Science.gov

Sample records for accurate flow measurement

  1. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  2. Accurate blood flow measurements: are artificial tracers necessary?

    PubMed

    Poelma, Christian; Kloosterman, Astrid; Hierck, Beerend P; Westerweel, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Imaging-based blood flow measurement techniques, such as particle image velocimetry, have become an important tool in cardiovascular research. They provide quantitative information about blood flow, which benefits applications ranging from developmental biology to tumor perfusion studies. Studies using these methods can be classified based on whether they use artificial tracers or red blood cells to visualize the fluid motion. We here present the first direct comparison in vivo of both methods. For high magnification cases, the experiments using red blood cells strongly underestimate the flow (up to 50% in the present case), as compared to the tracer results. For medium magnification cases, the results from both methods are indistinguishable as they give the same underestimation of the real velocities (approximately 33%, based on in vitro reference measurements). These results suggest that flow characteristics reported in literature cannot be compared without a careful evaluation of the imaging characteristics. A method to predict the expected flow averaging behavior for a particular facility is presented.

  3. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  4. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  5. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-01

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  6. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  7. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  8. An affordable and accurate conductivity probe for density measurements in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Marco; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In stratified flow experiments, conductivity (combined with temperature) is often used to measure density. The probes typically used can provide very fine spatial scales, but can be fragile, expensive to replace, and sensitive to environmental noise. A complementary instrument, comprising a low-cost conductivity probe, would prove valuable in a wide range of applications where resolving extremely small spatial scales is not needed. We propose using micro-USB cables as the actual conductivity sensors. By removing the metallic shield from a micro-B connector, 5 gold-plated microelectrodes are exposed and available for 4-wire measurements. These have a cell constant ~550m-1, an intrinsic thermal noise of at most 30pA/Hz1/2, as well as sub-millisecond time response, making them highly suitable for many stratified flow measurements. In addition, we present the design of a custom electronic board (Arduino-based and Matlab-controlled) for simultaneous acquisition from 4 sensors, with resolution (in conductivity, and resulting density) exceeding the performance of typical existing probes. We illustrate the use of our conductivity-measuring system through stratified flow experiments, and describe plans to release simple instructions to construct our complete system for around 200.

  9. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  10. The application of intraoperative transit time flow measurement to accurately assess anastomotic quality in sequential vein grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Ming-Xin; Li, Hai-Tao; Li, Jing-Xing; Song, Wei; Huang, Xin-Sheng; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Intraoperative transit time flow measurement (TTFM) is widely used to assess anastomotic quality in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, in sequential vein grafting, the flow characteristics collected by the conventional TTFM method are usually associated with total graft flow and might not accurately indicate the quality of every distal anastomosis in a sequential graft. The purpose of our study was to examine a new TTFM method that could assess the quality of each distal anastomosis in a sequential graft more reliably than the conventional TTFM approach. METHODS Two TTFM methods were tested in 84 patients who underwent sequential saphenous off-pump CABG in Beijing An Zhen Hospital between April and August 2012. In the conventional TTFM method, normal blood flow in the sequential graft was maintained during the measurement, and the flow probe was placed a few centimetres above the anastomosis to be evaluated. In the new method, blood flow in the sequential graft was temporarily reduced during the measurement by placing an atraumatic bulldog clamp at the graft a few centimetres distal to the anastomosis to be evaluated, while the position of the flow probe remained the same as in the conventional method. This new TTFM method was named the flow reduction TTFM. Graft flow parameters measured by both methods were compared. RESULTS Compared with the conventional TTFM, the flow reduction TTFM resulted in significantly lower mean graft blood flow (P < 0.05); in contrast, yielded significantly higher pulsatility index (P < 0.05). Diastolic filling was not significantly different between the two methods and was >50% in both cases. Interestingly, the flow reduction TTFM identified two defective middle distal anastomoses that the conventional TTFM failed to detect. Graft flows near the defective distal anastomoses were improved substantially after revision. CONCLUSIONS In this study, we found that temporary reduction of graft flow during TTFM seemed to

  11. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  12. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  16. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  17. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  18. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  19. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  20. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  1. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  2. Preparation and accurate measurement of pure ozone.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christof; Simone, Daniela; Guinet, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    Preparation of high purity ozone as well as precise and accurate measurement of its pressure are metrological requirements that are difficult to meet due to ozone decomposition occurring in pressure sensors. The most stable and precise transducer heads are heated and, therefore, prone to accelerated ozone decomposition, limiting measurement accuracy and compromising purity. Here, we describe a vacuum system and a method for ozone production, suitable to accurately determine the pressure of pure ozone by avoiding the problem of decomposition. We use an inert gas in a particularly designed buffer volume and can thus achieve high measurement accuracy and negligible degradation of ozone with purities of 99.8% or better. The high degree of purity is ensured by comprehensive compositional analyses of ozone samples. The method may also be applied to other reactive gases. PMID:21456766

  3. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  4. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  5. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  6. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  7. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  8. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  9. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems.

  10. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  11. Weak measure expansive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keonhee; Oh, Jumi

    2016-01-01

    A notion of measure expansivity for flows was introduced by Carrasco-Olivera and Morales in [3] as a generalization of expansivity, and they proved that there were no measure expansive flows on closed surfaces. In this paper we introduce a concept of weak measure expansivity for flows which is really weaker than that of measure expansivity, and show that there is a weak measure expansive flow on a closed surface. Moreover we show that any C1 stably weak measure expansive flow on a C∞ closed manifold M is Ω-stable, and any C1 stably measure expansive flow on M satisfies both Axiom A and the quasi-transversality condition.

  12. Fundamentals of flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    De Carlo, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    This book provides an understanding of flow measurement methods. Twelve separate units are designed to introduce the two basic approaches to flow measurement. ''Energy Extractive'' and ''Energy Additive,'' the general classes and types of flowmeters, the terminology associated with flow measurement, special techniques, mass flow measurement and the methodology for flowmeter selection. It explains the basic approaches to flow measurement and the different classes of flowmeters; flowmeter terminology; the basic theory of operation of different flowmeters; choosing the correct approach, class type, and particular device to satisfy the specified requirement; and sizing a flowmeter to satisfy the requirements of an installation.

  13. A unique, accurate LWIR optics measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantone, Stephen D.; Orband, Daniel G.

    2011-05-01

    A compact low-cost LWIR test station has been developed that provides real time MTF testing of IR optical systems and EO imaging systems. The test station is intended to be operated by a technician and can be used to measure the focal length, blur spot size, distortion, and other metrics of system performance. The challenges and tradeoffs incorporated into this instrumentation will be presented. The test station performs the measurement of an IR lens or optical system's first order quantities (focal length, back focal length) including on and off-axis imaging performance (e.g., MTF, resolution, spot size) under actual test conditions to enable the simulation of their actual use. Also described is the method of attaining the needed accuracies so that derived calculations like focal length (EFL = image shift/tan(theta)) can be performed to the requisite accuracy. The station incorporates a patented video capture technology and measures MTF and blur characteristics using newly available lowcost LWIR cameras. This allows real time determination of the optical system performance enabling faster measurements, higher throughput and lower cost results than scanning systems. Multiple spectral filters are also accommodated within the test stations which facilitate performance evaluation under various spectral conditions.

  14. Modified algesimeter provides accurate depth measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Algesimeter which incorporates a standard sensory needle with a sensitive micrometer, measures needle point depth penetration in pain tolerance research. This algesimeter provides an inexpensive, precise instrument with assured validity of recordings in those biomedical areas with a requirement for repeated pain detection or ascertaining pain sensitivity.

  15. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  16. EMR Gage Would Measure Coal Thickness Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. D.; Rollwitz, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests indicate electron magnetic resonance (EMR) would be effective in measuring thickness of coal overlying rock substrate. In prototype dual-frequency EMR system, Sample is irradiated by two radio frequencies. Signals are mixed, producing sum and difference output frequencies that are detected by receiver. Magnetic field is varied to scan resonant spot through sample. In system designed for field use, electromagnet is U-shaped, so that sample can be adjacent to, rather than inside the probe. Same coil is used for transmitting and receiving.

  17. Accurate Measurement of Bone Density with QCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleek, Tammy M.; Beaupre, Gary S.; Matsubara, Miki; Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of bone density measurement with a new OCT technology. A phantom was fabricated using two materials, a water-equivalent compound and hydroxyapatite (HA), combined in precise proportions (QRM GrnbH, Germany). The phantom was designed to have the approximate physical size and range in bone density as a human calcaneus, with regions of 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg/cc HA. The phantom was scanned at 80, 120 and 140 KVp with a GE CT/i HiSpeed Advantage scanner. A ring of highly attenuating material (polyvinyl chloride or teflon) was slipped over the phantom to alter the image by introducing non-axi-symmetric beam hardening. Images were corrected with a new OCT technology using an estimate of the effective X-ray beam spectrum to eliminate beam hardening artifacts. The algorithm computes the volume fraction of HA and water-equivalent matrix in each voxel. We found excellent agreement between expected and computed HA volume fractions. Results were insensitive to beam hardening ring material, HA concentration, and scan voltage settings. Data from all 3 voltages with a best fit linear regression are displays.

  18. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  19. Surface flow measurements from drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  20. Accurately measuring MPI broadcasts in a computational grid

    SciTech Connect

    Karonis N T; de Supinski, B R

    1999-05-06

    An MPI library's implementation of broadcast communication can significantly affect the performance of applications built with that library. In order to choose between similar implementations or to evaluate available libraries, accurate measurements of broadcast performance are required. As we demonstrate, existing methods for measuring broadcast performance are either inaccurate or inadequate. Fortunately, we have designed an accurate method for measuring broadcast performance, even in a challenging grid environment. Measuring broadcast performance is not easy. Simply sending one broadcast after another allows them to proceed through the network concurrently, thus resulting in inaccurate per broadcast timings. Existing methods either fail to eliminate this pipelining effect or eliminate it by introducing overheads that are as difficult to measure as the performance of the broadcast itself. This problem becomes even more challenging in grid environments. Latencies a long different links can vary significantly. Thus, an algorithm's performance is difficult to predict from it's communication pattern. Even when accurate pre-diction is possible, the pattern is often unknown. Our method introduces a measurable overhead to eliminate the pipelining effect, regardless of variations in link latencies. choose between different available implementations. Also, accurate and complete measurements could guide use of a given implementation to improve application performance. These choices will become even more important as grid-enabled MPI libraries [6, 7] become more common since bad choices are likely to cost significantly more in grid environments. In short, the distributed processing community needs accurate, succinct and complete measurements of collective communications performance. Since successive collective communications can often proceed concurrently, accurately measuring them is difficult. Some benchmarks use knowledge of the communication algorithm to predict the

  1. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The ideal cryogenic instrumentation for the colliding beam accelerator helium distribution system does not add pressure drop to the system, functions over the entire temperature range, has high resolution, and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. The design and testing of an ultrasonic flowmeter which measures helium flow under different temperatures are described.

  2. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  3. Recommendations for Achieving Accurate Numerical Simulation of Tip Clearance Flows in Transonic Compressor Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R,; Hathaway, Michael D.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    2000-01-01

    The tip clearance flows of transonic compressor rotors are important because they have a significant impact on rotor and stage performance. While numerical simulations of these flows are quite sophisticated. they are seldom verified through rigorous comparisons of numerical and measured data because these kinds of measurements are rare in the detail necessary to be useful in high-speed machines. In this paper we compare measured tip clearance flow details (e.g. trajectory and radial extent) with corresponding data obtained from a numerical simulation. Recommendations for achieving accurate numerical simulation of tip clearance flows are presented based on this comparison. Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) measurements acquired in a transonic compressor rotor, NASA Rotor 35, are used. The tip clearance flow field of this transonic rotor was simulated using a Navier-Stokes turbomachinery solver that incorporates an advanced k-epsilon turbulence model derived for flows that are not in local equilibrium. Comparison between measured and simulated results indicates that simulation accuracy is primarily dependent upon the ability of the numerical code to resolve important details of a wall-bounded shear layer formed by the relative motion between the over-tip leakage flow and the shroud wall. A simple method is presented for determining the strength of this shear layer.

  4. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  5. Accurate Insertion Loss Measurements of the Juno Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Chen, Jacqueline; Hodges, Richard; Demas, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two independent methods for estimating the insertion loss of patch array antennas that were developed for the Juno Microwave Radiometer instrument. One method is based principally on pattern measurements while the other method is based solely on network analyzer measurements. The methods are accurate to within 0.1 dB for the measured antennas and show good agreement (to within 0.1dB) of separate radiometric measurements.

  6. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  7. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  8. Factors affecting the accurate determination of cerebrovascular blood flow using high-speed droplet imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Stephen; Divani, Afshin; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Lieber, Baruch B.; Granger, William; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Yang, Chang-Ying J.

    1998-07-01

    Detailed cerebrovascular blood flow can be more accurately determined radiographically from the new droplet tracking method previously introduced by the authors than from standard soluble contrast techniques. For example, arteriovenous malformation (AVM) transit times which are crucial for proper glue embolization treatments, were shown to be about half when using droplets compared to those measured using soluble contrast techniques. In this work, factors such as x-ray pulse duration, frame rate, system spatial resolution (focal spot size), droplet size, droplet and system contrast parameters, and system noise are considered in relation to their affect on the accurate determination of droplet location and velocity.

