error between the rotor position and the displacement signal, a high resolution counter is adopted instead of the conventional phase-lock loop method. With Laser Doppler Vibrometer and proper signal processing, the proposed runout system can precisely measure the runout of the HDD spinning disks and motors with 1 nm resolution and 0.2% accuracy with a proper sampling rate. It can provide an effective and accurate means to measure the runout of high areal density HDDs, in particular the next generation HDDs, such as, pattern media HDDs and HAMR HDDs.

  7. Precise and accurate isotopic measurements using multiple-collector ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarède, F.; Telouk, Philippe; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Boyet, Maud; Agranier, Arnaud; Nelson, Bruce

    2004-06-01

    New techniques of isotopic measurements by a new generation of mass spectrometers equipped with an inductively-coupled-plasma source, a magnetic mass filter, and multiple collection (MC-ICPMS) are quickly developing. These techniques are valuable because of (1) the ability of ICP sources to ionize virtually every element in the periodic table, and (2) the large sample throughout. However, because of the complex trajectories of multiple ion beams produced in the plasma source whether from the same or different elements, the acquisition of precise and accurate isotopic data with this type of instrument still requires a good understanding of instrumental fractionation processes, both mass-dependent and mass-independent. Although physical processes responsible for the instrumental mass bias are still to be understood more fully, we here present a theoretical framework that allows for most of the analytical limitations to high precision and accuracy to be overcome. After a presentation of unifying phenomenological theory for mass-dependent fractionation in mass spectrometers, we show how this theory accounts for the techniques of standard bracketing and of isotopic normalization by a ratio of either the same or a different element, such as the use of Tl to correct mass bias on Pb. Accuracy is discussed with reference to the concept of cup efficiencies. Although these can be simply calibrated by analyzing standards, we derive a straightforward, very general method to calculate accurate isotopic ratios from dynamic measurements. In this study, we successfully applied the dynamic method to Nd and Pb as examples. We confirm that the assumption of identical mass bias for neighboring elements (notably Pb and Tl, and Yb and Lu) is both unnecessary and incorrect. We further discuss the dangers of straightforward standard-sample bracketing when chemical purification of the element to be analyzed is imperfect. Pooling runs to improve precision is acceptable provided the pooled

  8. Accurate measurement method for tube's endpoints based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoli; Jin, Peng; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tubes are used widely in aerospace vehicles, and their accurate assembly can directly affect the assembling reliability and the quality of products. It is important to measure the processed tube's endpoints and then fix any geometric errors correspondingly. However, the traditional tube inspection method is time-consuming and complex operations. Therefore, a new measurement method for a tube's endpoints based on machine vision is proposed. First, reflected light on tube's surface can be removed by using photometric linearization. Then, based on the optimization model for the tube's endpoint measurements and the principle of stereo matching, the global coordinates and the relative distance of the tube's endpoint are obtained. To confirm the feasibility, 11 tubes are processed to remove the reflected light and then the endpoint's positions of tubes are measured. The experiment results show that the measurement repeatability accuracy is 0.167 mm, and the absolute accuracy is 0.328 mm. The measurement takes less than 1 min. The proposed method based on machine vision can measure the tube's endpoints without any surface treatment or any tools and can realize on line measurement.

  9. Accurate frequency noise measurement of free-running lasers.

    PubMed

    Schiemangk, Max; Spiessberger, Stefan; Wicht, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther; Peters, Achim

    2014-10-20

    We present a simple method to accurately measure the frequency noise power spectrum of lasers. It relies on creating the beat note between two lasers, capturing the corresponding signal in the time domain, and appropriately postprocessing the data to derive the frequency noise power spectrum. In contrast to methods already established, it does not require stabilization of the laser to an optical reference, i.e., a second laser, to an optical cavity or to an atomic transition. It further omits a frequency discriminator and hence avoids bandwidth limitation and nonlinearity effects common to high-resolution frequency discriminators.

  10. Technological Basis and Scientific Returns for Absolutely Accurate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    The 2006 NRC Decadal Survey fostered a new appreciation for societal objectives as a driving motivation for Earth science. Many high-priority societal objectives are dependent on predictions of weather and climate. These predictions are based on numerical models, which derive from approximate representations of well-founded physics and chemistry on space and timescales appropriate to global and regional prediction. These laws of chemistry and physics in turn have a well-defined quantitative relationship with physical measurement units, provided these measurement units are linked to international measurement standards that are the foundation of contemporary measurement science and standards for engineering and commerce. Without this linkage, measurements have an ambiguous relationship to scientific principles that introduces avoidable uncertainty in analyses, predictions, and improved understanding of the Earth system. Since the improvement of climate and weather prediction is fundamentally dependent on the improvement of the representation of physical processes, measurement systems that reduce the ambiguity between physical truth and observations represent an essential component of a national strategy for understanding and living with the Earth system. This paper examines the technological basis and potential science returns of sensors that make measurements that are quantitatively tied on-orbit to international measurement standards, and thus testable to systematic errors. This measurement strategy provides several distinct benefits. First, because of the quantitative relationship between these international measurement standards and fundamental physical constants, measurements of this type accurately capture the true physical and chemical behavior of the climate system and are not subject to adjustment due to excluded measurement physics or instrumental artifacts. In addition, such measurements can be reproduced by scientists anywhere in the world, at any time

  11. Facility Measures Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honess, Shawn B.; Narvaez, Pablo; Mcauley, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Partly automated facility measures and computes steady near magnetic field produced by object. Designed to determine magnetic fields of equipment to be installed on spacecraft including sensitive magnetometers, with view toward application of compensating fields to reduce interfernece with spacecraft-magnetometer readings. Because of its convenient operating features and sensitivity of its measurements, facility serves as prototype for similar facilities devoted to magnetic characterization of medical equipment, magnets for high-energy particle accelerators, and magnetic materials.

  12. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  13. A high order accurate difference scheme for complex flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dexun Fu; Yanwen Ma

    1997-06-01

    A high order accurate finite difference method for direct numerical simulation of coherent structure in the mixing layers is presented. The reason for oscillation production in numerical solutions is analyzed. It is caused by a nonuniform group velocity of wavepackets. A method of group velocity control for the improvement of the shock resolution is presented. In numerical simulation the fifth-order accurate upwind compact difference relation is used to approximate the derivatives in the convection terms of the compressible N-S equations, a sixth-order accurate symmetric compact difference relation is used to approximate the viscous terms, and a three-stage R-K method is used to advance in time. In order to improve the shock resolution the scheme is reconstructed with the method of diffusion analogy which is used to control the group velocity of wavepackets. 18 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Toward Accurate Measurement of Participation: Rethinking the Conceptualization and Operationalization of Participatory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneault, Pierre-Marc; Jacob, Steve

    2009-01-01

    While participatory evaluation (PE) constitutes an important trend in the field of evaluation, its ontology has not been systematically analyzed. As a result, the concept of PE is ambiguous and inadequately theorized. Furthermore, no existing instrument accurately measures stakeholder participation. First, this article attempts to overcome these…

  15. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research's focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  16. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research`s focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  17. Highly accurate SNR measurement using the covariance of two SEM images with the identical view.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Quality of an SEM image is strongly influenced by the extent of noise. As a well-known method in the field of SEM, the covariance is applied to measure the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This method has potential ability for highly accurate measurement of the SNR, which is hardly known until now. If the precautions discussed in this article are adopted, that method can demonstrate its real ability. These precautions are strongly related to "proper acquisition of two images with the identical view," "alignment of an aperture diaphragm," "reduction of charging phenomena," "elimination of particular noises," and "accurate focusing," As necessary, characteristics in SEM signal and noise are investigated from a few standpoints. When using the maximum performance of this measurement, SNR of many SEM images obtained in a variety of the SEM operating conditions and specimens can be measured accurately.

  18. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  19. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an

  20. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  1. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems.

  2. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  3. The importance of accurate experimental data to marginal field development

    SciTech Connect

    Overa, S.J.; Lingelem, M.N.

    1997-12-31

    Since exploration started in the Norwegian North Sea in 1965 a total of 196 fields have been discovered. Less than one-third of these fields have been developed. The marginal fields can not be developed economically with current technology even though some of those fields have significant reserves. The total cost to develop one of those large installations is estimated to be 2--5 billion US dollars. Therefore new technology is needed to lower the designed and installed costs of each unit. The need for new physical property data is shown. The value of valid operating data from present units is also pointed out.

  4. New simple method for fast and accurate measurement of volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    A new simple method is presented, which allows us to measure in just a few minutes but with reasonable accuracy (less than 1%) the volume confined inside a generic enclosure, regardless of the complexity of its shape. The technique proposed also allows us to measure the volume of any portion of a complex manifold, including, for instance, pipes and pipe fittings, valves, gauge heads, and so on, without disassembling the manifold at all. To this purpose an airtight variable volume is used, whose volume adjustment can be precisely measured; it has an overall capacity larger than that of the unknown volume. Such a variable volume is initially filled with a suitable test gas (for instance, air) at a known pressure, as carefully measured by means of a high precision capacitive gauge. By opening a valve, the test gas is allowed to expand into the previously evacuated unknown volume. A feedback control loop reacts to the resulting finite pressure drop, thus contracting the variable volume until the pressure exactly retrieves its initial value. The overall reduction of the variable volume achieved at the end of this process gives a direct measurement of the unknown volume, and definitively gets rid of the problem of dead spaces. The method proposed actually does not require the test gas to be rigorously held at a constant temperature, thus resulting in a huge simplification as compared to complex arrangements commonly used in metrology (gas expansion method), which can grant extremely accurate measurement but requires rather expensive equipments and results in time consuming methods, being therefore impractical in most applications. A simple theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic cycle and the results of experimental tests are described, which demonstrate that, in spite of its simplicity, the method provides a measurement accuracy within 0.5%. The system requires just a few minutes to complete a single measurement, and is ready immediately at the end of the process. The

  5. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an

  6. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  7. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  8. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10(-34) J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, N(A). As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 10(8) from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the

  9. Air toxics being measured more accurately, controlled more effectively

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In response to the directives of the Clean Air Act Amendments, Argonne National Laboratory is developing new or improved pollutant control technologies for industries that burn fossil fuels. This research continues Argonne`s traditional support for the US DOE Flue Gas Cleanup Program. Research is underway to measure process emissions and identify new and improved control measures. Argonne`s emission control research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. Whenever appropriate, the work has emphasized integrated or combined control systems as the best approach to technologies that offer low cost and good operating characteristics.

  10. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    complexity of defects encountered. The variety arises due to factors such as defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect. This paper focuses on preliminary characterization results, in terms of classification and size estimation, obtained by Calibre MDPAutoClassify tool on a variety of mask blank defects. It primarily highlights the challenges faced in achieving the results with reference to the variety of defects observed on blank mask substrates and the underlying complexities which make accurate defect size measurement an important and challenging task.

  11. Highly Accurate Photogrammetric Measurements of the Planck Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Parian, J.; Gruen, Armin; Cozzani, Alessandro

    2006-06-01

    The Planck mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) is designed to image the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation Field over the whole sky. To achieve this aim, sophisticated reflectors are used as part of the Planck telescope receiving system. The system consists of secondary and primary reflectors which are sections of two different ellipsoids of revolution with mean diameters of 1 and 1.6 meters. Deformations of the reflectors which influence the optical parameters and the gain of receiving signals are investigated in vacuum and at very low temperatures. For this investigation, among the various high accuracy measurement techniques, photogrammetry was selected. With respect to the photogrammetric measurements, special considerations had to be taken into account in design steps, measurement arrangement and data processing to achieve very high accuracies. The determinability of additional parameters of the camera under the given network configuration, datum definition, reliability and precision issues as well as workspace limits and propagating errors from different sources are considered. We have designed an optimal photogrammetric network by heuristic simulation for the flight model of the primary and the secondary reflectors with relative precisions better than 1:1000000 and 1:400000 to achieve the requested accuracies. A least squares best fit ellipsoid method was developed to determine the optical parameters of the reflectors. In this paper we will report about the procedures, the network design and the results of real measurements.

  12. Developing accurate molecular mechanics force fields for conjugated molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-10-14

    A rapid method to parameterize the intramolecular component of classical force fields for complex conjugated molecules is proposed. The method is based on a procedure of force matching with a reference electronic structure calculation. It is particularly suitable for those applications where molecular dynamics simulations are used to generate structures that are therefore analysed by electronic structure methods, because it is possible to build force fields that are consistent with electronic structure calculations that follow classical simulations. Such applications are commonly encountered in organic electronics, spectroscopy of complex systems and photobiology (e.g. photosynthetic systems). We illustrate the method by parameterizing the force fields of a molecule used in molecular semiconductors (2,2-dicyanovinyl-capped S,N-heteropentacene or DCV-SN5), a polymeric semiconductor (thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole TT-DPP) and a chromophore embedded in a protein environment (15,16-dihydrobiliverdin or DBV) where several hundreds of parameters need to be optimized in parallel.

  13. Accurate body composition measures from whole-body silhouettes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bowen; Avila, Jesus I.; Ng, Bennett K.; Fan, Bo; Loo, Victoria; Gilsanz, Vicente; Hangartner, Thomas; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Lappe, Joan; Oberfield, Sharon; Winer, Karen; Zemel, Babette; Shepherd, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Obesity and its consequences, such as diabetes, are global health issues that burden about 171 × 106 adult individuals worldwide. Fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2), and percent fat mass may be useful to evaluate under- and overnutrition and muscle development in a clinical or research environment. This proof-of-concept study tested whether frontal whole-body silhouettes could be used to accurately measure body composition parameters using active shape modeling (ASM) techniques. Methods: Binary shape images (silhouettes) were generated from the skin outline of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scans of 200 healthy children of ages from 6 to 16 yr. The silhouette shape variation from the average was described using an ASM, which computed principal components for unique modes of shape. Predictive models were derived from the modes for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat using stepwise linear regression. The models were compared to simple models using demographics alone [age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index z-scores (BMIZ)]. Results: The authors found that 95% of the shape variation of the sampled population could be explained using 26 modes. In most cases, the body composition variables could be predicted similarly between demographics-only and shape-only models. However, the combination of shape with demographics improved all estimates of boys and girls compared to the demographics-only model. The best prediction models for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat agreed with the actual measures with R2 adj. (the coefficient of determination adjusted for the number of parameters used in the model equation) values of 0.86, 0.95, and 0.75 for boys and 0.90, 0.89, and 0.69 for girls, respectively. Conclusions: Whole-body silhouettes in children may be useful to derive estimates of body composition including FMI, FFMI, and percent fat. These results support the feasibility of measuring body composition variables from simple

  14. Mobil unit provides fast and accurate Btu measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lansing, J. )

    1991-05-01

    Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) provides service to more than four million customers in a 23,000-plus square mile area. Some 95% of these customers fall under the residential category and the remaining customers are industrial and commercial. To ensure Btu value received from the supplier and delivered to the user is accounted for properly, SoCalGas has divided its service area into 47 districts according to the gas Btu content. The company obtains the information by collecting approximately 200 sample cylinders each week from field monitoring points and transporting them to one of four laboratories for analysis. For collecting the information from each lab site, SoCalGas uses a computerized Gas Quality Measurement System (GQMS) that utilizes a Hewlett-Packard 1000 computer. Information on all the gas sample analysis is transmitted each day to the company's measurement office. About two- thirds of the lab work is performed in Los Angeles and the remaining at three satellite laboratories. Sample points are strategically located to monitor gas entering each district. By measuring gas volumes at these key points, a volume- weighted average can be determined and the customers' monthly bills then can be adjusted for gas energy content by this volume-weighted four-week average. The engineering department uses sample-cylinder analysis data to establish and maintain correct Btu boundaries. However, the time it takes for this information to be processed makes it difficult for engineering to process the data.

  15. An accurate ab initio quartic force field for ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The quartic force field of ammonia is computed using basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality and an augmented coupled cluster method. After correcting for Fermi resonance, the computed fundamentals and nu 4 overtones agree on average to better than 3/cm with the experimental ones except for nu 2. The discrepancy for nu 2 is principally due to higher-order anharmonicity effects. The computed omega 1, omega 3, and omega 4 confirm the recent experimental determination by Lehmann and Coy (1988) but are associated with smaller error bars. The discrepancy between the computed and experimental omega 2 is far outside the expected error range, which is also attributed to higher-order anharmonicity effects not accounted for in the experimental determination. Spectroscopic constants are predicted for a number of symmetric and asymmetric top isotopomers of NH3.

  16. Accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. W.; Wang, B.; Gao, C.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-09-01

    An accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement method is demonstrated. As a key technique, a simple ambiguity resolving process based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement is used to overcome the contradiction between measurement accuracy and system complexity. The system achieves a high measurement accuracy of 0.2 ps with a 0.1 ps measurement resolution and a large dynamic range up to 50 km as well as no dead zone.

  17. Thermal system field performance predictions from laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Teaney, Brian P.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2016-05-01

    Laboratory measurements on thermal imaging systems are critical to understanding their performance in a field environment. However, it is rarely a straightforward process to directly inject thermal measurements into thermal performance modeling software to acquire meaningful results. Some of the sources of discrepancies between laboratory and field measurements are sensor gain and level, dynamic range, sensor display and display brightness, and the environment where the sensor is operating. If measurements for the aforementioned parameters could be performed, a more accurate description of sensor performance in a particular environment is possible. This research will also include the procedure for turning both laboratory and field measurements into a system model.

  18. Distance scaling method for accurate prediction of slowly varying magnetic fields in satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Panagiotis P.; Chatzineofytou, Elpida G.; Spantideas, Sotirios T.; Capsalis, Christos N.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, the determination of the magnetic behavior of localized magnetic sources from near-field measurements is examined. The distance power law of the magnetic field fall-off is used in various cases to accurately predict the magnetic signature of an equipment under test (EUT) consisting of multiple alternating current (AC) magnetic sources. Therefore, parameters concerning the location of the observation points (magnetometers) are studied towards this scope. The results clearly show that these parameters are independent of the EUT's size and layout. Additionally, the techniques developed in the present study enable the placing of the magnetometers close to the EUT, thus achieving high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, the proposed method is verified by real measurements, using a mobile phone as an EUT.

  19. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  20. Method accurately measures mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1967-01-01

    Photomicrographic method determines mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Many diameters are measured simultaneously by measuring row lengths of particles in a triangular array at a glass-oil interface. The method provides size standards for electronic particle counters and prevents distortions, softening, and flattening.

  1. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  2. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    PubMed

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown.

  3. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    PubMed

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown. PMID:26767640

  4. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  5. Accurate aircraft wind measurements using the global positioning system (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobosy, R.J.; Crawford, T.L., McMillen, R.T., Dumas, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    High accuracy measurements of the spatial distribution of wind speed are required in the study of turbulent exchange between the atmosphere and the earth. The use of a differential global positioning system (GPS) to determine the sensor velocity vector component of wind speed is discussed in this paper. The results of noise and rocking testing are summarized, and fluxes obtained from the GPS-based methods are compared to those measured from systems on towers and airplanes. The GPS-based methods provided usable measurements that compared well with tower and aircraft data at a significantly lower cost. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. An accurate and simple method for measurement of paw edema.

    PubMed

    Fereidoni, M; Ahmadiani, A; Semnanian, S; Javan, M

    2000-01-01

    Several methods for measuring inflammation are available that rely on the parameters changing during inflammation. The most commonly used methods estimate the volume of edema formed. In this study, we present a novel method for measuring the volume of pathologically or artificially induced edema. In this model, a liquid column is placed on a balance. When an object is immersed, the liquid applies a force F to attempt its expulsion. Physically, F is the weight (W) of the volume of liquid displaced by that part of the object inserted into the liquid. A balance is used to measure this force (F=W).Therefore, the partial or entire volume of any object, for example, the inflamed hind paw of a rat, can be calculated thus, using the specific gravity of the immersion liquid, at equilibrium mass/specific gravity=volume (V). The extent of edema at time t (measured as V) will be V(t)-V(o). This method is easy to use, materials are of low cost and readily available. It is important that the rat paw (or any object whose volume is being measured) is kept from contacting the wall of the column containing the fluid whilst the value on the balance is read.

  7. Accurate phase measurements for thick spherical objects using optical quadrature microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures have resulted in the birth of over three million babies since 1978. Yet the live birth rate in the United States was only 34% in 2005, with 32% of the successful pregnancies resulting in multiple births. These multiple pregnancies were directly attributed to the transfer of multiple embryos to increase the probability that a single, healthy embryo was included. Current viability markers used for IVF, such as the cell number, symmetry, size, and fragmentation, are analyzed qualitatively with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. However, this method is not ideal for quantitative measures beyond the 8-cell stage of development because the cells overlap and obstruct the view within and below the cluster of cells. We have developed the phase-subtraction cell-counting method that uses the combination of DIC and optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells accurately in live mouse embryos beyond the 8-cell stage. We have also created a preliminary analysis to measure the cell symmetry, size, and fragmentation quantitatively by analyzing the relative dry mass from the OQM image in conjunction with the phase-subtraction count. In this paper, we will discuss the characterization of OQM with respect to measuring the phase accurately for spherical samples that are much larger than the depth of field. Once fully characterized and verified with human embryos, this methodology could provide the means for a more accurate method to score embryo viability.

  8. Measuring Fisher information accurately in correlated neural populations.

    PubMed

    Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kohn, Adam; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Neural responses are known to be variable. In order to understand how this neural variability constrains behavioral performance, we need to be able to measure the reliability with which a sensory stimulus is encoded in a given population. However, such measures are challenging for two reasons: First, they must take into account noise correlations which can have a large influence on reliability. Second, they need to be as efficient as possible, since the number of trials available in a set of neural recording is usually limited by experimental constraints. Traditionally, cross-validated decoding has been used as a reliability measure, but it only provides a lower bound on reliability and underestimates reliability substantially in small datasets. We show that, if the number of trials per condition is larger than the number of neurons, there is an alternative, direct estimate of reliability which consistently leads to smaller errors and is much faster to compute. The superior performance of the direct estimator is evident both for simulated data and for neuronal population recordings from macaque primary visual cortex. Furthermore we propose generalizations of the direct estimator which measure changes in stimulus encoding across conditions and the impact of correlations on encoding and decoding, typically denoted by Ishuffle and Idiag respectively.

  9. Inflation model building with an accurate measure of e -folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongchitnan, Sirichai

    2016-08-01

    It has become standard practice to take the logarithmic growth of the scale factor as a measure of the amount of inflation, despite the well-known fact that this is only an approximation for the true amount of inflation required to solve the horizon and flatness problems. The aim of this work is to show how this approximation can be completely avoided using an alternative framework for inflation model building. We show that using the inverse Hubble radius, H =a H , as the key dynamical parameter, the correct number of e -folding arises naturally as a measure of inflation. As an application, we present an interesting model in which the entire inflationary dynamics can be solved analytically and exactly, and, in special cases, reduces to the familiar class of power-law models.

  10. Accurate Measurement of Heat Capacity by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Experience with high quality heat capacity measurement by differential scanning calorimetry is summarized and illustrated, pointing out three major causes of error: (1) incompatible thermal histories of the sample, reference and blank runs; (2) unstable initial and final isotherms; (3) incompatible differences between initial and final isotherm amplitudes for sample, reference and blank runs. Considering these problems, it is shown for the case of polyoxymethylene that accuracies in heat capacity of 0.1 percent may be possible.

  11. ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2009-09-09

    Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

  12. Blood-Pressure Measuring System Gives Accurate Graphic Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop an instrument that will provide an external (indirect) measurement of arterial blood pressure in the form of an easily interpreted graphic trace that can be correlated with standard clinical blood-pressure measurements. From sphygmograms produced by conventional sphygmographs, it is very difficult to differentiate the systolic and diastolic blood-pressure pulses and to correlate these indices with the standard clinical values. It is nearly impossible to determine these indices when the subject is under physical or emotional stress. The solution: An electronic blood-pressure system, basically similar to conventional ausculatory sphygmomanometers, employing a standard occluding cuff, a gas-pressure source, and a gas-pressure regulator and valve. An electrical output transducer senses cuff pressure, and a microphone positioned on the brachial artery under the occluding cuff monitors the Korotkoff sounds from this artery. The output signals present the conventional systolic and diastolic indices in a clear, graphical display. The complete system also includes an electronic timer and cycle-control circuit.

  13. Accurate measurement of intestinal transit in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.S.; Galligan, J.J.; Burks, T.F.

    1981-11-01

    A new method for quantifying intestinal transit was evaluated by comparison with two other popular techniques. The distribution of radiochromium (51Cr) throughout the small intestine of rats previously treated with saline (1.0 ml/kg s.c.), capsaicin (10 mg/kg s.c.), hexamethonium (20 mg/kg i.p.), D-ala2-met-enkephalinamide (1.0 microgram i.c.v.), or neostigmine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) was quantified by (1) measuring the most distal intestinal segment reached by chromium, (2) calculating the slope produced by linear regression analysis on cumulative percent chromium that had passed through each segment, and (3) determining the geometric center of the distribution of chromium throughout the small intestine. It was concluded that the geometric center methods for quantifying intestinal transit provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of intestinal transit. Less sensitive techniques often fail to detect important effects of drugs on intestinal transit.

  14. Accurate blood flow measurements: are artificial tracers necessary?

    PubMed

    Poelma, Christian; Kloosterman, Astrid; Hierck, Beerend P; Westerweel, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case), as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements). These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented.

  15. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  16. An approach for the accurate measurement of social morality levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    In the social sciences, computer-based modeling has become an increasingly important tool receiving widespread attention. However, the derivation of the quantitative relationships linking individual moral behavior and social morality levels, so as to provide a useful basis for social policy-making, remains a challenge in the scholarly literature today. A quantitative measurement of morality from the perspective of complexity science constitutes an innovative attempt. Based on the NetLogo platform, this article examines the effect of various factors on social morality levels, using agents modeling moral behavior, immoral behavior, and a range of environmental social resources. Threshold values for the various parameters are obtained through sensitivity analysis; and practical solutions are proposed for reversing declines in social morality levels. The results show that: (1) Population size may accelerate or impede the speed with which immoral behavior comes to determine the overall level of social morality, but it has no effect on the level of social morality itself; (2) The impact of rewards and punishment on social morality levels follows the "5∶1 rewards-to-punishment rule," which is to say that 5 units of rewards have the same effect as 1 unit of punishment; (3) The abundance of public resources is inversely related to the level of social morality; (4) When the cost of population mobility reaches 10% of the total energy level, immoral behavior begins to be suppressed (i.e. the 1/10 moral cost rule). The research approach and methods presented in this paper successfully address the difficulties involved in measuring social morality levels, and promise extensive application potentials.

  17. An Approach for the Accurate Measurement of Social Morality Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    In the social sciences, computer-based modeling has become an increasingly important tool receiving widespread attention. However, the derivation of the quantitative relationships linking individual moral behavior and social morality levels, so as to provide a useful basis for social policy-making, remains a challenge in the scholarly literature today. A quantitative measurement of morality from the perspective of complexity science constitutes an innovative attempt. Based on the NetLogo platform, this article examines the effect of various factors on social morality levels, using agents modeling moral behavior, immoral behavior, and a range of environmental social resources. Threshold values for the various parameters are obtained through sensitivity analysis; and practical solutions are proposed for reversing declines in social morality levels. The results show that: (1) Population size may accelerate or impede the speed with which immoral behavior comes to determine the overall level of social morality, but it has no effect on the level of social morality itself; (2) The impact of rewards and punishment on social morality levels follows the “5∶1 rewards-to-punishment rule,” which is to say that 5 units of rewards have the same effect as 1 unit of punishment; (3) The abundance of public resources is inversely related to the level of social morality; (4) When the cost of population mobility reaches 10% of the total energy level, immoral behavior begins to be suppressed (i.e. the 1/10 moral cost rule). The research approach and methods presented in this paper successfully address the difficulties involved in measuring social morality levels, and promise extensive application potentials. PMID:24312189

  18. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  19. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  20. Accurate Measurements of Aircraft Engine Soot Emissions Using a CAPS PMssa Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Timothy; Thompson, Kevin; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Smallwood, Greg; Make-Lye, Richard; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We present results of aircraft engine soot emissions measurements during the VARIAnT2 campaign using CAPS PMssa monitors. VARIAnT2, an aircraft engine non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) emissions field campaign, was focused on understanding the variability in nvPM mass measurements using different measurement techniques and accounting for possible nvPM sampling system losses. The CAPS PMssa monitor accurately measures both the optical extinction and scattering (and thus single scattering albedo and absorption) of an extracted sample using the same sample volume for both measurements with a time resolution of 1 second and sensitivity of better than 1 Mm-1. Absorption is obtained by subtracting the scattering signal from the total extinction. Given that the single scattering albedo of the particulates emitted from the aircraft engine measured at both 630 and 660 nm was on the order of 0.1, any inaccuracy in the scattering measurement has little impact on the accuracy of the ddetermined absorption coefficient. The absorption is converted into nvPM mass using a documented Mass Absorption Coefficient (MAC). Results of soot emission indices (mass soot emitted per mass of fuel consumed) for a turbojet engine as a function of engine power will be presented and compared to results obtained using an EC/OC monitor.

  1. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available.

  2. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    PubMed

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available. PMID:24472756

  3. Accurate near-field calculation in the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismann, Martin; Gallagher, Dominic F. G.; Panoiu, Nicolae C.

    2015-12-01

    The rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is one of the most successful and widely used methods for modeling periodic optical structures. It yields fast convergence of the electromagnetic far-field and has been adapted to model various optical devices and wave configurations. In this article, we investigate the accuracy with which the electromagnetic near-field can be calculated by using RCWA and explain the observed slow convergence and numerical artifacts from which it suffers, namely unphysical oscillations at material boundaries due to the Gibbs phenomenon. In order to alleviate these shortcomings, we also introduce a mathematical formulation for accurate near-field calculation in RCWA, for one- and two-dimensional straight and slanted diffraction gratings. This accurate near-field computational approach is tested and evaluated for several representative test-structures and configurations in order to illustrate the advantages provided by the proposed modified formulation of the RCWA.

  4. A new cation-exchange method for accurate field speciation of hexavalent chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for field speciation of Cr(VI) has been developed to meet present stringent regulatory standards and to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The method consists of passing a water sample through strong acid cation-exchange resin at the field site, where Cr(III) is retained while Cr(VI) passes into the effluent and is preserved for later determination. The method is simple, rapid, portable, and accurate, and makes use of readily available, inexpensive materials. Cr(VI) concentrations are determined later in the laboratory using any elemental analysis instrument sufficiently sensitive to measure the Cr(VI) concentrations of interest. The new method allows measurement of Cr(VI) concentrations as low as 0.05 ??g 1-1, storage of samples for at least several weeks prior to analysis, and use of readily available analytical instrumentation. Cr(VI) can be separated from Cr(III) between pH 2 and 11 at Cr(III)/Cr(VI) concentration ratios as high as 1000. The new method has demonstrated excellent comparability with two commonly used methods, the Hach Company direct colorimetric method and USEPA method 218.6. The new method is superior to the Hach direct colorimetric method owing to its relative sensitivity and simplicity. The new method is superior to USEPA method 218.6 in the presence of Fe(II) concentrations up to 1 mg 1-1 and Fe(III) concentrations up to 10 mg 1-1. Time stability of preserved samples is a significant advantage over the 24-h time constraint specified for USEPA method 218.6.

  5. The Measurement of Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

  6. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  7. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  8. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy.

  9. An Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for CH4 and Isotopomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    A very accurate ab initio quartic force field for CH4 and its isotopomers is presented. The quartic force field was determined with the singles and doubles coupled-cluster procedure that includes a quasiperturbative estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), using the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta, cc-pVTZ, basis set. Improved quadratic force constants were evaluated with the correlation consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta, cc-pVQZ, basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies are determined using second-order perturbation theory anharmonic analyses. All fundamentals of CH4 and isotopomers for which accurate experimental values exist and for which there is not a large Fermi resonance, are predicted to within +/- 6 cm(exp -1). It is thus concluded that our predictions for the harmonic frequencies and the anharmonic constants are the most accurate estimates available. It is also shown that using cubic and quartic force constants determined with the correlation consistent polarized double zeta, cc-pVDZ, basis set in conjunction with the cc-pVQZ quadratic force constants and equilibrium geometry leads to accurate predictions for the fundamental vibrational frequencies of methane, suggesting that this approach may be a viable alternative for larger molecules. Using CCSD(T), core correlation is found to reduce the CH4 r(e), by 0.0015 A. Our best estimate for r, is 1.0862 +/- 0.0005 A.

  10. Highly accurate analytical energy of a two-dimensional exciton in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Ngoc-Tram D.; Nguyen, Duy-Anh P.; Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang

    2016-08-01

    Explicit expressions are given for analytically describing the dependence of the energy of a two-dimensional exciton on magnetic field intensity. These expressions are highly accurate with the precision of up to three decimal places for the whole range of the magnetic field intensity. The results are shown for the ground state and some excited states; moreover, we have all formulae to obtain similar expressions of any excited state. Analysis of numerical results shows that the precision of three decimal places is maintained for the excited states with the principal quantum number of up to n=100.

  11. Guided resonances on lithium niobate for extremely small electric field detection investigated by accurate sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Lu, Huihui; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of guided resonances (GR) on a thin film lithium niobate rectangular lattice photonic crystal by band diagram calculations and 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) transmission investigations which cover a broad range of parameters. A photonic crystal with an active zone as small as 13μm×13μm×0.7μm can be easily designed to obtain a resonance Q value in the order of 1000. These resonances are then employed in electric field (E-field) sensing applications exploiting the electro optic (EO) effect of lithium niobate. A local field factor that is calculated locally for each FDTD cell is proposed to accurately estimate the sensitivity of GR based E-field sensor. The local field factor allows well agreement between simulations and reported experimental data therefore providing a valuable method in optimizing the GR structure to obtain high sensitivities. When these resonances are associated with sub-picometer optical spectrum analyzer and high field enhancement antenna design, an E-field probe with a sensitivity of 50 μV/m could be achieved. The results of our simulations could be also exploited in other EO based applications such as EEG (Electroencephalography) or ECG (Electrocardiography) probe and E-field frequency detector with an 'invisible' probe to the field being detected etc. PMID:27607627

  12. Accurate Measurement of Velocity and Acceleration of Seismic Vibrations near Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Syed Javed; Imdadullah; Asghar, Mohammad Syed Jamil

    In spite of all prerequisite geological study based precautions, the sites of nuclear power plants are also susceptible to seismic vibrations and their consequent effects. The effect of the ongoing nuclear tragedy in Japan caused by an earthquake and its consequent tsunami on March 11, 2011 is currently beyond contemplations. It has led to a rethinking on nuclear power stations by various governments around the world. Therefore, the prediction of location and time of large earthquakes has regained a great importance. The earth crust is made up of several wide, thin and rigid plates like blocks which are in constant motion with respect to each other. A series of vibrations on the earth surface are produced by the generation of elastic seismic waves due to sudden rupture within the plates during the release of accumulated strain energy. The range of frequency of seismic vibrations is from 0 to 10 Hz. However, there appears a large variation in magnitude, velocity and acceleration of these vibrations. The response of existing or conventional methods of measurement of seismic vibrations is very slow, which is of the order of tens of seconds. A systematic and high resolution measurement of velocity and acceleration of these vibrations are useful to interpret the pattern of waves and their anomalies more accurately, which are useful for the prediction of an earthquake. In the proposed work, a fast rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used to measure the velocity and acceleration of seismic vibrations in the millisecond range. The broad spectrum of pulses within one second range, measured by proposed method, gives all possible values of instantaneous velocity and instantaneous acceleration of the seismic vibrations. The spectrum of pulses in millisecond range becomes available which is useful to measure the pattern of fore shocks to predict the time and location of large earthquakes more accurately. Moreover, instead of average, the peak values of these quantities are helpful

  13. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  14. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  15. A particle-tracking approach for accurate material derivative measurements with tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-08-01

    The evaluation of the instantaneous 3D pressure field from tomographic PIV data relies on the accurate estimate of the fluid velocity material derivative, i.e., the velocity time rate of change following a given fluid element. To date, techniques that reconstruct the fluid parcel trajectory from a time sequence of 3D velocity fields obtained with Tomo-PIV have already been introduced. However, an accurate evaluation of the fluid element acceleration requires trajectory reconstruction over a relatively long observation time, which reduces random errors. On the other hand, simple integration and finite difference techniques suffer from increasing truncation errors when complex trajectories need to be reconstructed over a long time interval. In principle, particle-tracking velocimetry techniques (3D-PTV) enable the accurate reconstruction of single particle trajectories over a long observation time. Nevertheless, PTV can be reliably performed only at limited particle image number density due to errors caused by overlapping particles. The particle image density can be substantially increased by use of tomographic PIV. In the present study, a technique to combine the higher information density of tomographic PIV and the accurate trajectory reconstruction of PTV is proposed (Tomo-3D-PTV). The particle-tracking algorithm is applied to the tracers detected in the 3D domain obtained by tomographic reconstruction. The 3D particle information is highly sparse and intersection of trajectories is virtually impossible. As a result, ambiguities in the particle path identification over subsequent recordings are easily avoided. Polynomial fitting functions are introduced that describe the particle position in time with sequences based on several recordings, leading to the reduction in truncation errors for complex trajectories. Moreover, the polynomial regression approach provides a reduction in the random errors due to the particle position measurement. Finally, the acceleration

  16. MASS MEASUREMENTS BY AN ACCURATE AND SENSITIVE SELECTED ION RECORDING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace-level components of mixtures were successfully identified or confirmed by mass spectrometric accurate mass measurements, made at high resolution with selected ion recording, using GC and LC sample introduction. Measurements were made at 20 000 or 10 000 resolution, respecti...

  17. Generation of accurate integral surfaces in time-dependent vector fields.

    PubMed

    Garth, Christoph; Krishnan, Han; Tricoche, Xavier; Bobach, Tom; Joy, Kenneth I

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel approach for the direct computation of integral surfaces in time-dependent vector fields. As opposed to previous work, which we analyze in detail, our approach is based on a separation of integral surface computation into two stages: surface approximation and generation of a graphical representation. This allows us to overcome several limitations of existing techniques. We first describe an algorithm for surface integration that approximates a series of time lines using iterative refinement and computes a skeleton of the integral surface. In a second step, we generate a well-conditioned triangulation. Our approach allows a highly accurate treatment of very large time-varying vector fields in an efficient, streaming fashion. We examine the properties of the presented methods on several example datasets and perform a numerical study of its correctness and accuracy. Finally, we investigate some visualization aspects of integral surfaces. PMID:18988990

  18. An Accurate Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for HNO and DNO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Lee, Timothy J.; Schwenke, David W.