  9. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  10. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  11. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  12. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  13. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  14. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  15. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  16. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  17. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  18. Monitoring circuit accurately measures movement of solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Solenoid operated valve in a control system powered by direct current issued to accurately measure the valve travel. This system is currently in operation with a 28-vdc power system used for control of fluids in liquid rocket motor test facilities.

  19. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  20. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  1. Toward more accurate loss tangent measurements in reentrant cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R. D.

    1980-05-01

    Karpova has described an absolute method for measurement of dielectric properties of a solid in a coaxial reentrant cavity. His cavity resonance equation yields very accurate results for dielectric constants. However, he presented only approximate expressions for the loss tangent. This report presents more exact expressions for that quantity and summarizes some experimental results.

  2. A high order accurate difference scheme for complex flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dexun Fu; Yanwen Ma

    1997-06-01

    A high order accurate finite difference method for direct numerical simulation of coherent structure in the mixing layers is presented. The reason for oscillation production in numerical solutions is analyzed. It is caused by a nonuniform group velocity of wavepackets. A method of group velocity control for the improvement of the shock resolution is presented. In numerical simulation the fifth-order accurate upwind compact difference relation is used to approximate the derivatives in the convection terms of the compressible N-S equations, a sixth-order accurate symmetric compact difference relation is used to approximate the viscous terms, and a three-stage R-K method is used to advance in time. In order to improve the shock resolution the scheme is reconstructed with the method of diffusion analogy which is used to control the group velocity of wavepackets. 18 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Accurately measuring volcanic plume velocity with multiple UV spectrometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Jones, G.; Horton, K.A.; Elias, T.; Garbeil, H.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Sutton, A.J.; Harris, A.J.L.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental problem with all ground-based remotely sensed measurements of volcanic gas flux is the difficulty in accurately measuring the velocity of the gas plume. Since a representative wind speed and direction are used as proxies for the actual plume velocity, there can be considerable uncertainty in reported gas flux values. Here we present a method that uses at least two time-synchronized simultaneously recording UV spectrometers (FLYSPECs) placed a known distance apart. By analyzing the time varying structure of SO2 concentration signals at each instrument, the plume velocity can accurately be determined. Experiments were conducted on Ki??lauea (USA) and Masaya (Nicaragua) volcanoes in March and August 2003 at plume velocities between 1 and 10 m s-1. Concurrent ground-based anemometer measurements differed from FLYSPEC-measured plume speeds by up to 320%. This multi-spectrometer method allows for the accurate remote measurement of plume velocity and can therefore greatly improve the precision of volcanic or industrial gas flux measurements. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  4. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  5. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  6. PERFORMING QUALITY FLOW MEASUREMENTS AT MINE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate flow measurement data is vital to research, monitoring, and remediation efforts at mining sites. This guidebook has been prepared to provide a summary of information relating to the performance of low measurements, and how this information can be applied at mining sites....

  7. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  8. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  9. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  10. A method for accurate temperature measurement using infrared thermal camera.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Sudo, Takayuki; Okubo, Shuichi; Komatsubara, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-08-01

    The temperature distribution on a centre-holed thin foil of molybdenum, used as a sample and heated using a sample-heating holder for electron microscopy, was measured using an infrared thermal camera. The temperature on the heated foil area located near the heating stage of the heating holder is almost equal to the temperature on the heating stage. However, during the measurement of the temperature at the edge of the hole of the foil located farthest from the heating stage, a drop in temperature should be taken into consideration; however, so far, no method has been developed to locally measure the temperature distribution on the heated sample. In this study, a method for the accurate measurement of temperature distribution on heated samples for electron microscopy is discussed.

  11. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  12. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  13. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  14. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  15. Accurate measurements of dynamics and reproducibility in small genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubuis, Julien O; Samanta, Reba; Gregor, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression has become a central tool for understanding genetic networks. In many systems, the only viable way to measure protein levels is by immunofluorescence, which is notorious for its limited accuracy. Using the early Drosophila embryo as an example, we show that careful identification and control of experimental error allows for highly accurate gene expression measurements. We generated antibodies in different host species, allowing for simultaneous staining of four Drosophila gap genes in individual embryos. Careful error analysis of hundreds of expression profiles reveals that less than ∼20% of the observed embryo-to-embryo fluctuations stem from experimental error. These measurements make it possible to extract not only very accurate mean gene expression profiles but also their naturally occurring fluctuations of biological origin and corresponding cross-correlations. We use this analysis to extract gap gene profile dynamics with ∼1 min accuracy. The combination of these new measurements and analysis techniques reveals a twofold increase in profile reproducibility owing to a collective network dynamics that relays positional accuracy from the maternal gradients to the pair-rule genes. PMID:23340845

  16. Accurate Runout Measurement for HDD Spinning Motors and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Bi, Chao; Lin, Song

    As hard disk drive (HDD) areal density increases, its track width becomes smaller and smaller and so is non-repeatable runout. HDD industry needs more accurate and better resolution runout measurements of spinning spindle motors and media platters in both axial and radial directions. This paper introduces a new system how to precisely measure the runout of HDD spinning disks and motors through synchronously acquiring the rotor position signal and the displacements in axial or radial directions. In order to minimize the synchronizing error between the rotor position and the displacement signal, a high resolution counter is adopted instead of the conventional phase-lock loop method. With Laser Doppler Vibrometer and proper signal processing, the proposed runout system can precisely measure the runout of the HDD spinning disks and motors with 1 nm resolution and 0.2% accuracy with a proper sampling rate. It can provide an effective and accurate means to measure the runout of high areal density HDDs, in particular the next generation HDDs, such as, pattern media HDDs and HAMR HDDs.

  17. Precise and accurate isotopic measurements using multiple-collector ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarède, F.; Telouk, Philippe; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Boyet, Maud; Agranier, Arnaud; Nelson, Bruce

    2004-06-01

    New techniques of isotopic measurements by a new generation of mass spectrometers equipped with an inductively-coupled-plasma source, a magnetic mass filter, and multiple collection (MC-ICPMS) are quickly developing. These techniques are valuable because of (1) the ability of ICP sources to ionize virtually every element in the periodic table, and (2) the large sample throughout. However, because of the complex trajectories of multiple ion beams produced in the plasma source whether from the same or different elements, the acquisition of precise and accurate isotopic data with this type of instrument still requires a good understanding of instrumental fractionation processes, both mass-dependent and mass-independent. Although physical processes responsible for the instrumental mass bias are still to be understood more fully, we here present a theoretical framework that allows for most of the analytical limitations to high precision and accuracy to be overcome. After a presentation of unifying phenomenological theory for mass-dependent fractionation in mass spectrometers, we show how this theory accounts for the techniques of standard bracketing and of isotopic normalization by a ratio of either the same or a different element, such as the use of Tl to correct mass bias on Pb. Accuracy is discussed with reference to the concept of cup efficiencies. Although these can be simply calibrated by analyzing standards, we derive a straightforward, very general method to calculate accurate isotopic ratios from dynamic measurements. In this study, we successfully applied the dynamic method to Nd and Pb as examples. We confirm that the assumption of identical mass bias for neighboring elements (notably Pb and Tl, and Yb and Lu) is both unnecessary and incorrect. We further discuss the dangers of straightforward standard-sample bracketing when chemical purification of the element to be analyzed is imperfect. Pooling runs to improve precision is acceptable provided the pooled

  18. Accurate measurement method for tube's endpoints based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoli; Jin, Peng; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tubes are used widely in aerospace vehicles, and their accurate assembly can directly affect the assembling reliability and the quality of products. It is important to measure the processed tube's endpoints and then fix any geometric errors correspondingly. However, the traditional tube inspection method is time-consuming and complex operations. Therefore, a new measurement method for a tube's endpoints based on machine vision is proposed. First, reflected light on tube's surface can be removed by using photometric linearization. Then, based on the optimization model for the tube's endpoint measurements and the principle of stereo matching, the global coordinates and the relative distance of the tube's endpoint are obtained. To confirm the feasibility, 11 tubes are processed to remove the reflected light and then the endpoint's positions of tubes are measured. The experiment results show that the measurement repeatability accuracy is 0.167 mm, and the absolute accuracy is 0.328 mm. The measurement takes less than 1 min. The proposed method based on machine vision can measure the tube's endpoints without any surface treatment or any tools and can realize on line measurement.

  19. Accurate solutions for transonic viscous flow over finite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, V. N.

    1986-01-01

    An explicit multistage Runge-Kutta type time-stepping scheme is used for solving the three-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. A finite-volume formulation is employed to facilitate treatment of complex grid topologies encountered in three-dimensional calculations. Convergence to steady state is expedited through usage of acceleration techniques. Further numerical efficiency is achieved through vectorization of the computer code. The accuracy of the overall scheme is evaluated by comparing the computed solutions with the experimental data for a finite wing under different test conditions in the transonic regime. A grid refinement study ir conducted to estimate the grid requirements for adequate resolution of salient features of such flows.

  20. Accurate frequency noise measurement of free-running lasers.

    PubMed

    Schiemangk, Max; Spiessberger, Stefan; Wicht, Andreas; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther; Peters, Achim

    2014-10-20

    We present a simple method to accurately measure the frequency noise power spectrum of lasers. It relies on creating the beat note between two lasers, capturing the corresponding signal in the time domain, and appropriately postprocessing the data to derive the frequency noise power spectrum. In contrast to methods already established, it does not require stabilization of the laser to an optical reference, i.e., a second laser, to an optical cavity or to an atomic transition. It further omits a frequency discriminator and hence avoids bandwidth limitation and nonlinearity effects common to high-resolution frequency discriminators.

  1. Technological Basis and Scientific Returns for Absolutely Accurate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    The 2006 NRC Decadal Survey fostered a new appreciation for societal objectives as a driving motivation for Earth science. Many high-priority societal objectives are dependent on predictions of weather and climate. These predictions are based on numerical models, which derive from approximate representations of well-founded physics and chemistry on space and timescales appropriate to global and regional prediction. These laws of chemistry and physics in turn have a well-defined quantitative relationship with physical measurement units, provided these measurement units are linked to international measurement standards that are the foundation of contemporary measurement science and standards for engineering and commerce. Without this linkage, measurements have an ambiguous relationship to scientific principles that introduces avoidable uncertainty in analyses, predictions, and improved understanding of the Earth system. Since the improvement of climate and weather prediction is fundamentally dependent on the improvement of the representation of physical processes, measurement systems that reduce the ambiguity between physical truth and observations represent an essential component of a national strategy for understanding and living with the Earth system. This paper examines the technological basis and potential science returns of sensors that make measurements that are quantitatively tied on-orbit to international measurement standards, and thus testable to systematic errors. This measurement strategy provides several distinct benefits. First, because of the quantitative relationship between these international measurement standards and fundamental physical constants, measurements of this type accurately capture the true physical and chemical behavior of the climate system and are not subject to adjustment due to excluded measurement physics or instrumental artifacts. In addition, such measurements can be reproduced by scientists anywhere in the world, at any time

  2. Flow measurements in semiconductor processing; New advances in measurement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tison, S. A.; Calabrese, A. M.

    1998-11-01

    Gas flow measurement, control, and distribution are an integral part in meeting present and future semiconductor processing requirements (1). Changes in processing and environmental concerns have put additional pressure not only on accurate measurement of the gas flow, but also in reducing flows. To address the need for more accurate metering of gas flows, NIST has developed primary flow standards which have uncertainties of 0.1% of reading or better over the flow range of 10-9 mol/s to 10-3 mol/s (0.001 sccm to 1000 sccm). These standards have been used to test NIST-designed high repeatability flow transfer standards (2) which can be used to document and improve flow measurements in the semiconductor industry (3). In particular two flowmeters have been developed at NIST; the first is a pressure-based flow sensor and the second a Doppler-shift flowmeter, both of which can be used for in-situ calibration of thermal mass flow controllers or for direct metering of process gases.

  3. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  4. Electroanalytical flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek

    2005-06-01

    A review based on 94 cited original papers describes recent achievements in application of different electrochemical detection in flow analysis, injection techniques of flow analysis, liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis.

  5. Flow rate measuring devices for gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfig, K. W.

    1985-07-01

    Flowrate measuring devices are described: volume meter with fixed or mobile walls; turbine meter; throttling procedure; ultrasonic and Doppler methods; vortex method; rotary flowmeter; and swinging body flow measuring procedure. Flowrate can also be measured from the force exerted on bodies immersed in a fluid or based on thermodynamical principles. The characteristics and operating envelope of each device/method are given.

  6. A spectroscopic transfer standard for accurate atmospheric CO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwaboh, Javis A.; Li, Gang; Serdyukov, Anton; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor of essential climate variables and has an indirect effect for enhancing global warming. Accurate and reliable measurements of atmospheric CO concentration are becoming indispensable. WMO-GAW reports states a compatibility goal of ±2 ppb for atmospheric CO concentration measurements. Therefore, the EMRP-HIGHGAS (European metrology research program - high-impact greenhouse gases) project aims at developing spectroscopic transfer standards for CO concentration measurements to meet this goal. A spectroscopic transfer standard would provide results that are directly traceable to the SI, can be very useful for calibration of devices operating in the field, and could complement classical gas standards in the field where calibration gas mixtures in bottles often are not accurate, available or stable enough [1][2]. Here, we present our new direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) sensor capable of performing absolute ("calibration free") CO concentration measurements, and being operated as a spectroscopic transfer standard. To achieve the compatibility goal stated by WMO for CO concentration measurements and ensure the traceability of the final concentration results, traceable spectral line data especially line intensities with appropriate uncertainties are needed. Therefore, we utilize our new high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy CO line data for the 2-0 band, with significantly reduced uncertainties, for the dTDLAS data evaluation. Further, we demonstrate the capability of our sensor for atmospheric CO measurements, discuss uncertainty calculation following the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) principles and show that CO concentrations derived using the sensor, based on the TILSAM (traceable infrared laser spectroscopic amount fraction measurement) method, are in excellent agreement with gravimetric values. Acknowledgement Parts of this work have been

  7. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  8. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research's focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  9. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research`s focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  10. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  11. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an

  12. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  13. Slim hole MWD tool accurately measures downhole annular pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Burban, B.; Delahaye, T. )

    1994-02-14

    Measurement-while-drilling of downhole pressure accurately determines annular pressure losses from circulation and drillstring rotation and helps monitor swab and surge pressures during tripping. In early 1993, two slim-hole wells (3.4 in. and 3 in. diameter) were drilled with continuous real-time electromagnetic wave transmission of downhole temperature and annular pressure. The data were obtained during all stages of the drilling operation and proved useful for operations personnel. The use of real-time measurements demonstrated the characteristic hydraulic effects of pressure surges induced by drillstring rotation in the small slim-hole annulus under field conditions. The interest in this information is not restricted to the slim-hole geometry. Monitoring or estimating downhole pressure is a key element for drilling operations. Except in special cases, no real-time measurements of downhole annular pressure during drilling and tripping have been used on an operational basis. The hydraulic effects are significant in conventional-geometry wells (3 1/2-in. drill pipe in a 6-in. hole). This paper describes the tool and the results from the field test.

  14. Highly accurate apparatus for electrochemical characterization of the felt electrodes used in redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Ho; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O. Ok; Jin, Chang-Soo; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Because of the rise in renewable energy use, the redox flow battery (RFB) has attracted extensive attention as an energy storage system. Thus, many studies have focused on improving the performance of the felt electrodes used in RFBs. However, existing analysis cells are unsuitable for characterizing felt electrodes because of their complex 3-dimensional structure. Analysis is also greatly affected by the measurement conditions, viz. compression ratio, contact area, and contact strength between the felt and current collector. To address the growing need for practical analytical apparatus, we report a new analysis cell for accurate electrochemical characterization of felt electrodes under various conditions, and compare it with previous ones. In this cell, the measurement conditions can be exhaustively controlled with a compression supporter. The cell showed excellent reproducibility in cyclic voltammetry analysis and the results agreed well with actual RFB charge-discharge performance.

  15. New simple method for fast and accurate measurement of volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    A new simple method is presented, which allows us to measure in just a few minutes but with reasonable accuracy (less than 1%) the volume confined inside a generic enclosure, regardless of the complexity of its shape. The technique proposed also allows us to measure the volume of any portion of a complex manifold, including, for instance, pipes and pipe fittings, valves, gauge heads, and so on, without disassembling the manifold at all. To this purpose an airtight variable volume is used, whose volume adjustment can be precisely measured; it has an overall capacity larger than that of the unknown volume. Such a variable volume is initially filled with a suitable test gas (for instance, air) at a known pressure, as carefully measured by means of a high precision capacitive gauge. By opening a valve, the test gas is allowed to expand into the previously evacuated unknown volume. A feedback control loop reacts to the resulting finite pressure drop, thus contracting the variable volume until the pressure exactly retrieves its initial value. The overall reduction of the variable volume achieved at the end of this process gives a direct measurement of the unknown volume, and definitively gets rid of the problem of dead spaces. The method proposed actually does not require the test gas to be rigorously held at a constant temperature, thus resulting in a huge simplification as compared to complex arrangements commonly used in metrology (gas expansion method), which can grant extremely accurate measurement but requires rather expensive equipments and results in time consuming methods, being therefore impractical in most applications. A simple theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic cycle and the results of experimental tests are described, which demonstrate that, in spite of its simplicity, the method provides a measurement accuracy within 0.5%. The system requires just a few minutes to complete a single measurement, and is ready immediately at the end of the process. The

  16. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    A team of radio astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most accurate measurement ever made of the distance to a faraway galaxy. Their direct measurement calls into question the precision of distance determinations made by other techniques, including those announced last week by a team using the Hubble Space Telescope. The radio astronomers measured a distance of 23.5 million light-years to a galaxy called NGC 4258 in Ursa Major. "Ours is a direct measurement, using geometry, and is independent of all other methods of determining cosmic distances," said Jim Herrnstein, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. The team says their measurement is accurate to within less than a million light-years, or four percent. The galaxy is also known as Messier 106 and is visible with amateur telescopes. Herrnstein, along with James Moran and Lincoln Greenhill of the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; Phillip Diamond, of the Merlin radio telescope facility at Jodrell Bank and the University of Manchester in England; Makato Inoue and Naomasa Nakai of Japan's Nobeyama Radio Observatory; Mikato Miyoshi of Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; Christian Henkel of Germany's Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy; and Adam Riess of the University of California at Berkeley, announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. "This is an incredible achievement to measure the distance to another galaxy with this precision," said Miller Goss, NRAO's Director of VLA/VLBA Operations. "This is the first time such a great distance has been measured this accurately. It took painstaking work on the part of the observing team, and it took a radio telescope the size of the Earth -- the VLBA -- to make it possible," Goss said. "Astronomers have sought to determine the Hubble Constant, the rate of expansion of the universe, for decades. This will in turn lead to an

  17. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  18. A novel technique for highly accurate gas exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkenings, R. K.; Jähne, B. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Heidelberg Aeolotron is a circular wind-wave facility for investigating air-sea gas exchange. In this contribution a novel technique for measuring highly accurate transfer velocities k of mass transfer will be presented. Traditionally, in mass balance techniques the constant of decay for gas concentrations over time is measured. The major drawback of this concept is the long time constant. At low wind speeds and a water height greater than 1 m the period of observation has to be several days. In a gas-tight facility such as the Aeolotron, the transfer velocity k can be computed from the concentration in the water body and the change of concentration in the gas space. Owing to this fact, transfer velocities are gained while greatly reducing the measuring times to less than one hour. The transfer velocity k of a tracer can be parameterized as k=1/β \\cdot u_* \\cdot Sc^n, with the Schmidt Number Sc, shear velocity u_* and the dimensionless transfer resistance β. The Schmidt Number exponent n can be derived from simultaneous measurements of different tracers. Since these tracers are of different Schmidt number, the shear velocity is not needed. To allow for Schmidt numbers spanning a hole decade, in our experiments He, H_2, N_2O and F12 are used. The relative accuracy of measuring the transfer velocity was improved to less than 2%. In 9 consecutive experiments conducted at a wind speed of 6.2 m/s, the deviation of the Schmidt number exponent was found to be just under 0.02. This high accuracy will allow precisely determining the transition of the Schmidt number exponent from n=2/3 to n=0.5 from a flat to wavy water surface. In order to quantify gas exchange not only the wind speed is important. Surfactants have a pronounced effect on the wave field and lead to a drastic reduction in the transfer velocity. In the Aeolotron measurements were conducted with a variety of measuring devices, ranging from an imaging slope gauge (ISG) to thermal techniques with IR

  19. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of the Planck constant, h, is entering a new phase. The CODATA 2010 recommended value is 6.626 069 57 × 10(-34) J s, but it has been a long road, and the trip is not over yet. Since its discovery as a fundamental physical constant to explain various effects in quantum theory, h has become especially important in defining standards for electrical measurements and soon, for mass determination. Measuring h in the International System of Units (SI) started as experimental attempts merely to prove its existence. Many decades passed while newer experiments measured physical effects that were the influence of h combined with other physical constants: elementary charge, e, and the Avogadro constant, N(A). As experimental techniques improved, the precision of the value of h expanded. When the Josephson and quantum Hall theories led to new electronic devices, and a hundred year old experiment, the absolute ampere, was altered into a watt balance, h not only became vital in definitions for the volt and ohm units, but suddenly it could be measured directly and even more accurately. Finally, as measurement uncertainties now approach a few parts in 10(8) from the watt balance experiments and Avogadro determinations, its importance has been linked to a proposed redefinition of a kilogram unit of mass. The path to higher accuracy in measuring the value of h was not always an example of continuous progress. Since new measurements periodically led to changes in its accepted value and the corresponding SI units, it is helpful to see why there were bumps in the road and where the different branch lines of research joined in the effort. Recalling the bumps along this road will hopefully avoid their repetition in the upcoming SI redefinition debates. This paper begins with a brief history of the methods to measure a combination of fundamental constants, thus indirectly obtaining the Planck constant. The historical path is followed in the section describing how the

  20. Quantitative tomographic measurements of opaque multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; O'HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,STEVEN L.

    2000-03-01

    An electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) system has been developed for quantitative measurements of radial phase distribution profiles in two-phase and three-phase vertical column flows. The EIT system is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. EIT measurements were validated by comparison with a gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. The EIT system was used to accurately measure average solid volume fractions up to 0.05 in solid-liquid flows, and radial gas volume fraction profiles in gas-liquid flows with gas volume fractions up to 0.15. In both flows, average phase volume fractions and radial volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT were in good agreement. A minor modification to the formula used to relate conductivity data to phase volume fractions was found to improve agreement between the methods. GDT and EIT were then applied together to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions within several vertical three-phase flows. For average solid volume fractions up to 0.30, the gas distribution for each gas flow rate was approximately independent of the amount of solids in the column. Measurements made with this EIT system demonstrate that EIT may be used successfully for noninvasive, quantitative measurements of dispersed multiphase flows.

  1. Accurate MTF measurement in digital radiography using noise response

    PubMed Central

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    an average of 20%. Deviations of the experimental results largely followed the trend seen in the simulation results, suggesting that differences between the two methods could be explained as resulting from the inherent inaccuracies of the edge-response measurement technique used in this study. Aliasing of the correlated noise component was shown to have a minimal effect on the measured MTF for the three detectors studied. Systems with significant aliasing of the correlated noise component (e.g., a-Se based detectors) would likely require a more sophisticated fitting scheme to provide accurate results. Conclusions: Results indicate that the noise-response method, a simple technique, can be used to accurately measure the MTF of digital x-ray detectors, while alleviating the problems and inaccuracies associated with use of precision test objects, such as a slit or an edge. PMID:20229882

  2. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in an Anatomically-Accurate Scaled Model of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, Christopher; Krane, Michael; Richter, Joseph; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The mammalian nose is a multi-purpose organ that houses a convoluted airway labyrinth responsible for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of environmental contaminants, and chemical sensing. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of respiratory airflow and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture an anatomically-accurate transparent model for stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Challenges in the design and manufacture of an index-matched anatomical model are addressed. PIV measurements are presented, which are used to validate concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian nasal airflow. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  3. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    complexity of defects encountered. The variety arises due to factors such as defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect. This paper focuses on preliminary characterization results, in terms of classification and size estimation, obtained by Calibre MDPAutoClassify tool on a variety of mask blank defects. It primarily highlights the challenges faced in achieving the results with reference to the variety of defects observed on blank mask substrates and the underlying complexities which make accurate defect size measurement an important and challenging task.

  4. Accurate body composition measures from whole-body silhouettes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bowen; Avila, Jesus I.; Ng, Bennett K.; Fan, Bo; Loo, Victoria; Gilsanz, Vicente; Hangartner, Thomas; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Lappe, Joan; Oberfield, Sharon; Winer, Karen; Zemel, Babette; Shepherd, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Obesity and its consequences, such as diabetes, are global health issues that burden about 171 × 106 adult individuals worldwide. Fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2), and percent fat mass may be useful to evaluate under- and overnutrition and muscle development in a clinical or research environment. This proof-of-concept study tested whether frontal whole-body silhouettes could be used to accurately measure body composition parameters using active shape modeling (ASM) techniques. Methods: Binary shape images (silhouettes) were generated from the skin outline of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scans of 200 healthy children of ages from 6 to 16 yr. The silhouette shape variation from the average was described using an ASM, which computed principal components for unique modes of shape. Predictive models were derived from the modes for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat using stepwise linear regression. The models were compared to simple models using demographics alone [age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index z-scores (BMIZ)]. Results: The authors found that 95% of the shape variation of the sampled population could be explained using 26 modes. In most cases, the body composition variables could be predicted similarly between demographics-only and shape-only models. However, the combination of shape with demographics improved all estimates of boys and girls compared to the demographics-only model. The best prediction models for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat agreed with the actual measures with R2 adj. (the coefficient of determination adjusted for the number of parameters used in the model equation) values of 0.86, 0.95, and 0.75 for boys and 0.90, 0.89, and 0.69 for girls, respectively. Conclusions: Whole-body silhouettes in children may be useful to derive estimates of body composition including FMI, FFMI, and percent fat. These results support the feasibility of measuring body composition variables from simple

  5. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  6. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannert, David A.; Horne, Roland N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether for gas/oil, gas/water, or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. The goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter.

  7. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  8. Invariant Measures for Cherry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghin, Radu; Vargas, Edson

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the invariant probability measures for Cherry flows, i.e. flows on the two-torus which have a saddle, a source, and no other fixed points, closed orbits or homoclinic orbits. In the case when the saddle is dissipative or conservative we show that the only invariant probability measures are the Dirac measures at the two fixed points, and the Dirac measure at the saddle is the physical measure. In the other case we prove that there exists also an invariant probability measure supported on the quasi-minimal set, we discuss some situations when this other invariant measure is the physical measure, and conjecture that this is always the case. The main techniques used are the study of the integrability of the return time with respect to the invariant measure of the return map to a closed transversal to the flow, and the study of the close returns near the saddle.