    1994-01-01

    An accurate ab initio quartic force field for HNO has been determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), in conjunction with the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta (cc-pVTZ) basis set. Improved harmonic frequencies were determined with the cc-pVQZ basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies were determined using a second-order perturbation theory analysis and also using variational calculations. The N-0 stretch and bending fundamentals are determined well from both vibrational analyses. The H-N stretch, however, is shown to have an unusually large anharmonic correction, and is not well determined using second-order perturbation theory. The H-N fundamental is well determined from the variational calculations, demonstrating the quality of the ab initio quartic force field. The zero-point energy of HNO that should be used in isodesmic reactions is also discussed.

  19. Importance of Accurate Measurements in Nutrition Research: Dietary Flavonoids as a Case Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurements of the secondary metabolites in natural products and plant foods are critical to establishing diet/health relationships. There are as many as 50,000 secondary metabolites which may influence human health. Their structural and chemical diversity present a challenge to analytic...

  20. A persistent scatterer interpolation for retrieving accurate ground deformation over InSAR-decorrelated agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Zebker, Howard A.; Knight, Rosemary

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a radar remote sensing technique for measuring surface deformation to millimeter-level accuracy at meter-scale resolution. Obtaining accurate deformation measurements in agricultural regions is difficult because the signal is often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. We present here a new algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with severe vegetation decorrelation using adaptive phase interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. We apply this algorithm to L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado, and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, the pumping of groundwater for irrigation results in deformation of the land that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm can significantly reduce the artifacts due to vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature.

  1. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  2. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  3. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, Charles V.; Killian, E. Wayne; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.; Randolph, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  4. Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Fields of Cyclic and Bent HC2N Isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force field (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC2N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T). Dunning s correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X=3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schr dinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by perturbation theory). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either perturbation theory or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC2N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05D, 3.06D, and 1.71D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  5. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Field fluctuations measured by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauber, R. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Vogel, K.; Schleich, W. P.; Walther, H.

    2010-09-01

    We derive the complete photon count statistics of an interferometer based on two beam splitters. As a special case we consider a joint intensity-electric field measurement. Our approach is based on the transformation properties of state vectors as well as field operators at a beam splitter. The work presented here was stimulated by discussions during the Lake Garda Conference 2001. The recent experimental interest in six-port interferometry has moved us to return to the problem. We feel, moreover, that the topic is appropriate for the Festschrift in honour of Stig Stenholm since he can truly be considered a pioneer in the field of quantum networks. We hope that our discussion may pique his interest.

  7. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  8. Radiometer for accurate (+ or - 1%) measurement of solar irradiance equal to 10,000 solar constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Sr.

    1981-01-01

    The 10,000 solar constant radiometer was developed for the accurate (+ or - 1%) measurement of the irradiance produced in the image formed by a parabolic reflector or by a multiple mirror solar installation. This radiometer is water cooled, weighs about 1 kg, and is 5 cm (2 in.) in diameter by 10 cm (4 in.) long. A sting is provided for mounting the radiometer in the solar installation capable of measuring irradiances as high as 20,000 solar constants, the instrument is self calibrating. Its accuracy depends on the accurate determination of the cavity aperture, and absorptivity of the cavity, and accurate electrical measurements. The spectral response is flat over the entire spectrum from far UV to far IR. The radiometer responds to a measurement within 99.7% of the final value within 8 s. During a measurement of the 10,000 solar constant irradiance, the temperature rise of the water is about 20 C. The radiometer has perfect cosine response up to 60 deg off the radiometer axis.

  9. Accurate ab initio quartic force fields for the ions HCO(+) and HOC(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCO(+) and HOC(+) have been computed using augmented coupled cluster methods and basis sets of spdf and spdfg quality. Calculations on HCN, CO, and N2 have been performed to assist in calibrating the computed results. Going from an spdf to an spdfg basis shortens triple bonds by about 0.004 A, and increases the corresponding harmonic frequency by 10-20/cm, leaving bond distances about 0.003 A too long and triple bond stretching frequencies about 5/cm too low. Accurate estimates for the bond distances, fundamental frequencies, and thermochemical quantities are given. HOC(+) lies 37.8 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol (0 K) above HCO(+); the classical barrier height for proton exchange is 76.7 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol.

  10. Electrostatics of proteins in dielectric solvent continua. I. An accurate and efficient reaction field description

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Sebastian; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2014-03-14

    We present a reaction field (RF) method which accurately solves the Poisson equation for proteins embedded in dielectric solvent continua at a computational effort comparable to that of an electrostatics calculation with polarizable molecular mechanics (MM) force fields. The method combines an approach originally suggested by Egwolf and Tavan [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2039 (2003)] with concepts generalizing the Born solution [Z. Phys. 1, 45 (1920)] for a solvated ion. First, we derive an exact representation according to which the sources of the RF potential and energy are inducible atomic anti-polarization densities and atomic shielding charge distributions. Modeling these atomic densities by Gaussians leads to an approximate representation. Here, the strengths of the Gaussian shielding charge distributions are directly given in terms of the static partial charges as defined, e.g., by standard MM force fields for the various atom types, whereas the strengths of the Gaussian anti-polarization densities are calculated by a self-consistency iteration. The atomic volumes are also described by Gaussians. To account for covalently overlapping atoms, their effective volumes are calculated by another self-consistency procedure, which guarantees that the dielectric function ε(r) is close to one everywhere inside the protein. The Gaussian widths σ{sub i} of the atoms i are parameters of the RF approximation. The remarkable accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparison with Kirkwood's analytical solution for a spherical protein [J. Chem. Phys. 2, 351 (1934)] and with computationally expensive grid-based numerical solutions for simple model systems in dielectric continua including a di-peptide (Ac-Ala-NHMe) as modeled by a standard MM force field. The latter example shows how weakly the RF conformational free energy landscape depends on the parameters σ{sub i}. A summarizing discussion highlights the achievements of the new theory and of its approximate solution

  11. Electrostatics of proteins in dielectric solvent continua. I. An accurate and efficient reaction field description.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2014-03-14

    We present a reaction field (RF) method which accurately solves the Poisson equation for proteins embedded in dielectric solvent continua at a computational effort comparable to that of an electrostatics calculation with polarizable molecular mechanics (MM) force fields. The method combines an approach originally suggested by Egwolf and Tavan [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2039 (2003)] with concepts generalizing the Born solution [Z. Phys. 1, 45 (1920)] for a solvated ion. First, we derive an exact representation according to which the sources of the RF potential and energy are inducible atomic anti-polarization densities and atomic shielding charge distributions. Modeling these atomic densities by Gaussians leads to an approximate representation. Here, the strengths of the Gaussian shielding charge distributions are directly given in terms of the static partial charges as defined, e.g., by standard MM force fields for the various atom types, whereas the strengths of the Gaussian anti-polarization densities are calculated by a self-consistency iteration. The atomic volumes are also described by Gaussians. To account for covalently overlapping atoms, their effective volumes are calculated by another self-consistency procedure, which guarantees that the dielectric function ε(r) is close to one everywhere inside the protein. The Gaussian widths σ(i) of the atoms i are parameters of the RF approximation. The remarkable accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparison with Kirkwood's analytical solution for a spherical protein [J. Chem. Phys. 2, 351 (1934)] and with computationally expensive grid-based numerical solutions for simple model systems in dielectric continua including a di-peptide (Ac-Ala-NHMe) as modeled by a standard MM force field. The latter example shows how weakly the RF conformational free energy landscape depends on the parameters σ(i). A summarizing discussion highlights the achievements of the new theory and of its approximate solution particularly by

  12. Practical do-it-yourself device for accurate volume measurement of breast.

    PubMed

    Tezel, E; Numanoğlu, A

    2000-03-01

    A simple and accurate method of measuring differences in breast volume based on Archimedes' principle is described. In this method, a plastic container is placed on the breast of the patient who is lying in supine position. While the breast occupies part of the container, the remaining part is filled with water and the volume is measured. This method allows the measurement of the volume differences of asymmetric breasts and also helps the surgeon to estimate the size of the prosthesis to be used in augmentation mammaplasty. PMID:10724264

  13. Progress Toward Accurate Measurements of Power Consumptions of DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.; Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of power consumption by Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators is a challenge due to the characteristics of the actuator current signal. Micro-discharges generate high-amplitude, high-frequency current spike transients superimposed on a low-amplitude, low-frequency current. We have used a high-speed digital oscilloscope to measure the actuator power consumption using the Shunt Resistor method and the Monitor Capacitor method. The measurements were performed simultaneously and compared to each other in a time-accurate manner. It was found that low signal-to-noise ratios of the oscilloscopes used, in combination with the high dynamic range of the current spikes, make the Shunt Resistor method inaccurate. An innovative, nonlinear signal compression circuit was applied to the actuator current signal and yielded excellent agreement between the two methods. The paper describes the issues and challenges associated with performing accurate power measurements. It provides insights into the two methods including new insight into the Lissajous curve of the Monitor Capacitor method. Extension to a broad range of parameters and further development of the compression hardware will be performed in future work.

  14. Accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements of laser-doped areas in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Martin; Kluska, Sven; Binder, Sebastian; Hameiri, Ziv; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.

    2014-10-07

    It is investigated how potential drop sheet resistance measurements of areas formed by laser-assisted doping in crystalline Si wafers are affected by typically occurring experimental factors like sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, or coatings. Measurements are obtained with a collinear four point probe setup and a modified transfer length measurement setup to measure sheet resistances of laser-doped lines. Inhomogeneities in doping depth are observed from scanning electron microscope images and electron beam induced current measurements. It is observed that influences from sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, and coatings can be neglected if certain preconditions are met. Guidelines are given on how to obtain accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements on laser-doped regions.

  15. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  16. Accurate Determination of Torsion and Pure Bending Moment for Viscoelastic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Ko, Chih-Chin; Shiau, Li-Ming

    Measurements of time-dependent material properties in the context of linear viscoelasticity, at a given frequency and temperature, require accurate determination of both loading and deformation that are subjected to the testing materials. A pendulum-type viscoelastic spectroscopy is developed to experimentally measure loss tangent and the magnitude of dynamic modulus of solid materials. The mechanical system of the device is based on the behavior of the cantilever beam, and torsion and pure bending moment are generated from the interaction between a permanent magnet and the Helmholtz coils. The strength of the magnetic interactions may be determined with a material with known mechanical properties, such as aluminum 6061T4 alloy. The sensitivity of the torque measurement is on the order of one micro N-m level. With the high accurate torque measurement and deformation detection from a laser-based displacement measurement system, viscoelastic properties of materials can be experimentally measured in different frequency regimes. Sinusoidal driving signals are adopted for measuring complex modulus in the sub-resonant regime, and dc bias driving for creep tests in the low frequency limit. At structural resonant frequencies, the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) method or Lorentzian curve fitting method is adopted to extract material properties. The completion of determining material properties in the wide frequency spectrum may help to identify the deformation mechanisms of the material and to create better models for simulation work.

  17. Rapid accurate isotopic measurements on boron in boric acid and boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, N L; Verbruggen, A; Hendrickx, F; De Bièvre, P

    1986-04-01

    A procedure is described whereby rapid and accurate isotopic measurements can be performed on boron in boric acid and boron carbide after fusion of these compounds with calcium carbonate. It allows the determination of the isotopic composition of boron in boric acid and boron carbide and the direct assay of boron or the (10)B isotope in boron carbide by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry.

  18. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  19. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J; Brewster, Aaron S; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Bogan, Michael J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Adams, Paul D; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2014-05-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  20. Accurate measurement of cortical bone elasticity tensor with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Simon; Grimal, Quentin; Laugier, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) allows to accurately characterize the complete set of elastic constants of an anisotropic material from a set of measured mechanical resonant frequencies of a specimen. This method does not suffer from the drawbacks and limitations of the conventional sound velocity approach, but has been reported to fail to measure bone because of its strong viscoelastic damping. In this study, we take advantage of recent developments of RUS to overcome this limitation. The frequency response of a human cortical bone specimen (about 5 × 7 × 7 mm(3)) was measured between 100 and 280 kHz. Despite an important overlapping of the resonant peaks 20 resonant frequencies could be retrieved by using a dedicated signal processing method. The experimental frequencies were progressively matched to the frequencies predicted by a model of the sample whose elastic constants were adjusted. The determined diagonal elastic constants were in good agreement with concurrent sound velocity measurements performed in the principal directions of the specimen. This study demonstrates that RUS is suitable for an accurate measurement of cortical bone anisotropic elasticity. In particular, precision of measured Young and shear moduli is about 0.5%.

  1. Accurate measurement of spatial noise portraits of photosensors of digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kulakov, M. N.; Starikov, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Method of measurement of accurate portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors is described. The method consists of four steps: creation of spatially homogeneous illumination; shooting light and dark frames; digital processing and filtering. Unlike standard technique, this method uses iterative creation of spatially homogeneous illumination by display, compensation of photosensor dark spatial noise portrait and improved procedure of elimination of dark temporal noise. Portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors of a scientific digital camera were found. Characteristics of the measured portraits were compared with values of photo response and dark signal non-uniformities of camera's photosensor.

  2. Magnetic field measurements via visible spectroscopy on the Z machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. R. Hansen, S. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Carlson, A. L.; Lamppa, D. C.; Rochau, G. A.; Schroen, D. G.

    2014-11-15

    Sandia's Z Machine uses its high current to magnetically implode targets relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Since target performance is highly dependent on the applied drive field, measuring magnetic field at the target is essential for accurate simulations. Recently, the magnetic field at the target was measured through splitting of the sodium 3s-3p doublet at 5890 and 5896 Å. Spectroscopic dopants were applied to the exterior of the target, and spectral lines were observed in absorption. Magnetic fields in excess of 200 T were measured, corresponding to drive currents of approximately 5 MA early in the pulse.

  3. Material interactions with the low earth orbital environment Accurate reaction rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, J. T.; Leger, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between spacecraft surfaces and atomic oxygen within the low earth orbital (LEO) environment have been observed and measured during Space Shuttle flights over the past 3 yr. The results of these experiments have demonstrated that interaction rates for many materials proposed for spacecraft applications are high and that protective coatings must be developed to enable long-lived operation of spacecraft structures in the LEO environment. A flight experiment discussed herein uses the Space Shuttle as an orbiting exposure laboratory to obtain accurate reaction rate measurements for materials typically used in spacecraft construction. An ion-neutral mass spectrometer, installed in the Orbiter cargo bay, will measure diurnal ambient oxygen densities while material samples are exposed at low altitude (222 km) to the orbital environment. From in situ atomic oxygen density information and postflight material recession measurements, accurate reaction rates can be derived to update the Space Station materials interaction data base. Additionally, gases evolved from a limited number of material surfaces subjected to direct oxygen impingement will be identified using the mass spectrometer. These measurements will aid in mechanistic definitions of chemical reactions which cause atom-surface interactions and in validating results of upcoming degradation studies conducted in ground-based neutral beam laboratories.

  4. Accurate time-of-flight measurement of particle based on ECL-TTL Timer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deping; Liu, Jianguo; Huang, Shuhua; Gui, Huaqiao; Cheng, Yin; Wang, Jie; Lu, Yihuai

    2014-11-01

    Because of its aerodynamic diameter of the aerosol particles are stranded in different parts of different human respiratory system, thus affecting human health. Therefore, how to continue to effectively monitor the aerosol particles become increasingly concerned about. Use flight time of aerosol particle beam spectroscopy of atmospheric aerosol particle size distribution is the typical method for monitoring atmospheric aerosol particle size and particle concentration measurement , and it is the key point to accurate measurement of aerosol particle size spectra that measurement of aerosol particle flight time. In order to achieve accurate measurements of aerosol particles in time-of-flight, this paper design an ECL-TTL high-speed timer with ECL counter and TTL counter. The high-speed timer includes a clock generation, high-speed timer and the control module. Clock Generation Module using a crystal plus multiplier design ideas, take advantage of the stability of the crystal to provide a stable 500MHz clock signal is high counter. High count module design using ECL and TTL counter mix design, timing accuracy while effectively maintaining , expanding the timing range, and simplifies circuit design . High-speed counter control module controls high-speed counter start, stop and reset timely based on aerosol particles time-of-flight, is a key part of the high-speed counting. The high-speed counting resolution of 4ns, the full scale of 4096ns, has been successfully applied Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, to meet the precise measurement of aerosol particles time-of-flight.

  5. Accurate Critical Stress Intensity Factor Griffith Crack Theory Measurements by Numerical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Critical stress intensity factor (KIc) has been an approximation for fracture toughness using only load-cell measurements. However, artificial man-made cracks several orders of magnitude longer and wider than natural flaws have required a correction factor term (Y) that can be up to about 3 times the recorded experimental value [1-3]. In fact, over 30 years ago a National Academy of Sciences advisory board stated that empirical KIc testing was of serious concern and further requested that an accurate bulk fracture toughness method be found [4]. Now that fracture toughness can be calculated accurately by numerical integration from the load/deflection curve as resilience, work of fracture (WOF) and strain energy release (SIc) [5, 6], KIc appears to be unnecessary. However, the large body of previous KIc experimental test results found in the literature offer the opportunity for continued meta analysis with other more practical and accurate fracture toughness results using energy methods and numerical integration. Therefore, KIc is derived from the classical Griffith Crack Theory [6] to include SIc as a more accurate term for strain energy release rate (𝒢Ic), along with crack surface energy (γ), crack length (a), modulus (E), applied stress (σ), Y, crack-tip plastic zone defect region (rp) and yield strength (σys) that can all be determined from load and deflection data. Polymer matrix discontinuous quartz fiber-reinforced composites to accentuate toughness differences were prepared for flexural mechanical testing comprising of 3 mm fibers at different volume percentages from 0-54.0 vol% and at 28.2 vol% with different fiber lengths from 0.0-6.0 mm. Results provided a new correction factor and regression analyses between several numerical integration fracture toughness test methods to support KIc results. Further, bulk KIc accurate experimental values are compared with empirical test results found in literature. Also, several fracture toughness mechanisms

  6. No galaxy left behind: accurate measurements with the faintest objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, E.; Huff, E. M.; Aleksić, J.; Melchior, P.; Jouvel, S.; MacCrann, N.; Ross, A. J.; Crocce, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Honscheid, K.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Percival, W. J.; Reil, K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of detectable stars or galaxies. We have implemented our proposal in BALROG, software which embeds fake objects in real imaging to accurately characterize measurement biases. We demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for their sensitivity to depth and seeing variations. Using the synthetic galaxies as randoms in the Landy-Szalay estimator suppresses the effects of variable survey selection by at least two orders of magnitude. With this correction, our measured angular clustering is found to be in excellent agreement with that of a matched sample from much deeper, higher resolution space-based Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) imaging; over angular scales of 0.004° < θ < 0.2°, we find a best-fitting scaling amplitude between the DES and COSMOS measurements of 1.00 ± 0.09. We expect this methodology to be broadly useful for extending measurements' statistical reach in a variety of upcoming imaging surveys.

  7. No Galaxy Left Behind: Accurate Measurements with the Faintest Objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Suchyta, E.

    2016-01-27

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of stars or galaxies detectable in an imaging survey. We have implemented our proposal in Balrog, a software package which embeds fake objects in real imaging in order to accurately characterize measurement biases.more » We also demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a wide variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for their sensitivity to depth and seeing variations. Using the synthetic galaxies as randoms in the standard LandySzalay correlation function estimator suppresses the effects of variable survey selection by at least two orders of magnitude. Now our measured angular clustering is found to be in excellent agreement with that of a matched sample drawn from much deeper, higherresolution space-based COSMOS imaging; over angular scales of 0.004° < θ < 0.2 ° , we find a best-fit scaling amplitude between the DES and COSMOS measurements of 1.00 ± 0.09. We expect this methodology to be broadly useful for extending the statistical reach of measurements in a wide variety of coming imaging surveys.« less

  8. Accurate field mapping in the presence of B0 inhomogeneities, applied to MR thermometry

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Chang-Sheng; Chu, Renxin; Hoge, W. Scott; Panych, Lawrence P.; Madore, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe how B0 inhomogeneities can cause errors in proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift thermometry, and to correct for these errors. Methods With PRF thermometry, measured phase shifts are converted into temperature measurements through the use of a scaling factor proportional to the echo time, TE. However, B0 inhomogeneities can deform, spread, and translate MR echoes, potentially making the ‘true’ echo time vary spatially within the imaged object and take on values that differ from the prescribed TE value. Acquisition and reconstruction methods able to avoid or correct for such errors are presented. Results Tests were performed in a gel phantom during sonication, and temperature measurements were made with proper shimming as well as with intentionally-introduced B0 inhomogeneities. Errors caused by B0 inhomogeneities were observed, described, and corrected by the proposed methods. No statistical difference was found between the corrected results and the reference results obtained with proper shimming, while errors by more than 10% in temperature elevation were corrected for. The approach was also applied to an abdominal in vivo dataset. Conclusion Field variations induce errors in measured field values, which can be detected and corrected. The approach was validated for a PRF thermometry application. PMID:24975329

  9. A new carrier gas type for accurate measurement of N2O by GC-ECD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinghong; Wang, Yuesi; Ling, Hong

    2010-11-01

    The accurate measurement of concentration is the basis for determining emission sources and sinks of nitrous oxide (N2O). The detection of N2O showed that the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) biased the N2O response when pure nitrogen (N2) was used as a carrier gas for gas chromatography (GC) equipped with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to explore how the presence of CO2 interferes with the accurate determination of N2O. The aims were to address the extent of the influence to try and explain the underlying mechanism, and to uncover technical options for solving the problem. Three GC carrier gases are discussed: pure nitrogen (DN); a mixture of argon and methane (AM); and a high concentration CO2, which was introduced into the ECD cell with a low flow rate based on DN (DN-CO2). The results show that when DN was used, the existence of CO2 in the ECD cell greatly enhanced the response of N2O, which increased with CO2 content and remained constant when the content reached a limit. Comparisons between the three methods show that the DN method is defective for the accurate determination of N2O. The bias is caused by different electron capture mechanisms of CO2 and N2O and depends heavily on the detector temperature. New GC carrier gas types with make-up gases that can remove the CO2-induced influence, such as the DN-CO2 and DN-CH4 methods reported in this paper, are recommended for the accurate measurement of N2O.

  10. Recommendations for accurate heat capacity measurements using a Quantum Design physical property measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Catherine A.; Stancescu, Maria; Marriott, Robert A.; White, Mary Anne

    2007-02-01

    A commercial instrument for determination of heat capacities of solids from ca. 400 K to 0.4 K, the physical property measurement system from Quantum Design, has been used to determine the heat capacities of a standard samples (sapphire [single crystal] and copper). We extend previous tests of the PPMS in three important ways: to temperatures as low as 0.4 K; to samples with poor thermal conductivity; to compare uncertainty with accuracy. We find that the accuracy of heat capacity determinations can be within 1% for 5 K < T < 300 K and 5% for 0.7 K < T < 5 K. Careful attention should be paid to the relative uncertainty for each data point, as determined from multiple measurements. While we have found that it is possible in some circumstances to obtain excellent results by measurement of samples that contribute more than ca. 1/3 to the total heat capacity, there is no "ideal" sample mass and sample geometry also is an important consideration. In fact, our studies of pressed pellets of zirconium tungstate, a poor thermal conductor, show that several samples of different masses should be determined for the highest degree of certainty.

  11. Parallel Higher-order Finite Element Method for Accurate Field Computations in Wakefield and PIC Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD), under SciDAC sponsorship, has developed a suite of 3D (2D) parallel higher-order finite element (FE) codes, T3P (T2P) and Pic3P (Pic2P), aimed at accurate, large-scale simulation of wakefields and particle-field interactions in radio-frequency (RF) cavities of complex shape. The codes are built on the FE infrastructure that supports SLAC's frequency domain codes, Omega3P and S3P, to utilize conformal tetrahedral (triangular)meshes, higher-order basis functions and quadratic geometry approximation. For time integration, they adopt an unconditionally stable implicit scheme. Pic3P (Pic2P) extends T3P (T2P) to treat charged-particle dynamics self-consistently using the PIC (particle-in-cell) approach, the first such implementation on a conformal, unstructured grid using Whitney basis functions. Examples from applications to the International Linear Collider (ILC), Positron Electron Project-II (PEP-II), Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and other accelerators will be presented to compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of these codes versus their counterparts using structured grids.

  12. Accurate Construction of Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) Images for Quantitative Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Kessler, Rene P.; Xiao, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Localization-based superresolution microscopy techniques such as Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) have allowed investigations of cellular structures with unprecedented optical resolutions. One major obstacle to interpreting superresolution images, however, is the overcounting of molecule numbers caused by fluorophore photoblinking. Using both experimental and simulated images, we determined the effects of photoblinking on the accurate reconstruction of superresolution images and on quantitative measurements of structural dimension and molecule density made from those images. We found that structural dimension and relative density measurements can be made reliably from images that contain photoblinking-related overcounting, but accurate absolute density measurements, and consequently faithful representations of molecule counts and positions in cellular structures, require the application of a clustering algorithm to group localizations that originate from the same molecule. We analyzed how applying a simple algorithm with different clustering thresholds (tThresh and dThresh) affects the accuracy of reconstructed images, and developed an easy method to select optimal thresholds. We also identified an empirical criterion to evaluate whether an imaging condition is appropriate for accurate superresolution image reconstruction with the clustering algorithm. Both the threshold selection method and imaging condition criterion are easy to implement within existing PALM clustering algorithms and experimental conditions. The main advantage of our method is that it generates a superresolution image and molecule position list that faithfully represents molecule counts and positions within a cellular structure, rather than only summarizing structural properties into ensemble parameters. This feature makes it particularly useful for cellular structures of heterogeneous densities and irregular geometries, and

  13. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  14. The road towards accurate optical width measurements at the industrial level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodermann, Bernd; Köning, Rainer; Bergmann, Detlef; Buhr, Egbert; Hässler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Flügge, Jens; Bosse, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Optical vision systems require both unidirectional and bidirectional measurements for the calibrations and the verification of the tool performance to enable accurate measurements traceable to the SI unit Metre. However, for bidirectional measurements up to now the national metrology institutes are unable to provide internationally recognized calibrations of suitable standards. Furthermore often users are not aware of the specific difficulties of these measurements. In this paper the current status and limitations of bidirectional optical measurements at the industrial level are summarised and compared to state-of-the-art optical linewidth measurements performed at PTB on measurement objects of semiconductor industry. It turns out, that for optical widths measurements at an uncertainty level below 1 μm edge localisation schemes are required, which are based on tool and sample dependent threshold values, which usually need to be determined by a rigorous simulation of the microscopic image. Furthermore the calibration samples and structures must have a sufficient quality, e. g. high edge angle and low edge roughness and the structure materials and their material parameters have to be known. The experience obtained within the accreditation process of industrial labs for width calibrations shows that, in order to be able to achieve a desired measurement uncertainties of about 100 nm, the imaging system needs to have a monochromatic Koehler illumination, numerical aperture larger than 0.5, a magnification greater than 50x and the ability to control the deviation of the focus position to better than 100 nm.

  15. Optical coherence tomography enables accurate measurement of equine cartilage thickness for determination of speed of sound.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, Pia H; Te Moller, Nikae C R; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Korhonen, Rami K; Brommer, Harold; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Arthroscopic estimation of articular cartilage thickness is important for scoring of lesion severity, and measurement of cartilage speed of sound (SOS)-a sensitive index of changes in cartilage composition. We investigated the accuracy of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in measurements of cartilage thickness and determined SOS by combining OCT thickness and ultrasound (US) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Material and methods - Cartilage thickness measurements from OCT and microscopy images of 94 equine osteochondral samples were compared. Then, SOS in cartilage was determined using simultaneous OCT thickness and US TOF measurements. SOS was then compared with the compositional, structural, and mechanical properties of cartilage. Results - Measurements of non-calcified cartilage thickness using OCT and microscopy were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.92; p < 0.001). With calcified cartilage included, the correlation was ρ = 0.85 (p < 0.001). The mean cartilage SOS (1,636 m/s) was in agreement with the literature. However, SOS and the other properties of cartilage lacked any statistically significant correlation. Interpretation - OCT can give an accurate measurement of articular cartilage thickness. Although SOS measurements lacked accuracy in thin equine cartilage, the concept of SOS measurement using OCT appears promising.

  16. Accurate measurements of the collision stopping powers for 5 to 30 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Miller Shawn

    Accurate knowledge of electron stopping powers is crucial for accurate radiation dosimetry and radiation transport calculations. Current values for stopping powers are based on a theoretical model, with estimated uncertainties of 0.5-1% (1σ) for electron energies greater than 100 keV. This work presents the first measurements of electron collision stopping powers capable of testing the theoretical values within these stated uncertainties. A large NaI spectrometer was used to measure the change in electron energy when an absorbing disk of known thickness was placed in an electron beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the experiment were performed to account for the effects of surrounding materials. Energy differences between the calculated and measured spectra were used to determine corrections to the soft collision component of the theoretical stopping powers employed by the Monte Carlo simulations. Four different elemental materials were studied: Be, Al, Cu, and Ta. This provided a wide range of atomic numbers and densities over which to test the theory. In addition, stopping powers were measured for graphite (both standard and pyrolytic), A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, C-552 air equivalent plastic, and water. The incident electron energies ranged from 5 to 30 MeV. Generally, the measured stopping powers agree with the theoretical values within the experimental uncertainties, which range from 0.4% to 0.7% (1σ). Aluminum, however, exhibits a 0.7% discrepancy at higher electron energies. Furthermore, these measurements have established that the grain density stopping power is appropriate for graphite, contrary to the recommendations of ICRU Report 37. This removes a 0.2% uncertainty in air kerma calibrations, and impacts on dosimetric quantities determined via graphite calorimetry, such as ɛG for Fricke dosimetry and (W/ e)air for ion chamber measurements.

  17. Measuring electric fields from surface contaminants with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper we demonstrate a technique of utilizing magnetically trapped neutral {sup 87}Rb atoms to measure the magnitude and direction of stray electric fields emanating from surface contaminants. We apply an alternating external electric field that adds to (or subtracts from) the stray field in such a way as to resonantly drive the trapped atoms into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the stray field gradient. Using this measurement technique, we are able to reconstruct the vector electric field produced by surface contaminants. In addition, we can accurately measure the electric fields generated from adsorbed atoms purposely placed onto the surface and account for their systematic effects, which can plague a precision surface-force measurement. We show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbate and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  18. Highly accurate isotope measurements of surface material on planetary objects in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Studies of isotope variations in solar system objects are of particular interest and importance. Highly accurate isotope measurements provide insight into geochemical processes, constrain the time of formation of planetary material (crystallization ages) and can be robust tracers of pre-solar events and processes. A detailed understanding of the chronology of the early solar system and dating of planetary materials require precise and accurate measurements of isotope ratios, e.g. lead, and abundance of trace element. However, such measurements are extremely challenging and until now, they never have been attempted in space research. Our group designed a highly miniaturized and self-optimizing laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for space flight for sensitive and accurate measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of extraterrestrial materials in situ. Current studies were performed by using UV radiation for ablation and ionization of sample material. High spatial resolution is achieved by focusing the laser beam to about Ø 20μm onto the sample surface. The instrument supports a dynamic range of at least 8 orders of magnitude and a mass resolution m/Δm of up to 800—900, measured at iron peak. We developed a measurement procedure, which will be discussed in detail, that allows for the first time to measure with the instrument the isotope distribution of elements, e.g. Ti, Pb, etc., with a measurement accuracy and precision in the per mill and sub per mill level, which is comparable to well-known and accepted measurement techniques, such as TIMS, SIMS and LA-ICP-MS. The present instrument performance offers together with the measurement procedure in situ measurements of 207Pb/206Pb ages with the accuracy for age in the range of tens of millions of years. Furthermore, and in contrast to other space instrumentation, our instrument can measure all elements present in the sample above 10 ppb concentration, which offers versatile applications

  19. Radial artery blood pressure measurement in neonates: an accurate and convenient technique in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; van Genderingen, H R; Lafeber, H N; Hack, W W

    1995-01-01

    To achieve accurate blood pressure measurement through radial artery catheters in infants, we previously developed an experimental high-fidelity catheter-manometer system (CMS). As this system lacks facilities for flushing and for blood sampling, we aimed to further develop this technique in order to make the system suitable for clinical practice. In addition, we aimed to develop methods to automate processing of the pressure wave forms. The high-fidelity system to be improved consisted of a 24 Gauge catheter, a threeway stopcock and a tip-manometer. We inserted this system in the catheter-manometer system as routinely used i.e. the remaining end of the stopcock was connected to the fluid-filled CMS as used routinely. This combined system became clinically applicable, since blood samples could be obtained and flushing could be performed. The measurement chain was completed by application of a modified physiological monitor and a computerized method to analyze pressure wave forms. In this manner accurate beat-to-beat pressure parameters were obtained. This technique was applied to 25 neonates admitted for intensive care and requiring arterial access. Gestational age of these infants ranged from 25-40 (median 29) weeks and birth weight ranges from 500-3375 (median 1060) grams. In all infants the technique was found to be convenient and the high-fidelity blood pressure measurements were performed without any problems. The advantage of the present system is the potential for both correct intermittent recordings of arterial wave forms in close relation to clinical condition and for the establishment of accurate radial artery beat-to-beat pressure values in clinical practice.

  20. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, <0.05) on time scales of <10 s for droplets containing involatile or volatile solutes. The approach is benchmarked for binary and ternary inorganic solution aerosols with typical uncertainties in water activity of <±0.2% at water activities >0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1). PMID:27285052

  1. Accurate Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave velocity and empirical Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxia; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a method for Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave speed. The error in Poisson's ratio has weak influence on the measurement of Young's modulus based on Rayleigh wave speed, and Poisson's ratio minimally varies in a certain material; thus, we can accurately estimate Young's modulus with surface wave speed and a rough Poisson's ratio. We numerically analysed three methods using Rayleigh, longitudinal, and transversal wave speed, respectively, and the error in Poisson's ratio shows the least influence on the result in the method involving Rayleigh wave speed. An experiment was performed and has proved the feasibility of this method. Device for speed measuring could be small, and no sample pretreatment is needed. Hence, developing a portable instrument based on this method is possible. This method makes a good compromise between usability and precision.

  2. A Flexible Fringe Projection Vision System with Extended Mathematical Model for Accurate Three-Dimensional Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Suzhi; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In order to acquire an accurate three-dimensional (3D) measurement, the traditional fringe projection technique applies complex and laborious procedures to compensate for the errors that exist in the vision system. However, the error sources in the vision system are very complex, such as lens distortion, lens defocus, and fringe pattern nonsinusoidality. Some errors cannot even be explained or rendered with clear expressions and are difficult to compensate directly as a result. In this paper, an approach is proposed that avoids the complex and laborious compensation procedure for error sources but still promises accurate 3D measurement. It is realized by the mathematical model extension technique. The parameters of the extended mathematical model for the ’phase to 3D coordinates transformation’ are derived using the least-squares parameter estimation algorithm. In addition, a phase-coding method based on a frequency analysis is proposed for the absolute phase map retrieval to spatially isolated objects. The results demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of the proposed flexible fringe projection vision system on spatially continuous and discontinuous objects for 3D measurement. PMID:27136553

  3. A Flexible Fringe Projection Vision System with Extended Mathematical Model for Accurate Three-Dimensional Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Suzhi; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In order to acquire an accurate three-dimensional (3D) measurement, the traditional fringe projection technique applies complex and laborious procedures to compensate for the errors that exist in the vision system. However, the error sources in the vision system are very complex, such as lens distortion, lens defocus, and fringe pattern nonsinusoidality. Some errors cannot even be explained or rendered with clear expressions and are difficult to compensate directly as a result. In this paper, an approach is proposed that avoids the complex and laborious compensation procedure for error sources but still promises accurate 3D measurement. It is realized by the mathematical model extension technique. The parameters of the extended mathematical model for the 'phase to 3D coordinates transformation' are derived using the least-squares parameter estimation algorithm. In addition, a phase-coding method based on a frequency analysis is proposed for the absolute phase map retrieval to spatially isolated objects. The results demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of the proposed flexible fringe projection vision system on spatially continuous and discontinuous objects for 3D measurement. PMID:27136553

  4. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  5. Object strength--an accurate measure for small objects that is insensitive to partial volume effects.

    PubMed

    Tofts, P S; Silver, N C; Barker, G J; Gass, A

    2005-07-01

    There are currently four problems in characterising small nonuniform lesions or other objects in Magnetic Resonance images where partial volume effects are significant. Object size is over- or under-estimated; boundaries are often not reproducible; mean object value cannot be measured; and fuzzy borders cannot be accommodated. A new measure, Object Strength, is proposed. This is the sum of all abnormal intensities, above a uniform background value. For a uniform object, this is simply the product of the increase in intensity and the size of the object. Biologically, this could be at least as relevant as existing measures of size or mean intensity. We hypothesise that Object Strength will perform better than traditional area measurements in characterising small objects. In a pilot study, the reproducibility of object strength measurements was investigated using MR images of small multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. In addition, accuracy was investigated using artificial lesions of known volume (0.3-6.2 ml) and realistic appearance. Reproducibility approached that of area measurements (in 33/90 lesion reports the difference between repeats was less than for area measurements). Total lesion volume was accurate to 0.2%. In conclusion, Object Strength has potential for improved characterisation of small lesions and objects in imaging and possibly spectroscopy.

  6. Ocean Lidar Measurements of Beam Attenuation and a Roadmap to Accurate Phytoplankton Biomass Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Mike; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhai, Pengwang; Weimer, Carl; Winker, David; Verhappen, Carolus C.; Butler, Carolyn; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hunt, Bill; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Lifermann, Anne; Josset, Damien; Hou, Weilin; MacDonnell, David; Rhew, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30° off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  7. Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger; Zhou, Yiwen; Utku, Cuneyt; Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater at a frequency of 1.413 GHz, the center of the protected band (i.e., passive use only) used in the measurement of sea surface salinity from space. The objective of the measurements is to accurately determine the complex dielectric constant of seawater as a function of salinity and temperature. A resonant cylindrical microwave cavity in transmission mode has been employed to make the measurements. The measurements are made using standard seawater at salinities of 30, 33, 35, and 38 practical salinity units over a range of temperatures from 0 degree C to 35 degree C in 5 degree C intervals. Repeated measurements have been made at each temperature and salinity. Mean values and standard deviations are then computed. The total error budget indicates that the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant have a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.3 over the range of salinities and temperatures considered. The measurements are compared with the dielectric constants obtained from the model functions of Klein and Swift and those of Meissner and Wentz. The biggest differences occur at low and high temperatures.