  9. Accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. W.; Wang, B.; Gao, C.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-09-01

    An accurate and fast fiber transfer delay measurement method is demonstrated. As a key technique, a simple ambiguity resolving process based on phase discrimination and frequency measurement is used to overcome the contradiction between measurement accuracy and system complexity. The system achieves a high measurement accuracy of 0.2 ps with a 0.1 ps measurement resolution and a large dynamic range up to 50 km as well as no dead zone.

  10. Equilibrium gas flow computations. I - Accurate and efficient calculation of equilibrium gas properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    This paper treats the accurate and efficient calculation of thermodynamic properties of arbitrary gas mixtures for equilibrium flow computations. New improvements in the Stupochenko-Jaffe model for the calculation of thermodynamic properties of diatomic molecules are presented. A unified formulation of equilibrium calculations for gas mixtures in terms of irreversible entropy is given. Using a highly accurate thermo-chemical data base, a new, efficient and vectorizable search algorithm is used to construct piecewise interpolation procedures with generate accurate thermodynamic variable and their derivatives required by modern computational algorithms. Results are presented for equilibrium air, and compared with those given by the Srinivasan program.

  11. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  12. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jack E.; Thomas, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  13. Measuring sap flow in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sap flow measurements provide a powerful tool for quantifying plant water use and monitoring qualitative physiological responses of plants to environmental conditions. As such, sap flow methods are widely employed to invesitgate the agronomic, ecological and hydrological outcomes of plant growth. T...

  14. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  15. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  16. A time-accurate implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    A new time accurate coupled solution procedure for solving the chemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers is described. The scheme is shown to be very efficient and robust for flows with velocities ranging from M less than or equal to 10(exp -10) to supersonic speeds.

  17. MONA: An accurate two-phase well flow model based on phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Asheim, H.

    1984-10-01

    In two phase flow, holdup and pressure loss are related to interfacial slippage. A model based on the slippage concept has been developed and tested using production well data from Forties, the Ekofisk area, and flowline data from Prudhoe Bay. The model developed turned out considerably more accurate than the standard models used for comparison.

  18. A time-accurate algorithm for chemical non-equilibrium viscous flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J.-S.; Chen, K.-H.; Choi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A time-accurate, coupled solution procedure is described for the chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers. This method employs the strong conservation form of the governing equations, but uses primitive variables as unknowns. Real gas properties and equilibrium chemistry are considered. Numerical tests include steady convergent-divergent nozzle flows with air dissociation/recombination chemistry, dump combustor flows with n-pentane-air chemistry, nonreacting flow in a model double annular combustor, and nonreacting unsteady driven cavity flows. Numerical results for both the steady and unsteady flows demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the present algorithm for Mach numbers ranging from the incompressible limit to supersonic speeds.

  19. Method accurately measures mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1967-01-01

    Photomicrographic method determines mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Many diameters are measured simultaneously by measuring row lengths of particles in a triangular array at a glass-oil interface. The method provides size standards for electronic particle counters and prevents distortions, softening, and flattening.

  20. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  1. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    PubMed

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown.

  2. Accurate Measurements of Spectral Reflectance in Picasso's Guernica Painting.

    PubMed

    de Luna, Javier Muñoz; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vázquez, Daniel; Melgosa, Manuel; Durán, Humberto; García, Jorge; Muro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-invasive spectral measurements to control the conservation status is a part of the preventive conservation of artworks which nowadays is becoming increasingly interesting. This paper describes how to use a spectral measuring device and an illumination system specifically designed for such a task in a very large dimension artwork painting (7.8 m wide × 3.5 m high). The system, controlled by a Cartesian robot, allows spectral measurements in a spectral range of 400-780 nm. The measured data array has a total of 2201 circular regions with 5.5 mm spot diameter placed on a square grid. Colorimetric calculations performed from these spectral measurements may be used to characterize color shifts related to reflectance changes in specific areas of the paint. A color shifting from the expected gray has been shown. PMID:26767640

  3. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  4. Accurate aircraft wind measurements using the global positioning system (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dobosy, R.J.; Crawford, T.L., McMillen, R.T., Dumas, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    High accuracy measurements of the spatial distribution of wind speed are required in the study of turbulent exchange between the atmosphere and the earth. The use of a differential global positioning system (GPS) to determine the sensor velocity vector component of wind speed is discussed in this paper. The results of noise and rocking testing are summarized, and fluxes obtained from the GPS-based methods are compared to those measured from systems on towers and airplanes. The GPS-based methods provided usable measurements that compared well with tower and aircraft data at a significantly lower cost. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Magnetic field models of nine CP stars from "accurate" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole models of magnetic fields in nine CP stars are constructed based on the measurements of metal lines taken from the literature, and performed by the LSD method with an accuracy of 10-80 G. The model parameters are compared with the parameters obtained for the same stars from the hydrogen line measurements. For six out of nine stars the same type of structure was obtained. Some parameters, such as the field strength at the poles B p and the average surface magnetic field B s differ considerably in some stars due to differences in the amplitudes of phase dependences B e (Φ) and B s (Φ), obtained by different authors. It is noted that a significant increase in the measurement accuracy has little effect on the modelling of the large-scale structures of the field. By contrast, it is more important to construct the shape of the phase dependence based on a fairly large number of field measurements, evenly distributed by the rotation period phases. It is concluded that the Zeeman component measurement methods have a strong effect on the shape of the phase dependence, and that the measurements of the magnetic field based on the lines of hydrogen are more preferable for modelling the large-scale structures of the field.

  6. An accurate and simple method for measurement of paw edema.

    PubMed

    Fereidoni, M; Ahmadiani, A; Semnanian, S; Javan, M

    2000-01-01

    Several methods for measuring inflammation are available that rely on the parameters changing during inflammation. The most commonly used methods estimate the volume of edema formed. In this study, we present a novel method for measuring the volume of pathologically or artificially induced edema. In this model, a liquid column is placed on a balance. When an object is immersed, the liquid applies a force F to attempt its expulsion. Physically, F is the weight (W) of the volume of liquid displaced by that part of the object inserted into the liquid. A balance is used to measure this force (F=W).Therefore, the partial or entire volume of any object, for example, the inflamed hind paw of a rat, can be calculated thus, using the specific gravity of the immersion liquid, at equilibrium mass/specific gravity=volume (V). The extent of edema at time t (measured as V) will be V(t)-V(o). This method is easy to use, materials are of low cost and readily available. It is important that the rat paw (or any object whose volume is being measured) is kept from contacting the wall of the column containing the fluid whilst the value on the balance is read.

  7. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements in Anatomically-Accurate Models of the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumple, C.; Richter, J.; Craven, B. A.; Krane, M.

    2012-11-01

    A summary of the research being carried out by our multidisciplinary team to better understand the form and function of the nose in different mammalian species that include humans, carnivores, ungulates, rodents, and marine animals will be presented. The mammalian nose houses a convoluted airway labyrinth, where two hallmark features of mammals occur, endothermy and olfaction. Because of the complexity of the nasal cavity, the anatomy and function of these upper airways remain poorly understood in most mammals. However, recent advances in high-resolution medical imaging, computational modeling, and experimental flow measurement techniques are now permitting the study of airflow and respiratory and olfactory transport phenomena in anatomically-accurate reconstructions of the nasal cavity. Here, we focus on efforts to manufacture transparent, anatomically-accurate models for stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements of nasal airflow. Challenges in the design and manufacture of index-matched anatomical models are addressed and preliminary SPIV measurements are presented. Such measurements will constitute a validation database for concurrent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of mammalian respiration and olfaction. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  8. Measuring Fisher information accurately in correlated neural populations.

    PubMed

    Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kohn, Adam; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Neural responses are known to be variable. In order to understand how this neural variability constrains behavioral performance, we need to be able to measure the reliability with which a sensory stimulus is encoded in a given population. However, such measures are challenging for two reasons: First, they must take into account noise correlations which can have a large influence on reliability. Second, they need to be as efficient as possible, since the number of trials available in a set of neural recording is usually limited by experimental constraints. Traditionally, cross-validated decoding has been used as a reliability measure, but it only provides a lower bound on reliability and underestimates reliability substantially in small datasets. We show that, if the number of trials per condition is larger than the number of neurons, there is an alternative, direct estimate of reliability which consistently leads to smaller errors and is much faster to compute. The superior performance of the direct estimator is evident both for simulated data and for neuronal population recordings from macaque primary visual cortex. Furthermore we propose generalizations of the direct estimator which measure changes in stimulus encoding across conditions and the impact of correlations on encoding and decoding, typically denoted by Ishuffle and Idiag respectively.

  9. Highly Accurate Photogrammetric Measurements of the Planck Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Parian, J.; Gruen, Armin; Cozzani, Alessandro

    2006-06-01

    The Planck mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) is designed to image the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation Field over the whole sky. To achieve this aim, sophisticated reflectors are used as part of the Planck telescope receiving system. The system consists of secondary and primary reflectors which are sections of two different ellipsoids of revolution with mean diameters of 1 and 1.6 meters. Deformations of the reflectors which influence the optical parameters and the gain of receiving signals are investigated in vacuum and at very low temperatures. For this investigation, among the various high accuracy measurement techniques, photogrammetry was selected. With respect to the photogrammetric measurements, special considerations had to be taken into account in design steps, measurement arrangement and data processing to achieve very high accuracies. The determinability of additional parameters of the camera under the given network configuration, datum definition, reliability and precision issues as well as workspace limits and propagating errors from different sources are considered. We have designed an optimal photogrammetric network by heuristic simulation for the flight model of the primary and the secondary reflectors with relative precisions better than 1:1000000 and 1:400000 to achieve the requested accuracies. A least squares best fit ellipsoid method was developed to determine the optical parameters of the reflectors. In this paper we will report about the procedures, the network design and the results of real measurements.

  10. Air toxics being measured more accurately, controlled more effectively

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In response to the directives of the Clean Air Act Amendments, Argonne National Laboratory is developing new or improved pollutant control technologies for industries that burn fossil fuels. This research continues Argonne`s traditional support for the US DOE Flue Gas Cleanup Program. Research is underway to measure process emissions and identify new and improved control measures. Argonne`s emission control research has ranged from experiments in the basic chemistry of pollution-control systems, through laboratory-scale process development and testing to pilot-scale field tests of several technologies. Whenever appropriate, the work has emphasized integrated or combined control systems as the best approach to technologies that offer low cost and good operating characteristics.

  11. Inflation model building with an accurate measure of e -folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongchitnan, Sirichai

    2016-08-01

    It has become standard practice to take the logarithmic growth of the scale factor as a measure of the amount of inflation, despite the well-known fact that this is only an approximation for the true amount of inflation required to solve the horizon and flatness problems. The aim of this work is to show how this approximation can be completely avoided using an alternative framework for inflation model building. We show that using the inverse Hubble radius, H =a H , as the key dynamical parameter, the correct number of e -folding arises naturally as a measure of inflation. As an application, we present an interesting model in which the entire inflationary dynamics can be solved analytically and exactly, and, in special cases, reduces to the familiar class of power-law models.

  12. Accurate Measurement of Heat Capacity by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Experience with high quality heat capacity measurement by differential scanning calorimetry is summarized and illustrated, pointing out three major causes of error: (1) incompatible thermal histories of the sample, reference and blank runs; (2) unstable initial and final isotherms; (3) incompatible differences between initial and final isotherm amplitudes for sample, reference and blank runs. Considering these problems, it is shown for the case of polyoxymethylene that accuracies in heat capacity of 0.1 percent may be possible.

  13. ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2009-09-09

    Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

  14. Mobil unit provides fast and accurate Btu measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lansing, J. )

    1991-05-01

    Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) provides service to more than four million customers in a 23,000-plus square mile area. Some 95% of these customers fall under the residential category and the remaining customers are industrial and commercial. To ensure Btu value received from the supplier and delivered to the user is accounted for properly, SoCalGas has divided its service area into 47 districts according to the gas Btu content. The company obtains the information by collecting approximately 200 sample cylinders each week from field monitoring points and transporting them to one of four laboratories for analysis. For collecting the information from each lab site, SoCalGas uses a computerized Gas Quality Measurement System (GQMS) that utilizes a Hewlett-Packard 1000 computer. Information on all the gas sample analysis is transmitted each day to the company's measurement office. About two- thirds of the lab work is performed in Los Angeles and the remaining at three satellite laboratories. Sample points are strategically located to monitor gas entering each district. By measuring gas volumes at these key points, a volume- weighted average can be determined and the customers' monthly bills then can be adjusted for gas energy content by this volume-weighted four-week average. The engineering department uses sample-cylinder analysis data to establish and maintain correct Btu boundaries. However, the time it takes for this information to be processed makes it difficult for engineering to process the data.