  8. Accurate PSF-matched photometry and photometric redshifts for the extreme deep field with the Chebyshev-Fourier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Benítez, N.; Molino, A.; Fernandes, C. A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Photometric redshifts, which have become the cornerstone of several of the largest astronomical surveys like PanStarrs, DES, J-PAS and LSST, require precise measurements of galaxy photometry in different bands using a consistent physical aperture. This is not trivial, due to the variation in the shape and width of the point spread function (PSF) introduced by wavelength differences, instrument positions and atmospheric conditions. Current methods to correct for this effect rely on a detailed knowledge of PSF characteristics as a function of the survey coordinates, which can be difficult due to the relative paucity of stars tracking the PSF behaviour. Here we show that it is possible to measure accurate, consistent multicolour photometry without knowing the shape of the PSF. The Chebyshev-Fourier functions (CHEFs) can fit the observed profile of each object and produce high signal-to-noise integrated flux measurements unaffected by the PSF. These total fluxes, which encompass all the galaxy populations, are much more useful for galaxy evolution studies than aperture photometry. We compare the total magnitudes and colours obtained using our software to traditional photometry with SEXTRACTOR, using real data from the COSMOS survey and the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF). We also apply the CHEF technique to the recently published eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) and compare the results to those from COLORPRO on the HUDF. We produce a photometric catalogue with 35 732 sources (10 823 with signal-to-noise ratio ≥5), reaching a photometric redshift precision of 2 per cent due to the extraordinary depth and wavelength coverage of the eXtreme Deep Field images.

  9. Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Utku, Cuneyt; Tarkocin, Yalcin; LeVine, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater at a frequency of 1.413 GHz that is at the center of the L-Sand radiometric protected frequency spectrum. Aquarius will be sensing the sea surface salinity from space in this band. The objective of the project is to refine the model function for the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature so that remote sensing measurements can be made with the accuracy needed to meet the measurement goals (0.2 psu) of the Aquarius mission. The measurements were made, using a microwave cavity operated in the transmission configuration. The cavity's temperature was accurately regulated to 0.02 C by immersing it in a temperature controlled bath of distilled water and ethanol glycol. Seawater had been purchased from Ocean Scientific International Limited (OS1L) at salinities of 30, 35 and 38 psu. Measurements of these seawater samples were then made over a range of temperatures, from l0 C to 35 C in 5 C intervals. Repeated measurements were made at each temperature and salinity, Mean values and standard deviations were then computed. Total error budgets indicated that the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant had a relative accuracy of about l%.

  10. A New Test Rig for Accurate Nonparametric Measurement and Characterization of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecucco, Andrea; Buckle, James; Siviter, Jonathan; Knox, Andrew R.

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are increasingly employed in large-scale applications, therefore accurate performance data are necessary to permit precise designs and simulations. However, there is still no standardized method to test the electrical and thermal performance of TEGs. This paper presents an innovative test system to assess device performance in the "real world." The fixture allows the hot temperature to be increased up to 800°C with minimal thermal losses and thermal shock; the clamping load can be adjusted up to 5 kN, and the temperatures are sensed by thermocouples placed directly on the TEG's surfaces. A computer program controls all the instruments in order to minimize errors and to aid accurate measurement and test repeatability. The test rig can measure four TEGs simultaneously, each one individually controlled and heated by a maximum electrical power of 2 kW. This allows testing of the effects of series and parallel connection of TEGs under mismatched conditions, e.g., dimensions, clamping force, temperature, etc. The test rig can be employed both as a performance evaluator and as a quality control unit, due to the ability to provide nonparametric testing of four TEGs concurrently. It can also be used to rapidly characterize devices of different dimensions at the same time.

  11. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU.

  12. Accurate and precise measurement of selenium by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Watson, Russell P; Lindstrom, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    An accurate and precise measurement of selenium in Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3149, a primary calibration standard for the quantitative determination of selenium, has been accomplished by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in order to resolve a question arising during the certification process of the standard. Each limiting factor of the uncertainty in the activation analysis, including the sample preparation, irradiation, and γ-ray spectrometry steps, has been carefully monitored to minimize the uncertainty in the determined mass fraction. Neutron and γ-ray self-shielding within the elemental selenium INAA standards contributed most significantly to the uncertainty of the measurement. An empirical model compensating for neutron self-shielding and reducing the self-shielding uncertainty was successfully applied to these selenium standards. The mass fraction of selenium in the new lot of SRM 3149 was determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.6%.

  13. Highly accurate thickness measurement of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimi, Soufiene; Klier, Jens; Jonuscheit, Joachim; von Freymann, Georg; Urbansky, Ralph; Beigang, René

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present a highly accurate approach for thickness measurements of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz time domain spectroscopy in reflection geometry. The proposed method combines the benefits of a model-based material parameters extraction method to calibrate the paint coatings, a generalized Rouard's method to simulate the terahertz radiation behavior within arbitrary thin films, and the robustness of a powerful evolutionary optimization algorithm to increase the sensitivity of the minimum thickness measurement limit. Within the framework of this work, a self-calibration model is introduced, which takes into consideration the real industrial challenges such as the effect of wet-on-wet spray in the painting process.

  14. Apparatus for accurate density measurements of fluids based on a magnetic suspension balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Maoqiong; Li, Huiya; Guo, Hao; Dong, Xueqiang; Wu, J. F.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus for accurate pressure, density and temperature (p, ρ, T) measurements over wide ranges of (p, ρ, T) (90 K to 290 K; 0 MPa to 3 MPa; 0 kg/m3 to 2000 kg/m3) is described. This apparatus is based on a magnetic suspension balance which applies the Archimedes' buoyancy principle. In order to verify the new apparatus, comprehensive (p, ρ, T) measurements on pure nitrogen were carried out. The maximum relative standard uncertainty is 0.09% in density. The maximum standard uncertainty in temperature is 5 mK, and that in pressure is 250 Pa for 1.5 MPa and 390 Pa for 3MPa full scale range respectively. The experimental data were compared with selected literature data and good agreements were found.

  15. Home Circadian Phase Assessments with Measures of Compliance Yield Accurate Dim Light Melatonin Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Wyatt, James K.; Park, Margaret; Fogg, Louis F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is a need for the accurate assessment of circadian phase outside of the clinic/laboratory, particularly with the gold standard dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). We tested a novel kit designed to assist in saliva sampling at home for later determination of the DLMO. The home kit includes objective measures of compliance to the requirements for dim light and half-hourly saliva sampling. Design: Participants were randomized to one of two 10-day protocols. Each protocol consisted of two back-to-back home and laboratory phase assessments in counterbalanced order, separated by a 5-day break. Setting: Laboratory or participants' homes. Participants: Thirty-five healthy adults, age 21–62 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Most participants received at least one 30-sec epoch of light > 50 lux during the home phase assessments (average light intensity 4.5 lux), but on average for < 9 min of the required 8.5 h. Most participants collected every saliva sample within 5 min of the scheduled time. Ninety-two percent of home DLMOs were not affected by light > 50 lux or sampling errors. There was no significant difference between the home and laboratory DLMOs (P > 0.05); on average the home DLMOs occurred 9.6 min before the laboratory DLMOs. The home DLMOs were highly correlated with the laboratory DLMOs (r = 0.91, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Participants were reasonably compliant to the home phase assessment procedures. The good agreement between the home and laboratory dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) demonstrates that including objective measures of light exposure and sample timing during home saliva sampling can lead to accurate home DLMOs. Clinical Trial Registration: Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Citation: Burgess HJ, Wyatt JK, Park M, Fogg LF. Home circadian phase assessments with measures of compliance yield accurate dim light melatonin onsets. SLEEP 2015;38(6):889–897

  16. k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy: A Method for Accurate Transport Measurements Independent of Fluorophore Photophysics

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, David L.; Ronis, David; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the theory and application of reciprocal space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). This technique measures the number density, diffusion coefficient, and velocity of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in a cell membrane imaged on a confocal, two-photon, or total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. In contrast to r-space correlation techniques, we show kICS can recover accurate dynamics even in the presence of complex fluorophore photobleaching and/or “blinking”. Furthermore, these quantities can be calculated without nonlinear curve fitting, or any knowledge of the beam radius of the exciting laser. The number densities calculated by kICS are less sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity of the fluorophore distribution than densities measured using image correlation spectroscopy. We use simulations as a proof-of-principle to show that number densities and transport coefficients can be extracted using this technique. We present calibration measurements with fluorescent microspheres imaged on a confocal microscope, which recover Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficients, and flow velocities that agree with single particle tracking measurements. We also show the application of kICS to measurements of the transport dynamics of α5-integrin/enhanced green fluorescent protein constructs in a transfected CHO cell imaged on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope using charge-coupled device area detection. PMID:16861272

  17. A New Cation-Exchange Method for Accurate Field Speciation of Hexavalent Chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, James W.; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2003-01-01

    A new cation-exchange method for field speciation of Cr(VI) has been developed to meet present stringent regulatory standards and to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The new method allows measurement of Cr(VI) concentrations as low as 0.05 micrograms per liter, storage of samples for at least several weeks prior to analysis, and use of readily available analytical instrumentation. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the determination in waters over the pH range of 2 to 11 and Fe concentrations up to 1 milligram per liter are equal to or better than existing methods such as USEPA method 218.6. Time stability of preserved samples is a significant advantage over the 24-hour time constraint specified for USEPA method 218.6.

  18. A very accurate filter wheel for a large field IR imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon, J. L.

    2010-07-01

    HAWK-I is a near-infrared imager with a relatively large field of view. Two filter wheels with 6 positions each offer a choice of 10 filters. The filters are directly in front of the detector, a mosaic of 2 × 2HAWAII 2RG 2048×2048 pixels detectors. A rather high positioning reproducibility (< 6 arc sec) is required in order to avoid any disagreement caused by subtraction of eventual fix pattern on the filters. The document describes various drive systems which have been tested in order to reach the specified positioning reproducibility. This includes an interesting dissipation free locking system combining electro magnet and permanent magnet. Every solution is discussed and the performances measured in the laboratory during a long campaign of test are exposed. We also address the choice of other critical components like the ball bearings, mounting of the filters and cooling of the wheels.

  19. Accurate and automatic extrinsic calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wantao; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Shi, Yusheng; Zhao, Can; Cheng, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Fast and precise 3D inspection system is in great demand in modern manufacturing processes. At present, the available sensors have their own pros and cons, and hardly exist an omnipotent sensor to handle the complex inspection task in an accurate and effective way. The prevailing solution is integrating multiple sensors and taking advantages of their strengths. For obtaining a holistic 3D profile, the data from different sensors should be registrated into a coherent coordinate system. However, some complex shape objects own thin wall feather such as blades, the ICP registration method would become unstable. Therefore, it is very important to calibrate the extrinsic parameters of each sensor in the integrated measurement system. This paper proposed an accurate and automatic extrinsic parameter calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors. In this system, fringe projection sensor (FPS) and conoscopic holography sensor (CHS) is integrated into a multi-axis motion platform, and the sensors can be optimally move to any desired position at the object's surface. In order to simple the calibration process, a special calibration artifact is designed according to the characteristics of the two sensors. An automatic registration procedure based on correlation and segmentation is used to realize the artifact datasets obtaining by FPS and CHS rough alignment without any manual operation and data pro-processing, and then the Generalized Gauss-Markoff model is used to estimate the optimization transformation parameters. The experiments show the measurement result of a blade, where several sampled patches are merged into one point cloud, and it verifies the performance of the proposed method.

  20. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity.

  1. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  2. Measuring nonlinear oscillations using a very accurate and low-cost linear optical position transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2016-09-01

    An accurate linear optical displacement transducer of about 0.2 mm resolution over a range of ∼40 mm is presented. This device consists of a stack of thin cellulose acetate strips, each strip longitudinally slid ∼0.5 mm over the precedent one so that one end of the stack becomes a stepped wedge of constant step. A narrowed light beam from a white LED orthogonally incident crosses the wedge at a known point, the transmitted intensity being detected with a phototransistor whose emitter is connected to a diode. We present the interesting analytical proof that the voltage across the diode is linearly dependent upon the ordinate of the point where the light beam falls on the wedge, as well as the experimental validation of such a theoretical proof. Applications to nonlinear oscillations are then presented—including the interesting case of a body moving under dry friction, and the more advanced case of an oscillator in a quartic energy potential—whose time-varying positions were accurately measured with our transducer. Our sensing device can resolve the dynamics of an object attached to it with great accuracy and precision at a cost considerably less than that of a linear neutral density wedge. The technique used to assemble the wedge of acetate strips is described.

  3. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  4. Accurate Measurement of the Effects of All Amino-Acid Mutations on Influenza Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Doud, Michael B.; Bloom, Jesse D.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza genes evolve mostly via point mutations, and so knowing the effect of every amino-acid mutation provides information about evolutionary paths available to the virus. We and others have combined high-throughput mutagenesis with deep sequencing to estimate the effects of large numbers of mutations to influenza genes. However, these measurements have suffered from substantial experimental noise due to a variety of technical problems, the most prominent of which is bottlenecking during the generation of mutant viruses from plasmids. Here we describe advances that ameliorate these problems, enabling us to measure with greatly improved accuracy and reproducibility the effects of all amino-acid mutations to an H1 influenza hemagglutinin on viral replication in cell culture. The largest improvements come from using a helper virus to reduce bottlenecks when generating viruses from plasmids. Our measurements confirm at much higher resolution the results of previous studies suggesting that antigenic sites on the globular head of hemagglutinin are highly tolerant of mutations. We also show that other regions of hemagglutinin—including the stalk epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies—have a much lower inherent capacity to tolerate point mutations. The ability to accurately measure the effects of all influenza mutations should enhance efforts to understand and predict viral evolution. PMID:27271655

  5. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1).

  6. Accurate Measurement of the Effects of All Amino-Acid Mutations on Influenza Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Doud, Michael B; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-01-01

    Influenza genes evolve mostly via point mutations, and so knowing the effect of every amino-acid mutation provides information about evolutionary paths available to the virus. We and others have combined high-throughput mutagenesis with deep sequencing to estimate the effects of large numbers of mutations to influenza genes. However, these measurements have suffered from substantial experimental noise due to a variety of technical problems, the most prominent of which is bottlenecking during the generation of mutant viruses from plasmids. Here we describe advances that ameliorate these problems, enabling us to measure with greatly improved accuracy and reproducibility the effects of all amino-acid mutations to an H1 influenza hemagglutinin on viral replication in cell culture. The largest improvements come from using a helper virus to reduce bottlenecks when generating viruses from plasmids. Our measurements confirm at much higher resolution the results of previous studies suggesting that antigenic sites on the globular head of hemagglutinin are highly tolerant of mutations. We also show that other regions of hemagglutinin-including the stalk epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies-have a much lower inherent capacity to tolerate point mutations. The ability to accurately measure the effects of all influenza mutations should enhance efforts to understand and predict viral evolution. PMID:27271655

  7. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1). PMID:23498117

  8. Accurate measurements of ozone absorption cross-sections in the Hartley band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallon, J.; Lee, S.; Moussay, P.; Tworek, K.; Petersen, M.; Wielgosz, R. I.

    2015-03-01

    Ozone plays a crucial role in tropospheric chemistry, is the third largest contributor to greenhouse radiative forcing after carbon dioxide and methane and also a toxic air pollutant affecting human health and agriculture. Long-term measurements of tropospheric ozone have been performed globally for more than 30 years with UV photometers, all relying on the absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have re-determined this cross-section and report a value of 11.27 x 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.86% (coverage factor k= 2). This is lower than the conventional value currently in use and measured by Hearn (1961) with a relative difference of 1.8%, with the consequence that historically reported ozone concentrations should be increased by 1.8%. In order to perform the new measurements of cross-sections with reduced uncertainties, a system was set up to generate pure ozone in the gas phase together with an optical system based on a UV laser with lines in the Hartley band, including accurate path length measurement of the absorption cell and a careful evaluation of possible impurities in the ozone sample by mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This resulted in new measurements of absolute values of ozone absorption cross-sections of 9.48 x 10-18, 10.44 x 10-18 and 11.07 x 10-18 cm2 molecule-1, with relative expanded uncertainties better than 0.7%, for the wavelengths (in vacuum) of 244.06, 248.32, and 257.34 nm respectively. The cross-section at the 253.65 nm line of mercury was determined by comparisons using a Standard Reference Photometer equipped with a mercury lamp as the light source. The newly reported value should be used in the future to obtain the most accurate measurements of ozone concentration, which are in closer agreement with non-UV-photometry based methods such as the gas phase titration of ozone with nitrogen monoxide.

  9. Accurate laser measurements of ozone absorption cross-sections in the Hartley band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallon, J.; Lee, S.; Moussay, P.; Tworek, K.; Petersen, M.; Wielgosz, R. I.

    2014-08-01

    Ozone plays a crucial role in tropospheric chemistry, is the third largest contributor to greenhouse radiative forcing after carbon dioxide and methane and also a toxic air pollutant affecting human health and agriculture. Long-term measurements of tropospheric ozone have been performed globally for more than 30 years with UV photometers, all relying on the absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have re-determined this cross-section and report a value of 11.27 × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.84 %. This is lower than the conventional value currently in use and measured by Hearn in 1961 with a relative difference of 1.8%, with the consequence that historically reported ozone concentrations should be increased by 1.8%. In order to perform the new measurements of cross sections with reduced uncertainties, a system to generate pure ozone in the gas phase together with an optical system based on a UV laser with lines in the Hartley band, including accurate path length measurement of the absorption cell and a careful evaluation of possible impurities in the ozone sample by mass spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy was setup. This resulted in new measurements of absolute values of ozone absorption cross sections of 9.48 × 10-18, 10.44 × 10-18, and 11.07 × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1, with relative expanded uncertainties better than 0.6%, for the wavelengths (in vacuum) of 244.062, 248.32, and 257.34 nm respectively. The cross-section at the 253.65 nm line of mercury was determined by comparisons using a Standard Reference Photometer equipped with a mercury lamp as the light source. The newly reported value should be used in the future to obtain the most accurate measurements of ozone concentration, which are in closer agreement with non UV photometry based methods such as the gas phase titration of ozone with nitrogen monoxide.

  10. Accurate measurement of intraarterial pressure through radial artery catheters in neonates.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; Westerhof, N; Leenhoven, T; Okken, A

    1990-07-01

    A technique is described for accurate measurement of intraarterial pressure through radial artery catheters in neonates. The technique, which can be used for short-term monitoring, uses cannulation of the radial artery with a 24-gauge Teflon catheter, connected by a Luer-Lok fitting to a three-way stopcock and a high-fidelity tip transducer. In vitro studies showed that the system is linear and the frequency response is flat (+/- 3 dB) up to 50 Hz. The technique permits gathering of high-quality pressure data and can be used in the area of neonatal clinical research for short-term monitoring. It needs to be developed further before routine application in clinical practice can be recommended.

  11. Simple yet accurate noncontact device for measuring the radius of curvature of a spherical mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Spiridonov, Maxim; Toebaert, David

    2006-09-10

    An easily reproducible device is demonstrated to be capable of measuring the radii of curvature of spherical mirrors, both convex and concave, without resorting to high-end interferometric or tactile devices. The former are too elaborate for our purposes,and the latter cannot be used due to the delicate nature of the coatings applied to mirrors used in high-power CO2 laser applications. The proposed apparatus is accurate enough to be useful to anyone using curved optics and needing a quick way to assess the values of the radii of curvature, be it for entrance quality control or trouble shooting an apparently malfunctioning optical system. Specifically, the apparatus was designed for checking 50 mm diameter resonator(typically flat or tens of meters concave) and telescope (typically some meters convex and concave) mirrors for a high-power CO2 laser, but it can easily be adapted to any other type of spherical mirror by a straightforward resizing.

  12. Simple yet accurate noncontact device for measuring the radius of curvature of a spherical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Maxim; Toebaert, David

    2006-09-01

    An easily reproducible device is demonstrated to be capable of measuring the radii of curvature of spherical mirrors, both convex and concave, without resorting to high-end interferometric or tactile devices. The former are too elaborate for our purposes, and the latter cannot be used due to the delicate nature of the coatings applied to mirrors used in high-power CO2 laser applications. The proposed apparatus is accurate enough to be useful to anyone using curved optics and needing a quick way to assess the values of the radii of curvature, be it for entrance quality control or trouble shooting an apparently malfunctioning optical system. Specifically, the apparatus was designed for checking 50 mm diameter resonator (typically flat or tens of meters concave) and telescope (typically some meters convex and concave) mirrors for a high-power CO2 laser, but it can easily be adapted to any other type of spherical mirror by a straightforward resizing.

  13. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Vlassak, J J

    2013-05-01

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious.

  14. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  15. Measuring solar reflectance - Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-09-15

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective ''cool colored'' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland US latitudes, this metric R{sub E891BN} can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {<=} 5:12 [23 ]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear sky air mass one global horizontal (''AM1GH'') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. (author)

  16. Extracting accurate strain measurements in bone mechanics: A critical review of current methods.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis related fractures are a social burden that advocates for more accurate fracture prediction methods. Mechanistic methods, e.g. finite element models, have been proposed as a tool to better predict bone mechanical behaviour and strength. However, there is little consensus about the optimal constitutive law to describe bone as a material. Extracting reliable and relevant strain data from experimental tests is of fundamental importance to better understand bone mechanical properties, and to validate numerical models. Several techniques have been used to measure strain in experimental mechanics, with substantial differences in terms of accuracy, precision, time- and length-scale. Each technique presents upsides and downsides that must be carefully evaluated when designing the experiment. Moreover, additional complexities are often encountered when applying such strain measurement techniques to bone, due to its complex composite structure. This review of literature examined the four most commonly adopted methods for strain measurements (strain gauges, fibre Bragg grating sensors, digital image correlation, and digital volume correlation), with a focus on studies with bone as a substrate material, at the organ and tissue level. For each of them the working principles, a summary of the main applications to bone mechanics at the organ- and tissue-level, and a list of pros and cons are provided. PMID:26099201

  17. An Accurate Method for Measuring Airplane-Borne Conformal Antenna's Radar Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuxia; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yafeng; Hu, Chufeng

    2016-09-01

    The airplane-borne conformal antenna attaches itself tightly with the airplane skin, so the conventional measurement method cannot determine the contribution of the airplane-borne conformal antenna to its radar cross section (RCS). This paper uses the 2D microwave imaging to isolate and extract the distribution of the reflectivity of the airplane-borne conformal antenna. It obtains the 2D spatial spectra of the conformal antenna through the wave spectral transform between the 2D spatial image and the 2D spatial spectrum. After the interpolation from the rectangular coordinate domain to the polar coordinate domain, the spectral domain data for the variation of the scatter of the conformal antenna with frequency and angle is obtained. The experimental results show that the measurement method proposed in this paper greatly enhances the airplane-borne conformal antenna's RCS measurement accuracy, essentially eliminates the influences caused by the airplane skin and more accurately reveals the airplane-borne conformal antenna's RCS scatter properties.

  18. Optimum satellite orbits for accurate measurement of the earth's radiation budget, summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. G.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    The optimum set of orbit inclinations for the measurement of the earth radiation budget from spacially integrating sensor systems was estimated for two and three satellite systems. The best set of the two were satellites at orbit inclinations of 80 deg and 50 deg; of three the inclinations were 80 deg, 60 deg and 50 deg. These were chosen on the basis of a simulation of flat plate and spherical detectors flying over a daily varying earth radiation field as measured by the Nimbus 3 medium resolution scanners. A diurnal oscillation was also included in the emitted flux and albedo to give a source field as realistic as possible. Twenty three satellites with different inclinations and equator crossings were simulated, allowing the results of thousand of multisatellite sets to be intercompared. All were circular orbits of radius 7178 kilometers.

  19. Can endocranial volume be estimated accurately from external skull measurements in great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus)?

    PubMed Central

    Palmstrom, Christin R.

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to validate and collect data approximating brain size on individuals in the field to understand what evolutionary factors drive brain size variation within and across species. We investigated whether we could accurately estimate endocranial volume (a proxy for brain size), as measured by computerized tomography (CT) scans, using external skull measurements and/or by filling skulls with beads and pouring them out into a graduated cylinder for male and female great-tailed grackles. We found that while females had higher correlations than males, estimations of endocranial volume from external skull measurements or beads did not tightly correlate with CT volumes. We found no accuracy in the ability of external skull measures to predict CT volumes because the prediction intervals for most data points overlapped extensively. We conclude that we are unable to detect individual differences in endocranial volume using external skull measurements. These results emphasize the importance of validating and explicitly quantifying the predictive accuracy of brain size proxies for each species and each sex. PMID:26082858

  20. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  1. Magsat: A satellite for measuring near earth magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Regan, R. D.; Murphy, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Magsat, designed for making measurements of the geomagnetic vector field, is evaluated. For accurate vector measurements the attitude of the fluxgate magnetometer will be determined to about 15 arc-seconds. Expected measurement accuracy will be 6 (gamma) in each component and 3 in magnitude. The Magsat data will be applied to solid earth studies including modeling of the Earth's main magnetic field, delineation of regional magnetic anomalies of crustal origin, and interpretation of those anomalies in terms of geologic and geophysical models. An opportunity will be presented to the scientific community to participate in data use investigations.

  2. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W.; Swanson, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical foundation of the field electron retarding potential method, and review of its experimental application to the measurement of single crystal face work functions. The results obtained from several substrates are discussed. An interesting and useful fallout from the experimental approach described is the ability to accurately measure the elastic and inelastic reflection coefficient for impinging electrons to near zero-volt energy.

  3. Maximum Mass of Strange Stars and Pulsars with the Most Accurately Measured Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, Yu. L.; Grigoryan, A. K.; Shahinyan, H. A.

    2015-06-01

    Strange quark matter (SQM) is studied using a bag model in which the transition to the SQM state takes place at energy densities of no more than twice the density in atomic nuclei. Thus, low mass neutron stars with a configuration consisting of SQM form a single family on a plot of the mass M of equilibrium superdense configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c (the M(ρ c ) curve). The bag model considered here depends on three constants: the vacuum pressure B, the quark-gluon interaction constant α c , and the strange quark mass m s . Sets of values of these constants are determined, which if used in the equation of state for SQM yield a maximal mass M max of the equilibrium quark configurations which exceeds the recently accurately determined mass of 2.01 M ⊙ for the binary radio pulsar PSR J0348+0432. The mass, radius, total baryon number, and red shift from the surface of the strange star are calculated for these configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c . The values of these integrated parameters are also calculated for each series with M max > 2.01 M ⊙ for superdense configurations with masses of 2.01, 1.97, and 1.44 solar masses, which have been determined with great accuracy from observations. It turns out that, according to the resulting equations of state, all of the three pulsars with the most accurately measured masses, may be possible candidate strange stars.

  4. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  5. Accurate, in vivo NIR measurement of skeletal muscle oxygenation through fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chunguang; Zou, Fengmei; Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Scott, Peter; Peshlov, Boyan; Soller, Babs R.

    2010-02-01

    Noninvasive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurement of muscle oxygenation requires the penetration of light through overlying skin and fat layers. We have previously demonstrated a dual-light source design and orthogonalization algorithm that corrects for inference from skin absorption and fat scattering. To achieve accurate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) measurement, one must select the appropriate source-detector distance (SD) to completely penetrate the fat layer. Methods: Six healthy subjects were supine for 15min to normalize tissue oxygenation across the body. NIR spectra were collected from the calf, shoulder, lower and upper thigh muscles with long SD distances of 30mm, 35mm, 40mm and 45mm. Spectral preprocessing with the short SD (3mm) spectrum preceded SmO2 calculation with a Taylor series expansion method. Three-way ANOVA was used to compare SmO2 values over varying fat thickness, subjects and SD distances. Results: Overlying fat layers varied in thickness from 4.9mm to 19.6mm across all subjects. SmO2 measured at the four locations were comparable for each subject (p=0.133), regardless of fat thickness and SD distance. SmO2 (mean+/-std dev) measured at calf, shoulder, low and high thigh were 62+/-3%, 59+/-8%, 61+/-2%, 61+/-4% respectively for SD distance of 30mm. In these subjects no significant influence of SD was observed (p=0.948). Conclusions: The results indicate that for our sensor design a 30mm SD is sufficient to penetrate through a 19mm fat layer and that orthogonalization with short SD effectively removed spectral interference from fat to result in a reproducible determination of SmO2.

  6. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, Boy-Santhos; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2013-04-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the 150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  7. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, B.; Hut, R.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2012-12-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the $150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  8. Measurements and computations of electromagnetic fields in electric power substations

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.K. ); Dawalibi, F. )

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic fields generated by a typical distribution substation were measured and calculated based on a computer model which takes into account currents in the grounding systems, distribution feeder neutrals, overhead ground wires and induced currents in equipment structures and ground grid loops. Both measured and computer results indicate that magnetic fields are significantly influenced by ground currents, as well as induced currents in structures and ground system loops. All currents in the network modeled were computed, based on the measured currents impressed at the boundary points (ends of the conductor network). The agreement between the measured and computer values is good. Small differences were observed and are attributed mainly to uncertainties in the geometry of the network model and phase angles of some of the currents in the neutral conductors which were not measured in the field. Further measurements, including more accurate geometrical information and phase angles, are planned.

  9. Technical Note: PRESAGE three-dimensional dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    PubMed Central

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and two-dimensional detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ± 0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors. PMID:25368961

  10. Influence of scattered light on accurate CCD flat fielding --- necessity of modifying baffles of some existent reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. A.; Zhang, C. S.; Sheng, C. J.; Peng, Y. L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper is the continuation of paper [1]. In this paper we further show that the difference between twilight flat field and night sky exposure is mainly due to the existence of scattered light. Like Grundahl and Sorensen, we also made the pinhole images of the 1.56m at the Shanghai Observatory and the 63cm of the Nanjing University to show the existence of scattered light intuitively. Both the 1.56m and the 63cm reflectors have normal designed baffles. Therefore it is the common weakness of all standard designed reflectors having only two baffles mounted in front of the primary and secondary mirrors which are not enough to protect the CCD cameras from scattered light in getting accurate flat fields. It is of great importance to modify the primary mirror baffle of all similar reflectors in order to get more accurate flat fielding.

  11. Do inverse ecosystem models accurately reconstruct plankton trophic flows? Comparing two solution methods using field data from the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Samo, Ty; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2012-03-01

    Despite the increasing use of linear inverse modeling techniques to elucidate fluxes in undersampled marine ecosystems, the accuracy with which they estimate food web flows has not been resolved. New Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) solution methods have also called into question the biases of the commonly used L2 minimum norm (L 2MN) solution technique. Here, we test the abilities of MCMC and L 2MN methods to recover field-measured ecosystem rates that are sequentially excluded from the model input. For data, we use experimental measurements from process cruises of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE-LTER) Program that include rate estimates of phytoplankton and bacterial production, micro- and mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from eight study sites varying from rich coastal upwelling to offshore oligotrophic conditions. Both the MCMC and L 2MN methods predicted well-constrained rates of protozoan and mesozooplankton grazing with reasonable accuracy, but the MCMC method overestimated primary production. The MCMC method more accurately predicted the poorly constrained rate of vertical carbon export than the L 2MN method, which consistently overestimated export. Results involving DOC and bacterial production were equivocal. Overall, when primary production is provided as model input, the MCMC method gives a robust depiction of ecosystem processes. Uncertainty in inverse ecosystem models is large and arises primarily from solution under-determinacy. We thus suggest that experimental programs focusing on food web fluxes expand the range of experimental measurements to include the nature and fate of detrital pools, which play large roles in the model.

  12. Accurate Quartic Force Fields and Vibrational Frequencies for HCN and HNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Gazdy, Bela; Bowman, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCN and HNC are determined using atomic natural orbital one-particle basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality in conjunction with the CCSD(T) electron correlation method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbation estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). The HCN force field is in good agreement with a recent experimentally derived force field and also with the force field recently computed by Wong and Bacskay. On the basis of the good agreement obtained for HCN, it is argued that the ab initio quartic force field for HNC is superior to a prior force field derived from experiment. The harmonic frequencies of HNC are predicted to be 3822 +/- 10, 472 +/- 5, and 2051 +/- 10 cm(exp -1) for omega(sub 1), omega(sub 2), and omega(sub 3), respectively; the experimentally derived values are above these values and fall outside the estimated uncertainties. Using the quartic force field, spectroscopic constants are predicted for HNC based on a vibrational second-order perturbation theory analysis. It is also asserted that the gas-phase fundamental nu(sub 3) for HNC is slightly lower than the matrix isolation value. The range of validity of the quartic force fields is investigated by comparison of variational vibrational energies computed with the quartic force fields to those obtained from our recently reported global HCN/HNC potential energy surface and also to experimental data.

  13. Accurate Quartic Force Fields and Vibrational Frequencies for HCN and HNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Gazdy, Bela; Bowman, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCN and HNC are determined using atomic natural orbital one-particle basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality in conjunction with the CCSD(T) electron correlation method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). The HCN force field is in good agreement with a recent experimentally derived force field and also with the force field recently computed by Wong and Bacskay. On the basis of the good agreement obtained for HCN, it is argued that the ab initio quartic force field for HNC is superior to a prior force field derived from experiment. The harmonic frequencies of HNC are predicted to be 3822 +/- 10,472 +/- 5, and 2051 +/-10/cm for omega1, omega2, and omega3, respectively; the experimentally derived values are above these values and fall outside the estimated uncertainties. Using the quartic force field, spectroscopic constants are predicted for HNC based on a vibrational second-order perturbation theory analysis. It is also asserted that the gas-phase fundamental v(sub 3) for HNC is slightly lower than the matrix isolation value. The range of validity of the quartic force fields is investigated by comparison of variational vibrational energies computed with the quartic force fields to those obtained from our recently reported global HCN/HNC potential energy surface and also to experimental data.

  14. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  15. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the third six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on sensor probe design and machining, sensor electronics design, software algorithm design, sensor field installation procedures, and sensor remote data access and control. Field testing will begin in the next several weeks.

  16. Erosion by Wind: Field Measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion and deposition results when wind moves soil from a bare susceptible surface to another location downwind. Although placement of permanent vertical references such as pins or rods has been used to measure soil redistribution, it is more commonly measured by capturing sediment moving dur...

  17. How Accurate is Your Sclerostin Measurement? Comparison Between Three Commercially Available Sclerostin ELISA Kits.

    PubMed

    Piec, Isabelle; Washbourne, Christopher; Tang, Jonathan; Fisher, Emily; Greeves, Julie; Jackson, Sarah; Fraser, William D

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin, bone formation antagonist is in the spotlight as a potential biomarker for diseases presenting with associated bone disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CDK-MBD). Accurate measurement of sclerostin is therefore important. Several immunoassays are available to measure sclerostin in serum and plasma. We compared the performance of three commercial ELISA kits. We measured sclerostin concentrations in serum and EDTA plasma obtained from healthy young (18-26 years) human subjects using kits from Biomedica, TECOmedical and from R&D Systems. The circulating sclerostin concentrations were systematically higher when measured with the Biomedica assay (serum: 35.5 ± 1.1 pmol/L; EDTA: 39.4 ± 2.0 pmol/L; mean ± SD) as compared with TECOmedical (serum: 21.8 ± 0.7 pmol/L; EDTA: 27.2 ± 1.3 pmol/L) and R&D Systems (serum: 7.6 ± 0.3 pmol/L; EDTA: 30.9 ± 1.5 pmol/L). We found a good correlation between the assay for EDTA plasma (r > 0.6; p < 0.001) while in serum, only measurements obtained using TECOmedical and R&D Systems assays correlated significantly (r = 0.78; p < 0.001). There was no correlation between matrices results when using the Biomedica kit (r = 0.20). The variability in values generated from Biomedica, R&D Systems and TECOmedical assays raises questions regarding the accuracy and specificity of the assays. Direct comparison of studies using different kits is not possible and great care should be given to measurement of sclerostin, with traceability of reagents. Standardization with appropriate material is required before different sclerostin assays can be introduced in clinical practice. PMID:26749312

  18. How Accurate is Your Sclerostin Measurement? Comparison Between Three Commercially Available Sclerostin ELISA Kits.

    PubMed

    Piec, Isabelle; Washbourne, Christopher; Tang, Jonathan; Fisher, Emily; Greeves, Julie; Jackson, Sarah; Fraser, William D

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin, bone formation antagonist is in the spotlight as a potential biomarker for diseases presenting with associated bone disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CDK-MBD). Accurate measurement of sclerostin is therefore important. Several immunoassays are available to measure sclerostin in serum and plasma. We compared the performance of three commercial ELISA kits. We measured sclerostin concentrations in serum and EDTA plasma obtained from healthy young (18-26 years) human subjects using kits from Biomedica, TECOmedical and from R&D Systems. The circulating sclerostin concentrations were systematically higher when measured with the Biomedica assay (serum: 35.5 ± 1.1 pmol/L; EDTA: 39.4 ± 2.0 pmol/L; mean ± SD) as compared with TECOmedical (serum: 21.8 ± 0.7 pmol/L; EDTA: 27.2 ± 1.3 pmol/L) and R&D Systems (serum: 7.6 ± 0.3 pmol/L; EDTA: 30.9 ± 1.5 pmol/L). We found a good correlation between the assay for EDTA plasma (r > 0.6; p < 0.001) while in serum, only measurements obtained using TECOmedical and R&D Systems assays correlated significantly (r = 0.78; p < 0.001). There was no correlation between matrices results when using the Biomedica kit (r = 0.20). The variability in values generated from Biomedica, R&D Systems and TECOmedical assays raises questions regarding the accuracy and specificity of the assays. Direct comparison of studies using different kits is not possible and great care should be given to measurement of sclerostin, with traceability of reagents. Standardization with appropriate material is required before different sclerostin assays can be introduced in clinical practice.

  19. Accurate and precise Pb isotope ratio measurements in environmental samples by MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik J.; Kober, Bernd; Dolgopolova, Alla; Gallagher, Kerry; Spiro, Baruch; Le Roux, Gaël; Mason, Thomas F. D.; Kylander, Malin; Coles, Barry J.

    2004-04-01

    Analytical protocols for accurate and precise Pb isotope ratio determinations in peat, lichen, vegetable, chimney dust, and ore-bearing granites using MC-ICP-MS and their application to environmental studies are presented. Acid dissolution of various matrix types was achieved using high temperature/high pressure microwave and hot plate digestion procedures. The digests were passed through a column packed with EiChrom Sr-resin employing only hydrochloric acid and one column passage. This simplified column chemistry allowed high sample throughput. Typically, internal precisions for approximately 30 ng Pb were below 100 ppm (+/-2[sigma]) on all Pb ratios in all matrices. Thallium was employed to correct for mass discrimination effects and the achieved accuracy was below 80 ppm for all ratios. This involved an optimization procedure for the 205Tl/203Tl ratio using least square fits relative to certified NIST-SRM 981 Pb values. The long-term reproducibility (+/-2[sigma]) for the NIST-SRM 981 Pb standard over a 5-month period (35 measurements) was better than 350 ppm for all ratios. Selected ore-bearing granites were measured with TIMS and MC-ICP-MS and showed good correlation (e.g., r=0.999 for 206Pb/207Pb ratios, slope=0.996, n=13). Mass bias and signal intensities of Tl spiked into natural (after matrix separation) and in synthetic samples did not differ significantly, indicating that any residual components of the complex peat and lichen matrix did not influence mass bias correction. Environmental samples with very different matrices were analyzed during two different studies: (i) lichens, vegetables, and chimney dust around a Cu smelter in the Urals, and (ii) peat samples from an ombrotrophic bog in the Faroe Islands. The presented procedure for sample preparation, mass spectrometry, and data processing tools resulted in accurate and precise Pb isotope data that allowed the reliable differentiation and identification of Pb sources with variations as small as 0

  20. Accurate measurement of the 12.6 GHz "clock" transition in trapped (171)Yb(+) ions.

    PubMed

    Fisk, P H; Sellars, M J; Lawn, M A; Coles, G

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the frequency of the (171)Yb(+) 12.6 GHz M(F)=0-->0 ground state hyperfine "clock" transition in buffer gas-cooled ion clouds confined in two similar, but not identical, linear Paul traps. After correction for the known differences between the two ion traps, including significantly different second-order Doppler shifts, the frequencies agree within an uncertainty of less than 2 parts in 10(13). Our best value, based on an analytic model for the second-order Doppler shift, for the frequency of the clock transition of an isolated ion at zero temperature, velocity, electric field and magnetic field, is 12642812118.466+0.002 Hz.

  1. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  2. An accurate mass and radius measurement for an ultracool white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Bergeron, P.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Bento, J.; Littlefair, S. P.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2012-11-01

    Studies of cool white dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood have placed a limit on the age of the Galactic disc of 8-9 billion years. However, determining their cooling ages requires the knowledge of their effective temperatures, masses, radii and atmospheric composition. So far, these parameters could only be inferred for a small number of ultracool white dwarfs for which an accurate distance is known, by fitting their spectral energy distributions in conjunction with a theoretical mass-radius relation. However, the mass-radius relation remains largely untested, and the derived cooling ages are hence model dependent. Here we report direct measurements of the mass and radius of an ultracool white dwarf in the double-lined eclipsing binary SDSS J013851.54-001621.6. We find MWD = 0.529 ± 0.010 M⊙ and RWD = 0.0131 ± 0.0003 R⊙. Our measurements are consistent with the mass-radius relation and we determine a robust cooling age of 9.5 billion years for the 3570 K white dwarf. We find that the mass and radius of the low-mass companion star, Msec = 0.132 ± 0.003 M⊙ and Rsec = 0.165 ± 0.001 R⊙, are in agreement with evolutionary models. We also find evidence that this >9.5 Gyr old M5 star is still active, far beyond the activity lifetime for a star of its spectral type. This is likely caused by the high tidally enforced rotation rate of the star. The companion star is close to filling its Roche lobe and the system will evolve into a cataclysmic variable in only 70 Myr. Our direct measurements demonstrate that this system can be used to calibrate ultracool white dwarf atmospheric models.

  3. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  4. Integration of a silicon-based microprobe into a gear measuring instrument for accurate measurement of micro gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, N.; Krah, T.; Jeong, D. C.; Metz, D.; Kniel, K.; Dietzel, A.; Büttgenbach, S.; Härtig, F.

    2014-06-01

    The integration of silicon micro probing systems into conventional gear measuring instruments (GMIs) allows fully automated measurements of external involute micro spur gears of normal modules smaller than 1 mm. This system, based on a silicon microprobe, has been developed and manufactured at the Institute for Microtechnology of the Technische Universität Braunschweig. The microprobe consists of a silicon sensor element and a stylus which is oriented perpendicularly to the sensor. The sensor is fabricated by means of silicon bulk micromachining. Its small dimensions of 6.5 mm × 6.5 mm allow compact mounting in a cartridge to facilitate the integration into a GMI. In this way, tactile measurements of 3D microstructures can be realized. To enable three-dimensional measurements with marginal forces, four Wheatstone bridges are built with diffused piezoresistors on the membrane of the sensor. On the reverse of the membrane, the stylus is glued perpendicularly to the sensor on a boss to transmit the probing forces to the sensor element during measurements. Sphere diameters smaller than 300 µm and shaft lengths of 5 mm as well as measurement forces from 10 µN enable the measurements of 3D microstructures. Such micro probing systems can be integrated into universal coordinate measuring machines and also into GMIs to extend their field of application. Practical measurements were carried out at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt by qualifying the microprobes on a calibrated reference sphere to determine their sensitivity and their physical dimensions in volume. Following that, profile and helix measurements were carried out on a gear measurement standard with a module of 1 mm. The comparison of the measurements shows good agreement between the measurement values and the calibrated values. This result is a promising basis for the realization of smaller probe diameters for the tactile measurement of micro gears with smaller modules.

  5. Accurate Permittivity Measurements for Microwave Imaging via Ultra-Wideband Removal of Spurious Reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Mathew G.; Viera, Joseph A.; Wanjura, John; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The use of microwave imaging is becoming more prevalent for detection of interior hidden defects in manufactured and packaged materials. In applications for detection of hidden moisture, microwave tomography can be used to image the material and then perform an inverse calculation to derive an estimate of the variability of the hidden material, such internal moisture, thereby alerting personnel to damaging levels of the hidden moisture before material degradation occurs. One impediment to this type of imaging occurs with nearby objects create strong reflections that create destructive and constructive interference, at the receiver, as the material is conveyed past the imaging antenna array. In an effort to remove the influence of the reflectors, such as metal bale ties, research was conducted to develop an algorithm for removal of the influence of the local proximity reflectors from the microwave images. This research effort produced a technique, based upon the use of ultra-wideband signals, for the removal of spurious reflections created by local proximity reflectors. This improvement enables accurate microwave measurements of moisture in such products as cotton bales, as well as other physical properties such as density or material composition. The proposed algorithm was shown to reduce errors by a 4:1 ratio and is an enabling technology for imaging applications in the presence of metal bale ties. PMID:22163668

  6. An improved method for accurate and rapid measurement of flight performance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Daniel T; Ganetzky, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has proven to be a useful model system for analysis of behavior, including flight. The initial flight tester involved dropping flies into an oil-coated graduated cylinder; landing height provided a measure of flight performance by assessing how far flies will fall before producing enough thrust to make contact with the wall of the cylinder. Here we describe an updated version of the flight tester with four major improvements. First, we added a "drop tube" to ensure that all flies enter the flight cylinder at a similar velocity between trials, eliminating variability between users. Second, we replaced the oil coating with removable plastic sheets coated in Tangle-Trap, an adhesive designed to capture live insects. Third, we use a longer cylinder to enable more accurate discrimination of flight ability. Fourth we use a digital camera and imaging software to automate the scoring of flight performance. These improvements allow for the rapid, quantitative assessment of flight behavior, useful for large datasets and large-scale genetic screens. PMID:24561810

  7. Produced water toxicity tests accurately measure the produced water toxicity in marine environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.S.; Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region VI has issued a general permit for offshore oil and gas discharges to the Gulf of Mexico that places numerical limits on whole effluent toxicity (WEI) for produced water. Recently proposed EPA general permits for other produced water discharges in Regions VI and X also include enforceable numerical limits on WET. Clearly, the industry will be conducting extensive produced water WET testing. Unfortunately, the WET test may not accurately measure the toxicity of the chemical constituents of produced water. Rather the mortality of test organisms may be attributable to (1) the high salinity of produced water, which causes salinity shock to the organisms, or (2) an ionic imbalance caused by excesses or deficiencies of one or more of seawater`s essential ions in the test chambers. Both of these effects are likely to be mitigated in actual offshore discharge settings, where the receiving water will be seawater and substantial dilution will be probable. Thus, the additional salinity of produced water will be rapidly assimilated, and the proper marine ionic balance will be quickly restored. Regulatory authorities should be aware of these factors when interpreting WET test results.

  8. Accurate measurement of refraction and dispersion of a solid by a double-layer interferometer.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A Y

    1997-02-01

    A silica plate of plane-parallel faces is inserted into one gap of a double-layer interferometer that transmits white light to a prism spectrograph in order to produce elliptic rings of equal chromatic order (RECO's). The silica plate is rotated and the expanding RECO's are counted at their center while this center is coincident with a standard wavelength. An analytic formula that relates the fringe count to the rotated angle enables the refractive index of the rotated plate to be accurately determined for different wavelengths. The results are fitted to a single-term Sellmeier dispersion function to find the peak wavelength of the ultraviolet absorption band and the atomic number density for such a transition. The variation of either the dispersion coefficient or the group-velocity factor with wavelength is determined from either the displacement of the RECO center across the visible spectrum if one of the double-layer interferometer's mirrors is displaced parallel to itself or from measurements on the RECO diameters. PMID:18250738

  9. An accurate magnetic field solution for medical electromagnetic tracking coils at close range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Tobias

    2015-06-01

    Electromagnetic tracking uses transmitter field models to determine position and orientation of an object. An important application of this technology is surgical navigation, where instruments are frequently tracked at short distances from the transmitter. At short distances, conventional and widely used dipole field models can lead to errors in tracked position and orientation. To increase tracking accuracy in this scenario, this work describes a novel transmitter field model and compares its performance against the dipole model. Demonstrated tracking accuracy improvements could have far-reaching benefits for medical navigation applications.

  10. Performance of field measuring probes for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Marone, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    Several years of experience have been acquired on the operation of probes (``moles``) constructed for the measurement of the multipole components of the magnetic fields of SSC magnets. The field is measured by rotating coils contained in a 2.4-m long tube that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet by an external device-the transporter. In addition to the measuring coils, the tube contains motors for rotating the coil and a system for sensing local vertical using gravity sensors to provide an absolute reference for the field measurements. We describe the steps that must be taken in order to ensure accurate, repeatable measurements; the design changes that have been motivated by difficulties encountered (noise, vibration, variations in temperature); and other performance issues. The mechanical interface between the probe and the hewn tube of the magnet is also described.

  11. Muscle function during brief maximal exercise: accurate measurements on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Arsac, L M; Belli, A; Lacour, J R

    1996-01-01

    A friction loaded cycle ergometer was instrumented with a strain gauge and an incremental encoder to obtain accurate measurement of human mechanical work output during the acceleration phase of a cycling sprint. This device was used to characterise muscle function in a group of 15 well-trained male subjects, asked to perform six short maximal sprints on the cycle against a constant friction load. Friction loads were successively set at 0.25, 0.35, 0.45, 0.55, 0.65 and 0.75 N.kg-1 body mass. Since the sprints were performed from a standing start, and since the acceleration was not restricted, the greatest attention was paid to the measurement of the acceleration balancing load due to flywheel inertia. Instantaneous pedalling velocity (v) and power output (P) were calculated each 5 ms and then averaged over each downstroke period so that each pedal downstroke provided a combination of v, force and P. Since an 8-s acceleration phase was composed of about 21 to 34 pedal downstrokes, this many v-P combinations were obtained amounting to 137-180 v-P combinations for all six friction loads in one individual, over the widest functional range of pedalling velocities (17-214 rpm). Thus, the individual's muscle function was characterised by the v-P relationships obtained during the six acceleration phases of the six sprints. An important finding of the present study was a strong linear relationship between individual optimal velocity (vopt) and individual maximal power output (Pmax) (n = 15, r = 0.95, P < 0.001) which has never been observed before. Since vopt has been demonstrated to be related to human fibre type composition both vopt, Pmax and their inter-relationship could represent a major feature in characterising muscle function in maximal unrestricted exercise. It is suggested that the present method is well suited to such analyses.

  12. New insights for accurate chemically specific measurements of slow diffusing molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianbo; Madsen, Louis A

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the myriad features of molecular transport in materials yields fundamental information for understanding processes such as ion conduction, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. Molecular transport especially impacts the performance of ion-containing liquids and polymeric materials when used as electrolytes and separation media, with applications encompassing battery electrolytes, reverse-osmosis membranes, mechanical transducers, and fuel cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a unique probe of molecular translations by allowing measurement of all mobile species via spectral selectivity, access to a broad range of transport coefficients, probing of any material direction, and investigation of variable lengthscales in a material, thus, tying morphology to transport. Here, we present new concepts to test for and guarantee robust diffusion measurements. We first employ a standard pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) calibration protocol using (2)H(2)O and obtain expected results, but we observe crippling artifacts when measuring (1)H-glycerol diffusion with the same experimental parameters. A mathematical analysis of (2)H(2)O and glycerol signals in the presence of PFG transients show tight agreement with experimental observations. These analyses lead to our principal findings that (1) negligible artifacts observed with low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) nuclei may become dominant when observing high γ nuclei, and (2) reducing the sample dimension along the gradient direction predictably reduces non-ideal behaviors of NMR signals. We further provide a useful quantitative strategy for error minimization when measuring diffusing species slower than the one used for gradient calibration. PMID:23406112

  13. New insights for accurate chemically specific measurements of slow diffusing molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jianbo; Madsen, Louis A.

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the myriad features of molecular transport in materials yields fundamental information for understanding processes such as ion conduction, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. Molecular transport especially impacts the performance of ion-containing liquids and polymeric materials when used as electrolytes and separation media, with applications encompassing battery electrolytes, reverse-osmosis membranes, mechanical transducers, and fuel cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a unique probe of molecular translations by allowing measurement of all mobile species via spectral selectivity, access to a broad range of transport coefficients, probing of any material direction, and investigation of variable lengthscales in a material, thus, tying morphology to transport. Here, we present new concepts to test for and guarantee robust diffusion measurements. We first employ a standard pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) calibration protocol using 2H2O and obtain expected results, but we observe crippling artifacts when measuring 1H-glycerol diffusion with the same experimental parameters. A mathematical analysis of 2H2O and glycerol signals in the presence of PFG transients show tight agreement with experimental observations. These analyses lead to our principal findings that (1) negligible artifacts observed with low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) nuclei may become dominant when observing high γ nuclei, and (2) reducing the sample dimension along the gradient direction predictably reduces non-ideal behaviors of NMR signals. We further provide a useful quantitative strategy for error minimization when measuring diffusing species slower than the one used for gradient calibration.

  14. MELIFT - A new device for accurate measurements in a snow rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, M.

    2012-04-01

    A deep snow pack, remote locations, no external power supply and very low temperatures are often the main ingredients when it comes to the deployment of meteorological stations in mountainous terrain. The accurate position of the sensor related to the snow surface is normally not known. A new device called METLIFT overcomes the problems. WMO recommends a height between 1.2 m and 2 m above ground level for the measurement of air temperature and humidity. The height above ground level is specified to take care of the possible strong vertical temperature and humidity gradients at the lowest layers in the atmosphere. Especially in snow rich and remote locations it may be hardly possible to follow this advice. Therefore most of the meteorological stations in mountainous terrain are situated at mountain tops where strong winds will blow off the snow or in valleys where a daily inspection of the sensors is possible. In other unpopulated mountainous areas, e.g. basins, plateaus, the distance of the sensor to the snow surface is not known or the sensor will be snow-covered. A new device was developed to guarantee the sensor height above surface within the WMO limits in harsh and remote environments. An ultrasonic snow height sensor measures the distance to the snow surface. If it exceeds certain limits due to snow accumulation or snow melt the lift adapts its height accordingly. The prototype of METLIFT has been installed in Lower Austria at an altitude of 1000m. The lift is 6 m high and can pull out for another 4 m. Sensor arms are mounted every meter to allow the connection of additional sensors or to measure a profile of a certain parameter of the lowest 5 m above surface. Sensors can be added easily since cable wiring is provided to each sensor arm. Horizontal winds are measured at 7 m height above surface. METLIFT is independent of external power supply. Three lead gel accumulators recharged by three solar panels provide the energy necessary for the sensors, the data

  15. Time-accurate Navier-Stokes computations of classical two-dimensional edge tone flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, B. L.; O'Farrell, J. M.; Jones, Jess H.

    1990-01-01

    Time-accurate Navier-Stokes computations were performed to study a Class II (acoustic) whistle, the edge tone, and gain knowledge of the vortex-acoustic coupling mechanisms driving production of these tones. Results were obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible air flow of a two-dimensional jet issuing from a slit interacting with a wedge. Cases considered were determined by varying the distance from the slit to the edge. Flow speed was kept constant at 1750 cm/sec as was the slit thickness of 0.1 cm, corresponding to conditions in the experiments of Brown. Excellent agreement was obtained in all four edge tone stage cases between the present computational results and the experimentally obtained results of Brown. Specific edge tone generated phenomena and further confirmation of certain theories concerning these phenomena were brought to light in this analytical simulation of edge tones.

  16. A new direct absorption measurement for high precision and accurate measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Highly accurate and precise water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are critical to understanding the climate feedbacks of water vapor and clouds in that region. However, the continued disagreement among water vapor measurements (~1 - 2 ppmv) are too large to constrain the role of different hydration and dehydration mechanisms operating in the UT/LS, with model validation dependent upon which dataset is chosen. In response to these issues, we present a new instrument for measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS that was flown during the April 2011 MACPEX mission out of Houston, TX. The dual axis instrument combines the heritage and validated accuracy of the Harvard Lyman-alpha instrument with a newly designed direct IR absorption instrument, the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The Lyman-alpha detection axis has flown aboard NASA's WB-57 and ER2 aircraft since 1994, and provides a requisite link between the new HHH instrument and the long history of Harvard water vapor measurements. The instrument utilizes the highly sensitive Lyman-alpha photo-fragment fluorescence detection method; its accuracy has been demonstrated though rigorous laboratory calibrations and in situ diagnostic procedures. The Harvard Herriott Hygrometer employs a fiber coupled near-IR laser with state-of-the-art electronics to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a spherical Herriott cell of 10 cm length. The instrument demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1-sec, 1-sigma) at mixing ratios as low as 5 ppmv with accuracies of 10% based on careful laboratory calibrations and in-flight performance. We present a description of the measurement technique along with our methodology for calibration and details of the measurement uncertainties. The simultaneous utilization of radically different measurement techniques in a single duct in the new Harvard Water Vapor (HWV) instrument allows for the constraint of systematic errors inherent in each technique

  17. GAP on EJSM: an accelerometer for accurate gravity and atmospheric measurements of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Benjamin; Christophe, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    The Gravity Advanced Package (GAP) is an electrostatic accelerometer with a bias calibration system proposed on EJSM Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) for fundamental physics objectives - more precisely for testing the law of gravity at the scale of the solar system - and for planetary objectives. GAP can provide decisive information during the planetary phase of the mission. During the orbit of JGO around Ganymede or the flyby of Callisto, such an instrument will measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, mainly due to the atmosphere. By combining these measurements with the ones provided by the radio-science instrument, which measures the total acceleration of the spacecraft, the gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft can be derived without using any model of the atmosphere. This is a major contribution of GAP to the mission considering the low altitude and the size of the solar panel, which would otherwise require precise models. Indeed, the presence of the instrument on board would provide data to better understand the atmosphere and the gravity field of Ganymede and Callisto. This combination of measurements from the accelerometer and from radio-science is similar to what is currently done for determining precise model of the Earth gravity potential with CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions. The GAP instrument is proposed by the ONERA team which has already built the 9 accelerometers in orbit for these geodetic missions. The presentation will describe the scientific objectives of the instrument with a review of the impact of the non-gravitational forces on the gravity measurement of Jupiter's moons. Then, a description of the instrument with its performance will be given, as well as the requirements for its implementation in the spacecraft.

  18. Fast and accurate determination of K, Ca, and Mg in human serum by sector field ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lee L; Davis, W Clay; Nuevo Ordonez, Yoana; Long, Stephen E

    2013-11-01

    Electrolytes in serum are important biomarkers for skeletal and cellular health. The levels of electrolytes are monitored by measuring the Ca, Mg, K, and Na in blood serum. Many reference methods have been developed for the determination of Ca, Mg, and K in clinical measurements; however, isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) has traditionally been the primary reference method serving as an anchor for traceability and accuracy to these secondary reference methods. The sample matrix must be separated before ID-TIMS measurements, which is a slow and tedious process that hindered the adoption of the technique in routine clinical measurements. We have developed a fast and accurate method for the determination of Ca, Mg, and K in serum by taking advantage of the higher mass resolution capability of the modern sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). Each serum sample was spiked with a mixture containing enriched (44)Ca, (26)Mg, and (41)K, and the (42)Ca(+):(44)Ca(+), (24)Mg(+):(26)Mg(+), and (39)K(+):(41)K(+) ratios were measured. The Ca and Mg ratios were measured in medium resolution mode (m/Δm ≈ 4 500), and the K ratio in high resolution mode (m/Δm ≈ 10 000). Residual (40)Ar(1)H(+) interference was still observed but the deleterious effects of the interference were minimized by measuring the sample at K > 100 ng g(-1). The interferences of Sr(++) at the two Ca isotopes were less than 0.25 % of the analyte signal, and they were corrected with the (88)Sr(+) intensity by using the Sr(++):Sr(+) ratio. The sample preparation involved only simple dilutions, and the measurement using this sample preparation approach is known as dilution-and-shoot (DNS). The DNS approach was validated with samples prepared via the traditional acid digestion approach followed by ID-SF-ICP-MS measurement. DNS and digested samples of SRM 956c were measured with ID-SF-ICP-MS for quality assurance, and the results (mean

  19. An accurate air temperature measurement system based on an envelope pulsed ultrasonic time-of-flight technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Huang, Y P; Huang, K N; Young, M S

    2007-11-01

    A new microcomputer based air temperature measurement system is presented. An accurate temperature measurement is derived from the measurement of sound velocity by using an ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The study proposes a novel algorithm that combines both amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) to get the TOF measurement. The proposed system uses the AM and PM envelope square waveform (APESW) to reduce the error caused by inertia delay. The APESW ultrasonic driving waveform causes an envelope zero and phase inversion phenomenon in the relative waveform of the receiver. To accurately achieve a TOF measurement, the phase inversion phenomenon was used to sufficiently identify the measurement pulse in the received waveform. Additionally, a counter clock technique was combined to compute the phase shifts of the last incomplete cycle for TOF. The presented system can obtain 0.1% TOF resolution for the period corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency ultrasonic wave. Consequently, with the integration of a humidity compensation algorithm, a highly accurate and high resolution temperature measurement can be achieved using the accurate TOF measurement. Experimental results indicate that the combined standard uncertainty of the temperature measurement is approximately 0.39 degrees C. The main advantages of this system are high resolution measurements, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  20. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  1. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  2. Rapid Field Measurement of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Based on CO{sub 2} Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    VESPER, DJ, Edenborn, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is commonly measured in water and is an important parameter for understanding carbonate equilibrium, carbon cycling, and water-rock interaction. While accurate measurements can be made in the analytical laboratory, we have developed a rapid, portable technique that can be used to obtain accurate and precise data in the field as well.

  3. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Montmorillonite Using an Accurate and Flexible Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V N; Cygan, R T; Myshakin, E M

    2012-06-21

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, CO2. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating CO2 in the interlayer of layered clays, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 and H2O in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation. An accurate and fully flexible set of interatomic potentials for CO2 is developed and combined with Clayff potentials to help evaluate the intercalation mechanism and examine the effect of molecular flexibility onthe diffusion rate of CO2 in water.

  4. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  5. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  6. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the second six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on evaluating corrosion effects in single crystal sapphire at temperatures up to 1400 C, and designing the sensor mechanical packaging with input from Wabash River Power Plant. Upcoming meetings will establish details for the gasifier field test.

  7. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  8. Are Current Atomistic Force Fields Accurate Enough to Study Proteins in Crowded Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  9. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  10. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems is presented in this paper. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed.

  11. Accurate ab initio quartic force fields for borane and BeH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    The quartic force fields of BH3 and BeH2 have been computed ab initio using an augmented coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) method and basis sets of spdf and spdfg quality. For BH3, the computed spectroscopic constants are in very good agreement with recent experimental data, and definitively confirm misassignments in some older work, in agreement with recent ab initio studies. Using the computed spectroscopic constants, the rovibrational partition function for both molecules has been constructed using a modified direct numerical summation algorithm, and JANAF-style thermochemical tables are presented.

  12. Accurate predictions of dielectrophoretic force and torque on particles with strong mutual field, particle, and wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2012-11-01

    The basis of dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the prediction of the force and torque on particles. The classical approach to the prediction is based on the effective moment method, which, however, is an approximate approach, assumes infinitesimal particles. Therefore, it is well-known that for finite-sized particles, the DEP approximation is inaccurate as the mutual field, particle, wall interactions become strong, a situation presently attracting extensive research for practical significant applications. In the present talk, we provide accurate calculations of the force and torque on the particles from first principles, by directly resolving the local geometry and properties and accurately accounting for the mutual interactions for finite-sized particles with both dielectric polarization and conduction in a sinusoidally steady-state electric field. Since the approach has a significant advantage, compared to other numerical methods, to efficiently simulate many closely packed particles, it provides an important, unique, and accurate technique to investigate complex DEP phenomena, for example heterogeneous mixtures containing particle chains, nanoparticle assembly, biological cells, non-spherical effects, etc. This study was supported by the Department of Energy under funding for an EFRC (the HeteroFoaM Center), grant no. DE-SC0001061.

  13. Relation between near field and far field acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bies, D. A.; Scharton, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of determining the far field directivity of an acoustic source located in a reverberant environment, such as a wind tunnel, are investigated analytically and experimentally. The decrease of sound pressure level with distance is illustrated; and the spatial extent of the hydrodynamic and geometric near fields, the far field, and the reverberant field are described. A previously-prosposed analytical technique for predicting the far field directivity of the acoustic source on the basis of near field data is investigated. Experiments are conducted with small acoustic sources and an analysis is performed to determine the variation with distance from the source of the directionality of the sound field. A novel experiment is conducted in which the sound pressure measured at various distances from an acoustic driver located in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel is crosscorrelated with the driver excitation voltage.

  14. Measuring the off axis magnetic field within a Helmholtz Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward; Martell, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Helmholtz coils are used because they produce nearly uniform magnetic fields on-axis. Prior research, namely Graf's thin coil experiment [The Physics Teacher, pp. 360 (2012)], has accurately measured the axial magnetic field produced by a thin coil; however, the magnetic field off-axis is known to be significantly more complicated and cannot be calculated analytically. In this research, I have numerically determined the magnetic field off-axis in the region between the two coils and compared those calculations with measured values. I then determined the effect the deviation from uniformity has on the behavior of a charged particle moving through this region, such as in the well-known electron charge-to-mass ratio experiment.

  15. New density functional parameterizations to accurate calculations of electric field gradient variations among compounds.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Régis Tadeu; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade

    2015-10-30

    This research provides a performance investigation of density functional theory and also proposes new functional parameterizations to deal with electric field gradient (EFG) calculations at nuclear positions. The entire procedure is conducted within the four-component formalism. First, we noticed that traditional hybrid and long-range corrected functionals are more efficient in the description of EFG variations for a set of elements (indium, antimony, iodine, lutetium, and hafnium) among linear molecules. Thus, we selected the PBE0, B3LYP, and CAM-B3LYP functionals and promoted a reoptimization of their parameters for a better description of these EFG changes. The PBE0q variant developed here showed an overall promising performance in a validation test conducted with potassium, iodine, copper, and gold. In general, the correlation coefficients found in linear regressions between experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and calculated EFGs are improved while the systematic EFG errors also decrease as a result of this reparameterization. PMID:26284820

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  17. Magnetic field measurements in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, U.; Seely, J.F.; Sheeley,Jr., N.R.; Suckewer, S.; Title, A.M.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement of the poloidal magnetic field in a tokamak plasma from the Zeeman splitting and polarization of the magnetic dipole radiation from heavy ions is discussed. When viewed from a direction perpendicular to the toroidal field, the effect of the poloidal field on the circularly polarized radiation is detectable using a photoelectric polarimeter. The Zeeman splittings for a number of magnetic dipole transitions with wavelengths in the range 2300--9300 A are presented. An imaging polarimeter is proposed that can measure the poloidal magnetic field with space and time resolution.

  18. Attracting Students to the Field of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Sara J.; Pastor, Dena A.

    2012-01-01

    To address the shortage of professionals in measurement, it is essential that we make young career-seekers aware that measurement is an option as a profession. In this paper, we discuss how creating a strong pipeline of students into our field involves personal interactions between faculty representing the graduate programs in measurement and…

  19. Accurate AB Initio Calculation of Anharmonic Force Fields and Spectroscopic Constants of Small Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jan M. L.

    The quartic force fields of a number of small polyatomic molecules (specifically, rm H _2O, NH_2, NH_3, CH_4, BH_3, BeH_2, H_2CO, N_2O, CO_2, CS_2, OCS, H_2S, FNO, ClNO, and H_2CS) have been computed ab initio using large basis sets and augmented coupled cluster methods. It has been established throughout that harmonic and fundamental frequencies can consistently be reproduced to within about 10 cm^{ -1} of experimental using spdf basis sets, except in such inherently problematic cases as the umbrella motion in NH_3; such problems are solved by recomputing the harmonic frequencies with an spdf g basis set. Coupled cluster frequencies using small basis sets of spd quality agree surprisingly well with experiment (mean absolute error of 26 cm^ {-1}), but bond distances are generally seriously overestimated. Using spdf basis sets, they are consistently overestimated by 0.002 and 0.006-7 A for single and multiple bonds, respectively; for spdf g basis sets this drops to 0.001 and 0.003-4 A, respectively. Geometries and harmonic frequencies for highly polar fluorine compounds such as HF and FNO are qualitatively wrong unless special anion functions are added to the fluorine basis set. Anharmonicity, rovibrational coupling, and centrifugal distortion constants are consistently predicted well; the anharmonic portions of the computed force fields are probably more reliable than their experimental counterparts in many cases. Remaining errors in the computed geometries and harmonic frequencies are shown to be almost entirely due to a combination of core correlation and residual deficiencies in the electron correlation treatment. A 3-term correction for remaining basis set incompleteness to computed total atomization energies is proposed by the author, and is shown to result in mean absolute errors of as little as 0.5 kcal/mol for spdf g basis sets. Example applications on rm HCO^+, HOC^+, B_2C, BCN, and BNC testify to the predictive power of the methods used in this work.

  20. Patient safety measures in burn care: do National reporting systems accurately reflect quality of burn care?

    PubMed

    Mandell, Samuel P; Robinson, Ellen F; Cooper, Claudette L; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been placed on quality of care metrics and patient safety. Groups such as the University Health-System Consortium (UHC) collect and review patient safety data, monitor healthcare facilities, and often report data using mortality and complication rates as outcomes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UHC database to determine if it differentiates quality of care across burn centers. We reviewed UHC clinical database (CDB) fields and available data from 2006 to 2008 for the burn product line. Based on the September 2008 American Burn Association (ABA) list of verified burn centers, we categorized centers as American Burn Association-verified burn centers, self-identified burn centers, and other centers that are not burn units but admit some burn patients. We compared total burn admissions, risk pool, complication rates, and mortality rates. Overall mortality was compared between the UHC and National Burn Repository. The UHC CDB provides fields for number of admissions, % intensive care unit admission, risk pool, length of stay, complication profiles, and mortality index. The overall numbers of burn patients in the database for the study period included 17,740 patients admitted to verified burn centers (mean 631 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), 10,834 for self-identified burn centers (mean 437 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), and 1,487 for other centers (mean 11.5 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years). Reported complication rates for verified burn centers (21.6%), self-identified burn centers (21.3%), and others (20%) were similar. Mortality rates were highest for self-identified burn centers (3.06%), less for verified centers (2.88%), and lowest for other centers (0.74%). However, these outcomes data may be misleading, because the risk pool criteria do not include burn-specific risk factors, and the inability to adjust for injury severity prevents rigorous comparison across centers. Databases such as the

  1. Noncontact accurate measurement of cardiopulmonary activity using a compact quadrature Doppler radar sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhao, Zhangyan; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Fujiang

    2014-03-01

    The designed sensor enables accurate reconstruction of chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities, and the algorithm enables estimation of respiration, heartbeat rate, and some indicators of heart rate variability (HRV). In particular, quadrature receiver and arctangent demodulation with calibration are introduced for high linearity representation of chest displacement; 24-bit ADCs with oversampling are adopted for radar baseband acquisition to achieve a high signal resolution; continuous-wavelet filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based algorithm are applied for cardio/pulmonary signal recovery and separation so that accurate beat-to-beat interval can be acquired in time domain for HRV analysis. In addition, the wireless sensor is realized and integrated on a printed circuit board compactly. The developed sensor system is successfully tested on both simulated target and human subjects. In simulated target experiments, the baseband signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 73.27 dB, high enough for heartbeat detection. The demodulated signal has 0.35% mean squared error, indicating high demodulation linearity. In human subject experiments, the relative error of extracted beat-to-beat intervals ranges from 2.53% to 4.83% compared with electrocardiography (ECG) R-R peak intervals. The sensor provides an accurate analysis for heart rate with the accuracy of 100% for p = 2% and higher than 97% for p = 1%. PMID:24235293

  2. Noncontact accurate measurement of cardiopulmonary activity using a compact quadrature Doppler radar sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhao, Zhangyan; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Fujiang

    2014-03-01

    The designed sensor enables accurate reconstruction of chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities, and the algorithm enables estimation of respiration, heartbeat rate, and some indicators of heart rate variability (HRV). In particular, quadrature receiver and arctangent demodulation with calibration are introduced for high linearity representation of chest displacement; 24-bit ADCs with oversampling are adopted for radar baseband acquisition to achieve a high signal resolution; continuous-wavelet filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based algorithm are applied for cardio/pulmonary signal recovery and separation so that accurate beat-to-beat interval can be acquired in time domain for HRV analysis. In addition, the wireless sensor is realized and integrated on a printed circuit board compactly. The developed sensor system is successfully tested on both simulated target and human subjects. In simulated target experiments, the baseband signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 73.27 dB, high enough for heartbeat detection. The demodulated signal has 0.35% mean squared error, indicating high demodulation linearity. In human subject experiments, the relative error of extracted beat-to-beat intervals ranges from 2.53% to 4.83% compared with electrocardiography (ECG) R-R peak intervals. The sensor provides an accurate analysis for heart rate with the accuracy of 100% for p = 2% and higher than 97% for p = 1%.

  3. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  4. Field methods for measuring concentrated flow erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; James, M. R.; Quinton, J. N.; Taguas, E. V.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    techniques (3D) for measuring erosion from concentrated flow (pole, laser profilemeter, photo-reconstruction and terrestrial LiDAR) The comparison between two- and three-dimensional methods has showed the superiority of the 3D techniques for obtaining accurate cross sectional data. The results from commonly-used 2D methods can be subject to systematic errors in areal cross section that exceed magnitudes of 10 % on average. In particular, the pole simplified method has showed a clear tendency to understimate areas. Laser profilemeter results show that further research on calibrating optical devices for a variety of soil conditions must be carried out to improve its performance. For volume estimations, photo-reconstruction results provided an excellent approximation to terrestrial laser data and demonstrate that this new remote sensing technique has a promising application field in soil erosion studies. 2D approaches involved important errors even over short measurement distances. However, as well as accuracy, the cost and time requirements of a technique must be considered.

  5. Can Community Health Workers Report Accurately on Births and Deaths? Results of Field Assessments in Ethiopia, Malawi and Mali

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Romesh; Amouzou, Agbessi; Munos, Melinda; Marsh, Andrew; Hazel, Elizabeth; Victora, Cesar; Black, Robert; Bryce, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most low-income countries lack complete and accurate vital registration systems. As a result, measures of under-five mortality rates rely mostly on household surveys. In collaboration with partners in Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, and Mali, we assessed the completeness and accuracy of reporting of births and deaths by community-based health workers, and the accuracy of annualized under-five mortality rate estimates derived from these data. Here we report on results from Ethiopia, Malawi and Mali. Method In all three countries, community health workers (CHWs) were trained, equipped and supported to report pregnancies, births and deaths within defined geographic areas over a period of at least fifteen months. In-country institutions collected these data every month. At each study site, we administered a full birth history (FBH) or full pregnancy history (FPH), to women of reproductive age via a census of households in Mali and via household surveys in Ethiopia and Malawi. Using these FBHs/FPHs as a validation data source, we assessed the completeness of the counts of births and deaths and the accuracy of under-five, infant, and neonatal mortality rates from the community-based method against the retrospective FBH/FPH for rolling twelve-month periods. For each method we calculated total cost, average annual cost per 1,000 population, and average cost per vital event reported. Results On average, CHWs submitted monthly vital event reports for over 95 percent of catchment areas in Ethiopia and Malawi, and for 100 percent of catchment areas in Mali. The completeness of vital events reporting by CHWs varied: we estimated that 30%-90% of annualized expected births (i.e. the number of births estimated using a FPH) were documented by CHWs and 22%-91% of annualized expected under-five deaths were documented by CHWs. Resulting annualized under-five mortality rates based on the CHW vital events reporting were, on average, under-estimated by 28% in Ethiopia, 32% in

  6. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor,Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Wire degradation has resulted in aircraft fatalities and critical space launches being delayed. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power is wirelessly provided to the sensing element by using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency, resistance and amplitude has been developed and is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be near the acquisition hardware. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed. Examples of magnetic field response sensors and the respective measurement characterizations are presented. Implementation of this method on an aerospace system is discussed.

  7. Seeking: Accurate Measurement Techniques for Deep-Bone Density and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, Jean

    2009-01-01

    We are seeking a clinically-useful technology with enough sensitivity to assess the microstructure of "spongy" bone that is found in the marrow cavities of whole bones. However, this technology must be for skeletal sites surrounded by layers of soft tissues, such as the spine and the hip. Soft tissue interferes with conventional imaging and using a more accessible area -- for example, the wrist or the ankle of limbs-- as a proxy for the less accessible skeletal regions, will not be accurate. A non-radioactive technology is strongly preferred.

  8. A Fabry-Perot interferometer for accurate measurement of temporal changes in stellar Doppler shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, R. S.; Smith, P. H.; Frecker, J. E.; Merline, W. J.; Perry, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    The scrambling of incident light by an optical filter, and the stability obtainable through wavelength calibration by means of a tilt-tunable Fabry-Perot etalon, allow the accurate observation of Doppler shift changes in stellar absorption lines. Distinct, widely spaced monochromatic images of the entrance aperture are formed in the focal plane of the camera through a sampling of about 350 points on the profile of the stellar spectrum by successive orders of interferometric transmission through the etalon. Changes in Doppler shift modify the relative intensities of these images, in proportion to the slope of the spectral profile at each point sampled.

  9. DC-magnetic field vector measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    A magnetometer experiment was designed to determine the local magnetic field by measuring the total of the Earth's magnetic field and that of an unknown spacecraft. The measured field vector components are available to all onboard experiments via the Spacelab command and data management system. The experiment consists of two parts, an electronic box and the magnetic field sensor. The sensor includes three independent measuring flux-gate magnetometers, each measuring one component. The physical background is the nonlinearity of the B-H curve of a ferrite material. Two coils wound around a ferrite rod are necessary. One of them, a tank coil, pumps the ferrite rod at approximately 20 kilohertz. As a consequence of the nonlinearity, many harmonics can be produced. The second coil (i.e., the detection coil) resonates to the first harmonic. If an unknown dc or low-frequency magnetic field exists, the amplitude of the first harmonic is a measure for the unknown magnetic field. The voltages detected by the sensors are to be digitized and transferred to the command and data management system.