  15. A new carrier gas type for accurate measurement of N2O by GC-ECD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinghong; Wang, Yuesi; Ling, Hong

    2010-11-01

    The accurate measurement of concentration is the basis for determining emission sources and sinks of nitrous oxide (N2O). The detection of N2O showed that the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) biased the N2O response when pure nitrogen (N2) was used as a carrier gas for gas chromatography (GC) equipped with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to explore how the presence of CO2 interferes with the accurate determination of N2O. The aims were to address the extent of the influence to try and explain the underlying mechanism, and to uncover technical options for solving the problem. Three GC carrier gases are discussed: pure nitrogen (DN); a mixture of argon and methane (AM); and a high concentration CO2, which was introduced into the ECD cell with a low flow rate based on DN (DN-CO2). The results show that when DN was used, the existence of CO2 in the ECD cell greatly enhanced the response of N2O, which increased with CO2 content and remained constant when the content reached a limit. Comparisons between the three methods show that the DN method is defective for the accurate determination of N2O. The bias is caused by different electron capture mechanisms of CO2 and N2O and depends heavily on the detector temperature. New GC carrier gas types with make-up gases that can remove the CO2-induced influence, such as the DN-CO2 and DN-CH4 methods reported in this paper, are recommended for the accurate measurement of N2O.

  16. Blood-Pressure Measuring System Gives Accurate Graphic Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop an instrument that will provide an external (indirect) measurement of arterial blood pressure in the form of an easily interpreted graphic trace that can be correlated with standard clinical blood-pressure measurements. From sphygmograms produced by conventional sphygmographs, it is very difficult to differentiate the systolic and diastolic blood-pressure pulses and to correlate these indices with the standard clinical values. It is nearly impossible to determine these indices when the subject is under physical or emotional stress. The solution: An electronic blood-pressure system, basically similar to conventional ausculatory sphygmomanometers, employing a standard occluding cuff, a gas-pressure source, and a gas-pressure regulator and valve. An electrical output transducer senses cuff pressure, and a microphone positioned on the brachial artery under the occluding cuff monitors the Korotkoff sounds from this artery. The output signals present the conventional systolic and diastolic indices in a clear, graphical display. The complete system also includes an electronic timer and cycle-control circuit.

  17. Accurate measurement of intestinal transit in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.S.; Galligan, J.J.; Burks, T.F.

    1981-11-01

    A new method for quantifying intestinal transit was evaluated by comparison with two other popular techniques. The distribution of radiochromium (51Cr) throughout the small intestine of rats previously treated with saline (1.0 ml/kg s.c.), capsaicin (10 mg/kg s.c.), hexamethonium (20 mg/kg i.p.), D-ala2-met-enkephalinamide (1.0 microgram i.c.v.), or neostigmine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) was quantified by (1) measuring the most distal intestinal segment reached by chromium, (2) calculating the slope produced by linear regression analysis on cumulative percent chromium that had passed through each segment, and (3) determining the geometric center of the distribution of chromium throughout the small intestine. It was concluded that the geometric center methods for quantifying intestinal transit provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of intestinal transit. Less sensitive techniques often fail to detect important effects of drugs on intestinal transit.

  18. Accurate on line measurements of low fluences of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Taccetti, F.; Carraresi, L.; Castelli, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Sottili, L.; Taccetti, N.

    2015-03-01

    Ion beams supplied by the 3MV Tandem accelerator of LABEC laboratory (INFN-Firenze), have been used to study the feasibility of irradiating materials with ion fluences reproducible to about 1%. Test measurements have been made with 7.5 MeV 7Li2+ beams of different intensities. The fluence control is based on counting ions contained in short bursts generated by chopping the continuous beam with an electrostatic deflector followed by a couple of adjustable slits. Ions are counted by means of a micro-channel plate (MCP) detecting the electrons emitted from a thin layer of Al inserted along the beam path in between the pulse defining slits and the target. Calibration of the MCP electron detector is obtained by comparison with the response of a Si detector.

  19. An approach for the accurate measurement of social morality levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    In the social sciences, computer-based modeling has become an increasingly important tool receiving widespread attention. However, the derivation of the quantitative relationships linking individual moral behavior and social morality levels, so as to provide a useful basis for social policy-making, remains a challenge in the scholarly literature today. A quantitative measurement of morality from the perspective of complexity science constitutes an innovative attempt. Based on the NetLogo platform, this article examines the effect of various factors on social morality levels, using agents modeling moral behavior, immoral behavior, and a range of environmental social resources. Threshold values for the various parameters are obtained through sensitivity analysis; and practical solutions are proposed for reversing declines in social morality levels. The results show that: (1) Population size may accelerate or impede the speed with which immoral behavior comes to determine the overall level of social morality, but it has no effect on the level of social morality itself; (2) The impact of rewards and punishment on social morality levels follows the "5∶1 rewards-to-punishment rule," which is to say that 5 units of rewards have the same effect as 1 unit of punishment; (3) The abundance of public resources is inversely related to the level of social morality; (4) When the cost of population mobility reaches 10% of the total energy level, immoral behavior begins to be suppressed (i.e. the 1/10 moral cost rule). The research approach and methods presented in this paper successfully address the difficulties involved in measuring social morality levels, and promise extensive application potentials.

  20. An Approach for the Accurate Measurement of Social Morality Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    In the social sciences, computer-based modeling has become an increasingly important tool receiving widespread attention. However, the derivation of the quantitative relationships linking individual moral behavior and social morality levels, so as to provide a useful basis for social policy-making, remains a challenge in the scholarly literature today. A quantitative measurement of morality from the perspective of complexity science constitutes an innovative attempt. Based on the NetLogo platform, this article examines the effect of various factors on social morality levels, using agents modeling moral behavior, immoral behavior, and a range of environmental social resources. Threshold values for the various parameters are obtained through sensitivity analysis; and practical solutions are proposed for reversing declines in social morality levels. The results show that: (1) Population size may accelerate or impede the speed with which immoral behavior comes to determine the overall level of social morality, but it has no effect on the level of social morality itself; (2) The impact of rewards and punishment on social morality levels follows the “5∶1 rewards-to-punishment rule,” which is to say that 5 units of rewards have the same effect as 1 unit of punishment; (3) The abundance of public resources is inversely related to the level of social morality; (4) When the cost of population mobility reaches 10% of the total energy level, immoral behavior begins to be suppressed (i.e. the 1/10 moral cost rule). The research approach and methods presented in this paper successfully address the difficulties involved in measuring social morality levels, and promise extensive application potentials. PMID:24312189

  1. A time-accurate implicit method for chemically reacting flows at all Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, J. P.; Yang, V.; Shuen, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a unified solution algorithm capable of treating time-accurate chemically reacting flows at all Mach numbers, ranging from molecular diffusion velocities to supersonic speeds. A rescaled pressure term is used in the momentum equation to circumvent the singular behavior of pressure at low Mach numbers. A dual time-stepping integration procedure is established. The system eigenvalues become well behaved and have the same order of magnitude, even in the very low Mach number regime. The computational efficiency for moderate and high speed flow is competitive with the conventional density-based scheme. The capabilities of the algorithm are demonstrated by applying it to selected model problems including nozzle flows and flame dynamics.

  2. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  3. Flow measurement -some new considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Sovik, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Recent developments are presented which have further increased the number of options available for selecting a flowmeter. One of these is the smart differential pressure transmitter which has its own word processor. Magnetic flowmeters are discussed, and improvements of the vortex flowmeter are presented. Technological advances continue to expand the capabilities of the vortex flowmeter. Although improved flowmeters are more readily available, careful attention to the application is still the key to successful flow measurement in today's process plants.

  4. A time accurate prediction of the viscous flow in a turbine stage including a rotor in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavalikul, Akamol

    in the relative frame of reference; the boundary conditions for the computations were obtained from inlet flow measurements performed in the AFTRF. A complete turbine stage, including an NGV and a rotor row was simulated using the RANS solver with the SST kappa -- o turbulence model, with two different computational models for the interface between the rotating component and the stationary component. The first interface model, the circumferentially averaged mixing plane model, was solved for a fixed position of the rotor blades relative to the NGV in the stationary frame of reference. The information transferred between the NGV and rotor domains is obtained by averaging across the entire interface. The quasi-steady state flow characteristics of the AFTRF can be obtained from this interface model. After the model was validated with the existing experimental data, this model was not only used to investigate the flow characteristics in the turbine stage but also the effects of using pressure side rotor tip extensions. The tip leakage flow fields simulated from this model and from the linear cascade model show similar trends. More detailed understanding of unsteady characteristics of a turbine flow field can be obtained using the second type of interface model, the time accurate sliding mesh model. The potential flow interactions, wake characteristics, their effects on secondary flow formation, and the wake mixing process in a rotor passage were examined using this model. Furthermore, turbine stage efficiency and effects of tip clearance height on the turbine stage efficiency were also investigated. A comparison between the results from the circumferential average model and the time accurate flow model results is presented. It was found that the circumferential average model cannot accurately simulate flow interaction characteristics on the interface plane between the NGV trailing edge and the rotor leading edge. However, the circumferential average model does give

  5. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-09-01

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large--on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue.

  6. k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy: A Method for Accurate Transport Measurements Independent of Fluorophore Photophysics

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, David L.; Ronis, David; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the theory and application of reciprocal space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). This technique measures the number density, diffusion coefficient, and velocity of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in a cell membrane imaged on a confocal, two-photon, or total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. In contrast to r-space correlation techniques, we show kICS can recover accurate dynamics even in the presence of complex fluorophore photobleaching and/or “blinking”. Furthermore, these quantities can be calculated without nonlinear curve fitting, or any knowledge of the beam radius of the exciting laser. The number densities calculated by kICS are less sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity of the fluorophore distribution than densities measured using image correlation spectroscopy. We use simulations as a proof-of-principle to show that number densities and transport coefficients can be extracted using this technique. We present calibration measurements with fluorescent microspheres imaged on a confocal microscope, which recover Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficients, and flow velocities that agree with single particle tracking measurements. We also show the application of kICS to measurements of the transport dynamics of α5-integrin/enhanced green fluorescent protein constructs in a transfected CHO cell imaged on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope using charge-coupled device area detection. PMID:16861272

  7. Time-accurate Navier-Stokes computations of classical two-dimensional edge tone flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, B. L.; O'Farrell, J. M.; Jones, Jess H.

    1990-01-01

    Time-accurate Navier-Stokes computations were performed to study a Class II (acoustic) whistle, the edge tone, and gain knowledge of the vortex-acoustic coupling mechanisms driving production of these tones. Results were obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible air flow of a two-dimensional jet issuing from a slit interacting with a wedge. Cases considered were determined by varying the distance from the slit to the edge. Flow speed was kept constant at 1750 cm/sec as was the slit thickness of 0.1 cm, corresponding to conditions in the experiments of Brown. Excellent agreement was obtained in all four edge tone stage cases between the present computational results and the experimentally obtained results of Brown. Specific edge tone generated phenomena and further confirmation of certain theories concerning these phenomena were brought to light in this analytical simulation of edge tones.

  8. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  9. A Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm for accurate tracking of two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwakar, S. V.; Das, Sarit K.; Sundararajan, T.

    2009-12-01

    A new Quadratic Spline based Interface (QUASI) reconstruction algorithm is presented which provides an accurate and continuous representation of the interface in a multiphase domain and facilitates the direct estimation of local interfacial curvature. The fluid interface in each of the mixed cells is represented by piecewise parabolic curves and an initial discontinuous PLIC approximation of the interface is progressively converted into a smooth quadratic spline made of these parabolic curves. The conversion is achieved by a sequence of predictor-corrector operations enforcing function ( C0) and derivative ( C1) continuity at the cell boundaries using simple analytical expressions for the continuity requirements. The efficacy and accuracy of the current algorithm has been demonstrated using standard test cases involving reconstruction of known static interface shapes and dynamically evolving interfaces in prescribed flow situations. These benchmark studies illustrate that the present algorithm performs excellently as compared to the other interface reconstruction methods available in literature. Quadratic rate of error reduction with respect to grid size has been observed in all the cases with curved interface shapes; only in situations where the interface geometry is primarily flat, the rate of convergence becomes linear with the mesh size. The flow algorithm implemented in the current work is designed to accurately balance the pressure gradients with the surface tension force at any location. As a consequence, it is able to minimize spurious flow currents arising from imperfect normal stress balance at the interface. This has been demonstrated through the standard test problem of an inviscid droplet placed in a quiescent medium. Finally, the direct curvature estimation ability of the current algorithm is illustrated through the coupled multiphase flow problem of a deformable air bubble rising through a column of water.

  10. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, J. C.; Eghbali, D. A.; Flitton, V. E.; Anderson, D. G.

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m(exp 3)/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40 percent. Both flowmeter types accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results.

  11. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.; Eghbali, D.A.; Flitton, V.E.; Anderson, D.G.

    1991-12-31

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m{sup 3}/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40%. Both flowmeter types of accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results. 2 refs.

  12. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  13. MRI Based Diagnostics for Temperature Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Lauren Sascha; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the thermal diffusion in the complex turbulent flows related to cooling high temperature gas turbine blades is critical to optimize the performance and predict the lifetime of the blades. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques for temperature measurement in simple but related flows are being developed in an effort to obtain full field thermal measurements to better understand diffusion processes and support the development of more accurate computational models in these flows. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) utilizes the temperature dependence of the hydrogen proton resonant frequency (PRF) in water. MRT is now routinely used to measure tissue temperatures during medical procedures, and a few previous studies have made velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent pipe flows. In this study, MRT is applied to the flow of a heated single hole film cooling jet (Reynolds number 3000) inclined at 30 degrees injected into a cold developing turbulent channel flow (Reynolds number 25,000 based on bulk velocity and channel height.) The jet fluid temperature is 30 degrees Celsius above the temperature in the channel. The temperature measurements compare well to previously published results for measured passive scalar concentration in the same flow although the temperature measurements show higher uncertainties of 5--10 % of the temperature difference. Techniques for reducing this uncertainty will be presented as well as procedures for applying MRT to quantify the turbulent heat transfer coefficient in turbulent internal flows.