  10. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability is proposed that makes it feasible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) methodology was used for the analysis of flow field measurements within a low-aspect-ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor acquired with two-dimensional laser anemometry. It is shown that the MMS method may be utilized to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analytical tools developed for numerical flow field simulation data. Thus an experimenter utilizing an interactive graphics program could illustrate scalar quantities such as Mach number by profiles, contour lines, carpet plots, and surfaces employing various color intensities. Also, flow directionality can be shown by the display of vector fields and particle traces.

  11. Accurate measurement of the relative abundance of different DNA species in complex DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-06-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription.

  12. Accurate Measurement of the Relative Abundance of Different DNA Species in Complex DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription. PMID:22334570

  13. Accurate Monitoring and Fault Detection in Wind Measuring Devices through Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Komal Saifullah; Tariq, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Many wind energy projects report poor performance as low as 60% of the predicted performance. The reason for this is poor resource assessment and the use of new untested technologies and systems in remote locations. Predictions about the potential of an area for wind energy projects (through simulated models) may vary from the actual potential of the area. Hence, introducing accurate site assessment techniques will lead to accurate predictions of energy production from a particular area. We solve this problem by installing a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to periodically analyze the data from anemometers installed in that area. After comparative analysis of the acquired data, the anemometers transmit their readings through a WSN to the sink node for analysis. The sink node uses an iterative algorithm which sequentially detects any faulty anemometer and passes the details of the fault to the central system or main station. We apply the proposed technique in simulation as well as in practical implementation and study its accuracy by comparing the simulation results with experimental results to analyze the variation in the results obtained from both simulation model and implemented model. Simulation results show that the algorithm indicates faulty anemometers with high accuracy and low false alarm rate when as many as 25% of the anemometers become faulty. Experimental analysis shows that anemometers incorporating this solution are better assessed and performance level of implemented projects is increased above 86% of the simulated models. PMID:25421739

  14. Accurate radiocarbon age estimation using "early" measurements: a new approach to reconstructing the Paleolithic absolute chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Takayuki; Sano, Katsuhiro; Yoneda, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents new correction approaches for "early" radiocarbon ages to reconstruct the Paleolithic absolute chronology. In order to discuss time-space distribution about the replacement of archaic humans, including Neanderthals in Europe, by the modern humans, a massive data, which covers a wide-area, would be needed. Today, some radiocarbon databases focused on the Paleolithic have been published and used for chronological studies. From a viewpoint of current analytical technology, however, the any database have unreliable results that make interpretation of radiocarbon dates difficult. Most of these unreliable ages had been published in the early days of radiocarbon analysis. In recent years, new analytical methods to determine highly-accurate dates have been developed. Ultrafiltration and ABOx-SC methods, as new sample pretreatments for bone and charcoal respectively, have attracted attention because they could remove imperceptible contaminates and derive reliable accurately ages. In order to evaluate the reliability of "early" data, we investigated the differences and variabilities of radiocarbon ages on different pretreatments, and attempted to develop correction functions for the assessment of the reliability. It can be expected that reliability of the corrected age is increased and the age applied to chronological research together with recent ages. Here, we introduce the methodological frameworks and archaeological applications.

  15. Accurate nonadiabatic quantum dynamics on the cheap: Making the most of mean field theory with master equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Aaron; Markland, Thomas E.; Brackbill, Nora

    2015-03-07

    In this article, we show how Ehrenfest mean field theory can be made both a more accurate and efficient method to treat nonadiabatic quantum dynamics by combining it with the generalized quantum master equation framework. The resulting mean field generalized quantum master equation (MF-GQME) approach is a non-perturbative and non-Markovian theory to treat open quantum systems without any restrictions on the form of the Hamiltonian that it can be applied to. By studying relaxation dynamics in a wide range of dynamical regimes, typical of charge and energy transfer, we show that MF-GQME provides a much higher accuracy than a direct application of mean field theory. In addition, these increases in accuracy are accompanied by computational speed-ups of between one and two orders of magnitude that become larger as the system becomes more nonadiabatic. This combination of quantum-classical theory and master equation techniques thus makes it possible to obtain the accuracy of much more computationally expensive approaches at a cost lower than even mean field dynamics, providing the ability to treat the quantum dynamics of atomistic condensed phase systems for long times.

  16. Accurate nonadiabatic quantum dynamics on the cheap: making the most of mean field theory with master equations.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Aaron; Brackbill, Nora; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we show how Ehrenfest mean field theory can be made both a more accurate and efficient method to treat nonadiabatic quantum dynamics by combining it with the generalized quantum master equation framework. The resulting mean field generalized quantum master equation (MF-GQME) approach is a non-perturbative and non-Markovian theory to treat open quantum systems without any restrictions on the form of the Hamiltonian that it can be applied to. By studying relaxation dynamics in a wide range of dynamical regimes, typical of charge and energy transfer, we show that MF-GQME provides a much higher accuracy than a direct application of mean field theory. In addition, these increases in accuracy are accompanied by computational speed-ups of between one and two orders of magnitude that become larger as the system becomes more nonadiabatic. This combination of quantum-classical theory and master equation techniques thus makes it possible to obtain the accuracy of much more computationally expensive approaches at a cost lower than even mean field dynamics, providing the ability to treat the quantum dynamics of atomistic condensed phase systems for long times.

  17. Establishing traceability of photometric absorbance values for accurate measurements of the haemoglobin concentration in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, K.; Wolf, H. U.; Heuck, C.; Kammel, M.; Kummrow, A.; Neukammer, J.

    2013-10-01

    Haemoglobin concentration in blood is one of the most frequently measured analytes in laboratory medicine. Reference and routine methods for the determination of the haemoglobin concentration in blood are based on the conversion of haeme, haemoglobin and haemiglobin species into uniform end products. The total haemoglobin concentration in blood is measured using the absorbance of the reaction products. Traceable absorbance measurement values on the highest metrological level are a prerequisite for the calibration and evaluation of procedures with respect to their suitability for routine measurements and their potential as reference measurement procedures. For this purpose, we describe a procedure to establish traceability of spectral absorbance measurements for the haemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method and for the alkaline haematin detergent (AHD) method. The latter is characterized by a higher stability of the reaction product. In addition, the toxic hazard of cyanide, which binds to the iron ion of the haem group and thus inhibits the oxygen transport, is avoided. Traceability is established at different wavelengths by applying total least-squares analysis to derive the conventional quantity values for the absorbance from the measured values. Extrapolation and interpolation are applied to get access to the spectral regions required to characterize the Q-absorption bands of the HiCN and AHD methods, respectively. For absorbance values between 0.3 and 1.8, the contributions of absorbance measurements to the total expanded uncertainties (95% level of confidence) of absorbance measurements range from 1% to 0.4%.

  18. A More Accurate Measurement of the {sup 28}Si Lattice Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, E. Sasso, C. P.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2015-09-15

    In 2011, a discrepancy between the values of the Planck constant measured by counting Si atoms and by comparing mechanical and electrical powers prompted a review, among others, of the measurement of the spacing of {sup 28}Si (220) lattice planes, either to confirm the measured value and its uncertainty or to identify errors. This exercise confirmed the result of the previous measurement and yields the additional value d{sub 220} = 192 014 711.98(34) am having a reduced uncertainty.

  19. Accurate and high-resolution boundary conditions and flow fields in the first-class cabin of an MD-82 commercial airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wen, Jizhou; Chao, Jiangyue; Yin, Weiyou; Shen, Chen; Lai, Dayi; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Liu, Junjie; Sun, Hejiang; Chen, Qingyan

    2012-09-01

    Flow fields in commercial airliner cabins are crucial for creating a thermally comfortable and healthy cabin environment. Flow fields depend on the thermo-fluid boundary conditions at the diffusers, in addition to the cabin geometry and furnishing. To study the flow fields in cabins, this paper describes a procedure to obtain the cabin geometry, boundary conditions at the diffusers, and flow fields. This investigation used a laser tracking system and reverse engineering to generate a digital model of an MD-82 aircraft cabin. Even though the measuring error by the system was very small, approximations and assumptions were needed to reduce the workload and data size. The geometric model can also be easily used to calculate the space volume. A combination of hot-sphere anemometers (HSA) and ultrasonic anemometers (UA) were applied to obtain the velocity magnitude, velocity direction, and turbulence intensity at the diffusers. The measured results indicate that the flow boundary conditions in a real cabin were rather complex and the velocity magnitude, velocity direction, and turbulence intensity varied significantly from one slot opening to another. UAs were also applied to measure the three-dimensional air velocity at 20 Hz, which could also be used to determine the turbulence intensity. Due to the instability of the flow, it should at least be measured for 4 min to obtain accurate averaged velocity and turbulence information. It was found that the flow fields were of low speed and high turbulence intensity. This study provides high quality data for validating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, including cabin geometry, boundary conditions of diffusers, and high-resolution flow field in the first-class cabin of a functional MD-82 commercial airliner.

  20. Accurate respiration measurement using DC-coupled continuous-wave radar sensor for motion-adaptive cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Ruijiang; Zhang, Hualiang; Fung, Albert Y C; Torres, Carlos; Jiang, Steve B; Li, Changzhi

    2012-11-01

    Accurate respiration measurement is crucial in motion-adaptive cancer radiotherapy. Conventional methods for respiration measurement are undesirable because they are either invasive to the patient or do not have sufficient accuracy. In addition, measurement of external respiration signal based on conventional approaches requires close patient contact to the physical device which often causes patient discomfort and undesirable motion during radiation dose delivery. In this paper, a dc-coupled continuous-wave radar sensor was presented to provide a noncontact and noninvasive approach for respiration measurement. The radar sensor was designed with dc-coupled adaptive tuning architectures that include RF coarse-tuning and baseband fine-tuning, which allows the radar sensor to precisely measure movement with stationary moment and always work with the maximum dynamic range. The accuracy of respiration measurement with the proposed radar sensor was experimentally evaluated using a physical phantom, human subject, and moving plate in a radiotherapy environment. It was shown that respiration measurement with radar sensor while the radiation beam is on is feasible and the measurement has a submillimeter accuracy when compared with a commercial respiration monitoring system which requires patient contact. The proposed radar sensor provides accurate, noninvasive, and noncontact respiration measurement and therefore has a great potential in motion-adaptive radiotherapy.

  1. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, Melanie L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequencies correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic field used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for discerning changes in sensor s response kequency, resistance and amplitude is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminating the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to any form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  2. Archimedes Revisited: A Faster, Better, Cheaper Method of Accurately Measuring the Volume of Small Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2005-01-01

    A little-known method of measuring the volume of small objects based on Archimedes' principle is described, which involves suspending an object in a water-filled container placed on electronic scales. The suspension technique is a variation on the hydrostatic weighing technique used for measuring volume. The suspension method was compared with two…

  3. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  4. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  5. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  6. An Inexpensive, Stable, and Accurate Relative Humidity Measurement Method for Challenging Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Hong; Yang, Simon X.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, an improved psychrometer is developed to solve practical issues arising in the relative humidity measurement of challenging drying environments for meat manufacturing in agricultural and agri-food industries. The design in this research focused on the structure of the improved psychrometer, signal conversion, and calculation methods. The experimental results showed the effect of varying psychrometer structure on relative humidity measurement accuracy. An industrial application to dry-cured meat products demonstrated the effective performance of the improved psychrometer being used as a relative humidity measurement sensor in meat-drying rooms. In a drying environment for meat manufacturing, the achieved measurement accuracy for relative humidity using the improved psychrometer was ±0.6%. The system test results showed that the improved psychrometer can provide reliable and long-term stable relative humidity measurements with high accuracy in the drying system of meat products. PMID:26999161

  7. Measuring laser power as a force: a new paradigm to accurately monitor optical power during laser-based machining operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Simonds, Brian; Sowards, Jeffrey; Hadler, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    In laser manufacturing operations, accurate measurement of laser power is important for product quality, operational repeatability, and process validation. Accurate real-time measurement of high-power lasers, however, is difficult. Typical thermal power meters must absorb all the laser power in order to measure it. This constrains power meters to be large, slow and exclusive (that is, the laser cannot be used for its intended purpose during the measurement). To address these limitations, we have developed a different paradigm in laser power measurement where the power is not measured according to its thermal equivalent but rather by measuring the laser beam's momentum (radiation pressure). Very simply, light reflecting from a mirror imparts a small force perpendicular to the mirror which is proportional to the optical power. By mounting a high-reflectivity mirror on a high-sensitivity force transducer (scale), we are able to measure laser power in the range of tens of watts up to ~ 100 kW. The critical parameters for such a device are mirror reflectivity, angle of incidence, and scale sensitivity and accuracy. We will describe our experimental characterization of a radiation-pressure-based optical power meter. We have tested it for modulated and CW laser powers up to 92 kW in the laboratory and up to 20 kW in an experimental laser welding booth. We will describe present accuracy, temporal response, sources of measurement uncertainty, and hurdles which must be overcome to have an accurate power meter capable of routine operation as a turning mirror within a laser delivery head.

  8. Stratospheric electric field measurements with transmediterranean balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Morena, B. A.; Alberca, L. F.; Curto, J. J.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal component of the stratospheric electric field was measured using a balloon in the ODISEA Campaign of Transmediterranean Balloon Program. The balloon flew between Trapani (Sicily) and El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain) along the 39 deg N parallel at a height between 34 and 24 km. The high values found for the field on fair-weather and its quasi-turbulent variation, both in amplitude and direction, are difficult to explain with the classical electric field source. A new source, first described by Holzworth (1989), is considered as possibly causing them.

  9. A Proposed Frequency Synthesis Approach to Accurately Measure the Angular Position of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagri, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an approach for measuring the angular position of a spacecraft with reference to a nearby calibration source (quasar) with an accuracy of a few tenths of a nanoradian using a very long baseline interferometer of two antennas that measures the interferometer phase with a modest accuracy. It employs (1) radio frequency phase to determine the spacecraft position with high precision and (2) multiple delay measurements using either frequency tones or telemetry signals at different frequency spacings to resolve ambiguity of the location of the fringe (cycle) containing the direction of the spacecraft.

  10. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application.

  11. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application. PMID:22497159

  12. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  13. Accurate Evaluation of Ion Conductivity of the Gramicidin A Channel Using a Polarizable Force Field without Any Corrections.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dinglin; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui

    2016-06-14

    Classical molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of membrane proteins faces significant challenges in accurately reproducing and predicting experimental observables such as ion conductance and permeability due to its incapability of precisely describing the electronic interactions in heterogeneous systems. In this work, the free energy profiles of K(+) and Na(+) permeating through the gramicidin A channel are characterized by using the AMOEBA polarizable force field with a total sampling time of 1 μs. Our results indicated that by explicitly introducing the multipole terms and polarization into the electrostatic potentials, the permeation free energy barrier of K(+) through the gA channel is considerably reduced compared to the overestimated results obtained from the fixed-charge model. Moreover, the estimated maximum conductance, without any corrections, for both K(+) and Na(+) passing through the gA channel are much closer to the experimental results than any classical MD simulations, demonstrating the power of AMOEBA in investigating the membrane proteins. PMID:27171823

  14. Limited rotational and rovibrational line lists computed with highly accurate quartic force fields and ab initio dipole surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    In this work, computational procedures are employed to compute the rotational and rovibrational spectra and line lists for H2O, CO2, and SO2. Building on the established use of quartic force fields, MP2 and CCSD(T) Dipole Moment Surfaces (DMSs) are computed for each system of study in order to produce line intensities as well as the transition energies. The computed results exhibit a clear correlation to reference data available in the HITRAN database. Additionally, even though CCSD(T) DMSs produce more accurate intensities as compared to experiment, the use of MP2 DMSs results in reliable line lists that are still comparable to experiment. The use of the less computationally costly MP2 method is beneficial in the study of larger systems where use of CCSD(T) would be more costly. PMID:23692860

  15. Small-scale field experiments accurately scale up to predict density dependence in reef fish populations at large scales.

    PubMed

    Steele, Mark A; Forrester, Graham E

    2005-09-20

    Field experiments provide rigorous tests of ecological hypotheses but are usually limited to small spatial scales. It is thus unclear whether these findings extrapolate to larger scales relevant to conservation and management. We show that the results of experiments detecting density-dependent mortality of reef fish on small habitat patches scale up to have similar effects on much larger entire reefs that are the size of small marine reserves and approach the scale at which some reef fisheries operate. We suggest that accurate scaling is due to the type of species interaction causing local density dependence and the fact that localized events can be aggregated to describe larger-scale interactions with minimal distortion. Careful extrapolation from small-scale experiments identifying species interactions and their effects should improve our ability to predict the outcomes of alternative management strategies for coral reef fishes and their habitats.

  16. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  17. Accurate VUV Laboratory Measurements of Fe III Transitions for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Pickering, J. C.; Smillie, D.; Nave, G.; Szabo, C. I.; Smith, Peter L.; Nielsen, K. E.; Peters, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of Fe III spectra in the 1150 to 2500 A wavelength interval. Spectra have been recorded with an iron-neon Penning discharge lamp (PDL) between 1600 and 2500 A at Imperial College (IC) using high resolution Fourier (FT) transform spectroscopy. These FT spectrometer measurements were extended beyond 1600 A to 1150 A using high-resolution grating spectroscopy at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These recorded spectra represent the first radiometrically calibrated measurements of a doubly-ionized iron-group element spectrum combining the techniques of vacuum ultraviolet FT and grating spectroscopy. The spectral range of the new laboratory measurements corresponds to recent HST/STIS observations of sharp-lined B stars and of Eta Carinae. The new improved atomic data can be applied to abundance studies and diagnostics of astrophysical plasmas.

  18. A more accurate method for measurement of tuberculocidal activity of disinfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, J M; Ezzell, R J; Wendt, T M

    1987-01-01

    The current Association of Official Analytical Chemists method for testing tuberculocidal activity of disinfectants has been shown to be inaccurate and to have a high degree of variability. An alternate test method is proposed which is more accurate, more precise, and quantitative. A suspension of Mycobacterium bovis BCG was exposed to a variety of disinfectant chemicals and a kill curve was constructed from quantitative data. Data are presented that show the discrepancy between current claims, determined by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists method, of selected commercially available products and claims generated by the proposed method. The effects of different recovery media were examined. The data indicated that Mycobacteria 7H11 and Middlebrook 7H10 agars were equal in recovery of the different chemically treated cells, with Lowenstein-Jensen agar having approximately the same recovery rate but requiring incubation for up to 3 weeks longer for countability. The kill curves generated for several different chemicals were reproducible, as indicated by the standard deviations of the slopes and intercepts of the linear regression curves. PMID:3314707

  19. Electric field measurements from Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a unique location for the study of atmospheric electricity. Not only is it one of the most pollutant free places on Earth, but its proximity to the south magnetic pole means that it is an ideal location to study the effects of solar variability on the atmospheric electric field. This is due to the reduced shielding effect of the geomagnetic field at the poles which leads to a greater flux of incoming Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) as well as an increased probability of energetic particle precipitation from SEPs and relativistic electrons. To investigate such effects, two electric field mills of different design were installed at the British Antarctic Survey Halley base in February 2015 (75. 58 degrees south, 26.66 degrees west). Halley is situated on the Brunt Ice Shelf in the south east of the Weddell Sea and has snow cover all year round. Preliminary analysis has focused on selection of fair weather criteria using wind speed and visibility measurements which are vital to assess the effects of falling snow, blowing snow and freezing fog on the electric field measurements. When the effects of such adverse weather conditions are removed clear evidence of the characteristic Carnegie Curve diurnal cycle exists in the Halley electric field measurements (with a mean value of 50V/m and showing a 40% peak to peak variation in comparison to the 34% variation in the Carnegie data). Since the Carnegie Curve represents the variation in thunderstorm activity across the Earth, its presence in the Halley data confirms the presence of the global atmospheric electric circuit signal at Halley. The work presented here will discuss the details of the Halley electric field dataset, including the variability in the fair weather measurements, with a particular focus on magnetic field fluctuations.

  20. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform. [for sea floor geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  1. Three dimensional accurate morphology measurements of polystyrene standard particles on silicon substrate by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Malac, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticle (NP) sample is one of the most widely used standard materials. It is used for calibration of particle counters and particle size measurement tools. It has been reported that the measured NP sizes by various methods, such as Differential Mobility Analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), differ from each other. Deformation of PSL NPs on mica substrate has been reported in AFM measurements: the lateral width of PSL NPs is smaller than their vertical height. To provide a reliable calibration standard, the deformation must be measured by a method that can reliably visualize the entire three dimensional (3D) shape of the PSL NPs. Here we present a method for detailed measurement of PSL NP 3D shape by means of electron tomography in a transmission electron microscope. The observed shape of the PSL NPs with 100 nm and 50 nm diameter were not spherical, but squished in direction perpendicular to the support substrate by about 7.4% and 12.1%, respectively. The high difference in surface energy of the PSL NPs and that of substrate together with their low Young modulus appear to explain the squishing of the NPs without presence of water film.

  2. The Gravitomagnetic Field and its Measurement with the LAGEOS Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos

    2003-05-01

    This paper is structured in four sections. In the first one we briefly describe the gravitomagnetic field and the Lense-Thirring effect in general relativity. In the second and third sections we review the method proposed to measure the Lense-Thirring effect by analyzing the orbits of the two laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II. We then report on our measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect by analyzing the data of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II with the orbital programs GEODYN-SOLVE, using the Earth's Gravitational Models JGM-3 and EGM-96, and the method explained in section 2. The first detection was obtained in 1995, the most accurate measurements were obtained in 1998 using EGM-96. Finally, in the fourth section, we briefly describe the proposed LARES experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring effect with accuracy of about 2%-3%.

  3. Accurate measurement of body weight and food intake in environmentally enriched male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Beale, Kylie E L; Murphy, Kevin G; Harrison, Eleanor K; Kerton, Angela J; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Smith, Kirsty L

    2011-08-01

    Laboratory animals are crucial in the study of energy homeostasis. In particular, rats are used to study alterations in food intake and body weight. To accurately record food intake or energy expenditure it is necessary to house rats individually, which can be stressful for social animals. Environmental enrichment may reduce stress and improve welfare in laboratory rodents. However, the effect of environmental enrichment on food intake and thus experimental outcome is unknown. We aimed to determine the effect of environmental enrichment on food intake, body weight, behavior and fecal and plasma stress hormones in male Wistar rats. Singly housed 5-7-week-old male rats were given either no environmental enrichment, chew sticks, a plastic tube of 67 mm internal diameter, or both chew sticks and a tube. No differences in body weight or food intake were seen over a 7-day period. Importantly, the refeeding response following a 24-h fast was unaffected by environmental enrichment. Rearing, a behavior often associated with stress, was significantly reduced in all enriched groups compared to controls. There was a significant increase in fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) in animals housed with both forms of enrichment compared to controls at the termination of the study, suggesting enrichment reduces hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in singly housed rats. In summary, environmental enrichment does not influence body weight and food intake in singly housed male Wistar rats and may therefore be used to refine the living conditions of animals used in the study of energy homeostasis without compromising experimental outcome.

  4. A method to measure the density of seawater accurately to the level of 10-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hannes; Wolf, Henning; Hassel, Egon

    2016-04-01

    A substitution method to measure seawater density relative to pure water density using vibrating tube densimeters was realized and validated. Standard uncertainties of 1 g m-3 at atmospheric pressure, 10 g m-3 up to 10 MPa, and 20 g m-3 to 65 MPa in the temperature range of 5 °C to 35 °C and for salt contents up to 35 g kg-1 were achieved. The realization was validated by comparison measurements with a hydrostatic weighing apparatus for atmospheric pressure. For high pressures, literature values of seawater compressibility were compared with substitution measurements of the realized apparatus.

  5. Accurate DOSY measure for out-of-equilibrium systems using permutated DOSY (p-DOSY).

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Maria; Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Velders, Aldrik H; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a excellent tool for monitoring in-situ chemical reactions. In particular, DOSY measurement is well suited to characterize transient species by the determination of their sizes. However, here we bring to light a difficulty in the DOSY experiments performed in out-of-equilibrium systems. On such a system, the evolution of the concentration of species interferes with the measurement process, and creates a bias on the diffusion coefficient determination that may lead to erroneous interpretations. We show that a random permutation of the series of gradient strengths used during the DOSY experiment allows to average out this bias. This approach, that we name p-DOSY does not require changes in the pulse sequences nor in the processing software, and restores completely the full accuracy of the measure. This technique is demonstrated on the monitoring of the anomerization reaction of α- to β-glucose.

  6. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D.

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  7. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-01

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  8. Accurate heteronuclear J-coupling measurements in dilute spin systems using the multiple-quantum filtered J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Charlotte; Fayon, Franck; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves; Silly, Gilles; Massiot, Dominique

    2007-07-14

    A new solid-state MAS NMR experiment is proposed to accurately measure heteronuclear (19)F-(207)Pb J-coupling constants, even though these couplings are not visible on high speed (19)F 1D MAS spectra; in particular, we demonstrate that the J-resolved experiment combined with scalar multiple-quantum filtering considerably improves the resolution of J-multiplet patterns for dilute spin systems. PMID:17594032

  9. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  10. An affordable and accurate conductivity probe for density measurements in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Marco; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In stratified flow experiments, conductivity (combined with temperature) is often used to measure density. The probes typically used can provide very fine spatial scales, but can be fragile, expensive to replace, and sensitive to environmental noise. A complementary instrument, comprising a low-cost conductivity probe, would prove valuable in a wide range of applications where resolving extremely small spatial scales is not needed. We propose using micro-USB cables as the actual conductivity sensors. By removing the metallic shield from a micro-B connector, 5 gold-plated microelectrodes are exposed and available for 4-wire measurements. These have a cell constant ~550m-1, an intrinsic thermal noise of at most 30pA/Hz1/2, as well as sub-millisecond time response, making them highly suitable for many stratified flow measurements. In addition, we present the design of a custom electronic board (Arduino-based and Matlab-controlled) for simultaneous acquisition from 4 sensors, with resolution (in conductivity, and resulting density) exceeding the performance of typical existing probes. We illustrate the use of our conductivity-measuring system through stratified flow experiments, and describe plans to release simple instructions to construct our complete system for around 200.

  11. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  12. High- and low-pressure pneumotachometers measure respiration rates accurately in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagot, R. J.; Mc Donald, R. T.; Roman, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Respiration-rate transducers in the form of pneumotachometers measure respiration rates of pilots operating high performance research aircraft. In each low pressure or high pressure oxygen system a sensor is placed in series with the pilots oxygen supply line to detect gas flow accompanying respiration.

  13. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance between the equivalent sources and measurement surfaces and for the difference in magnitude between pressure and velocity. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to examine the methods. The double layer velocity method seems to be more robust to noise and flanking sound than the combined pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward.

  14. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  15. Documents Similarity Measurement Using Field Association Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlam, El-Sayed; Fuketa, M.; Morita, K.; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of text analysis and information retrieval and measurement of document similarity focuses on a new text manipulation system called FA (field association)-Sim that is useful for retrieving information in large heterogeneous texts and for recognizing content similarity in text excerpts. Discusses recall and precision, automatic indexing…

  16. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor- capacit or circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequenci es correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induc tion. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic fi eld used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for disce rning changes in sensor's response frequency, resistance and amplitud e is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminat ing the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each se nsor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to a ny form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  17. Measurement of testicular volume in smaller testes: how accurate is the conventional orchidometer?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chieh; Huang, William J S; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different methods, including the Seager orchidometer (SO) and ultrasonography (US), for assessing testicular volume of smaller testes (testes volume less than 18 mL). Moreover, the equations used for the calculations--the Hansen formula (length [L] x width [W](2) x 0.52, equation A), the prolate ellipsoid formula (L x W x height [H] x 0.52, equation B), and the Lambert equation (L x W x H x 0.71, equation C)--were also examined and compared with the gold standard testicular volume obtained by water displacement (Archimedes principle). In this study, 30 testes from 15 men, mean age 75.3 (+/-8.3) years, were included. They all had advanced prostate cancer and were admitted for orchiectomy. Before the procedure, all the testes were assessed using SO and US. The dimensions were then input into each equation to obtain the volume estimates. The testicular volume by water displacement was 8.1 +/- 3.5 mL. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) of the 2 different methods (SO, US) to the gold standard were 0.70 and 0.85, respectively. The calculated testicular volumes were 9.2 +/- 3.9 mL (measured by SO, equation A), 11.9 +/- 5.2 mL (measured by SO, equation C), 7.3 +/- 4.2 mL (measured by US, equation A), 6.5 +/- 3.3 mL (measured by US, equation B) and 8.9 +/- 4.5 mL (measured by US, equation C). Only the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Hansen equation (equation A) and the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Lambert equation (equation C) showed no significant differences when compared with the volumes estimated by water displacement (mean difference 0.81 mL, P = .053, and 0.81 mL, P = .056, respectively). Based on our measurements, we categorized testicular volume by different cutoff values (7.0 mL, 7.5 mL, 8.0 mL, and 8.5 mL) to calculate a new constant for use in the Hansen equation. The new constant was 0.59. We then reexamined the equations using the new 0.59 constant, and found

  18. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  19. Describing and compensating gas transport dynamics for accurate instantaneous emission measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Ajtay, Delia

    Instantaneous emission measurements on chassis dynamometers and engine test benches are becoming increasingly usual for car-makers and for environmental emission factor measurement and calculation, since much more information about the formation conditions can be extracted than from the regulated bag measurements (integral values). The common exhaust gas analysers for the "regulated pollutants" (carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide) allow measurement at a rate of one to ten samples per second. This gives the impression of having after-the-catalyst emission information with that chronological precision. It has been shown in recent years, however, that beside the reaction time of the analysers, the dynamics of gas transport in both the exhaust system of the car and the measurement system last significantly longer than 1 s. This paper focuses on the compensation of all these dynamics convoluting the emission signals. Most analysers show linear and time-invariant reaction dynamics. Transport dynamics can basically be split into two phenomena: a pure time delay accounting for the transport of the gas downstream and a dynamic signal deformation since the gas is mixed by turbulence along the way. This causes emission peaks to occur which are smaller in height and longer in time at the sensors than they are after the catalyst. These dynamics can be modelled using differential equations. Both mixing dynamics and time delay are constant for modelling a raw gas analyser system, since the flow in that system is constant. In the exhaust system of the car, however, the parameters depend on the exhaust volume flow. For gasoline cars, the variation in overall transport time may be more than 6 s. It is shown in this paper how all these processes can be described by invertible mathematical models with the focus on the more complex case of the car's exhaust system. Inversion means that the sharp emission signal at the catalyst out location can be

  20. A step toward standardization: development of accurate measurements of X-ray absorption and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chantler, Christopher T; Barnea, Zwi; Tran, Chanh Q; Rae, Nicholas A; de Jonge, Martin D

    2012-11-01

    This paper explains how to take the counting precision available for XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) and attenuation measurements, of perhaps one part in 10(6) in special cases, to produce a local variance below 0.01% and an accuracy of attenuation of the order 0.01%, with an XAFS accuracy at a similar level leading to the determination of dynamical bond lengths to an accuracy similar to that obtained by standard and experienced crystallographic measurements. This includes the necessary corrections for the detector response to be linear, including a correction for dark current and air-path energy dependencies; a proper interpretation of the range of sample thicknesses for absorption experiments; developments of methods to measure and correct for harmonic contamination, especially at lower energies without mirrors; the significance of correcting for the actual bandwidth of the beam on target after monochromation, especially for the portability of results and edge structure from one beamline to another; definitions of precision, accuracy and XAFS accuracy suitable for theoretical model analysis; the role of additional and alternative high-accuracy procedures; and discusses some principles regarding data formats for XAFS and for the deposition of data sets with manuscripts or to a database. Increasingly, the insight of X-ray absorption and the standard of accuracy needed requires data with high intrinsic precision and therefore with allowance for a range of small but significant systematic effects. This is always crucial for absolute measurements of absorption, and is of equal importance but traditionally difficult for (usually relative) measurements of fluorescence XAFS or even absorption XAFS. Robust error analysis is crucial so that the significance of conclusions can be tested within the uncertainties of the measurements. Errors should not just include precision uncertainty but should attempt to include estimation of the most significant systematic error

  1. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth W.; Scott, Mark M.; Reid, David R.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Jeremy D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Marsh, Jeramy M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10-3 for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands.

  2. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kenneth W; Scott, Mark M; Reid, David R; Bean, Jeffrey A; Ellis, Jeremy D; Morris, Andrew P; Marsh, Jeramy M

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10(-3) for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands. PMID:27250447

  3. A Procedure for Accurately Measuring the Shaker Overturning Moment During Random Vibration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeri, Reza D.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: For large system level random vibration tests, there may be some concerns about the shaker's capability for the overturning moment. It is the test conductor's responsibility to predict and monitor the overturning moment during random vibration tests. If the predicted moment is close to the shaker's capability, test conductor must measure the instantaneous moment at low levels and extrapolate to higher levels. That data will be used to decide whether it is safe to proceed to the next test level. Challenge: Kistler analog formulation for computing the real-time moment is only applicable to very limited cases in which we have 3 or 4 load cells installed at shaker interface with hardware. Approach: To overcome that limitation, a simple procedure was developed for computing the overturning moment time histories using the measured time histories of the individual load cells.

  4. LEM—electromagnetic fields measurement laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annino, A.; Falciglia, F.; Musumeci, F.; Oliveri, M.; Privitera, G.; Triglia, A.

    2000-04-01

    The widespread presence of electromagnetic waves and the relative problems regarding them have favored the constitution of the LEM at the DMFCI in Catania University, where competence has been developing in this sector for about 10 years. Full operativeness has been reached as far as the electromagnetic field measurements in anthropized environments are concerned. Other research will be undertaken as soon as further funds are available. Some problems connected with the perfecting of measurements instruments and the results of emission measurements of cellular telephones are presented.

  5. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  6. Switched integration amplifier-based photocurrent meter for accurate spectral responsivity measurement of photometers.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongchong; Hong, Kee-Suk; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2016-03-20

    This work introduces a switched integration amplifier (SIA)-based photocurrent meter for femtoampere (fA)-level current measurement, which enables us to measure a 107 dynamic range of spectral responsivity of photometers even with a common lamp-based monochromatic light source. We described design considerations and practices about operational amplifiers (op-amps), switches, readout methods, etc., to compose a stable SIA of low offset current in terms of leakage current and gain peaking in detail. According to the design, we made six SIAs of different integration capacitance and different op-amps and evaluated their offset currents. They showed an offset current of (1.5-85) fA with a slow variation of (0.5-10) fA for an hour under opened input. Applying a detector to the SIA input, the offset current and its variation were increased and the SIA readout became noisier due to finite shunt resistance and nonzero shunt capacitance of the detector. One of the SIAs with 10 pF nominal capacitance was calibrated using a calibrated current source at the current level of 10 nA to 1 fA and at the integration time of 2 to 65,536 ms. As a result, we obtained a calibration formula for integration capacitance as a function of integration time rather than a single capacitance value because the SIA readout showed a distinct dependence on integration time at a given current level. Finally, we applied it to spectral responsivity measurement of a photometer. It is demonstrated that the home-made SIA of 10 pF was capable of measuring a 107 dynamic range of spectral responsivity of a photometer. PMID:27140564

  7. Accurate metrology of polarization curves measured at the speckle size of visible light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghabbach, A; Zerrad, M; Soriano, G; Amra, C

    2014-06-16

    An optical procedure is presented to measure at the speckle size and with high accuracy, the polarization degree of patterns scattered by disordered media. Whole mappings of polarization ratio, polarimetric phase and polarization degree are pointed out. Scattered clouds are emphasized on the Poincaré sphere, and are completed by probability density functions of the polarization degree. A special care is attributed to the accuracy of data. The set-up provides additional signatures of scattering media.

  8. Development of Filtered Rayleigh Scattering for Accurate Measurement of Gas Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Richard B.; Lempert, Walter R.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to develop new diagnostic tools capable of capturing unsteady and/or time-evolving, high-speed flow phenomena. The program centers around the development of Filtered Rayleigh Scattering (FRS) for velocity, temperature, and density measurement, and the construction of narrow linewidth laser sources which will be capable of producing an order MHz repetition rate 'burst' of high power pulses.

  9. Exercise-induced hyperthermia may prevent accurate core temperature measurement by tympanic membrane thermometer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, S; Scarbough, M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on brain and deep trunk temperature measurement in order to determine the optimal temperature site of the body for varying nursing practices in outpatient clinical settings. Eight women, 18 to 50 years old (30.9 +/- 12.6; mean +/- SD), participated in the study. Subjects were asked to perform their regular aerobic exercise in a natural environment while body temperature (ear and rectal) and heart rate (HR) were measured simultaneously and repeatedly before, during, and after exercise. Glass mercury rectal thermometers were used for measurement of deep trunk temperature, an infrared tympanic membrane thermometer for measurement of brain temperature, and a portable heart rate monitor for monitoring heart rate. Rectal temperature was higher than ear temperature for all but one of the 40 pairs of observation. The time pattern varied for the two modes of temperature (F = 9.67; df 4,28; p < .001). Rectal temperature changed over time (F = 7.86; df 4,28; p < .002), and ear temperature did not (F = 1.5; df 4,28; p = .25), indicating that ear temperature did not respond to exercise. While rectal temperature was strongly correlated with HR (r = .60), ear temperature did not correlate either with rectal temperature (r = .02) or with HR (r = .08). Thus deep trunk temperature responds to exercise at moderate levels. On the other hand, ear temperature does not increase due to exercise. Ear temperature is not a valid indicator of trunk temperature during and immediately after exercise.

  10. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  11. A Robust Method of Vehicle Stability Accurate Measurement Using GPS and INS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-12-01

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. Integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) is a very practical method to get high-precision measurement data. Usually, the Kalman filter is used to fuse the data from GPS and INS. In this paper, a robust method is used to measure vehicle sideslip angle and yaw rate, which are two important parameters for vehicle stability. First, a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model is introduced, based on sideslip angle and yaw rate. Second, a double level Kalman filter is established to fuse the data from Global Positioning System and Inertial Navigation System. Then, this method is simulated on a sample vehicle, using Carsim software to test the sideslip angle and yaw rate. Finally, a real experiment is made to verify the advantage of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method of measurement and estimation, and the approach can meet the design requirements of the vehicle stability controller.

  12. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required.

  13. Regular, Fast and Accurate Airborne In-Situ Methane Measurements Around the Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, Christoph; Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Schuck, Tanja J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    We present a laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft. The instrument is based on a commercial fast methane analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Res.), which was modified for fully unattended employment. A laboratory characterization was performed and the results with emphasis on the precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy are presented. An in-flight calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. By statistical comparison of the in-situ measurements with the flask samples we derive a total uncetrainty estimate of ~ 3.85 ppbv (1?) around the tropopause, and ~ 12.4 ppbv (1?) during aircraft ascent and descent. Data from the first two years of airborne operation are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere, with occasional crossings of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. With its high spatial resolution and high accuracy this data set is unprecedented in the highly important atmospheric layer of the tropopause.