  14. In vitro flow measurements in ion sputtered hydrocephalus shunts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental procedure for accurate measurements of the pressure-drop/flow rate relationship in hydrocephalus shunts. Using a fish-hook arrangement, small flow rates in a perforated ion-sputtered Teflon microtubule were measured in vitro in a pressured system and were correlated with pressure in the system. Results indicate that appropriate drainage rates could be obtained in the physiological range for hydrocephalus shunts.

  15. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  16. Orbital Advection by Interpolation: A Fast and Accurate Numerical Scheme for Super-Fast MHD Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M; Guan, X; Gammie, F

    2008-04-11

    In numerical models of thin astrophysical disks that use an Eulerian scheme, gas orbits supersonically through a fixed grid. As a result the timestep is sharply limited by the Courant condition. Also, because the mean flow speed with respect to the grid varies with position, the truncation error varies systematically with position. For hydrodynamic (unmagnetized) disks an algorithm called FARGO has been developed that advects the gas along its mean orbit using a separate interpolation substep. This relaxes the constraint imposed by the Courant condition, which now depends only on the peculiar velocity of the gas, and results in a truncation error that is more nearly independent of position. This paper describes a FARGO-like algorithm suitable for evolving magnetized disks. Our method is second order accurate on a smooth flow and preserves {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to machine precision. The main restriction is that B must be discretized on a staggered mesh. We give a detailed description of an implementation of the code and demonstrate that it produces the expected results on linear and nonlinear problems. We also point out how the scheme might be generalized to make the integration of other supersonic/super-fast flows more efficient. Although our scheme reduces the variation of truncation error with position, it does not eliminate it. We show that the residual position dependence leads to characteristic radial variations in the density over long integrations.

  17. Capacitance Probe for Fluid Flow and Volume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a micro-gravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  18. Capacitance probe for fluid flow and volume measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids are disclosed, including the use of a capacitive probe for measuring the flow volume of a material within a flow stream. The capacitance probe has at least two elongate electrodes and, in a specific embodiment of the invention, has three parallel elongate electrodes with the center electrode being an extension of the center conductor of a co-axial cable. A conductance probe is also provided to provide more accurate flow volume data in response to conductivity of the material within the flow stream. A preferred embodiment of the present invention provides for a gas flow stream through a microgravity environment that allows for monitoring a flow volume of a fluid sample, such as a urine sample, that is entrained within the gas flow stream.

  19. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique.

  20. An accurate adaptive solver for surface-tension-driven interfacial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popinet, Stéphane

    2009-09-01

    A method combining an adaptive quad/octree spatial discretisation, geometrical Volume-Of-Fluid interface representation, balanced-force continuum-surface-force surface-tension formulation and height-function curvature estimation is presented. The extension of these methods to the quad/octree discretisation allows adaptive variable resolution along the interface and is described in detail. The method is shown to recover exact equilibrium (to machine accuracy) between surface-tension and pressure gradient in the case of a stationary droplet, irrespective of viscosity and spatial resolution. Accurate solutions are obtained for the classical test case of capillary wave oscillations. An application to the capillary breakup of a jet of water in air further illustrates the accuracy and efficiency of the method. The source code of the implementation is freely available as part of the Gerris flow solver.

  1. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  2. Towards Accurate Prediction of Turbulent, Three-Dimensional, Recirculating Flows with the NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, A.; Tacina, R.; Jeng, S.-M.; Cai, J.

    2001-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to calculate the steady state, nonreacting flow field of a prototype Lean Direct Injection (LDI) swirler. This configuration used nine groups of eight holes drilled at a thirty-five degree angle to induce swirl. These nine groups created swirl in the same direction, or a corotating pattern. The static pressure drop across the holes was fixed at approximately four percent. Computations were performed on one quarter of the geometry, because the geometry is considered rotationally periodic every ninety degrees. The final computational grid used was approximately 2.26 million tetrahedral cells, and a cubic nonlinear k - epsilon model was used to model turbulence. The NCC results were then compared to time averaged Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) data. The LDV measurements were performed on the full geometry, but four ninths of the geometry was measured. One-, two-, and three-dimensional representations of both flow fields are presented. The NCC computations compare both qualitatively and quantitatively well to the LDV data, but differences exist downstream. The comparison is encouraging, and shows that NCC can be used for future injector design studies. To improve the flow prediction accuracy of turbulent, three-dimensional, recirculating flow fields with the NCC, recommendations are given.

  3. Accurate determination of plasmid copy number of flow-sorted cells using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Michael; Vorpahl, Carsten; Türkowsky, Dominique; Lindmeyer, Martin; Bühler, Bruno; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Susann

    2014-06-17

    Many biotechnological processes rely on the expression of a plasmid-based target gene. A constant and sufficient number of plasmids per cell is desired for efficient protein production. To date, only a few methods for the determination of plasmid copy number (PCN) are available, and most of them average the PCN of total populations disregarding heterogeneous distributions. Here, we utilize the highly precise quantification of DNA molecules by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) and combine it with cell sorting using flow cytometry. A duplex PCR assay was set up requiring only 1000 sorted cells for precise determination of PCN. The robustness of this method was proven by thorough optimization of cell sorting, cell disruption, and PCR conditions. When non plasmid-harboring cells of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 were spiked with different dilutions of the expression plasmid pA-EGFP_B, a PCN from 1 to 64 could be accurately detected. As a proof of principle, induced cultures of P. putida KT2440 producing an EGFP-fused model protein by means of the plasmid pA-EGFP_B were investigated by flow cytometry and showed two distinct subpopulations, fluorescent and nonfluorescent cells. These two subpopulations were sorted for PCN determination with ddPCR. A remarkably diverging plasmid distribution was found within the population, with nonfluorescent cells showing a much lower PCN (≤1) than fluorescent cells (PCN of up to 5) under standard conditions.

  4. Filtering requirements for gradient-based optical flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Christmas, W J

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy of gradient-based optical flow algorithms depends on the ability to measure intensity gradients accurately. We show how the temporal gradient can be compromised by temporal aliasing arising from motion and how appropriate post-sampling spatial filtering improves the situation. We also demonstrate a benefit of using higher-order gradient estimators.

  5. Transit time ultrasonic flow meters for natural gas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Upp, E.L.; Warner, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    Transit-time ultrasonic flow meters for gas have gained a larger acceptance within the natural gas industry in recent years, and are now an option for custody transfer metering in several countries. Additionally, there are several varieties of less expensive transit-time ultrasonic flow meters which are excellent in check metering applications although limited in accuracy. The proper choice of ultrasonic flow meter normally depends on the absolute accuracy required, with the multipath configuration offering the best accuracy. Ultrasonic flow meters must be properly installed and the natural gas must be of good quality to achieve an accurate measurement, as with any type of gas flow meter. As experience grows within the measurement community, the use and applications for transit-time ultrasonic flow meters may expand greatly.

  6. Techniques to measure volumetric flow and particulate concentration in stacks with cyclonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterrett, J. D.; Barbin, A. R.; Reece, J. W.; Carter, W. G.; Ferguson, B. B.

    1982-08-01

    It was determined that an in stack venturi can accurately measure volumetric flow in stacks with a severe cyclonic flow profile. The design requirements of the venturi are described. Also described was a low head loss, egg crate shaped device that effectively straightens cyclonic flow. Installation of such a device after a tangential inlet to a tall stack can result in considerable energy savings because it takes less fan power to push the straightened flow. Results to determine the particulate distribution downstream of the egg crate were inconclusive.

  7. Flow monitor reliability design criteria for thermal mass flow measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Groce, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Implementation of Title IV of the Clean Air Act greatly expanded the market of mass flow measurement in utility flue gas ducts and stacks. Lessons learned from recent experience in this demanding application resulted in the rapid evolution of equipment designed to ensure accuracy, reliability and ease of maintenance. Thermal mass flow measurement, one of three accepted methods of mass flow measurement, has proven to be an accurate and reliable means of achieving dependable flow data. Aside from system accuracy and repeatability, on-line time appears to be the critical performance factor for any mass flow measurement system. This paper addresses the major design features that have resulted in maximum on-line time and conformance with compliance plans.

  8. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  9. Real-Time Measurement of Vehicle Exhaust Gas Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Hylton, J.O.; Joy, R.D.; McKnight, T.E.

    1999-06-28

    A flow measurement system was developed to measure, in real-time, the exhaust gas flow from vehicies. This new system was based on the vortex shedding principle using ultrasonic detectors for sensing the shed vortices. The flow meter was designed to measure flow over a range of 1 to 366 Ips with an inaccuracy of ~1o/0 of reading. Additionally, the meter was engineered to cause minimal pressure drop (less than 125mm of water), to function in a high temperature environment (up to 650oC) with thermal transients of 15 oC/s, and to have a response time of 0.1 seconds for a 10% to 90!40 step change. The flow meter was also configured to measure hi-directional flow. Several flow meter prototypes were fabricated, tested, and calibrated in air, simulated exhaust gas, and actual exhaust gas. Testing included gas temperatures to 600oC, step response experiments, and flow rates from O to 360 lps in air and exhaust gas. Two prototypes have been tested extensively at NIST and two additional meters have been installed in exhaust gas flow lines for over one year. This new flow meter design has shown to be accurate, durabIe, fast responding, and to have a wide rangeabi~ity.

  10. Underestimation of access flow by ultrasound dilution flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Clemens; Smits, Johannes H. M.; Zijlstra, Jan J.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Viergever, Max A.

    2002-02-01

    For hemodialysis access surveillance, flow measurements are increasingly considered important because they identify accesses at risk of thrombosis. Usually these flow measurements are performed with the ultrasound dilution technique. In a previous patient study it was observed that the resulting flow values were systematically low as compared to magnetic resonance flow measurements, but a satisfactory explanation was lacking. In the present study, we will demonstrate by hemodynamic calculations and in vitro experiments that this discrepancy can be explained by a temporary reduction of the access flow rate, caused by the reversed needle configuration during ultrasound dilution flow measurements. In this configuration, blood is injected retrogressively at one needle and flow between the needles is increased, causing an increased dissipation of energy. The proposed explanation is subsequently confirmed in a patient with a loop graft, by measuring the blood velocity by Doppler ultrasound as a function of reversed dialyzer flow rate. Apart from the ultrasound dilution technique, these findings are applicable to other recently proposed methods for measuring access flow that employ the reversed needle configuration.

  11. Highly accurate SNR measurement using the covariance of two SEM images with the identical view.

    PubMed

    Oho, Eisaku; Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Quality of an SEM image is strongly influenced by the extent of noise. As a well-known method in the field of SEM, the covariance is applied to measure the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This method has potential ability for highly accurate measurement of the SNR, which is hardly known until now. If the precautions discussed in this article are adopted, that method can demonstrate its real ability. These precautions are strongly related to "proper acquisition of two images with the identical view," "alignment of an aperture diaphragm," "reduction of charging phenomena," "elimination of particular noises," and "accurate focusing," As necessary, characteristics in SEM signal and noise are investigated from a few standpoints. When using the maximum performance of this measurement, SNR of many SEM images obtained in a variety of the SEM operating conditions and specimens can be measured accurately.

  12. MASS MEASUREMENTS BY AN ACCURATE AND SENSITIVE SELECTED ION RECORDING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace-level components of mixtures were successfully identified or confirmed by mass spectrometric accurate mass measurements, made at high resolution with selected ion recording, using GC and LC sample introduction. Measurements were made at 20 000 or 10 000 resolution, respecti...

  13. A Structured-Grid Quality Measure for Simulated Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A structured-grid quality measure is proposed, combining three traditional measurements: intersection angles, stretching, and curvature. Quality assesses whether the grid generated provides the best possible tradeoffs in grid stretching and skewness that enable accurate flow predictions, whereas the grid density is assumed to be a constraint imposed by the available computational resources and the desired resolution of the flow field. The usefulness of this quality measure is assessed by comparing heat transfer predictions from grid convergence studies for grids of varying quality in the range of [0.6-0.8] on an 8'half-angle sphere-cone, at laminar, perfect gas, Mach 10 wind tunnel conditions.

  14. Whistle Gauge Measures Flow And Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.

    1989-01-01

    Simple, rugged gauge used to measure speed of flow and temperature of steam or other gas flowing through pipes of arbitrary diameter, from 1 to 28 in. or larger. Specially designed, instrumented whistle - has no moving parts, small, nonobstruction, operates at high temperature and pressure, and cleans itself. Does not operate at zero flow, but at moderate flows (tens of meters per second) generates intense sound for use in measurements. Consists of slanted ring groove of depth D and pressure taps in wall of pipe carrying flow to be measured. Resonant wavelength of sound generated by ring groove depends primarily on size and shape of groove and approximately equal to 4D.