  14. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required. PMID:18488965

  15. Optical aperture area determination for accurate illuminance and luminous efficacy measurements of LED lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönsberg, Timo; Mäntynen, Henrik; Ikonen, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    The measurement uncertainty of illuminance and, consequently, luminous flux and luminous efficacy of LED lamps can be reduced with a recently introduced method based on the predictable quantum efficient detector (PQED). One of the most critical factors affecting the measurement uncertainty with the PQED method is the determination of the aperture area. This paper describes an upgrade to an optical method for direct determination of aperture area where superposition of equally spaced Gaussian laser beams is used to form a uniform irradiance distribution. In practice, this is accomplished by scanning the aperture in front of an intensity-stabilized laser beam. In the upgraded method, the aperture is attached to the PQED and the whole package is transversely scanned relative to the laser beam. This has the benefit of having identical geometry in the laser scanning of the aperture area and in the actual photometric measurement. Further, the aperture and detector assembly does not have to be dismantled for the aperture calibration. However, due to small acceptance angle of the PQED, differences between the diffraction effects of an overfilling plane wave and of a combination of Gaussian laser beams at the circular aperture need to be taken into account. A numerical calculation method for studying these effects is discussed in this paper. The calculation utilizes the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which is applied to the geometry of the PQED and the aperture. Calculation results for various aperture diameters and two different aperture-to-detector distances are presented.

  16. Accurate three-dimensional virtual reconstruction of surgical field using calibrated trajectories of an image-guided medical robot

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Brain tumor margin removal is challenging because diseased tissue is often visually indistinguishable from healthy tissue. Leaving residual tumor leads to decreased survival, and removing normal tissue causes life-long neurological deficits. Thus, a surgical robotics system with a high degree of dexterity, accurate navigation, and highly precise resection is an ideal candidate for image-guided removal of fluorescently labeled brain tumor cells. To image, we developed a scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) which acquires concurrent reflectance and fluorescence wide-field images at a high resolution. This miniature flexible endoscope was affixed to the arm of a RAVEN II surgical robot providing programmable motion with feedback control using stereo-pair surveillance cameras. To verify the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructed surgical field, a multimodal physical-sized model of debulked brain tumor was used to obtain the 3-D locations of residual tumor for robotic path planning to remove fluorescent cells. Such reconstruction is repeated intraoperatively during margin clean-up so the algorithm efficiency and accuracy are important to the robotically assisted surgery. Experimental results indicate that the time for creating this 3-D surface can be reduced to one-third by using known trajectories of a robot arm, and the error from the reconstructed phantom is within 0.67 mm in average compared to the model design. PMID:26158071

  17. Accurate three-dimensional virtual reconstruction of surgical field using calibrated trajectories of an image-guided medical robot.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Brain tumor margin removal is challenging because diseased tissue is often visually indistinguishable from healthy tissue. Leaving residual tumor leads to decreased survival, and removing normal tissue causes life-long neurological deficits. Thus, a surgical robotics system with a high degree of dexterity, accurate navigation, and highly precise resection is an ideal candidate for image-guided removal of fluorescently labeled brain tumor cells. To image, we developed a scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) which acquires concurrent reflectance and fluorescence wide-field images at a high resolution. This miniature flexible endoscope was affixed to the arm of a RAVEN II surgical robot providing programmable motion with feedback control using stereo-pair surveillance cameras. To verify the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructed surgical field, a multimodal physical-sized model of debulked brain tumor was used to obtain the 3-D locations of residual tumor for robotic path planning to remove fluorescent cells. Such reconstruction is repeated intraoperatively during margin clean-up so the algorithm efficiency and accuracy are important to the robotically assisted surgery. Experimental results indicate that the time for creating this 3-D surface can be reduced to one-third by using known trajectories of a robot arm, and the error from the reconstructed phantom is within 0.67 mm in average compared to the model design.

  18. Recommendations for field measurements of aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Specific recommendations for environmental test criteria, data acquisition procedures, and instrument performance requirements for measurement of noise levels produced by aircraft in flight are provided. Recommendations are also given for measurement of associated airplane and engine parameters and atmospheric conditions. Recommendations are based on capabilities which were available commercially in 1981; they are applicable to field tests of aircraft flying subsonically past microphones located near the surface of the ground either directly under or to the side of a flight path. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations include fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines or by propellers. The recommended field-measurement procedures are consistent with assumed requirements for data processing and analysis.

  19. Uranium isotope ratio measurements in field settings

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Barshick, C.M.; Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    The authors have developed a technique for uranium isotope ratio measurements of powder samples in field settings. Such a method will be invaluable for environmental studies, radioactive waste operations, and decommissioning and decontamination operations. Immediate field data can help guide an ongoing sampling campaign. The measurement encompasses glow discharge sputtering from pressed sample hollow cathodes, high resolution laser spectroscopy using conveniently tunable diode lasers, and optogalvanic detection. At 10% {sup 235}U enrichment and above, the measurement precision for {sup 235}U/({sup 235}U+{sup 238}U) isotope ratios was {+-}3%; it declined to {+-}15% for 0.3% (i.e., depleted) samples. A prototype instrument was constructed and is described.

  20. Recommendations for field measurements of aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, A. H.

    1982-04-01

    Specific recommendations for environmental test criteria, data acquisition procedures, and instrument performance requirements for measurement of noise levels produced by aircraft in flight are provided. Recommendations are also given for measurement of associated airplane and engine parameters and atmospheric conditions. Recommendations are based on capabilities which were available commercially in 1981; they are applicable to field tests of aircraft flying subsonically past microphones located near the surface of the ground either directly under or to the side of a flight path. Aircraft types covered by the recommendations include fixed-wing airplanes powered by turbojet or turbofan engines or by propellers. The recommended field-measurement procedures are consistent with assumed requirements for data processing and analysis.

  1. Recent Results on the Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at 1.413GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.H.; Tarkocin, Y.; Utku, C.; Le Vine, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the complex. dielectric constant of seawater at 30.00 psu, 35.00 psu and 38.27 psu over the temperature range from 5 C to 3 5 at 1.413 GHz are given and compared with the Klein-Swift results. A resonant cavity technique is used. The calibration constant used in the cavity perturbation formulas is determined experimentally using methanol and ethanediol (ethylene glycol) as reference liquids. Analysis of the data shows that the measurements are accurate to better than 1.0% in almost all cases studied.

  2. A compact DOAS instrument optimised for ammonia field-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Sintermann, Joerg; Dietrich, Klaus; Häni, Christoph; Jocher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Accurate, high time-resolution measurements of NH3 in ambient air are still a challenge due to the stickiness of this molecule and its interactions with inlet or instrument surfaces. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) with open-path arrangement offers a contact-free in-situ approach to determine ambient NH3. We present a DOAS instrument, optimised for open-path field-measurements of ambient ammonia (NH3) alongside nitrogen oxide (NO) and sulphur dioxide (SO2). This device, operating in the UV range over paths of up to 100 m, is a further development of the miniDOAS presented by Volten et al. (2012). We use a temperature-controlled spectrometer, a deuterium light source and a modified optical arrangement. The system was set up in a robust, field-deployable, temperature-regulated housing. For the evaluation of light spectra a new high-pass filter routine based upon robust baseline extraction with local regression was used. In order to fit differential absorption cross-sections to the measurements, multiple linear regression is performed including terms of an autoregressive-moving-average model. In this presentation we discuss the influence of filter and fit procedure on the precision and accuracy of the system with examples of field measurements with artificial NH3 sources. Volten, H., Bergwerff, J. B., Haaima, M., Lolkema, D. E., Berkhout, A. J. C., van der Hoff, G. R., Potma, C. J. M., Wichink Kruit, R. J., van Pul, W. A. J. and Swart, D. P. J.: Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere, Atmospheric Meas. Tech., 5(2), 413-427, doi:10.5194/amt-5-413-2012, 2012.

  3. Examining factors that may influence accurate measurement of testosterone in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Graham, Katherine M; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Burns, Charlene M; Bettinger, Tammie L; Wheaton, Catharine J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in reported testosterone concentrations in male sea turtle blood samples are common in the veterinary literature, but may be accounted for by differences in sample handling and processing prior to assay. Therefore, our study was performed to determine best practices for testosterone analysis in male sea turtles (Caretta caretta and Chelonia mydas). Blood samples were collected into 5 collection tube types, and assay validation and measured testosterone concentrations were compared across different sample storage (fresh, refrigerated 1 week, or frozen), extraction (unextracted or ether-extracted), and processing treatment (untreated, homogenized, or dissociation reagent) conditions. Ether-extracted and dissociation reagent-treated samples validated in all conditions tested and are recommended for use, as unextracted samples validated only if assayed fresh. Dissociation reagent treatment was simpler to perform than ether extraction and resulted in total testosterone concentrations ~2.7-3.5 times greater than free testosterone measured in ether-extracted samples. Sample homogenization did not affect measured testosterone concentrations, and could be used to increase volume in gelled samples. An annual seasonal testosterone increase was observed in both species when ether extraction or dissociation reagent treatment was used. Annual deslorelin implant treatments in a Chelonia mydas male resulted in suppression of seasonal testosterone following the fourth treatment. Seasonal testosterone patterns resumed following discontinuation of deslorelin. Comparison of in-house and commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits revealed similar patterns of seasonal testosterone increases and deslorelin-induced suppression. Our study highlights the importance of methodological validation and provides laboratorians with best practices for testosterone enzyme immunoassay in sea turtles.

  4. Examining factors that may influence accurate measurement of testosterone in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Graham, Katherine M; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Burns, Charlene M; Bettinger, Tammie L; Wheaton, Catharine J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in reported testosterone concentrations in male sea turtle blood samples are common in the veterinary literature, but may be accounted for by differences in sample handling and processing prior to assay. Therefore, our study was performed to determine best practices for testosterone analysis in male sea turtles (Caretta caretta and Chelonia mydas). Blood samples were collected into 5 collection tube types, and assay validation and measured testosterone concentrations were compared across different sample storage (fresh, refrigerated 1 week, or frozen), extraction (unextracted or ether-extracted), and processing treatment (untreated, homogenized, or dissociation reagent) conditions. Ether-extracted and dissociation reagent-treated samples validated in all conditions tested and are recommended for use, as unextracted samples validated only if assayed fresh. Dissociation reagent treatment was simpler to perform than ether extraction and resulted in total testosterone concentrations ~2.7-3.5 times greater than free testosterone measured in ether-extracted samples. Sample homogenization did not affect measured testosterone concentrations, and could be used to increase volume in gelled samples. An annual seasonal testosterone increase was observed in both species when ether extraction or dissociation reagent treatment was used. Annual deslorelin implant treatments in a Chelonia mydas male resulted in suppression of seasonal testosterone following the fourth treatment. Seasonal testosterone patterns resumed following discontinuation of deslorelin. Comparison of in-house and commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits revealed similar patterns of seasonal testosterone increases and deslorelin-induced suppression. Our study highlights the importance of methodological validation and provides laboratorians with best practices for testosterone enzyme immunoassay in sea turtles. PMID:26699527

  5. Possibility of detecting anisotropic expansion of the universe by very accurate astrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Quercellini, Claudia; Quartin, Miguel; Amendola, Luca

    2009-04-17

    Refined astrometry measurements allow us to detect large-scale deviations from isotropy through real-time observations of changes in the angular separation between sources at cosmic distances. This "cosmic parallax" effect is a powerful consistency test of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric and may set independent constraints on cosmic anisotropy. We apply this novel general test to Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmologies with off-center observers and show that future satellite missions such as Gaia might achieve accuracies that would put limits on the off-center distance which are competitive with cosmic microwave background dipole constraints. PMID:19518616

  6. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL* rf spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D.; Monsanglant, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Lebee, G.

    1999-01-15

    The MISTRAL* experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  7. The dark art of light measurement: accurate radiometry for low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mohammed A; Zainal, Siti A; Holder, Michelle J; Carroll, James D; Cooper, Paul R; Milward, Michael R; Palin, William M

    2016-05-01

    Lasers and light-emitting diodes are used for a range of biomedical applications with many studies reporting their beneficial effects. However, three main concerns exist regarding much of the low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation literature; (1) incomplete, inaccurate and unverified irradiation parameters, (2) miscalculation of 'dose,' and (3) the misuse of appropriate light property terminology. The aim of this systematic review was to assess where, and to what extent, these inadequacies exist and to provide an overview of 'best practice' in light measurement methods and importance of correct light measurement. A review of recent relevant literature was performed in PubMed using the terms LLLT and photobiomodulation (March 2014-March 2015) to investigate the contemporary information available in LLLT and photobiomodulation literature in terms of reporting light properties and irradiation parameters. A total of 74 articles formed the basis of this systematic review. Although most articles reported beneficial effects following LLLT, the majority contained no information in terms of how light was measured (73%) and relied on manufacturer-stated values. For all papers reviewed, missing information for specific light parameters included wavelength (3%), light source type (8%), power (41%), pulse frequency (52%), beam area (40%), irradiance (43%), exposure time (16%), radiant energy (74%) and fluence (16%). Frequent use of incorrect terminology was also observed within the reviewed literature. A poor understanding of photophysics is evident as a significant number of papers neglected to report or misreported important radiometric data. These errors affect repeatability and reliability of studies shared between scientists, manufacturers and clinicians and could degrade efficacy of patient treatments. Researchers need a physicist or appropriately skilled engineer on the team, and manuscript reviewers should reject papers that do not report beam measurement

  8. The dark art of light measurement: accurate radiometry for low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mohammed A; Zainal, Siti A; Holder, Michelle J; Carroll, James D; Cooper, Paul R; Milward, Michael R; Palin, William M

    2016-05-01

    Lasers and light-emitting diodes are used for a range of biomedical applications with many studies reporting their beneficial effects. However, three main concerns exist regarding much of the low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation literature; (1) incomplete, inaccurate and unverified irradiation parameters, (2) miscalculation of 'dose,' and (3) the misuse of appropriate light property terminology. The aim of this systematic review was to assess where, and to what extent, these inadequacies exist and to provide an overview of 'best practice' in light measurement methods and importance of correct light measurement. A review of recent relevant literature was performed in PubMed using the terms LLLT and photobiomodulation (March 2014-March 2015) to investigate the contemporary information available in LLLT and photobiomodulation literature in terms of reporting light properties and irradiation parameters. A total of 74 articles formed the basis of this systematic review. Although most articles reported beneficial effects following LLLT, the majority contained no information in terms of how light was measured (73%) and relied on manufacturer-stated values. For all papers reviewed, missing information for specific light parameters included wavelength (3%), light source type (8%), power (41%), pulse frequency (52%), beam area (40%), irradiance (43%), exposure time (16%), radiant energy (74%) and fluence (16%). Frequent use of incorrect terminology was also observed within the reviewed literature. A poor understanding of photophysics is evident as a significant number of papers neglected to report or misreported important radiometric data. These errors affect repeatability and reliability of studies shared between scientists, manufacturers and clinicians and could degrade efficacy of patient treatments. Researchers need a physicist or appropriately skilled engineer on the team, and manuscript reviewers should reject papers that do not report beam measurement

  9. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.

  10. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.

  11. Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants: Accurate Measurement of Plasma Drug Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Helen; Minet, Valentine; Devalet, Bérangère; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have now widely reached the lucrative market of anticoagulation. While the marketing authorization holders claimed that no routine monitoring is required and that these compounds can be given at fixed doses, several evidences arisen from the literature tend to demonstrate the opposite. New data suggests that an assessment of the response at the individual level could improve the benefit-risk ratio of at least dabigatran. Information regarding the association of rivaroxaban and apixaban exposure and the bleeding risk is available in the drug approval package on the FDA website. These reviews suggest that accumulation of these compounds increases the risk of experiencing a bleeding complication. Therefore, in certain patient populations such as patients with acute or chronic renal impairment or with multiple drug interactions, measurement of drug exposure may be useful to ensure an optimal treatment response. More specific circumstances such as patients experiencing a haemorrhagic or thromboembolic event during the treatment duration, patients who require urgent surgery or an invasive procedure, or patient with a suspected overdose could benefit from such a measurement. This paper aims at providing guidance on how to best estimate the intensity of anticoagulation using laboratory assays in daily practice. PMID:26090400

  12. Recent Advances in Highly Accurate Range Measurements with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, Michael; Balss, Ulrich; Gisinger, Christoph; Cong, Xiao Ying; Brcic, Ramon; Steigenberger, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Earth surface displacement measurement from space using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery is an interesting alternative to SAR interferometry (InSAR). The advantages are that 2D information can be retrieved (InSAR only 1D), absolute displacements can be retrieved (no reference point required) and it is very robust (phase unwrapping not required). On the other hand, the accuracy is limited by the pixel resolution, the object contrast, the orbit accuracy, by wave propagation distortion and by geodetic effects. Therefore the accuracy was more in the meter / decimeter level in the past, compared to millimeter accuracy of InSAR. During the recent years our team established a test and validation site at the geodetic observatory Wettzell, Germany and developed compensation methods to reduce the overall error of absolute range measurements from decimeters to only one centimeter. The methods include correction of dry and wet atmospheric delays, ionospheric corrections, solid earth tides, continental drift, atmospheric pressure loading and ocean tidal loading. For more one year a radar reflector was monitored and each image evaluated. Our presentation gives and overview of methods and achieved results. Futhermore, examples of real world applications and an outlook on more applications is given such as phase unwrapping augmentation.

  13. Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants: Accurate Measurement of Plasma Drug Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Douxfils, Jonathan; Mani, Helen; Minet, Valentine; Devalet, Bérangère; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Mullier, François

    2015-01-01

    Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have now widely reached the lucrative market of anticoagulation. While the marketing authorization holders claimed that no routine monitoring is required and that these compounds can be given at fixed doses, several evidences arisen from the literature tend to demonstrate the opposite. New data suggests that an assessment of the response at the individual level could improve the benefit-risk ratio of at least dabigatran. Information regarding the association of rivaroxaban and apixaban exposure and the bleeding risk is available in the drug approval package on the FDA website. These reviews suggest that accumulation of these compounds increases the risk of experiencing a bleeding complication. Therefore, in certain patient populations such as patients with acute or chronic renal impairment or with multiple drug interactions, measurement of drug exposure may be useful to ensure an optimal treatment response. More specific circumstances such as patients experiencing a haemorrhagic or thromboembolic event during the treatment duration, patients who require urgent surgery or an invasive procedure, or patient with a suspected overdose could benefit from such a measurement. This paper aims at providing guidance on how to best estimate the intensity of anticoagulation using laboratory assays in daily practice. PMID:26090400

  14. Surface EMG measurements during fMRI at 3T: accurate EMG recordings after artifact correction.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Hiske; Zijdewind, Inge; Hoogduin, Hans; Maurits, Natasha

    2005-08-01

    In this experiment, we have measured surface EMG of the first dorsal interosseus during predefined submaximal isometric contractions (5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of maximal force) of the index finger simultaneously with fMRI measurements. Since we have used sparse sampling fMRI (3-s scanning; 2-s non-scanning), we were able to compare the mean amplitude of the undisturbed EMG (non-scanning) intervals with the mean amplitude of the EMG intervals during scanning, after MRI artifact correction. The agreement between the mean amplitudes of the corrected and the undisturbed EMG was excellent and the mean difference between the two amplitudes was not significantly different. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the corrected and undisturbed amplitude at different force levels. In conclusion, we have shown that it is feasible to record surface EMG during scanning and that, after MRI artifact correction, the EMG recordings can be used to quantify isometric muscle activity, even at very low activation intensities.

  15. New Synoptic Measurements of Umbral Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Hughes, A.; Marble, A.; Livingston, W. C.; Pevtsov, A.; SOLIS Team

    2013-07-01

    Apparent cyclic and secular changes of sunspot umbral intensities and magnetic field strengths have been reported for many decades. Monthly measurements since 1998 show changes that have been interpreted as a decline in sunspot vigor that, if continued, may lead to very few visible sunspots in forthcoming cycles (Livingston, Penn, and Svalgaard 2012, ApJ 757, L8). This dramatic notion is controversial (e.g. Nagovitsyn, Pevtsov, and Livingston 2012, ApJ 758, L20), and additional observational evidence is needed based on a minimum of interpretational steps and selection effects. The SOLIS vector spectromagnetograph has recorded photospheric spectra around 630.2 nm over the full solar disk daily since late 2003 with spatial and spectral pixel dimensions of about one arc second and 2.3 pm. We fit the unpolarized intensity spectra in sunspots with a simple Zeeman triplet model using a single field strength, which works well if the field strength exceeds about 2 kG and the individual spectra are not affected by strong Doppler and/or Zeeman variations. The derived total field strengths may be compared with independent spectrograph-based measurements from NSO, Hinode/SP, and Mt. Wilson and with filter-based measurements from SoHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. NSO plans to implement this reduction for all suitable archived SOLIS spectra and to continue daily umbral field strength measurements as cycle 24 proceeds. Preliminary comparisons show good agreements in some cases and systematic differences in others.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Apparent cyclic and secular changes of sunspot umbral intensities and magnetic field strengths have been reported for many decades. Monthly measurements since 1998 show changes that have been interpreted as a decline in sunspot vigor that, if continued, may lead to very few visible sunspots in forthcoming cycles (Livingston, Penn, and Svalgaard 2012, ApJ 757, L8). This dramatic notion is controversial (e.g. Nagovitsyn, Pevtsov, and Livingston

  16. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability was developed that makes it possible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) procedure was applied to the analysis of flow field measurements within a low aspect ratio transonic axial flow fan rotor obtained with 2-D laser anemometry. The procedure generates input for the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamics problems. The relative Mach number contour plots obtained by this method resemble the conventional contour plots obtained by more traditional methods. The results show that the MMS procedure can be used to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analysis tools developed for data from numerical flow field simulations. They show that an experimenter can apply the MMS procedure to his data and then use an interactive graphics program to display scalar quantities like the Mach number by profiles, carpet plots, contour lines, and surfaces using various colors. Also, flow directionality can be shown by display of vector fields and particle traces.

  17. Study on technology of high-frequency pulsed magnetic field strength measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Yin, Tao

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency transient weak magnetic field is always involved in researches about biomedical engineering field while common magnetic-field sensors cannot work properly at frequencies as high as MHz. To measure the value of MHz-level weak pulsed magnetic-field strength accurately, this paper designs a measurement and calibration method for pulsed magnetic-field. In this paper, a device made of Nonferromagnetic material was independently designed and applied to pulsed magnetic field measurement. It held an accurately relative position between the magnetic field generating coil and the detecting coil. By applying a sinusoidal pulse to the generator, collecting the induced electromotive force of the detector, the final magnetic field strength was worked out through algorithms written in Matlab according to Faraday's Law. Experiments were carried out for measurement and calibration. Experiments showed that, under good stability and consistency, accurate measurement of magnetic-field strength of a sinepulse magnetic-field can be achieved, with frequency at 0.5, 1, 1.5 MHz and strength level at micro-Tesla. Calibration results carried out a measuring relative error about 2.5%.

  18. Towards an accurate representation of electrostatics in classical force fields: Efficient implementation of multipolar interactions in biomolecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagui, Celeste; Pedersen, Lee G.; Darden, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The accurate simulation of biologically active macromolecules faces serious limitations that originate in the treatment of electrostatics in the empirical force fields. The current use of "partial charges" is a significant source of errors, since these vary widely with different conformations. By contrast, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through the use of a distributed multipole moment description, has been shown to converge to the quantum MEP outside the van der Waals surface, when higher order multipoles are used. However, in spite of the considerable improvement to the representation of the electronic cloud, higher order multipoles are not part of current classical biomolecular force fields due to the excessive computational cost. In this paper we present an efficient formalism for the treatment of higher order multipoles in Cartesian tensor formalism. The Ewald "direct sum" is evaluated through a McMurchie-Davidson formalism [L. McMurchie and E. Davidson, J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)]. The "reciprocal sum" has been implemented in three different ways: using an Ewald scheme, a particle mesh Ewald (PME) method, and a multigrid-based approach. We find that even though the use of the McMurchie-Davidson formalism considerably reduces the cost of the calculation with respect to the standard matrix implementation of multipole interactions, the calculation in direct space remains expensive. When most of the calculation is moved to reciprocal space via the PME method, the cost of a calculation where all multipolar interactions (up to hexadecapole-hexadecapole) are included is only about 8.5 times more expensive than a regular AMBER 7 [D. A. Pearlman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 91, 1 (1995)] implementation with only charge-charge interactions. The multigrid implementation is slower but shows very promising results for parallelization. It provides a natural way to interface with continuous, Gaussian-based electrostatics in the future. It is

  19. Towards an accurate representation of electrostatics in classical force fields: efficient implementation of multipolar interactions in biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Sagui, Celeste; Pedersen, Lee G; Darden, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The accurate simulation of biologically active macromolecules faces serious limitations that originate in the treatment of electrostatics in the empirical force fields. The current use of "partial charges" is a significant source of errors, since these vary widely with different conformations. By contrast, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through the use of a distributed multipole moment description, has been shown to converge to the quantum MEP outside the van der Waals surface, when higher order multipoles are used. However, in spite of the considerable improvement to the representation of the electronic cloud, higher order multipoles are not part of current classical biomolecular force fields due to the excessive computational cost. In this paper we present an efficient formalism for the treatment of higher order multipoles in Cartesian tensor formalism. The Ewald "direct sum" is evaluated through a McMurchie-Davidson formalism [L. McMurchie and E. Davidson, J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)]. The "reciprocal sum" has been implemented in three different ways: using an Ewald scheme, a particle mesh Ewald (PME) method, and a multigrid-based approach. We find that even though the use of the McMurchie-Davidson formalism considerably reduces the cost of the calculation with respect to the standard matrix implementation of multipole interactions, the calculation in direct space remains expensive. When most of the calculation is moved to reciprocal space via the PME method, the cost of a calculation where all multipolar interactions (up to hexadecapole-hexadecapole) are included is only about 8.5 times more expensive than a regular AMBER 7 [D. A. Pearlman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 91, 1 (1995)] implementation with only charge-charge interactions. The multigrid implementation is slower but shows very promising results for parallelization. It provides a natural way to interface with continuous, Gaussian-based electrostatics in the future. It is

  20. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Timothy W; Ten Cate, James A; Allured, Bradley; Carpenter, Michael A

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  1. Measurements of magnetic fields in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deglinnocenti, Egidio Landi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be measured, in solar prominences, by means of two different basic mechanisms that are responsible for the introduction (or the reduction) of a given amount of polarization in spectral lines: these are the Zeeman effect and the Hanle effect. Through the splitting of the magnetic components of a spectral line, the Zeeman effect is capable of introducing a certain amount of circular polarization across the line profile. The Hanle effect consist of a modification of the linear polarization that is induced in spectral lines by the anisotropic illumination of the prominence plasma by the photospheric radiation field. These two effects are briefly discussed.

  2. Electric field measurements with stratospheric balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, I. B.

    1989-01-01

    Electric fields and currents in the middle atmosphere are important elements of the modern picture of this region. Balloon instruments, reaching the level of the stratosphere, were used extensively for the experimental work. The research has shown good progress, both in the MAP period and in the years before and after. The knowledge was increased about, e.g., the upper atmosphere potential, the electric properties of the medium itself and about the coupling with magnetospheric (ionospheric) fields and currents. Also various measurements have brought about a discussion of the possible existence of hitherto unknown sources. Throughout the MAP period the work on a possible definition of an electric index has continued.

  3. Material interactions with the Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment: Accurate reaction rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, James T.; Leger, Lubert J.

    1987-01-01

    To resolve uncertainties in estimated LEO atomic oxygen fluence and provide reaction product composition data for comparison to data obtained in ground-based simulation laboratories, a flight experiment has been proposed for the space shuttle which utilizes an ion-neutral mass spectrometer to obtain in-situ ambient density measurements and identify reaction products from modeled polymers exposed to the atomic oxygen environment. An overview of this experiment is presented and the methodology of calibrating the flight mass spectrometer in a neutral beam facility prior to its use on the space shuttle is established. The experiment, designated EOIM-3 (Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials, third series), will provide a reliable materials interaction data base for future spacecraft design and will furnish insight into the basic chemical mechanisms leading to atomic oxygen interactions with surfaces.

  4. Measurements of accurate x-ray scattering data of protein solutions using small stationary sample cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xinguo; Hao Quan

    2009-01-15

    In this paper, we report a method of precise in situ x-ray scattering measurements on protein solutions using small stationary sample cells. Although reduction in the radiation damage induced by intense synchrotron radiation sources is indispensable for the correct interpretation of scattering data, there is still a lack of effective methods to overcome radiation-induced aggregation and extract scattering profiles free from chemical or structural damage. It is found that radiation-induced aggregation mainly begins on the surface of the sample cell and grows along the beam path; the diameter of the damaged region is comparable to the x-ray beam size. Radiation-induced aggregation can be effectively avoided by using a two-dimensional scan (2D mode), with an interval as small as 1.5 times the beam size, at low temperature (e.g., 4 deg. C). A radiation sensitive protein, bovine hemoglobin, was used to test the method. A standard deviation of less than 5% in the small angle region was observed from a series of nine spectra recorded in 2D mode, in contrast to the intensity variation seen using the conventional stationary technique, which can exceed 100%. Wide-angle x-ray scattering data were collected at a standard macromolecular diffraction station using the same data collection protocol and showed a good signal/noise ratio (better than the reported data on the same protein using a flow cell). The results indicate that this method is an effective approach for obtaining precise measurements of protein solution scattering.

  5. Standardization of vitrinite reflectance measurements in shale petroleum systems: How accurate are my Ro data?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance generally is considered the most robust thermal maturity parameter available for application to hydrocarbon exploration and petroleum system evaluation. However, until 2011 there was no standardized methodology available to provide guidelines for vitrinite reflectance measurements in shale. Efforts to correct this deficiency resulted in publication of ASTM D7708-11: Standard test method for microscopical determination of the reflectance of vitrinite dispersed in sedimentary rocks. In 2012-2013, an interlaboratory exercise was conducted to establish precision limits for the measurement technique. Six samples, representing a wide variety of shale, were tested in duplicate by 28 analysts in 22 laboratories from 14 countries. Samples ranged from immature to overmature (Ro 0.31-1.53%), from organic-rich to organic-lean (1-22 wt.% total organic carbon), and contained Type I (lacustrine), Type II (marine), and Type III (terrestrial) kerogens. Repeatability values (difference between repetitive results from same operator, same conditions) ranged from 0.03-0.11% absolute reflectance, whereas reproducibility values (difference between results obtained on same test material by different operators, different laboratories) ranged from 0.12-0.54% absolute reflectance. Repeatability and reproducibility degraded consistently with increasing maturity and decreasing organic content. However, samples with terrestrial kerogens (Type III) fell off this trend, showing improved levels of reproducibility due to higher vitrinite content and improved ease of identification. Operators did not consistently meet the reporting requirements of the test method, indicating that a common reporting template is required to improve data quality. The most difficult problem encountered was the petrographic distinction of solid bitumens and low-reflecting inert macerals from vitrinite when vitrinite occurred with reflectance ranges overlapping the other components. Discussion among

  6. Accurate measurement of the sticking time and sticking probability of Rb atoms on a polydimethylsiloxane coating

    SciTech Connect

    Atutov, S. N. Plekhanov, A. I.

    2015-01-15

    We present the results of a systematic study of Knudsen’s flow of Rb atoms in cylindrical capillary cells coated with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compound. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the characterization of the coating in terms of the sticking probability and sticking time of Rb on the two types of coating of high and medium viscosities. We report the measurement of the sticking probability of a Rb atom to the coating equal to 4.3 × 10{sup −5}, which corresponds to the number of bounces 2.3 × 10{sup 4} at room temperature. These parameters are the same for the two kinds of PDMS used. We find that at room temperature, the respective sticking times for high-viscosity and medium-viscosity PDMS are 22 ± 3 μs and 49 ± 6 μs. These sticking times are about million times larger than the sticking time derived from the surface Rb atom adsorption energy and temperature of the coating. A tentative explanation of this surprising result is proposed based on the bulk diffusion of the atoms that collide with the surface and penetrate inside the coating. The results can be important in many resonance cell experiments, such as the efficient magnetooptical trapping of rare elements or radioactive isotopes and in experiments on the light-induced drift effect.

  7. Pushing the frontiers of T-cell vaccines: accurate measurement of human T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Gorski, Stacey Ann; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for novel approaches to tackle major vaccine challenges such as malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, among others. Success will require vaccines able to induce a cytotoxic T-cell response – a deficiency of most current vaccine approaches. The successful development of T-cell vaccines faces many hurdles, not least being the lack of consensus on a standardized T-cell assay format able to be used as a correlate of vaccine efficacy. Hence, there remains a need for reproducible measures of T-cell immunity proven in human clinical trials to correlate with vaccine protection. The T-cell equivalent of a neutralizing antibody assay would greatly accelerate the development and commercialization of T-cell vaccines. Recent advances have seen a plethora of new T-cell assays become available, including some like cytometry by time-of-flight with extreme multiparameter T-cell phenotyping capability. However, whether it is historic thymidine-based proliferation assays or sophisticated new cytometry assays, each assay has its relative advantages and disadvantages, and relatively few of these assays have yet to be validated in large-scale human vaccine trials. This review examines the current range of T-cell assays and assesses their suitability for use in human vaccine trials. Should one or more of these assays be accepted as an agreed surrogate of T-cell protection by a regulatory agency, this would significantly accelerate the development of T-cell vaccines. PMID:23252389

  8. The need for preoperative baseline arm measurement to accurately quantify breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fangdi; Skolny, Melissa N; Swaroop, Meyha N; Rawal, Bhupendra; Catalano, Paul J; Brunelle, Cheryl L; Miller, Cynthia L; Taghian, Alphonse G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) is a feared outcome of breast cancer treatment, yet the push for early screening is hampered by a lack of standardized quantification. We sought to determine the necessity of preoperative baseline in accounting for temporal changes of upper extremity volume. 1028 women with unilateral breast cancer were prospectively screened for lymphedema by perometry. Thresholds were defined: relative volume change (RVC) ≥10 % for clinically significant lymphedema and ≥5 % including subclinical lymphedema. The first postoperative measurement (pseudo-baseline) simulated the case of no baseline. McNemar's test and binomial logistic regression models were used to analyze BCRL misdiagnoses. Preoperatively, 28.3 and 2.9 % of patients had arm asymmetry of ≥5 and 10 %, respectively. Without baseline, 41.6 % of patients were underdiagnosed and 40.1 % overdiagnosed at RVC ≥ 5 %, increasing to 50.0 and 54.8 % at RVC ≥ 10 %. Increased pseudo-baseline asymmetry, increased weight change between baselines, hormonal therapy, dominant use of contralateral arm, and not receiving axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) were associated with increased risk of underdiagnosis at RVC ≥ 5 %; not receiving regional lymph node radiation was significant at RVC ≥ 10 %. Increased pseudo-baseline asymmetry, not receiving ALND, and dominant use of ipsilateral arm were associated with overdiagnosis at RVC ≥ 5 %; increased pseudo-baseline asymmetry and not receiving ALND were significant at RVC ≥ 10 %. The use of a postoperative proxy even early after treatment results in poor sensitivity for identifying BCRL. Providers with access to patients before surgery should consider the consequent need for proper baseline, with specific strategy tailored by institution. PMID:27154787

  9. Implications of (Less) Accurate Mass-Radius-Measurements for the Habitability of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets: Why Do We Need PLATO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Wagner, F. W.; Plesa, A.-C.; Höning, D.; Sohl, F.; Breuer, D.; Rauer, H.

    2012-04-01

    Several space missions (CoRoT, Kepler and others) already provided promising candidates for terrestrial exoplanets (i.e. with masses less than about 10 Earth masses) and thereby triggered an exciting new research branch of planetary modelling to investigate the possible habitability of such planets. Earth analogues (low-mass planets with an Earth-like structure and composition) are likely to be found in the near future with new missions such as the proposed M3 mission PLATO. Planets may be more diverse in the universe than they are in the solar system. Our neighbouring planets in the habitable zone are all terrestrial by the means of being differentiated into an iron core, a silicate mantle and a crust. To reliably determine the interior structure of an exoplanet, measurements of mass and radius have to be sufficiently accurate (around +/-2% error allowed for the radius and +/-5% for the mass). An Earth-size planet with an Earth-like mass but an expected error of ~15% in mass for example may have either a Mercury-like, an Earth-like or a Moon-like (i.e. small iron core) structure [1,2]. Even though the atmospheric escape is not strongly influenced by the interior structure, the outgassing of volatiles and the likeliness of plate tectonics and an ongoing carbon-cycle may be very different. Our investigations show, that a planet with a small silicate mantle is less likely to shift into the plate-tectonics regime, cools faster (which may lead to the loss of a magnetic field after a short time) and outgasses less volatiles than a planet with the same mass but a large silicate mantle and small iron core. To be able to address the habitability of exoplanets, space missions such as PLATO, which can lead up to 2% accuracy in radius [3], are extremely important. Moreover, information about the occurrence of different planetary types helps us to better understand the formation of planetary systems and to further constrain the Drake's equation, which gives an estimate of the

  10. ARTEMIS Low Altitude Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Constantinescu, Dragos; Auster, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Since 2011, two spacecraft of the five THEMIS mission spacecraft are in orbit around the Moon. These two ARTEMIS probes provide for very interesting observations of plasma physical properties of the lunar environment. In particular, the very low periselene of the ARTEMIS probes allows for the detection of crustal magnetic features of our terrestrial companion. Repeated low passes over the same region are used to confirm the crustal origin of the measured magnetic field variations. Using a model for the decay of the magnetic field intensity and measurements at several altitudes, we estimate the magnetic moment and the depth of the equivalent dipole. Some of these magnetic anomalies are strong enough to produce upstream waves due to the interaction with the solar wind with the anomaly driven mini-magnetospheres.

  11. Methyl bromide volatility measurements from treated fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N. |

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used as an agricultural soil fumigant and concern is growing over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after application. The post-application volatilization losses of methyl bromide from two fields using different application practices were measured using an aerodynamic-gradient technique. One field was covered with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during application and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 days of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 days including the one day after the tarp was removed on day 8. The nontarped field lost 89%of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 days. The error associated, with each flux measurement, as well as variations in daily flux losses with differing sampling period lengths show the degree of variability inherent in this type of study.

  12. Heat pulse probe measurements of soil water evaporation in a corn field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Latent heat fluxes from cropped fields consist of soil water evaporation and plant transpiration. It is difficult to accurately separate evapotranspiration into evaporation and transpiration. Heat pulse probes have been used to measure bare field subsurface soil water evaporation, however, the appl...

  13. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  14. Ultrasound field measurement using a binary lens

    PubMed Central

    Clement, G.T.; Nomura, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Field characterization methods using a scattering target in the absence of a point-like receiver have been well described in which scattering is recorded by a relatively large receiver located outside the field of measurement. Unfortunately, such methods are prone to artifacts due to averaging across the receiver surface. To avoid this problem while simultaneously increasing the gain of a received signal, the present study introduces a binary plate lens designed to focus spherically-spreading waves onto a planar region having a nearly-uniform phase proportional to that of the target location. The lens is similar to a zone plate, but modified to produce a biconvex-like behavior, such that it focuses both planar and spherically spreading waves. A measurement device suitable for characterizing narrowband ultrasound signals in air is designed around this lens by coupling it to a target and planar receiver. A prototype device is constructed and used to characterize the field of a highly-focused 400 kHz air transducer along 2 radial lines. Comparison of the measurements with numeric predictions formed from nonlinear acoustic simulation showed good relative pressure correlation, with mean differences of 10% and 12% over center 3dB FWHM drop and 12% and 17% over 6dB. PMID:25643084

  15. Magsat vector magnetometer calibration using Magsat geomagnetic field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, E. R.; Jennings, T.; Morrissey, M.; Langel, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    From the time of its launch on Oct. 30, 1979 into a nearly polar, Sun synchronous orbit, until it reentered the Earth's atmosphere on June 11, 1980, Magsat measured and transmitted more than three complete sets of global magnetic field data. The data obtained from the mission will be used primarily to compute a currently accurate model of the Earth's main magnetic field, to update and refine world and regional magnetic charts, and to develop a global scalar and vector crustal magnetic anomaly map. The in-flight calibration procecure used for 39 vector magnetometer system parameters is described as well as results obtained from some data sets and the numerical studies designed to evaluate the results.

  16. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  17. Highly accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants for cyclic and linear C3H3(+).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-05-19

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C(3)H(3)(+) molecular cation, referred to as c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+). Specifically, the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit, and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants by use of both vibrational second-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C(3)H(3)(+), obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+) are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations. PMID:21510653

  18. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic spatial power spectrum R(sub n)(r) is the mean square magnetic induction represented by degree n spherical harmonic coefficients of the internal scalar potential averaged over the geocentric sphere of radius r. McLeod's Rule for the magnetic field generated by Earth's core geodynamo says that the expected core surface power spectrum (R(sub nc)(c)) is inversely proportional to (2n + 1) for 1 less than n less than or equal to N(sub E). McLeod's Rule is verified by locating Earth's core with main field models of Magsat data; the estimated core radius of 3485 kn is close to the seismologic value for c of 3480 km. McLeod's Rule and similar forms are then calibrated with the model values of R(sub n) for 3 less than or = n less than or = 12. Extrapolation to the degree 1 dipole predicts the expectation value of Earth's dipole moment to be about 5.89 x 10(exp 22) Am(exp 2)rms (74.5% of the 1980 value) and the expected geomagnetic intensity to be about 35.6 (mu)T rms at Earth's surface. Archeo- and paleomagnetic field intensity data show these and related predictions to be reasonably accurate. The probability distribution chi(exp 2) with 2n+1 degrees of freedom is assigned to (2n + 1)R(sub nc)/(R(sub nc). Extending this to the dipole implies that an exceptionally weak absolute dipole moment (less than or = 20% of the 1980 value) will exist during 2.5% of geologic time. The mean duration for such major geomagnetic dipole power excursions, one quarter of which feature durable axial dipole reversal, is estimated from the modern dipole power time-scale and the statistical model of excursions. The resulting mean excursion duration of 2767 years forces us to predict an average of 9.04 excursions per million years, 2.26 axial dipole reversals per million years, and a mean reversal duration of 5533 years. Paleomagnetic data show these predictions to be quite accurate. McLeod's Rule led to accurate predictions of Earth's core radius, mean paleomagnetic field

  19. A Two-Sinker Densimeter for Accurate Measurements of the Density of Natural Gases at Standard Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Markus; Kleinrahm, Reiner; Glos, Stefan; Wagner, Wolfgang; Span, Roland; Schley, Peter; Uhrig, Martin

    2010-05-01

    A special reference densimeter has been developed for accurate measurements of densities of natural gases and multicomponent gas mixtures at standard conditions of temperature and pressure ( T s = 273.15 K and p s = 0.101325 MPa). The densimeter covers the range from 0.7 kg · m-3 to 1.3 kg · m-3; the total measurement uncertainty in density is 0.020 % (95 % level of confidence). The measurement principle used is the two-sinker method, which is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The certified calibration laboratory of E.ON Ruhrgas AG, Germany, uses this densimeter to verify the standard densities of certified calibration gases (binary and multicomponent gas mixtures). Moreover, the densimeter is used to determine the compositions of commercially available binary gas mixtures with a small uncertainty of (0.01-0.03) mol%.

  20. Accurate measurement of dispersion data through short and narrow tubes used in very high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2015-09-01

    An original method is proposed for the accurate and reproducible measurement of the time-based dispersion properties of short L< 50cm and narrow rc< 50μm tubes at mobile phase flow rates typically used in very high-pressure liquid chromatography (vHPLC). Such tubes are used to minimize sample dispersion in vHPLC; however, their dispersion characteristics cannot be accurately measured at such flow rates due to system dispersion contribution of vHPLC injector and detector. It is shown that using longer and wider tubes (>10μL) enables a reliable measurement of the dispersion data. We confirmed that the dimensionless plot of the reduced dispersion coefficient versus the reduced linear velocity (Peclet number) depends on the aspect ratio, L/rc, of the tube, and unexpectedly also on the diffusion coefficient of the analyte. This dimensionless plot could be easily obtained for a large volume tube, which has the same aspect ratio as that of the short and narrow tube, and for the same diffusion coefficient. The dispersion data for the small volume tube are then directly extrapolated from this plot. For instance, it is found that the maximum volume variances of 75μm×30.5cm and 100μm×30.5cm prototype finger-tightened connecting tubes are 0.10 and 0.30μL(2), respectively, with an accuracy of a few percent and a precision smaller than seven percent.

  1. Evaluation of the sample needed to accurately estimate outcome-based measurements of dairy welfare on farm.

    PubMed

    Endres, M I; Lobeck-Luchterhand, K M; Espejo, L A; Tucker, C B

    2014-01-01

    Dairy welfare assessment programs are becoming more common on US farms. Outcome-based measurements, such as locomotion, hock lesion, hygiene, and body condition scores (BCS), are included in these assessments. The objective of the current study was to investigate the proportion of cows in the pen or subsamples of pens on a farm needed to provide an accurate estimate of the previously mentioned measurements. In experiment 1, we evaluated cows in 52 high pens (50 farms) for lameness using a 1- to 5-scale locomotion scoring system (1 = normal and 5 = severely lame; 24.4 and 6% of animals were scored ≥ 3 or ≥ 4, respectively). Cows were also given a BCS using a 1- to 5-scale, where 1 = emaciated and 5 = obese; cows were rarely thin (BCS ≤ 2; 0.10% of cows) or fat (BCS ≥ 4; 0.11% of cows). Hygiene scores were assessed on a 1- to 5-scale with 1 = clean and 5 = severely dirty; 54.9% of cows had a hygiene score ≥ 3. Hock injuries were classified as 1 = no lesion, 2 = mild lesion, and 3 = severe lesion; 10.6% of cows had a score of 3. Subsets of data were created with 10 replicates of random sampling that represented 100, 90, 80, 70, 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3% of the cows measured/pen. In experiment 2, we scored the same outcome measures on all cows in lactating pens from 12 farms and evaluated using pen subsamples: high; high and fresh; high, fresh, and hospital; and high, low, and hospital. For both experiments, the association between the estimates derived from all subsamples and entire pen (experiment 1) or herd (experiment 2) prevalence was evaluated using linear regression. To be considered a good estimate, 3 criteria must be met: R(2)>0.9, slope = 1, and intercept = 0. In experiment 1, on average, recording 15% of the pen represented the percentage of clinically lame cows (score ≥ 3), whereas 30% needed to be measured to estimate severe lameness (score ≥ 4). Only 15% of the pen was needed to estimate the percentage of the herd with a hygiene

  2. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  3. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  4. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagg, Andreas; Lites, Bruce; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Consequently, inference of magnetic fields in the photosphere, and especially in the chromosphere, is crucial to deepen our understanding not only for solar phenomena such as chromospheric and coronal heating, flares or coronal mass ejections, but also for fundamental physical topics like dynamo theory or atomic physics. In this review, we present an overview of significant advances during the last decades in measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the availability of observatories, together with some selected results. We discuss the problems of determining magnetic fields at smallest spatial scales, connected with increasing demands on polarimetric sensitivity and temporal resolution, and highlight some promising future developments for their solution.

  5. Measuring methyl bromide emissions from fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Yates, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used extensively for pest control. Recent evidence suggests that methyl bromide may react with stratospheric ozone and, due to the Clean Air Act, is scheduled for phase-out within the next 5 to 10 years. As indicated in a recent report from The National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program, there will be substantial economic impact on the agricultural community if the use of methyl bromide is restricted. There are several areas of uncertainty concerning the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Foremost is the quantification of mass emitted to the atmosphere from agricultural fields. To address this, two field experiments were conducted to directly measure methyl bromide emissions. In the first experiment, methyl bromide was injected at approximately 25 cm depth and the soil was covered with 1 mil high-density polyethylene plastic. The second experiment was similar except that methyl bromide was injected at approximately 68 cm depth and the soil was not covered. From these experiments, the emission rate into the atmosphere and the subsurface transport of methyl bromide was determined. Both experiments include a field-scale mass balance to verify the accuracy of the flux-measurement methods as well as to check data consistency. The volatilization rate and mass lost was determined from estimates of the degradation and from several atmospheric and chamber flux methods.

  6. Near-field measurement facility plans at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R. G.

    1983-05-01

    The direction of future antenna technology will be toward antennas which are large, both physically and electrically, will operate at frequencies up to 60 GHz, and are non-reciprocal and complex, implementing multiple-beam and scanning beam concepts and monolithic semiconductor devices and techniques. The acquisition of accurate antenna performance measurements is a critical part of the advanced antenna research program and represents a substantial antenna measurement technology challenge, considering the special characteristics of future spacecraft communications antennas. Comparison of various antenna testing techniques and their relative advantages and disadvantages shows that the near-field approach is necessary to meet immediate and long-term testing requirements. The LeRC facilities, the 22 ft x 22 ft horizontal antenna boresight planar scanner and the 60 ft x 60 ft vertical antenna boresight plant scanner (with a 60 GHz frequency and D/lamdba = 3000 electrical size capabilities), will meet future program testing requirements.

  7. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies.

    PubMed

    Wong, William W; Clarke, Lucinda L

    2012-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H(2)) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H(2)-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H(2)-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 (o)/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 (o)/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer.

  8. A Hydrogen Gas-Water Equilibration Method Produces Accurate and Precise Stable Hydrogen Isotope Ratio Measurements in Nutrition Studies12

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William W.; Clarke, Lucinda L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H2) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H2-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H2-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 o/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 o/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PMID:23014490

  9. Modified methods of stellar magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The standard methods of the magnetic field measurement, based on an analysis of the relation between the Stokes V-parameter and the first derivative of the total line profile intensity, were modified by applying a linear integral operator \\hat{L} to both sides of this relation. As the operator \\hat{L}, the operator of the wavelet transform with DOG-wavelets is used. The key advantage of the proposed method is an effective suppression of the noise contribution to the line profile and the Stokes parameter V. The efficiency of the method has been studied using model line profiles with various noise contributions. To test the proposed method, the spectropolarimetric observations of the A0 star α2 CVn, the Of?p star HD 148937, and the A0 supergiant HD 92207 were used. The longitudinal magnetic field strengths calculated by our method appeared to be in good agreement with those determined by other methods.

  10. New Methods of Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    The standard methods of magnetic field measurements, based on the relation between the Stokes V parameter and the first derivative of the line profile intensity were modified by applying a linear integral transform to both sides of this relation. We used the wavelet integral transform with the DOG wavelets. The key advantage of the proposed method is the effective suppression of the noise contribution both to the line profile and the Stokes V parameter. To test the proposed method, spectropolarimetric observations of the young O star θ1 Ori C were used. We also demonstrate that the smoothed Time Variation Spectra (smTVS) can be used as a tool for detecting the local stellar magnetic fields.

  11. Field measurements in unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, B.; Pasternack, G.

    2003-04-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development and application of digital terrain models to better understand process-form relations. However, field measurements in mountain channels have largely been restricted to low velocity or ephemeral flow conditions. To address this problem, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was developed at UC Davis and used to measure the 3D bed and water surface topographies of an unwadeable plunging hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Labeled as the River Truss, the system is capable of making high-resolution form and process measurements over a 30 to 115 m2 area. Bed and water surface DTMs were derived from the field data using AutoCAD. River Truss precision was assessed by DTM differencing the hydraulic jump bed surface topography with a DTM developed from tacheometric survey at low base flows. Bed surface DTMs indicate significant spatial complexity of the underlying bed step in the supercritical flow region and significant downstream bed scour. Water surface DTMs indicate 3D complexity of the plunging flow surface and divergence from 1D free-fall theory. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics associated with natural hydraulic jumps may be better understood. Also, a second generation River Truss that has a larger coverage area and automated data collection has been designed and is now being built.

  12. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  13. An accurate scatter measurement and correction technique for cone beam breast CT imaging using scanning sampled measurement (SSM)technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu

    2006-03-01

    We developed and investigated a scanning sampled measurement (SSM) technique for scatter measurement and correction in cone beam breast CT imaging. A cylindrical polypropylene phantom (water equivalent) was mounted on a rotating table in a stationary gantry experimental cone beam breast CT imaging system. A 2-D array of lead beads, with the beads set apart about ~1 cm from each other and slightly tilted vertically, was placed between the object and x-ray source. A series of projection images were acquired as the phantom is rotated 1 degree per projection view and the lead beads array shifted vertically from one projection view to the next. A series of lead bars were also placed at the phantom edge to produce better scatter estimation across the phantom edges. Image signals in the lead beads/bars shadow were used to obtain sampled scatter measurements which were then interpolated to form an estimated scatter distribution across the projection images. The image data behind the lead bead/bar shadows were restored by interpolating image data from two adjacent projection views to form beam-block free projection images. The estimated scatter distribution was then subtracted from the corresponding restored projection image to obtain the scatter removed projection images. Our preliminary experiment has demonstrated that it is feasible to implement SSM technique for scatter estimation and correction for cone beam breast CT imaging. Scatter correction was successfully performed on all projection images using scatter distribution interpolated from SSM and restored projection image data. The resultant scatter corrected projection image data resulted in elevated CT number and largely reduced the cupping effects.

  14. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  15. Tunneling Time and Weak Measurement in Strong Field Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Mishra, Siddhartha; Doran, Brent R.; Gordon, Daniel F.; Landsman, Alexandra S.

    2016-06-01

    Tunneling delays represent a hotly debated topic, with many conflicting definitions and little consensus on when and if such definitions accurately describe the physical observables. Here, we relate these different definitions to distinct experimental observables in strong field ionization, finding that two definitions, Larmor time and Bohmian time, are compatible with the attoclock observable and the resonance lifetime of a bound state, respectively. Both of these definitions are closely connected to the theory of weak measurement, with Larmor time being the weak measurement value of tunneling time and Bohmian trajectory corresponding to the average particle trajectory, which has been recently reconstructed using weak measurement in a two-slit experiment [S. Kocsis, B. Braverman, S. Ravets, M. J. Stevens, R. P. Mirin, L. K. Shalm, and A. M. Steinberg, Science 332, 1170 (2011)]. We demonstrate a big discrepancy in strong field ionization between the Bohmian and weak measurement values of tunneling time, and we suggest this arises because the tunneling time is calculated for a small probability postselected ensemble of electrons. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of experiments in attosecond science, suggesting that tunneling is unlikely to be an instantaneous process.

  16. Tunneling Time and Weak Measurement in Strong Field Ionization.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Mishra, Siddhartha; Doran, Brent R; Gordon, Daniel F; Landsman, Alexandra S

    2016-06-10

    Tunneling delays represent a hotly debated topic, with many conflicting definitions and little consensus on when and if such definitions accurately describe the physical observables. Here, we relate these different definitions to distinct experimental observables in strong field ionization, finding that two definitions, Larmor time and Bohmian time, are compatible with the attoclock observable and the resonance lifetime of a bound state, respectively. Both of these definitions are closely connected to the theory of weak measurement, with Larmor time being the weak measurement value of tunneling time and Bohmian trajectory corresponding to the average particle trajectory, which has been recently reconstructed using weak measurement in a two-slit experiment [S. Kocsis, B. Braverman, S. Ravets, M. J. Stevens, R. P. Mirin, L. K. Shalm, and A. M. Steinberg, Science 332, 1170 (2011)]. We demonstrate a big discrepancy in strong field ionization between the Bohmian and weak measurement values of tunneling time, and we suggest this arises because the tunneling time is calculated for a small probability postselected ensemble of electrons. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of experiments in attosecond science, suggesting that tunneling is unlikely to be an instantaneous process. PMID:27341232

  17. Computer aided measurement of multimode fields in waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonwinterfeld, C.; Zocher, E.

    1982-02-01

    A method for computer aided measurement to analyze closed and open multimode structures, e.g., waveguides, travelling wave structures, is presented. Measurements are realized with a sonde having a very low coupling coefficient with relation to waveguides positioned manually, and connected through an attenuator to a differential analyzer connected at the other hand to the signal generator. The phase and amplitude values are digitized, and fed to a computer. The obtained values are then further analyzed in a larger computer. Precision of measurements attained is plus minus two grad and plus or minus 0.2 dB. The mathematical solution of the nonlinear equations system is an application of the Prony algorithm to waves in a medium with axial translational symmetry. The method was tested by measuring multimodal fields in a circular waveguide with smooth walls. Based on fairly accurate field data, the results of the analysis are checked, the accuracy of the wave number values is established, and the optimum parameters of the analysis are obtained.

  18. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ∼10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films. PMID:27475589

  19. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ∼10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films.

  20. Accurate measurements of cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films by dual-frequency time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Puqing; Huang, Bin; Koh, Yee Kan

    2016-07-01

    Accurate measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity Λcross of a high-thermal-conductivity thin film on a low-thermal-conductivity (Λs) substrate (e.g., Λcross/Λs > 20) are challenging, due to the low thermal resistance of the thin film compared with that of the substrate. In principle, Λcross could be measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), using a high modulation frequency fh and a large laser spot size. However, with one TDTR measurement at fh, the uncertainty of the TDTR measurement is usually high due to low sensitivity of TDTR signals to Λcross and high sensitivity to the thickness hAl of Al transducer deposited on the sample for TDTR measurements. We observe that in most TDTR measurements, the sensitivity to hAl only depends weakly on the modulation frequency f. Thus, we performed an additional TDTR measurement at a low modulation frequency f0, such that the sensitivity to hAl is comparable but the sensitivity to Λcross is near zero. We then analyze the ratio of the TDTR signals at fh to that at f0, and thus significantly improve the accuracy of our Λcross measurements. As a demonstration of the dual-frequency approach, we measured the cross-plane thermal conductivity of a 400-nm-thick nickel-iron alloy film and a 3-μm-thick Cu film, both with an accuracy of ˜10%. The dual-frequency TDTR approach is useful for future studies of thin films.

  1. New radiation detectors for field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjie, A.; Quam, W.

    1993-12-31

    Two new types of radiation detectors are discussed; the first is a large area TLD and the second is a high pressure xenon proportional counter. The large area TLD can be used to measure In situ alpha activity with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Some field measurements are presented. The high pressure xenon proportional counter (XGPC) is capable of realtime survey work and monitoring of plutonium (through detection of the 60 keV Americium-241 gamma ray) and uranium. Spectral resolution data from the 8 atmosphere proportional counter are presented. In many applications the counting efficiency penalty due to low stopping power of xenon at higher gamma energies can be offset by increasing gas pressure and using physically long counters.

  2. Field scale measurements of NH3 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Ammann, Christof; Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Lehuger, Simon; Gärtner, Andrea; Hirschberger, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The uncertainty in the ammonia emissions after application of organic manure contributes to a large extent to the overall uncertainties of the nitrogen budget of managed grassland systems (Ammann et al., 2009). Due to the sticky nature of the ammonia molecule and the variability of the emission fluxes the experimental determination is still a major challenge and a wide spread range of emission factors can be found in the literature. We report on two field experiments performed in August 2009 at the NitroEurope site in Oensingen, Switzerland. The ammonia emission flux after liquid manure application was investigated simultaneously by various micrometeorological methods: (1) a mass balance approach measuring the horizontal advection flux with open-path FTIR sensors (Gärtner et al., 2008), (2) aerodynamic gradient methods, and (3) eddy covariance measurements based on a novel fast ammonia analyser. Due to the sequential application of the manure and the fast decrease of the ammonia volatilisation, detailed footprint calculations (Neftel et al., 2008) and corrections with a high temporal resolution were crucial for obtaining representative emission fluxes. The plausibility of flux measurements has been evaluated with back trajectories simulations (WindTrax, Flesch et al., 2009). The results of all applied flux measurement methods confirmed the low emission levels found earlier by Spirig et al. (2009). A comparison of the field observations with results of process oriented models showed considerable differences in the temporal course of the ammonia emission indicating the need for improvements of the models. References: Ammann, C., Spirig, C., Leifeld, J. and Neftel, A.: Assessment of the nitrogen and carbon budget of two managed temperate grassland fields, Agric. Ecosyst. Environ., 133, 150-162, 2009. Flesch, T.K., Harper, L.A., Desjardins, R.L., Gao, Z., and Crenna, B.: Multi-Source Emission Determination Using an Inverse-Dispersion Technique. Boundary-Layer Meteorol

  3. Laboratory and Field Measurements of Raindrop Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, A.; Chamberlain, K.; Schounhuber, M.; Einaudi, Franco

    2000-01-01

    This study presents new measurements of raindrop oscillations in laboratory and field conditions. A 2-D video disdrometer is used to detect the shape of oscillating raindrops. The studies that were conducted to examine the oscillatory behavior of drops reveal that there is a lack of observations of the large drop oscillations. Yet, these drops have significant importance on radar rain estimation. Therefore, the new laboratory study is particularly designed to expand our knowledge on oscillatory behavior of large raindrops. The preliminary laboratory tests indicate that the drops are less oblate than the equilibrium shapes. Regarding the field studies, a large sample of raindrops was collected in several tropical field campaigns. The raindrops are mostly distorted and canted due to the environmental wind. An algorithm that determines the drop orientation and canting angle is added to the current system. This would reveal one of the most comprehensive data set on the oscillating behavior of raindrops in natural rain. The role of the oscillating raindrops on polarimetric parameters and subsequent rain estimation will be added to the discussion.

  4. Advanced materials characterization based on full field deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, A. Paige

    Accurate stress-strain constitutive properties are essential for understanding the complex deformation and failure mechanisms for materials with highly anisotropic mechanical properties. Among such materials, glass-fiber- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer--matrix composites play a critical role in advanced structural designs. The large number of different methods and specimen types currently required to generate three-dimensional allowables for structural design slows down the material characterization. Also, some of the material constitutive properties are never measured due to the prohibitive cost of the specimens needed. This work shows that simple short-beam shear (SBS) specimens are well-suited for measurement of multiple constitutive properties for composite materials and that can enable a major shift toward accurate material characterization. The material characterization is based on the digital image correlation (DIC) full-field deformation measurement. The full-field-deformation measurement enables additional flexibility for assessment of stress--strain relations, compared to the conventional strain gages. Complex strain distributions, including strong gradients, can be captured. Such flexibility enables simpler test-specimen design and reduces the number of different specimen types required for assessment of stress--strain constitutive behavior. Two key elements show advantage of using DIC in the SBS tests. First, tensile, compressive, and shear stress--strain relations are measured in a single experiment. Second, a counter-intuitive feasibility of closed-form stress and modulus models, normally applicable to long beams, is demonstrated for short-beam specimens. The modulus and stress--strain data are presented for glass/epoxy and carbon/epoxy material systems. The applicability of the developed method to static, fatigue, and impact load rates is also demonstrated. In a practical method to determine stress-strain constitutive relations, the stress

  5. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  6. A field method for measurement of infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1963-01-01

    The determination of infiltration--the downward entry of water into a soil (or sediment)--is receiving increasing attention in hydrologic studies because of the need for more quantitative data on all phases of the hydrologic cycle. A measure of infiltration, the infiltration rate, is usually determined in the field by flooding basins or furrows, sprinkling, or measuring water entry from cylinders (infiltrometer rings). Rates determined by ponding in large areas are considered most reliable, but the high cost usually dictates that infiltrometer rings, preferably 2 feet in diameter or larger, be used. The hydrology of subsurface materials is critical in the study of infiltration. The zone controlling the rate of infiltration is usually the least permeable zone. Many other factors affect infiltration rate--the sediment (soil) structure, the condition of the sediment surface, the distribution of soil moisture or soil- moisture tension, the chemical and physical nature of the sediments, the head of applied water, the depth to ground water, the chemical quality and the turbidity of the applied water, the temperature of the water and the sediments, the percentage of entrapped air in the sediments, the atmospheric pressure, the length of time of application of water, the biological activity in the sediments, and the type of equipment or method used. It is concluded that specific values of the infiltration rate for a particular type of sediment are probably nonexistent and that measured rates are primarily for comparative use. A standard field-test method for determining infiltration rates by means of single- or double-ring infiltrometers is described and the construction, installation, and operation of the infiltrometers are discussed in detail.

  7. Field measurement of diesel particulate matter emissions.

    PubMed

    Volkwein, Jon C; Mischler, Steven E; Davies, Brian; Ellis, Clive

    2008-03-01

    A primary means to reduce environmental levels of diesel particulate matter (DPM) exposure to miners is to reduce the amount of DPM emission from the engine. A quick and economic method to estimate engine particulate emission levels has been developed. The method relies on the measurement of pressure increase across a filter element that is briefly used to collect a DPM sample directly from the engine exhaust. The method has been refined with the inclusion of an annular aqueous denuder to the tube which permits dry filter samples to be obtained without addition of dilution air. Tailpipe filter samples may then be directly collected in hot and water-supersaturated exhaust gas flows from water bath-cooled coal mine engines without the need for dilution air. Measurement of a differential pressure (DP) increase with time has been related to the mass of elemental carbon (EC) on the filter. Results for laboratory and field measurements of the method showed agreement between DP increase and EC collected on the filter with R(2) values >0.86. The relative standard deviation from replicate samples of DP and EC was 0.16 and 0.11, respectively. The method may also have applications beyond mining, where qualitative evaluation of engine emissions is desirable to determine if engine or control technology maintenance may be required.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  9. Necessary Conditions for Accurate, Transient Hot-Wire Measurements of the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids are Seldom Satisfied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Tertsinidou, Georgia J.; Assael, Marc J.; Wakeham, William A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper considers the conditions that are necessary to secure accurate measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity of two-phase systems comprising nanoscale particles of one material suspended in a fluid phase of a different material. It is shown that instruments operating according to the transient hot-wire technique can, indeed, produce excellent measurements when a finite element method (FEM) is employed to describe the instrument for the exact geometry of the hot wire. Furthermore, it is shown that an approximate analytic solution can be employed with equal success, over the time range of 0.1 s to 1 s, provided that (a) two wires are employed, so that end effects are canceled, (b) each wire is very thin, less than 30 \\upmu m diameter, so that the line source model and the corresponding corrections are valid, (c) low values of the temperature rise, less than 4 K, are employed in order to minimize the effect of convection on the heat transfer in the time of measurement of 1 s, and (d) insulated wires are employed for measurements in electrically conducting or polar liquids to avoid current leakage or other electrical distortions. According to these criteria, a transient hot-wire instrument has been designed, constructed, and employed for the measurement of the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of water when TiO2 or multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are added. These new results, together with a critical evaluation of other measurements, demonstrate the importance of proper implementation of the technique.

  10. Accurate kinematic measurement at interfaces between dissimilar materials using conforming finite-element-based digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Moussawi, Ali; Lubineau, Gilles; Pan, Bing

    2016-06-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is now an extensively applied full-field measurement technique with subpixel accuracy. A systematic drawback of this technique, however, is the smoothening of the kinematic field (e.g., displacement and strains) across interfaces between dissimilar materials, where the deformation gradient is known to be large. This can become an issue when a high level of accuracy is needed, for example, in the interfacial region of composites or joints. In this work, we described the application of global conforming finite-element-based DIC technique to obtain precise kinematic fields at interfaces between dissimilar materials. Speckle images from both numerical and actual experiments processed by the described global DIC technique better captured sharp strain gradient at the interface than local subset-based DIC.

  11. Accurate and absolute diffusion measurements of Rhodamine 6G in low-concentration aqueous solutions by the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G.; Zick, K.

    2015-04-28

    A pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sequence with solvent suppression (PGSE-WATERGATE) was applied to accurately measure the diffusion coefficients of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in low-concentration aqueous solutions. Three samples with Rh6G concentrations of C{sub Rh6G} = 1, 4.5, and 25 μM were investigated. The precise determination of the diffusion coefficients in this low-concentration range was made possible by using a cryogenically cooled NMR probe and by the effective solvent suppression of the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence. The present results bridge the gap between diffusion data measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in the single molecule limit and diffusivities obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) without solvent suppression at higher concentrations. To further extend the concentration range, the diffusion coefficient of Rh6G was also measured on a sample with C{sub Rh6G} = 410 μM by PFG-NMR. The overall concentration dependence of the Rh6G diffusion at 25 °C is discussed in terms of dimerization of the Rh6G molecules. The concentration-dependent monomer/dimer proportion is deduced from the diffusion data.

  12. Turbulence Measurements in the Near Field of a Wingtip Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Jim; Zilliac, Greg; Bradshaw, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The roll-up of a wingtip vortex, at Reynolds number based on chord of 4.6 million was studied with an emphasis on suction side and near wake measurements. The research was conducted in a 32 in. x 48 in. low-speed wind tunnel. The half-wing model had a semi-span of 36 in. a chord of 48 in. and a rounded tip. Seven-hole pressure probe measurements of the velocity field surrounding the wingtip showed that a large axial velocity of up to 1.77 U(sub infinity) developed in the vortex core. This level of axial velocity has not been previously measured. Triple-wire probes have been used to measure all components of the Reynolds stress tensor. It was determined from correlation measurements that meandering of the vortex was small and did not appreciably contribute to the turbulence measurements. The flow was found to be turbulent in the near-field (as high as 24 percent RMS w - velocity on the edge of the core) and the turbulence decayed quickly with streamwise distance because of the nearly solid body rotation of the vortex core mean flow. A streamwise variation of the location of peak levels of turbulence, relative to the core centerline, was also found. Close to the trailing edge of the wing, the peak shear stress levels were found at the edge of the vortex core, whereas in the most downstream wake planes they occurred at a radius roughly equal to one-third of the vortex core radius. The Reynolds shear stresses were not aligned with the mean strain rate, indicating that an isotropic-eddy-viscosity based prediction method cannot accurately model the turbulence in the cortex. In cylindrical coordinates, with the origin at the vortex centerline, the radial normal stress was found to be larger than the circumferential.

  13. Polarization bispectrum for measuring primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2013-11-01

    We examine the potential of polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain primordial magnetic fields (PMFs). We compute all possible bispectra between temperature and polarization anisotropies sourced by PMFs and show that they are weakly correlated with well-known local-type and secondary ISW-lensing bispectra. From a Fisher analysis it is found that, owing to E-mode bispectra, in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment the expected uncertainty in the amplitude of magnetized bispectra is 80% improved in comparison with an analysis in terms of temperature auto-bispectrum alone. In the Planck or the proposed PRISM experiment cases, we will be able to measure PMFs with strength 2.6 or 2.2 nG. PMFs also generate bispectra involving B-mode polarization, due to tensor-mode dependence. We also find that the B-mode bispectrum can reduce the uncertainty more drastically and hence PMFs comparable to or less than 1 nG may be measured in a PRISM-like experiment.

  14. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  15. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  16. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the first six months of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on analyzing and testing factors that impact performance degradation of the initially designed sensor prototype, including sensing element movement within the sensing probe and optical signal quality degradation. Based these results, a new version of the sensing system was designed by combining the sapphire disk sensing element and the single crystal zirconia right angle light reflector into one novel single crystal sapphire right angle prism. The new sensor prototype was tested up to 1650 C.

  17. Accurate characterization of delay discounting: a multiple model approach using approximate Bayesian model selection and a unified discounting measure.

    PubMed

    Franck, Christopher T; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; House, Leanna L; Bickel, Warren K

    2015-01-01

    The study of delay discounting, or valuation of future rewards as a function of delay, has contributed to understanding the behavioral economics of addiction. Accurate characterization of discounting can be furthered by statistical model selection given that many functions have been proposed to measure future valuation of rewards. The present study provides a convenient Bayesian model selection algorithm that selects the most probable discounting model among a set of candidate models chosen by the researcher. The approach assigns the most probable model for each individual subject. Importantly, effective delay 50 (ED50) functions as a suitable unifying measure that is computable for and comparable between a number of popular functions, including both one- and two-parameter models. The combined model selection/ED50 approach is illustrated using empirical discounting data collected from a sample of 111 undergraduate students with models proposed by Laibson (1997); Mazur (1987); Myerson & Green (1995); Rachlin (2006); and Samuelson (1937). Computer simulation suggests that the proposed Bayesian model selection approach outperforms the single model approach when data truly arise from multiple models. When a single model underlies all participant data, the simulation suggests that the proposed approach fares no worse than the single model approach.

  18. The importance of complete tissue homogenization for accurate stoichiometric measurement of myosin light chain phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-02-01

    The standard method for measuring the phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chain (MLC20) in smooth muscle is extraction of the light chain using a urea extraction buffer, urea-glycerol gel electrophoresis of the soluble portion of the extract (supernatant) and Western blot analysis. The undissolved portion of the tissue during extraction (the pellet) is usually discarded. Because the pellet contains a finite amount of MLC20, omission of the pellet could result in inaccurate measurement of MLC20 phosphorylation. In this study we compared the level of tracheal smooth muscle MLC20 phosphorylation in the supernatant alone, with that in the complete tissue homogenate (supernatant and pellet) using the standard method. The supernatant fraction showed the well-known double bands representing phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated MLC20. The dissolved pellet fraction showed varying amounts of un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated MLC20. There was a small but statistically significant overestimation of the percent MLC20 phosphorylation if the pellet was not taken into consideration. The overestimation was 7% ± 2% (mean ± SEM) (p < 0.05) in unstimulated muscle and 2% ± 1% (p < 0.05) in acetylcholine (10(-6) mol/L) stimulated muscle. This finding suggests that for accurate estimation of the stoichiometry of MLC20 phosphorylation it is necessary to consider the contribution from the pellet portion of the muscle tissue homogenate.

  19. Using accurate phase space coordinates of ~100,00 halo field stars to constrain the Milky Way halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Monica

    2015-08-01

    The current cosmological paradigm predicts that dark matter halos are triaxial overall, but oblate in regions where baryons dominate. However recent measurements of the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo find it to be very triaxial with a shape and orientation that are significantly at odds with theoretical predictions. The ESA’s Gaia satellite will soon map the entire Milky Way giving us six phase-space coordinates, ages and abundances for hundreds of thousands of halo stars. I will report progress on a new code based on the Schwarzschild orbit superposition method and orbital frequency mapping, to determine the global shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo using field stars from Gaia. This technique will simultaneously yield the self-consistent phase-space distribution function of the stellar halo in the inner 20-30kpc region. Detailed analysis of correlations between the chemical abundances, ages and orbits of halo stars in this distribution function will enable us to extract clues to the formation history of the Milky Way that are encoded in orbital properties of halo stars.

  20. An accurate method for the determination of complex coefficients of single crystal piezoelectric resonators II: design of measurement and experiments.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Qing-Ming; Uchino, Kenji

    2004-02-01

    In this paper, we present the design of measurements for single crystals by using the general results in Part I of this paper. The selection of impedance measurement or admittance measurement for both bar and plate type resonators is dependent on whether the cutting orientation l is parallel to or perpendicular to the electric field direction n. Two matrices A and B, which are defined in part I of this paper, are major tools used for the measurement design. For different cutting orientations, the elements in matrix A are associated with different elastic and piezoelectric constants. Matrix B reveals what vibration modes can be excited electrically and how to excite them. With the aid of matrices A and B, the design of measurement becomes straightforward. The measurement for a rhombohedral class (3m) LiNbO3 single crystal is used as an example to demonstrate the experiment and calculation procedures. It is found that by using either three thin bars and one plate or three plates and one thin bar we can completely characterize the complex materials constants of a LiNbO3 single crystal. PMID:15055814

  1. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Bergen, Michael; Egerton, Ray F.; Li, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  2. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F.; Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng

    2014-08-15

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  3. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  4. An accurate measurement of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation with heavily gas-dominated ALFALFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papastergis, E.; Adams, E. A. K.; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We use a sample of 97 galaxies selected from the Arecibo legacy fast ALFA (ALFALFA) 21 cm survey to make an accurate measurement of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR). These galaxies are specifically selected to be heavily gas-dominated (Mgas/M∗ ≳ 2.7) and to be oriented edge-on. The former property ensures that the error on the galactic baryonic mass is small, despite the large systematic uncertainty involved in galactic stellar mass estimates. The latter property means that rotational velocities can be derived directly from the width of the 21 cm emission line, without any need for inclination corrections. We measure a slope for the linewidth-based BTFR of α = 3.75 ± 0.11, a value that is somewhat steeper than (but in broad agreement with) previous literature results. The relation is remarkably tight, with almost all galaxies being located within a perpendicular distance of ± 0.1 dex from the best fit line. The low observational error budget for our sample enables us to establish that, despite its tightness, the measured linewidth-based BTFR has some small (i.e., non-zero) intrinsic scatter. We furthermore find a systematic difference in the BTFR of galaxies with "double-horned" 21 cm line profiles - suggestive of flat outer galactic rotation curves - and those with "peaked" profiles - suggestive of rising rotation curves. When we restrict our sample of galaxies to objects in the former category, we measure a slightly steeper slope of α = 4.13 ± 0.15. Overall, the high-accuracy measurement of the BTFR presented in this article is intended as a reliable observational benchmark against which to test theoretical expectations. Here we consider a representative set of semi-analytic models and hydrodynamic simulations in the lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) context, as well as modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). In the near future, interferometric follow-up observations of several sample members will enable us to further refine the BTFR measurement, and

  5. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  6. A Simple Dewar/Cryostat for Thermally Equilibrating Samples at Known Temperatures for Accurate Cryogenic Luminescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Phoebe G; Jagow, Devin M; Portune, Cameron M; Kenney, John W

    2016-01-01

    The design and operation of a simple liquid nitrogen Dewar/cryostat apparatus based upon a small fused silica optical Dewar, a thermocouple assembly, and a CCD spectrograph are described. The experiments for which this Dewar/cryostat is designed require fast sample loading, fast sample freezing, fast alignment of the sample, accurate and stable sample temperatures, and small size and portability of the Dewar/cryostat cryogenic unit. When coupled with the fast data acquisition rates of the CCD spectrograph, this Dewar/cryostat is capable of supporting cryogenic luminescence spectroscopic measurements on luminescent samples at a series of known, stable temperatures in the 77-300 K range. A temperature-dependent study of the oxygen quenching of luminescence in a rhodium(III) transition metal complex is presented as an example of the type of investigation possible with this Dewar/cryostat. In the context of this apparatus, a stable temperature for cryogenic spectroscopy means a luminescent sample that is thermally equilibrated with either liquid nitrogen or gaseous nitrogen at a known measureable temperature that does not vary (ΔT < 0.1 K) during the short time scale (~1-10 sec) of the spectroscopic measurement by the CCD. The Dewar/cryostat works by taking advantage of the positive thermal gradient dT/dh that develops above liquid nitrogen level in the Dewar where h is the height of the sample above the liquid nitrogen level. The slow evaporation of the liquid nitrogen results in a slow increase in h over several hours and a consequent slow increase in the sample temperature T over this time period. A quickly acquired luminescence spectrum effectively catches the sample at a constant, thermally equilibrated temperature. PMID:27501355

  7. A guide to accurate measurement of diffusion using fluorescence correlation techniques with blinking quantum dot nanoparticle labels.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Heinze, Katrin G; Hebert, Benedict; Wiseman, Paul W

    2008-06-14

    Fluctuation-based fluorescence correlation techniques are widely used to study dynamics of fluorophore labeled biomolecules in cells. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been developed as bright and photostable fluorescent probes for various biological applications. However, the fluorescence intermittency of QDs, commonly referred to as "blinking", is believed to complicate quantitative correlation spectroscopy measurements of transport properties, as it is an additional source of fluctuations that contribute on a wide range of time scales. The QD blinking fluctuations obey power-law distributions so there is no single characteristic fluctuation time for this phenomenon. Consequently, it is highly challenging to separate fluorescence blinking fluctuations from those due to transport dynamics. Here, we quantify the bias introduced by QD blinking in transport measurements made using fluctuation methods. Using computer simulated image time series of diffusing point emitters with set "on" and "off" time emission characteristics, we show that blinking results in a systematic overestimation of the diffusion coefficients measured with correlation analysis when a simple diffusion model is used to fit the time correlation decays. The relative error depends on the inherent blinking power-law statistics, the sampling rate relative to the characteristic diffusion time and blinking times, and the total number of images in the time series. This systematic error can be significant; moreover, it can often go unnoticed in common transport model fits of experimental data. We propose an alternative fitting model that incorporates blinking and improves the accuracy of the recovered diffusion coefficients. We also show how to completely eliminate the bias by applying k-space image correlation spectroscopy, which completely separates the diffusion and blinking dynamics, and allows the simultaneous recovery of accurate diffusion coefficients and QD blinking probability distribution

  8. High-precision topography measurement through accurate in-focus plane detection with hybrid digital holographic microscope and white light interferometer module.