  15. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Than X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for monitoring the presence, concentration, and the movement of fluids. It is based on utilizing electromagnetic measurements of the complex permittivity of the fluids for detecting and monitoring the fluid. More particularly the apparatus uses one or more microwave probes which are placed at the locations where the measurements are to be made. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids, based on their dielectric constant at the probe. The apparatus can be used for multiple purposes including measures of flow rates, turbulence, dispersion, fluid identification, and changes in flow conditions of multiple fluids or multiple states of a single fluid in a flowline or a holding container. The apparatus includes a probe consisting of two electrical conductors separated by an insulator. A radio frequency signal is communicated to the probe and is reflected back from the portion of the probe exposed to the fluid. The radio frequency signal also provides a reference signal. An oscillator generates a second signal which combined with each of the reference signal and the reflected signal to produce signals of lower frequencies to facilitate filtering and amplifying those signals. The two signals are then mixed in a detector to produce an output signal that is representative of the phase and amplitude change caused by the reflection of the signal at the probe exposed to the fluid. The detector may be a dual phase detector that provides two such output signals that are in phase quadrature. A phase shifter may be provided for selectively changing the phase of the reference signal to improve the sensitivity of at least one of the output signals for more accurate readings and/or for calibration purposes. The two outputs that are in quadrature with respect to each other may be simultaneously monitored to account for

  16. MELIFT - A new device for accurate measurements in a snow rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, M.

    2012-04-01

    A deep snow pack, remote locations, no external power supply and very low temperatures are often the main ingredients when it comes to the deployment of meteorological stations in mountainous terrain. The accurate position of the sensor related to the snow surface is normally not known. A new device called METLIFT overcomes the problems. WMO recommends a height between 1.2 m and 2 m above ground level for the measurement of air temperature and humidity. The height above ground level is specified to take care of the possible strong vertical temperature and humidity gradients at the lowest layers in the atmosphere. Especially in snow rich and remote locations it may be hardly possible to follow this advice. Therefore most of the meteorological stations in mountainous terrain are situated at mountain tops where strong winds will blow off the snow or in valleys where a daily inspection of the sensors is possible. In other unpopulated mountainous areas, e.g. basins, plateaus, the distance of the sensor to the snow surface is not known or the sensor will be snow-covered. A new device was developed to guarantee the sensor height above surface within the WMO limits in harsh and remote environments. An ultrasonic snow height sensor measures the distance to the snow surface. If it exceeds certain limits due to snow accumulation or snow melt the lift adapts its height accordingly. The prototype of METLIFT has been installed in Lower Austria at an altitude of 1000m. The lift is 6 m high and can pull out for another 4 m. Sensor arms are mounted every meter to allow the connection of additional sensors or to measure a profile of a certain parameter of the lowest 5 m above surface. Sensors can be added easily since cable wiring is provided to each sensor arm. Horizontal winds are measured at 7 m height above surface. METLIFT is independent of external power supply. Three lead gel accumulators recharged by three solar panels provide the energy necessary for the sensors, the data

  17. On the Methods to Measure Powder Flow.

    PubMed

    Tan, Geoffrey; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The flow of powders can often play a critical role in the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. Many of these processes require good, consistent and predictable flow of powders to ensure continuous production of pharmaceutical dosages and to ensure their quality. Therefore, the flow of powders is of paramount importance to the pharmaceutical industry and thus the measuring and evaluating of powder flow is of utmost importance. At present, there are numerous methods in which the flow of powders can be measured. However, due to the complex and environment-dependent nature of powders, no one method exists that is capable of providing a complete picture of the behaviour of powders under dynamic conditions. Some of the most commonly applied methods to measure the flow of powders include: density indices, such as the Carr index and Hausner ratio, powder avalanching, the angle of repose (AOR), flow through an orifice, powder rheometry and shear cell testing.

  18. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  19. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing.

  20. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing. PMID:27475167

  1. Importance of Accurate Measurements in Nutrition Research: Dietary Flavonoids as a Case Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurements of the secondary metabolites in natural products and plant foods are critical to establishing diet/health relationships. There are as many as 50,000 secondary metabolites which may influence human health. Their structural and chemical diversity present a challenge to analytic...

  2. Toward Accurate Measurement of Participation: Rethinking the Conceptualization and Operationalization of Participatory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneault, Pierre-Marc; Jacob, Steve

    2009-01-01

    While participatory evaluation (PE) constitutes an important trend in the field of evaluation, its ontology has not been systematically analyzed. As a result, the concept of PE is ambiguous and inadequately theorized. Furthermore, no existing instrument accurately measures stakeholder participation. First, this article attempts to overcome these…

  3. A direct measurement of thermosiphon flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kudish, A.I.; Santumaura, P.

    1983-06-01

    The rate of thermosiphon flow has been measured directly by the application of a simple and well-known laboratory technique, a constant level device. The measurements were performed on an open-cycle thermosiphon system. The thermosiphon flow rate was correlated both with the temperature difference across the solar collector (..delta..T) and the global insolation rate for four different thermosiphon heights. The minimum ..delta..T required to initiate thermosiphon flow in the morning was also determined.

  4. Accurate measurement of dispersion data through short and narrow tubes used in very high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; McDonald, Thomas; Gilar, Martin

    2015-09-01

    An original method is proposed for the accurate and reproducible measurement of the time-based dispersion properties of short L< 50cm and narrow rc< 50μm tubes at mobile phase flow rates typically used in very high-pressure liquid chromatography (vHPLC). Such tubes are used to minimize sample dispersion in vHPLC; however, their dispersion characteristics cannot be accurately measured at such flow rates due to system dispersion contribution of vHPLC injector and detector. It is shown that using longer and wider tubes (>10μL) enables a reliable measurement of the dispersion data. We confirmed that the dimensionless plot of the reduced dispersion coefficient versus the reduced linear velocity (Peclet number) depends on the aspect ratio, L/rc, of the tube, and unexpectedly also on the diffusion coefficient of the analyte. This dimensionless plot could be easily obtained for a large volume tube, which has the same aspect ratio as that of the short and narrow tube, and for the same diffusion coefficient. The dispersion data for the small volume tube are then directly extrapolated from this plot. For instance, it is found that the maximum volume variances of 75μm×30.5cm and 100μm×30.5cm prototype finger-tightened connecting tubes are 0.10 and 0.30μL(2), respectively, with an accuracy of a few percent and a precision smaller than seven percent.

  5. Solar collector performance without flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for characterizing solar collector performance in four series of experiments with temperature and radiation measurements. The proposed method eliminates the requirement for mass flow rate meters and is therefore suited to small thermosyphon flow collection circuits. Experimental measurements on a specific system were not reliable because of the occurrence of internal mass transfers between collector and storage reservoir.

  6. Instrument continuously measures density of flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, R. B.; Macinko, J.; Miller, C. E.

    1967-01-01

    Electromechanical densitometer continuously measures the densities of either single-phase or two-phase flowing cryogenic fluids. Measurement is made on actual flow. The instrument operates on the principle that the mass of any vibrating system is a primary factor in determining the dynamic characteristics of the system.

  7. Low-drag insertion turbine flow measurement technology for ciculating water systems without fully-developed flow profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Tous, I.A.; Leggett, M.; Hill, D.

    1996-05-01

    Measurement of circulating water flow rate can provide indications of cooling system problems and can be used to calculate turbine cycle heat rate. Unfortunately, this parameter is often difficult to accurately measure in power plants. A particular problem arises when a circulating water system cannot provide the necessary location and conditions (i.e., fully-developed flow profile) for the use of conventional measurement technology that are essential for obtaining highly accurate results. A low drag insertion turbine flow measurement system can overcome this problem because it is not dependent upon a fully-developed flow profile to obtain highly accurate results. This paper describes the applications and results of performing circulating water flow measurement using a high accuracy low drag insertion flow metering system in locations without a fully-developed flow profile. A case study of this type of measurement at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Genoa Station is presented and compared with the results of a dedicated magnetic influent flowmeter measuring flow in a large cross-section of a round tunnel more than one quarter of a mile straight where fully-developed flow is present. The results indicate a close agreement ({approx}{plus_minus}2% from each other).

  8. Low-drag insertion turbine flow measurement technology for circulating water systems without fully-developed flow profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Tous, I.A.; Leggett, M.; Hill, D.

    1996-08-01

    Measurement of circulating water flow rate can provide indications of cooling system problems and can be used to calculate turbine cycle heat rate. Unfortunately, this parameter is often difficult to accurately measure in power plants. A particular problem arises when a circulating water system cannot provide the necessary location and conditions (i.e., fully-developed flow profile) for the use of conventional measurement technology that are essential for obtaining highly accurate results. A low drag insertion turbine flow measurement system can overcome this problem because it is not dependent upon a fully-developed flow profile to obtain highly accurate results. This paper describes the applications and results of performing circulating water flow measurement using a high accuracy low drag insertion flow metering system in locations without a fully-developed flow profile. A case study of this type of measurement at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Genoa Station is presented and compared with the results of a dedicated magnetic influent flowmeter measuring flow in a large cross-section of a round tunnel more than one quarter of a mile straight where fully-developed flow is present. The results indicate a close agreement ({approx}{+-}2% from each other). 4 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  10. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, Charles V.; Killian, E. Wayne; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.; Randolph, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  11. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  12. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  13. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... royalty: (1) If the meter measures electricity, it must have an accuracy of ±0.25% or better of reading... an accuracy reading of ±2 percent or better; (3) If the meter measures steam flowing at less than 100,000 lbs/hr on a monthly basis, it must have an accuracy reading of ±4 percent or better; (4) If...

  14. Tailoring Inlet Flow to Enable High Accuracy Compressor Performance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossman, John R.; Smith, Natalie R.; Talalayev, Anton; Key, Nicole L.

    2011-12-01

    To accomplish the research goals of capturing the effects of blade row interactions on compressor performance, small changes in performance must be measurable. This also requires axi-symmetric flow so that measuring one passage accurately captures the phenomena occurring in all passages. Thus, uniform inlet flow is a necessity. The original front-driven compressor had non-uniform temperature at the inlet. Additional challenges in controlling shaft speed to within tight tolerances were associated with the use of a viscous fluid coupling. Thus, a new electric motor, with variable frequency drive speed control was implemented. To address the issues with the inlet flow, the compressor is now driven from the rear resulting in improved inlet flow uniformity. This paper presents the design choices of the new layout in addition to the preliminary performance data of the compressor and an uncertainty analysis.

  15. Doppler Measurements of the Suns Meridional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Doppler velocity data obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments in Tucson from 1992 August through 1995 April were analyzed to determine the structure and evolution of the Sun's meridional flow. Individual measurements of the flow were derived from line-of-sight velocity images averaged over 17 minutes to remove the p-mode oscillation signal. Typical flow velocities are poleward at approximately 20 m/s, but the results suggest that episodes may occur with much stronger flows. Such variations may help to explain some of the many disparate reports on the strength and structure of the Sun's meridional flow.

  16. Guide to Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Jason D.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Snyder, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In electric propulsion (EP) systems, accurate measurement of the propellant mass flow rate of gas or liquid to the thruster and external cathode is a key input in the calculation of thruster efficiency and specific impulse. Although such measurements are often achieved with commercial mass flow controllers and meters integrated into propellant feed systems, the variability in potential propellant options and flow requirements amongst the spectrum of EP power regimes and devices complicates meter selection, integration, and operation. At the direction of the Committee on Standards for Electric Propulsion Testing, a guide was jointly developed by members of the electric propulsion community to establish a unified document that contains the working principles, methods of implementation and analysis, and calibration techniques and recommendations on the use of mass flow meters in laboratory and spacecraft electric propulsion systems. The guide is applicable to EP devices of all types and power levels ranging from microthrusters to high-power ion engines and Hall effect thrusters. The establishment of a community standard on mass flow metering will help ensure the selection of the proper meter for each application. It will also improve the quality of system performance estimates by providing comprehensive information on the physical phenomena and systematic errors that must be accounted for during the analysis of flow measurement data. This paper will outline the standard methods and recommended practices described in the guide titled "Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems."

  17. Entrainment measurements in annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Assad, A.; Jan, C.; Bertodano, M. de; Beus, S.G.

    1997-07-01

    Air/water and vapor/freon were utilized to scale and simulate annular two-phase flow for high pressure steam/water conditions. A unique vapor/liquid Freon loop was built to obtain the high pressure data. The results were compared with two correlations available in the open literature. The Ishii and Mishima dimensionless group was able to scale the data remarkably well even for vapor/liquid Freon. However, the correlation needs to be adjusted for high Weber numbers of the gas phase.

  18. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  19. Radiometer for accurate (+ or - 1%) measurement of solar irradiance equal to 10,000 solar constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Sr.

    1981-01-01

    The 10,000 solar constant radiometer was developed for the accurate (+ or - 1%) measurement of the irradiance produced in the image formed by a parabolic reflector or by a multiple mirror solar installation. This radiometer is water cooled, weighs about 1 kg, and is 5 cm (2 in.) in diameter by 10 cm (4 in.) long. A sting is provided for mounting the radiometer in the solar installation capable of measuring irradiances as high as 20,000 solar constants, the instrument is self calibrating. Its accuracy depends on the accurate determination of the cavity aperture, and absorptivity of the cavity, and accurate electrical measurements. The spectral response is flat over the entire spectrum from far UV to far IR. The radiometer responds to a measurement within 99.7% of the final value within 8 s. During a measurement of the 10,000 solar constant irradiance, the temperature rise of the water is about 20 C. The radiometer has perfect cosine response up to 60 deg off the radiometer axis.

  20. A method for measuring cooling air flow in base coolant passages of rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    Method accurately determines actual coolant mass flow rate in cooling passages of rotating turbine blades. Total and static pressures are measured in blade base coolant passages. Mass flow rates are calculated from these measurements of pressure, measured temperature and known area.