    PubMed

    Liżewski, Kamil; Tomczewski, Sławomir; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kostencka, Julianna

    2014-04-10

    High-precision topography measurement of micro-objects using interferometric and holographic techniques can be realized provided that the in-focus plane of an imaging system is very accurately determined. Therefore, in this paper we propose an accurate technique for in-focus plane determination, which is based on coherent and incoherent light. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, a calibration of the imaging system with an amplitude object is performed with a common autofocusing method using coherent illumination, which allows for accurate localization of the in-focus plane position. In the second step, the position of the detected in-focus plane with respect to the imaging system is measured with white light interferometry. The obtained distance is used to accurately adjust a sample with the precision required for the measurement. The experimental validation of the proposed method is given for measurement of high-numerical-aperture microlenses with subwavelength accuracy.

  9. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

    2012-01-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances

  10. A fast experimental beam hardening correction method for accurate bone mineral measurements in 3D μCT imaging system.

    PubMed

    Koubar, Khodor; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Bone mineral density plays an important role in the determination of bone strength and fracture risks. Consequently, it is very important to obtain accurate bone mineral density measurements. The microcomputerized tomography system provides 3D information about the architectural properties of bone. Quantitative analysis accuracy is decreased by the presence of artefacts in the reconstructed images, mainly due to beam hardening artefacts (such as cupping artefacts). In this paper, we introduced a new beam hardening correction method based on a postreconstruction technique performed with the use of off-line water and bone linearization curves experimentally calculated aiming to take into account the nonhomogeneity in the scanned animal. In order to evaluate the mass correction rate, calibration line has been carried out to convert the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient into bone masses. The presented correction method was then applied on a multimaterial cylindrical phantom and on mouse skeleton images. Mass correction rate up to 18% between uncorrected and corrected images were obtained as well as a remarkable improvement of a calculated mouse femur mass has been noticed. Results were also compared to those obtained when using the simple water linearization technique which does not take into account the nonhomogeneity in the object.

  11. High performance near field measurements for antennas and microstrip circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Zuercher, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    A simple and efficient computer-controlled setup for measuring near fields has been realized. It uses the modulated scatterer technique, together with a homodyne receiver to measure both the amplitude and phase of the fields. To move the probe, a standard plotter is used. Special probes have been designed for measuring all field components.

  12. An accurate method for energy spectrum reconstruction of Linac beams based on EPID measurements of scatter radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, B.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Santos, A.

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a methodology to reconstruct a Linac high energy photon spectrum beam. The method is based on EPID scatter images generated when the incident photon beam impinges onto a plastic block. The distribution of scatter radiation produced by this scattering object placed on the external EPID surface and centered at the beam field size was measured. The scatter distribution was also simulated for a series of monoenergetic identical geometry photon beams. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the scattered photons for monoenergetic photon beams at 92 different locations, with 0.5 cm increments and at 8.5 cm from the centre of the scattering material. Measurements were performed with the same geometry using a 6 MeV photon beam produced by the linear accelerator. A system of linear equations was generated to combine the polyenergetic EPID measurements with the monoenergetic simulation results. Regularization techniques were applied to solve the system for the incident photon spectrum. A linear matrix system, A×S=E, was developed to describe the scattering interactions and their relationship to the primary spectrum (S). A is the monoenergetic scatter matrix determined from the Monte Carlo simulations, S is the incident photon spectrum, and E represents the scatter distribution characterized by EPID measurement. Direct matrix inversion methods produce results that are not physically consistent due to errors inherent in the system, therefore Tikhonov regularization methods were applied to address the effects of these errors and to solve the system for obtaining a consistent bremsstrahlung spectrum.

  13. The application of intraoperative transit time flow measurement to accurately assess anastomotic quality in sequential vein grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Ming-Xin; Li, Hai-Tao; Li, Jing-Xing; Song, Wei; Huang, Xin-Sheng; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Intraoperative transit time flow measurement (TTFM) is widely used to assess anastomotic quality in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, in sequential vein grafting, the flow characteristics collected by the conventional TTFM method are usually associated with total graft flow and might not accurately indicate the quality of every distal anastomosis in a sequential graft. The purpose of our study was to examine a new TTFM method that could assess the quality of each distal anastomosis in a sequential graft more reliably than the conventional TTFM approach. METHODS Two TTFM methods were tested in 84 patients who underwent sequential saphenous off-pump CABG in Beijing An Zhen Hospital between April and August 2012. In the conventional TTFM method, normal blood flow in the sequential graft was maintained during the measurement, and the flow probe was placed a few centimetres above the anastomosis to be evaluated. In the new method, blood flow in the sequential graft was temporarily reduced during the measurement by placing an atraumatic bulldog clamp at the graft a few centimetres distal to the anastomosis to be evaluated, while the position of the flow probe remained the same as in the conventional method. This new TTFM method was named the flow reduction TTFM. Graft flow parameters measured by both methods were compared. RESULTS Compared with the conventional TTFM, the flow reduction TTFM resulted in significantly lower mean graft blood flow (P < 0.05); in contrast, yielded significantly higher pulsatility index (P < 0.05). Diastolic filling was not significantly different between the two methods and was >50% in both cases. Interestingly, the flow reduction TTFM identified two defective middle distal anastomoses that the conventional TTFM failed to detect. Graft flows near the defective distal anastomoses were improved substantially after revision. CONCLUSIONS In this study, we found that temporary reduction of graft flow during TTFM seemed to

  14. Initial Observations of the Magnetic Field Measurements on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Rowland, D. E.; Bromund, K.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Martin, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite onboard the C/NOFS spacecraft includes a sensitive fluxgate magnetometer to measure DC and ULF magnetic fields in the low latitude ionosphere. The instrument includes a DC vector measurement at 1 sample/sec with a range of ± 45,000 nT whose primary objective is to enable a V×B measurement that is more accurate than that provided by using a magnetic field model. These data will also be used to provide signatures of large-scale ionospheric current systems, which, when analyzed in conjunction with the C/NOFS DC electric field measurements, promise to advance our understanding of equatorial electrodynamics. The instrument also includes an AC-coupled vector measurement in the 0.05 - 8 Hz frequency range at 16 samples/sec with an output range of ± 900 nT in order to measure small-scale current filaments and possible Alfven waves associated with plasma irregularities. We compare the Earth's magnetic field models such as the most recently updated IGRF (the International Geomagnetic Reference Field) model and the POMME (the POtsdam Magnetic Model of the Earth) model with the measurements in order to provide an in-flight "calibration" of the data as well as compute magnetic field differences to reveal large scale ionospheric currents. Our initial results show that, on average, the POMME model accurately reproduces the C/NOFS-measured magnetic field within 20 nT in magnitude and within 0.1 deg in field direction everywhere in the low latitude ionosphere except in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly. Initial results of the C/NOFS magnetic field measurements will be shown.

  15. Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Curt; Warda, Lynne; Piotrowski, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions and bicycle collisions and falls are a leading cause of death by preventable injury for children. In order to design, implement and evaluate campaigns and programs aimed at improving child safety, accurate surveillance is needed. This paper examined the challenges that confront efforts to collect surveillance data relevant to child traffic safety, including observation, interview, and focus group methods. Strategies to address key challenges in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of surveillance methods were recommended. The potential for new technology to enhance existing surveillance methods was also explored. PMID:27399749

  16. Challenges in the Accurate Surveillance of Booster Seat and Bicycle Helmet Usage by Children: Lessons from the Field.

    PubMed

    Pankratz, Curt; Warda, Lynne; Piotrowski, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions and bicycle collisions and falls are a leading cause of death by preventable injury for children. In order to design, implement and evaluate campaigns and programs aimed at improving child safety, accurate surveillance is needed. This paper examined the challenges that confront efforts to collect surveillance data relevant to child traffic safety, including observation, interview, and focus group methods. Strategies to address key challenges in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of surveillance methods were recommended. The potential for new technology to enhance existing surveillance methods was also explored. PMID:27399749

  17. Precise and accurate measurement of U and Th isotopes via ICP-MS using a single solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz-Kraus, R.; Sharp, W. D.; Ludwig, K. R.

    2012-04-01

    , allowing the sample's 238U/235U ratio to be measured. In step 3, we monitor peak-tails at half-mass positions (229.5, 231.5, 234.5) and on mass 237 while aspirating sample solution. Tail measurement requires a distinct cup configuration to maintain 238U in the cups; however, no sample is consumed during automated cup reconfiguration. We monitor the accuracy of 234U/238U ratios using CRM 145, which gives a weighted mean atom ratio of (5.2846 ± 0.0029) - 10-5 (all errors 2σ), consistent with published and reference values. The reproducibility of 230Th/238U ratios is monitored using the Schwartzwalder Mine secular-equilibrium standard (SM). We detect no bias in 230Th/238U or 234U/238U ratios measured for SM at beam intensities ranging over a factor of four, consistent with accurate correction for IC yields. Aladdin's cave coral (AC-1) was analyzed to check our ICP-MS method (and the preceding purification by ion exchange) on a carbonate and yields a mean age of 125.43 ± 0.38 ka, in agreement with published values. We are currently applying the method to corals, speleothems, pedogenic coatings, and tufas.

  18. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  19. Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

  20. Measurement of the velocity field behind the automotive vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ležovič, Tomáš; Lízal, František; Jedelský, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Passenger comfort in a personal vehicle cabin strongly depends on the appropriate function of the cabin ventilation system. Great attention is therefore paid to the effective functioning of the automotive vents. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) was used in our case for accurate measurement of the velocity field and consequent assessment of jet boundaries and jet axis. A novel methodology has been developed for the simulation of realistic conditions when using just a single vent under laboratory conditions instead of the complete vehicle ventilation system. A special technique has also been developed for determination of the terminal inclination angles of vent vanes for the particular vent type, which can be completely closed by the adjustable horizontal vanes. A two wire CTA probe was used for measurement of the actual velocity over predefined planes, which were specified according to smoke visualization. Mean velocities and the turbulence intensity were evaluated on the basis of the obtained data and are presented in a form of charts. Both jet boundary and orientation of the jet for a given setup of the vent are important characteristics of particular vent type. Effectiveness of different vents could be compared using our methodology and hence contribute to development of advanced ventilation system.

  1. Magnetic Field Measurement with Ground State Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, A.

    Observational studies of magnetic fields are crucial. We introduce a process "ground state alignment" as a new way to determine the magnetic field direction in diffuse medium. The alignment is due to anisotropic radiation impinging on the atom/ion. The consequence of the process is the polarization of spectral lines resulting from scattering and absorption from aligned atomic/ionic species with fine or hyperfine structure. The magnetic field induces precession and realign the atom/ion and therefore the polarization of the emitted or absorbed radiation reflects the direction of the magnetic field. The atoms get aligned at their low levels and, as the life-time of the atoms/ions we deal with is long, the alignment induced by anisotropic radiation is susceptible to extremely weak magnetic fields (1 G ≳ B ≳ 10^{-15} G). In fact, the effects of atomic/ionic alignment were studied in the laboratory decades ago, mostly in relation to the maser research. Recently, the atomic effect has been already detected in observations from circumstellar medium and this is a harbinger of future extensive magnetic field studies. A unique feature of the atomic realignment is that they can reveal the 3D orientation of magnetic field. In this chapter, we shall review the basic physical processes involved in atomic realignment. We shall also discuss its applications to interplanetary, circumstellar and interstellar magnetic fields. In addition, our research reveals that the polarization of the radiation arising from the transitions between fine and hyperfine states of the ground level can provide a unique diagnostics of magnetic fields in the Epoch of Reionization.

  2. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H; Li, Li; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K(12) position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4(×12)-VT750) had a high binding affinity (~3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4(×12)-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  3. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet β-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K12 position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4×12-VT750) had a high binding affinity (∼3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4×12-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  4. Accurate measurement of circulating mitochondrial DNA content from human blood samples using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Ajaz, Saima; Czajka, Anna; Malik, Afshan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a protocol to accurately measure the amount of human mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) in peripheral blood samples which can be modified to quantify MtDNA from other body fluids, human cells, and tissues. This protocol is based on the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) to quantify the amount of MtDNA relative to nuclear DNA (designated the Mt/N ratio). In the last decade, there have been increasing numbers of studies describing altered MtDNA or Mt/N in circulation in common nongenetic diseases where mitochondrial dysfunction may play a role (for review see Malik and Czajka, Mitochondrion 13:481-492, 2013). These studies are distinct from those looking at genetic mitochondrial disease and are attempting to identify acquired changes in circulating MtDNA content as an indicator of mitochondrial function. However, the methodology being used is not always specific and reproducible. As more than 95 % of the human mitochondrial genome is duplicated in the human nuclear genome, it is important to avoid co-amplification of nuclear pseudogenes. Furthermore, template preparation protocols can also affect the results because of the size and structural differences between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Here we describe how to (1) prepare DNA from blood samples; (2) pretreat the DNA to prevent dilution bias; (3) prepare dilution standards for absolute quantification using the unique primers human mitochondrial genome forward primer (hMitoF3) and human mitochondrial genome reverse primer(hMitoR3) for the mitochondrial genome, and human nuclear genome forward primer (hB2MF1) and human nuclear genome reverse primer (hB2MR1) primers for the human nuclear genome; (4) carry out qPCR for either relative or absolute quantification from test samples; (5) analyze qPCR data; and (6) calculate the sample size to adequately power studies. The protocol presented here is suitable for high-throughput use.

  5. A poloidal field measurement technique: Pitch angle measurements via injected He/sup +/ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.

    1989-07-01

    The poloidal field of a tokamak can be determined by observing the light emitted by He/sup +/ ions injected into the plasma by a perpendicular He/sup 0/ beam. These ions will orbit in small circles located where the neutral atom became ionized, and they will remain there for a few microseconds. During this time, some of these ions will also emit light at various spectral lines. The observed spectrum of any of these lines will have a peculiar and very wide shape, and it will be offset (Doppler shifted) with respect to the natural line location. The location and width of the spectral pattern provide independent information about the components of the poloidal field which are parallel and perpendicular to the beam velocity, and this information is local to the point where the light is emitted. For a horizontal beam, these components are b/sub x/ and b/sub y/, respectively. The difference in Doppler shift between two measurement points above one another (at the top and bottom of the beam) is directly proportional to /delta/b/sub x/, which in turn is proportional to the transform on that flux surface. Thus, this technique provides a means to measure directly local values of q(r). Simulation studies indicate that accurate measurements can be made in milliseconds. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Vibrating diaphragm measures high electrostatic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Meter with flexible conductive diaphragm measures electrostatic charge density on a conducting surface in a vacuum. The diaphragm is supported from an insulated conductive support ring rigidly attached to the conductive surface whose electrostatic charge density is to be measured.

  7. Atomic-position resolution by quadrature-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Pippa; Collett, Matthew; Walls, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    An atom passing through a standing light field imparts a position-dependent phase shift to the field. By making a phase-sensitive measurement of the field, it is possible to resolve the atom's position to much less than the wavelength of the light. The field measurement results in the creation of virtual slits, and diffraction and interference phenomena may be observed. The phase measurements give welcher Weg information and enable ``quantum-eraser'' experiments to be realized.

  8. A Simple, Buoy Deployable Instrument for Accurate Dissolved Carbon Dioxide and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Measurements in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B. A.; Wyss, J. R.; Bowling, J. M.; Schueller, D. J.; Sherman, J. F.

    2007-05-01

    the collection cell. With the acid valve on, DIC is measured. With the acid valve off, pCO2 is measured. We will present data illustrating the accuracy and precision of this device in both laboratory and field circumstances. We will also show the unique possibility of coupling not only pCO2 and DIC in one device, but dissolved organic carbon as well.

  9. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2011-08-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM, the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia over 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  10. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM: the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference-free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia for 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day, the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales, the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  11. On dual field measurements using geohydrophones

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenthal, D.

    1994-12-31

    A new device is suggested to record with a single streamer both pressure and particle velocity dual fields in marine and land environments. Actually, a set of two vertical phones is enough to determine its dual conjugate field. By using finer and finer temporal grids, the vertical offset between the upper and lower phones can be reduced, facilitating construction of physically small dual sensor strings.

  12. Measurement of the severity of disability in community-dwelling adults and older adults: interval-level measures for accurate comparisons in large survey data sets

    PubMed Central

    Buz, José; Cortés-Rodríguez, María

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) create a single metric of disability using Rasch modelling to be used for comparing disability severity levels across groups and countries, (2) test whether the interval-level measures were invariant across countries, sociodemographic and health variables and (3) examine the gains in precision using interval-level measures relative to ordinal scores when discriminating between groups known to differ in disability. Design Cross-sectional, population-based study. Setting/participants Data were drawn from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), including comparable data across 16 countries and involving 58 489 community-dwelling adults aged 50+. Main outcome measures A single metric of disability composed of self-care and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) and functional limitations. We examined the construct validity through the fit to the Rasch model and the know-groups method. Reliability was examined using person separation reliability. Results The single metric fulfilled the requirements of a strong hierarchical scale; was able to separate persons with different levels of disability; demonstrated invariance of the item hierarchy across countries; and was unbiased by age, gender and different health conditions. However, we found a blurred hierarchy of ADL and IADL tasks. Rasch-based measures yielded gains in relative precision (11–116%) in discriminating between groups with different medical conditions. Conclusions Equal-interval measures, with person-invariance and item-invariance properties, provide epidemiologists and researchers with the opportunity to gain better insight into the hierarchical structure of functional disability, and yield more reliable and accurate estimates of disability across groups and countries. Interval-level measures of disability allow parametric statistical analysis to confidently examine the relationship between disability and continuous measures so frequent in health sciences

  13. Accurate validation of visible infrared double extinction simultaneous measurements of particle sizes and number densities by using densely laden standard media.

    PubMed

    Guidt, J B; Gouesbet, G; Toulouzan, J N

    1990-03-01

    Simultaneous measurements of particle sizes and number densities by means of the visible infrared double extinction technique are carried out and accurately validated. Accurate validation has been made possible by using a new kind of standard media, i.e., embedding the particles under study in a high viscosity gel. A byproduct of the work is a discussion of Beer-Lambert law limitations for multiple scattering in densely laden media.

  14. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Yancey, Jeremy A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG-X-GTGT host-guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard-Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid-liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  15. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  16. Field technologies for the measurement of PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    Dindal, A.B.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.; Carden, D.M.; Billets, S.

    1997-08-01

    The collaborative effort between the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Department of Energy (DOE), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents a viable team to administer, plan, execute, and report on demonstrations of commercially available field characterization and monitoring technologies. This effort is part of the EPA`s Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. One of the overriding goals of this effort is to develop regulatory-accepted and cost effective alternatives to conventional fixed laboratory analyses through the identification and evaluation of innovative, field technologies. A technology demonstration of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) field analytical techniques will occur during July 22 through 30, 1997. The demonstration will be conducted at a DOE site (ORNL) where there is a substantial repository of PCB-contaminated materials from multiple DOE sites. Technology developers with PCB monitoring instrumentation will be evaluated. These instruments will include field portable gas chromatographs with surface acoustic wave and electron capture detectors, and field analysis kits, such as immunoassay and ion specific electrode kits. These instruments are suitable for the quantification of PCBs in a variety of matrices. Soil and surface samples will be evaluated during the demonstration. The demonstration will focus on the current DOE-Oak Ridge analytical needs to support Toxic Substance and Control Act (TSCA) decisions, while allowing developers to showcase the features of their technologies.

  17. Real-Time Measurement of Rates of Outdoor Airflow into HVACSystems: A Field Study of Three Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2005-09-01

    Technologies for real-time continuous measurement of the flow rates of outdoor air (OA) into HVAC systems are now available commercially. Our prior papers reported on laboratory-based evaluations of these measurement technologies and this document describes the methods and results of a field study of the accuracy of three of these technologies. From the field study data, we determined that neither wind speed nor wind direction have an important adverse impact on measurement accuracy. The field study confirmed that these three measurement technologies can provide reasonably accurate measurements of outdoor air intake rates in field settings, if the pressure signals are measured with high accuracy. Some of the pressure transducers marketed for use with commercial HVAC systems were determined to be sufficiently accurate for this application. Given the significant impact of OA flow rates on both energy use and occupant health, more widespread use of technologies that provide for real time measurements of OA flow rates seems warranted.

  18. The Cambridge Face Tracker: Accurate, Low Cost Measurement of Head Posture Using Computer Vision and Face Recognition Software

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter B. M.; Baltrušaitis, Tadas; Robinson, Peter; Vivian, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We validate a video-based method of head posture measurement. Methods The Cambridge Face Tracker uses neural networks (constrained local neural fields) to recognize facial features in video. The relative position of these facial features is used to calculate head posture. First, we assess the accuracy of this approach against videos in three research databases where each frame is tagged with a precisely measured head posture. Second, we compare our method to a commercially available mechanical device, the Cervical Range of Motion device: four subjects each adopted 43 distinct head postures that were measured using both methods. Results The Cambridge Face Tracker achieved confident facial recognition in 92% of the approximately 38,000 frames of video from the three databases. The respective mean error in absolute head posture was 3.34°, 3.86°, and 2.81°, with a median error of 1.97°, 2.16°, and 1.96°. The accuracy decreased with more extreme head posture. Comparing The Cambridge Face Tracker to the Cervical Range of Motion Device gave correlation coefficients of 0.99 (P < 0.0001), 0.96 (P < 0.0001), and 0.99 (P < 0.0001) for yaw, pitch, and roll, respectively. Conclusions The Cambridge Face Tracker performs well under real-world conditions and within the range of normally-encountered head posture. It allows useful quantification of head posture in real time or from precaptured video. Its performance is similar to that of a clinically validated mechanical device. It has significant advantages over other approaches in that subjects do not need to wear any apparatus, and it requires only low cost, easy-to-setup consumer electronics. Translational Relevance Noncontact assessment of head posture allows more complete clinical assessment of patients, and could benefit surgical planning in future. PMID:27730008

  19. Measurements of solar magnetic fields by Fourier transform techniques. II - Saturated and blended lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fourier techniques have been exhaustively calibrated using Unno's (1956) results for the absorption profile of a simple Zeeman triplet. If a simple transformation is applied to the normalized line depths, then magnetic-field strengths and inclination angles can be measured very accurately from noisy saturated line profiles. Systematic errors caused by saturation effects can be estimated and reduced by varying one parameter. When a significant fraction of the line profile is unsplit and unpolarized, large errors may be made in measurements of low fields, unless the line is sufficiently weak. For a weak line, a vertical field of 1600 gauss can be measured to 10% accuracy even when 70% of the line profile is stray light. These stray-light errors are troublesome in measuring fields of gaps and pores but not sunspots. Numerical results of the error analysis are presented graphically.

  20. Deducing dust emission mechanisms from field measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The mechanism of dust emission (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) and the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under ...

  1. Rocket borne instrument to measure electric fields inside electrified clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhnke, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Simple electric field measuring system is mounted on small rocket and consists of two voltage probes, one extending from nose and other on tail fin. Electric field through which rocket passes is determined by potential difference between probes.

  2. [Welding arc temperature field measurements based on Boltzmann spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Si, Hong; Hua, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Wang; Li, Fang; Xiao, Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Arc plasma, as non-uniform plasma, has complicated energy and mass transport processes in its internal, so plasma temperature measurement is of great significance. Compared with absolute spectral line intensity method and standard temperature method, Boltzmann plot measuring is more accurate and convenient. Based on the Boltzmann theory, the present paper calculates the temperature distribution of the plasma and analyzes the principle of lines selection by real time scanning the space of the TIG are measurements. PMID:23240385

  3. Laboratory Measurements of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Miniati, F.; Edwards, M.; Mithen, J.; Bell, A. R.; Constantin, C.; Everson, E.; Schaeffer, D.; Niemann, C.; Ravasio, A.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ryutov, D.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gregori, G.

    2010-11-01

    It has been proposed that high Mach number collisionless shocks propagating in an initially unmagnetized plasma play a major role in the magnetization of large scale structures in the Universe. A detailed study of the experimental configuration necessary to scale such environments down to laboratory dimensions will be presented. We will show initial results from preliminary experiments conducted at the Phoenix laser (UCLA) and the LULI laser (Ecole Polytechnique) where collisionless shocks are generated by the expansion of exploding foils driven by energetic laser beams. The time evolution of the magnetic field is probed with induction coils placed at 10 cm from the laser focus. We will discuss various mechanisms of magnetic field generation and compare them with the experimental results.

  4. Field Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter in Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Yolanda L.; Na, Jeong K.; Yost, William T.; Kessel, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustics techniques were used to measure fatigue in turbine blades in a power generation plant. The measurements were made in the field using a reference based measurement technique, and a reference sample previously measured in the laboratory. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter showed significant increase with fatigue in the blades, as indicated by service age and areas of increased stress. The technique shows promise for effectively measuring fatigue in field applications and predicting subsequent failures.

  5. Earth's Magnetic Field Measurements for the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    Measurements of the earth's magnetic field at several locations at SLAC were conducted to determine the possible field error contribution from tuning the undulators in a location with a different magnetic field than that which will be found in the undulator hall. An average difference of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 Gauss has been measured between the downward earth's field components in the test facility and SLAC tunnel locations.

  6. Analysis of three-component aeromagnetic data. [over total field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, B. K.; Leu, L. K.

    1973-01-01

    The numerical method of obtaining three field components from total field measurements, using double Fourier series expansion, is presented. The expressions for moments of the anomalous field components over a finite area are given. The magnitude and direction of the magnetization vector indicate that the vertical component of the magnetic field calculated from total field observations is more accurate at higher geomagnetic latitudes than at lower latitudes. The opposite is true for the horizontal components. The error in determining the magnetization vector directions are significantly large over most of the range of variation of declination and inclination of the vector, demonstrating the practical limitations of computing field components from total field data even under the best of conditions.

  7. A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method for accurate representation of limiting water wave deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Xiping

    2016-09-01

    A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method is developed to study the sensitive behavior of water waves during breaking. The THINC model is employed to solve the volume-of-fluid function over the entire domain covered by a relatively coarse grid while the phase-field model based on Allen-Cahn equation is applied over the fine grid. A special algorithm that takes into account the sharpness of the diffuse-interface is introduced to correlate the order parameter obtained on the fine grid and the volume-of-fluid function obtained on the coarse grid. The coupled model is then applied to the study of water waves generated by moving pressures on the free surface. The deformation process of the wave crest during the initial stage of breaking is discussed in details. It is shown that there is a significant variation of the free nappe developed at the front side of the wave crest as the wave steepness differs. It is of a plunging type at large wave steepness while of a spilling type at small wave steepness. The numerical results also indicate that breaking occurs later and the duration of breaking is shorter for waves of smaller steepness and vice versa. Neglecting the capillary effect leads to wave breaking with a sharper nappe and a more dynamic plunging process. The surface tension also has an effect to prevent the formation of a free nappe at the front side of the wave crest in some cases.

  8. Appraisal of Artificial Screening Techniques of Tomato to Accurately Reflect Field Performance of the Late Blight Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowska, Marzena; Nowicki, Marcin; Kłosińska, Urszula; Maciorowski, Robert; Kozik, Elżbieta U.

    2014-01-01

    Late blight (LB) caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans continues to thwart global tomato production, while only few resistant cultivars have been introduced locally. In order to gain from the released tomato germplasm with LB resistance, we compared the 5-year field performance of LB resistance in several tomato cultigens, with the results of controlled conditions testing (i.e., detached leaflet/leaf, whole plant). In case of these artificial screening techniques, the effects of plant age and inoculum concentration were additionally considered. In the field trials, LA 1033, L 3707, L 3708 displayed the highest LB resistance, and could be used for cultivar development under Polish conditions. Of the three methods using controlled conditions, the detached leaf and the whole plant tests had the highest correlation with thefield experiments. The plant age effect on LB resistance in tomato reported here, irrespective of the cultigen tested or inoculum concentration used, makes it important to standardize the test parameters when screening for resistance. Our results help show why other reports disagree on LB resistance in tomato. PMID:25279467

  9. Effect of magnetic field on Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredin, Jerome; Grondein, Pascaline; Chabert, Pascal; Godyak, Valery; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-09-01

    In the context of PEGASES thruster where an ion-ion plasma is formed across a localized magnetic field, a study to understand how magnetic field affects the Langmuir probe measurements has been made. Several theoretical works have predict that the plasma anisotropy created by a magnetic field will influence Langmuir probe measurement as a function of the orientation of the probe tip. The study has been made in an electropositive plasma of argon for a uniform magnetic field to avoid effects of magnetic field gradient. The electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) measured with various magnetic field show that the measurements with the probe tip along the magnetic field are depleted in the low energy range compared to the one perpendicular to the magnetic field. Comparison of the results obtained with different magnetic field and different probe orientations allows for evaluation the effect of magnetic field on accuracy of EEDF measurement in plasma with magnetic field. These results confirm the theory on Langmuir probes in magnetized plasma that predict a depletion of low electron energy for measurements along the magnetic field lines.

  10. Gradio - Earth gravity field measurement on Aristoteles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, D.; Meyer, Ph.; Bernard, A.; Touboul, P.

    1991-10-01

    The design and operation of Gradio, the instrument that was specifically designed for precise gradiometry measurements during the Aristoteles mission, are described. The Gradio is based on simultaneous measurements by four three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometers performed in several locations on a rigid stable structure, called gradio plate, which are then used to compute g gradients. The operational phase of Gradio will last 6 months; the orbit will be circular, near polar, and heliosynchronous, at an altitude of 200 km. It is estimated that Gradio will measure the two main components T(yy) and T(zz) of the gravity gradient tensor in the (0.005, 0.125) Hz frequency bandwidth with an accuracy of 0.01 E.U.

  11. Towards accurate solvation dynamics of divalent cations in water using the polarizable amoeba force field: From energetics to structure.

    PubMed

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Perera, Lalith; Cisneros, G Andrés; Ren, Pengyu; Pedersen, Lee G; Darden, Thomas A

    2006-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed using a modified amoeba force field to determine hydration and dynamical properties of the divalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+. The extension of amoeba to divalent cations required the introduction of a cation specific parametrization. To accomplish this, the Thole polarization damping model parametrization was modified based on the ab initio polarization energy computed by a constrained space orbital variation energy decomposition scheme. Excellent agreement has been found with condensed phase experimental results using parameters derived from gas phase ab initio calculations. Additionally, we have observed that the coordination of the calcium cation is influenced by the size of the periodic water box, a recurrent issue in first principles molecular dynamics studies.

  12. Measurement and tricubic interpolation of the magnetic field for the OLYMPUS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, J. C.; Diefenbach, J.; Elbakian, G.; Gavrilov, G.; Goerrissen, N.; Hasell, D. K.; Henderson, B. S.; Holler, Y.; Karyan, G.; Ludwig, J.; Marukyan, H.; Naryshkin, Y.; O'Connor, C.; Russell, R. L.; Schmidt, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Suvorov, K.; Veretennikov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment used a 0.3 T toroidal magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of outgoing charged particles. In order to accurately determine particle trajectories, knowledge of the magnetic field was needed throughout the spectrometer volume. For that purpose, the magnetic field was measured at over 36,000 positions using a three-dimensional Hall probe actuated by a system of translation tables. We used these field data to fit a numerical magnetic field model, which could be employed to calculate the magnetic field at any point in the spectrometer volume. Calculations with this model were computationally intensive; for analysis applications where speed was crucial, we pre-computed the magnetic field and its derivatives on an evenly spaced grid so that the field could be interpolated between grid points. We developed a spline-based interpolation scheme suitable for SIMD implementations, with a memory layout chosen to minimize space and optimize the cache behavior to quickly calculate field values. This scheme requires only one-eighth of the memory needed to store necessary coefficients compared with a previous scheme (Lekien and Marsden, 2005 [1]). This method was accurate for the vast majority of the spectrometer volume, though special fits and representations were needed to improve the accuracy close to the magnet coils and along the toroidal axis.

  13. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  14. Specifying the Earth's Plasmasphere With Data Assimilation of Ground-Based Field-Line Resonance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Rivera, S.; McCarthy, N.; Ober, D. M.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.; Moldwin, M.

    2009-12-01

    The plasmasphere is an important medium for propagation of the waves which contribute to the decay and acceleration of energetic particles in the radiation belts and ring current. Accurate knowledge of the plasmasphere evolution is thus an important element for accurately predicting the evolution of the energetic particle populations. A variety of routine measurements provide information about the plasmasphere, including ground-based and space-based magnetic field measurements, space based in-situ plasma density measurements, whistler wave measurements, TEC measurements from GPS receivers, and in some cases global EUV images. Combining these measurements with a physics-based model through a data assimilation scheme should, in principle, allow a better specification of the plasmasphere. Other information which can be used include information about the global magnetic and electric fields from a combination of measurements and models. In this paper we will discuss modeling the plasmasphere using ground-based field-line resonance measurements. The advantages of ground-based measurements over space-based measurements are the longevity of the magnetometer arrays, the potentially greater simultaneous coverage in local time and L-shell (as opposed to single-point satellite measurements), and the lower cost of maintaining the networks. In this paper we will explore using a network of ground-based magnetometers to constrain the evolution of the plasmasphere through a data assimilation scheme. We will use the Ober et al. [1997] plasmasphere model, a particle filter data assimilation scheme, and simulated field-line resonance measurements as well as measurements from the McMAC, MEASURE, SAMBA, and CARISMA, magnetometer arrays.

  15. CLASH-VLT: INSIGHTS ON THE MASS SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACS J0416.1–2403 THROUGH ACCURATE STRONG LENS MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, C.; Suyu, S. H.; Umetsu, K.; Rosati, P.; Caminha, G. B.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Munari, E.; Nonino, M.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Lombardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Zitrin, A.; Halkola, A. and others

    2015-02-10

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≅ 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of a set of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.''3 by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of two cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components, parameterized with dual pseudo-isothermal total mass profiles. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ∼5%, including the systematic uncertainties estimated from six distinct mass models. We emphasize that the use of multiple-image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and knowledge of cluster membership based on extensive spectroscopic information is key to constructing robust high-resolution mass maps. We also produce magnification maps over the central area that is covered with HST observations. We investigate the galaxy contribution, both in terms of total and stellar mass, to the total mass budget of the cluster. When compared with the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations, our results point to a lack of massive subhalos in the inner regions of simulated clusters with total masses similar to that of MACS J0416.1–2403. Our findings of the location and shape of the cluster dark-matter halo density profiles and on the cluster substructures provide intriguing

  16. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, B. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J.; Hanson, J. D.; Maurer, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  17. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, B. A.; Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J. Hanson, J. D.; Maurer, D. A.

    2014-09-15

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  18. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, B A; Knowlton, S F; Hartwell, G J; Hanson, J D; Maurer, D A

    2014-09-01

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46 V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  19. PIV Measurements of Bioreactor Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, G. P.; Brown, J. B.

    1999-11-01

    Spinner-flask bioreactors are operated with several stationary tissue constructs mounted on long needles; the culture medium is stirred by a magnetic stir bar at the vessel bottom. Flow-visualization and PIV measurements have been performed in a scaled-up model system in which the curved, outer vessel wall has been eliminated and the vessel body, culture-medium simulant and tissue-construct models are all index-of-refraction matched. Measurements in the vicinity of the tissue constructs indicate high instantaneous shear stresses at some locations, which may be detrimental to tissue growth. Since the flow is driven by a periodic source, turbulence properties are determined using phase-locked ensemble averaging.

  20. Field methods for measurement of fluvial sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Thomas K.; Glysson, G. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes equipment and procedures for collection and measurement of fluvial sediment. The complexity of the hydrologic and physical environments and man's ever-increasing data needs make it essential for those responsible for the collection of sediment data to be aware of basic concepts involved in processes of erosion, transport, deposition of sediment, and equipment and procedures necessary to representatively collect sediment data. In addition to an introduction, the chapter has two major sections. The 'Sediment-Sampling Equipment' section encompasses discussions of characteristics and limitations of various models of depth- and point-integrating samplers, single-stage samplers, bed-material samplers, bedload samplers, automatic pumping samplers, and support equipment. The 'Sediment-Sampling Techniques'` section includes discussions of representative sampling criteria, characteristics of sampling sites, equipment selection relative to the sampling conditions and needs, depth and point-integration techniques, surface and dip sampling, determination of transit rates, sampling programs and related data, cold-weather sampling, bed-material and bedload sampling, measuring total sediment discharge, and measuring reservoir sedimentation rates.