  1. On preferential flow and its measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Preferential flow is a useful generic term for describing the process whereby water movement through a porous medium follows favored routes bypassing other parts of the medium. This term does not give any indication of the pore scales involved. Sometimes macropore flow is used to describe preferential flow and this term implies that large pores of some sort are conductive. There is no consensus definition of what constitutes a macropore so one needs to carefully determine what is meant when that term is used. The main focus of this report is on the measurement and characterization of preferential flow through structured soils, however, preferred path flow also occurs in sandy soils. Fingering flow in soils, a result of wetting front instability, is a third type of preferential flow that occurs in porous media with more or less random pore arrangement. There may not be any physically defined channels in the soil to account for this type of flow. A larger scale flow described as funnel flow by Kung et al. (1990) results from profile heterogeneity. Low permeability layers or coarse lenses in a profile may restrict vertical drainage redirecting flow laterally through specific regions of the profile (like a funnel). Water repellency can also be a factor in the development of preferential flow. 34 refs.

  2. Practical do-it-yourself device for accurate volume measurement of breast.

    PubMed

    Tezel, E; Numanoğlu, A

    2000-03-01

    A simple and accurate method of measuring differences in breast volume based on Archimedes' principle is described. In this method, a plastic container is placed on the breast of the patient who is lying in supine position. While the breast occupies part of the container, the remaining part is filled with water and the volume is measured. This method allows the measurement of the volume differences of asymmetric breasts and also helps the surgeon to estimate the size of the prosthesis to be used in augmentation mammaplasty. PMID:10724264

  3. Progress Toward Accurate Measurements of Power Consumptions of DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.; Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of power consumption by Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators is a challenge due to the characteristics of the actuator current signal. Micro-discharges generate high-amplitude, high-frequency current spike transients superimposed on a low-amplitude, low-frequency current. We have used a high-speed digital oscilloscope to measure the actuator power consumption using the Shunt Resistor method and the Monitor Capacitor method. The measurements were performed simultaneously and compared to each other in a time-accurate manner. It was found that low signal-to-noise ratios of the oscilloscopes used, in combination with the high dynamic range of the current spikes, make the Shunt Resistor method inaccurate. An innovative, nonlinear signal compression circuit was applied to the actuator current signal and yielded excellent agreement between the two methods. The paper describes the issues and challenges associated with performing accurate power measurements. It provides insights into the two methods including new insight into the Lissajous curve of the Monitor Capacitor method. Extension to a broad range of parameters and further development of the compression hardware will be performed in future work.

  4. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Characteristics Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.; Lin, C. S.; Edwards, L. G.; Knapp, J.; Harrison, M. E.; Xhang, X.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the technical approach and initial results of a test program for studying two-phase annular flow under the simulated microgravity conditions of KC-135 aircraft flights. A helical coil flow channel orientation was utilized in order to circumvent the restrictions normally associated with drop tower or aircraft flight tests with respect to two-phase flow, namely spatial restrictions preventing channel lengths of sufficient size to accurately measure pressure drops. Additionally, the helical coil geometry is of interest in itself, considering that operating in a microgravity environment vastly simplifies the two-phase flows occurring in coiled flow channels under 1-g conditions for virtually any orientation. Pressure drop measurements were made across four stainless steel coil test sections, having a range of inside tube diameters (0.95 to 1.9 cm), coil diameters (25 - 50 cm), and length-to-diameter ratios (380 - 720). High-speed video photographic flow observations were made in the transparent straight sections immediately preceding and following the coil test sections. A transparent coil of tygon tubing of 1.9 cm inside diameter was also used to obtain flow visualization information within the coil itself. Initial test data has been obtained from one set of KC-135 flight tests, along with benchmark ground tests. Preliminary results appear to indicate that accurate pressure drop data is obtainable using a helical coil geometry that may be related to straight channel flow behavior. Also, video photographic results appear to indicate that the observed slug-annular flow regime transitions agree quite reasonably with the Dukler microgravity map.

  5. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  6. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability is proposed that makes it feasible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) methodology was used for the analysis of flow field measurements within a low-aspect-ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor acquired with two-dimensional laser anemometry. It is shown that the MMS method may be utilized to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analytical tools developed for numerical flow field simulation data. Thus an experimenter utilizing an interactive graphics program could illustrate scalar quantities such as Mach number by profiles, contour lines, carpet plots, and surfaces employing various color intensities. Also, flow directionality can be shown by the display of vector fields and particle traces.

  7. Accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements of laser-doped areas in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Martin; Kluska, Sven; Binder, Sebastian; Hameiri, Ziv; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.

    2014-10-07

    It is investigated how potential drop sheet resistance measurements of areas formed by laser-assisted doping in crystalline Si wafers are affected by typically occurring experimental factors like sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, or coatings. Measurements are obtained with a collinear four point probe setup and a modified transfer length measurement setup to measure sheet resistances of laser-doped lines. Inhomogeneities in doping depth are observed from scanning electron microscope images and electron beam induced current measurements. It is observed that influences from sample size, inhomogeneities, surface roughness, and coatings can be neglected if certain preconditions are met. Guidelines are given on how to obtain accurate potential drop sheet resistance measurements on laser-doped regions.

  8. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  9. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation. PMID:27517769

  10. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. C.; Ghafur, O.; Khurmi, C.; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J. E.; Laban, D. E.; Pullen, M. G.; Bartschat, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Wells, D.; Quiney, H. M.; Tong, X. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.; Kielpinski, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  11. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  12. Accurate Determination of Torsion and Pure Bending Moment for Viscoelastic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Ko, Chih-Chin; Shiau, Li-Ming

    Measurements of time-dependent material properties in the context of linear viscoelasticity, at a given frequency and temperature, require accurate determination of both loading and deformation that are subjected to the testing materials. A pendulum-type viscoelastic spectroscopy is developed to experimentally measure loss tangent and the magnitude of dynamic modulus of solid materials. The mechanical system of the device is based on the behavior of the cantilever beam, and torsion and pure bending moment are generated from the interaction between a permanent magnet and the Helmholtz coils. The strength of the magnetic interactions may be determined with a material with known mechanical properties, such as aluminum 6061T4 alloy. The sensitivity of the torque measurement is on the order of one micro N-m level. With the high accurate torque measurement and deformation detection from a laser-based displacement measurement system, viscoelastic properties of materials can be experimentally measured in different frequency regimes. Sinusoidal driving signals are adopted for measuring complex modulus in the sub-resonant regime, and dc bias driving for creep tests in the low frequency limit. At structural resonant frequencies, the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) method or Lorentzian curve fitting method is adopted to extract material properties. The completion of determining material properties in the wide frequency spectrum may help to identify the deformation mechanisms of the material and to create better models for simulation work.

  13. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.C.

    1980-09-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented piping spool pieces is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Results from application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data are shown. Results of the study are used to make recommendations regarding spool piece design, instrument selection, and data reduction methods to obtain more accurate measurements of two-phase flow parameters. 13 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies.

    PubMed

    Wong, William W; Clarke, Lucinda L

    2012-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H(2)) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H(2)-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H(2)-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 (o)/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 (o)/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer.

  15. A Hydrogen Gas-Water Equilibration Method Produces Accurate and Precise Stable Hydrogen Isotope Ratio Measurements in Nutrition Studies12

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William W.; Clarke, Lucinda L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to hydrogen gas (H2) for mass spectrometric analysis are labor intensive, require special reagent, and involve memory effect and potential isotope fractionation. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of a platinum catalyzed H2-water equilibration method for stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements. Time to reach isotopic equilibrium, day-to-day and week-to-week reproducibility, accuracy, and precision of stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements by the H2-water equilibration method were assessed using a Thermo DELTA V Advantage continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. It took 3 h to reach isotopic equilibrium. The day-to-day and week-to-week measurements on water and urine samples with natural abundance and enriched levels of deuterium were highly reproducible. The method was accurate to within 2.8 o/oo and reproducible to within 4.0 o/oo based on analysis of international references. All the outcome variables, whether in urine samples collected in 10 doubly labeled water studies or plasma samples collected in 26 body water studies, did not differ from those obtained using the reference zinc reduction method. The method produced highly accurate estimation on ad libitum energy intakes, body composition, and water turnover rates. The method greatly reduces the analytical cost and could easily be adopted by laboratories equipped with a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. PMID:23014490

  16. Rapid accurate isotopic measurements on boron in boric acid and boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, N L; Verbruggen, A; Hendrickx, F; De Bièvre, P

    1986-04-01

    A procedure is described whereby rapid and accurate isotopic measurements can be performed on boron in boric acid and boron carbide after fusion of these compounds with calcium carbonate. It allows the determination of the isotopic composition of boron in boric acid and boron carbide and the direct assay of boron or the (10)B isotope in boron carbide by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry.

  17. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  18. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; Tran, Rosalie; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J; Brewster, Aaron S; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; White, William E; Schafer, Donald W; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Glatzel, Pieter; Zwart, Petrus H; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Bogan, Michael J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Adams, Paul D; Sauter, Nicholas K

    2014-05-01

    X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources enable the use of crystallography to solve three-dimensional macromolecular structures under native conditions and without radiation damage. Results to date, however, have been limited by the challenge of deriving accurate Bragg intensities from a heterogeneous population of microcrystals, while at the same time modeling the X-ray spectrum and detector geometry. Here we present a computational approach designed to extract meaningful high-resolution signals from fewer diffraction measurements.

  19. Proceedings of the fluid flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report presents reports which were presented at the Third International Symposium on Fluid Flow Measurement. Topics were concerned with metering, calibration, flow modeling, and gas properties. Individual reports have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  20. Accurate phase measurements for thick spherical objects using optical quadrature microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures have resulted in the birth of over three million babies since 1978. Yet the live birth rate in the United States was only 34% in 2005, with 32% of the successful pregnancies resulting in multiple births. These multiple pregnancies were directly attributed to the transfer of multiple embryos to increase the probability that a single, healthy embryo was included. Current viability markers used for IVF, such as the cell number, symmetry, size, and fragmentation, are analyzed qualitatively with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. However, this method is not ideal for quantitative measures beyond the 8-cell stage of development because the cells overlap and obstruct the view within and below the cluster of cells. We have developed the phase-subtraction cell-counting method that uses the combination of DIC and optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells accurately in live mouse embryos beyond the 8-cell stage. We have also created a preliminary analysis to measure the cell symmetry, size, and fragmentation quantitatively by analyzing the relative dry mass from the OQM image in conjunction with the phase-subtraction count. In this paper, we will discuss the characterization of OQM with respect to measuring the phase accurately for spherical samples that are much larger than the depth of field. Once fully characterized and verified with human embryos, this methodology could provide the means for a more accurate method to score embryo viability.

  1. Accurate measurement of cortical bone elasticity tensor with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Simon; Grimal, Quentin; Laugier, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) allows to accurately characterize the complete set of elastic constants of an anisotropic material from a set of measured mechanical resonant frequencies of a specimen. This method does not suffer from the drawbacks and limitations of the conventional sound velocity approach, but has been reported to fail to measure bone because of its strong viscoelastic damping. In this study, we take advantage of recent developments of RUS to overcome this limitation. The frequency response of a human cortical bone specimen (about 5 × 7 × 7 mm(3)) was measured between 100 and 280 kHz. Despite an important overlapping of the resonant peaks 20 resonant frequencies could be retrieved by using a dedicated signal processing method. The experimental frequencies were progressively matched to the frequencies predicted by a model of the sample whose elastic constants were adjusted. The determined diagonal elastic constants were in good agreement with concurrent sound velocity measurements performed in the principal directions of the specimen. This study demonstrates that RUS is suitable for an accurate measurement of cortical bone anisotropic elasticity. In particular, precision of measured Young and shear moduli is about 0.5%.

  2. Three-phase flow measurement in the petroleum industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, R.; Johansen, G. A.; Hjertaker, B. T.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of how to accurately measure the flowrate of oil-gas-water mixtures in a pipeline remains one of the key challenges in the petroleum industry. This paper discusses why three-phase flow measurement is still important and why it remains a difficult problem to solve. The measurement strategies and principal base technologies currently used by commercial manufacturers are described, and research developments that could influence future flowmeter design are considered. Finally, future issues, which will need to be addressed by manufacturers and users of three-phase flowmeters, are discussed.

  3. Field Measurements of the 1983 Royal Gardens Lava Flows, Kilauea Volcano, and 1984 Mauna Loa Lava Flow, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, J.; Zimbelman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models used in the remote determination of lava flow rheology and compositions rely on estimates of such geometric and flow parameters as volume flow rates, levee heights, and channel dimensions, as well as morphologic and structural patterns on the flow surfaces. Quantitative measures of these variables are difficult to obtain, even under optimum conditions. Detailed topographic profiles across several Hawaiian lava flows that were carefully monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey during their emplacement in 1983 were surveyed in order to test various flow emplacement models. Twenty two accurate channel cross sections were constructed by combining these profiles with digitized pre-flow topographic measurements. Levee heights, shear zone widths, and flow depths could then be read directly from the cross sections and input into the models. The profiles were also compared with ones constructed for some Martian lava flows.

  4. Field measurements of the 1983 Royal Gardens lava flows, Kilauea Volcano, and 1984 Mauna Loa lava flows, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J.; Zimbelman, J.

    1985-04-01

    Theoretical models used in the remote determination of lava flow rheology and compositions rely on estimates of such geometric and flow parameters as volume flow rates, levee heights, and channel dimensions, as well as morphologic and structural patterns on the flow surfaces. Quantitative measures of these variables are difficult to obtain, even under optimum conditions. Detailed topographic profiles across several Hawaiian lava flows that were carefully monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey during their emplacement in 1983 were surveyed in order to test various flow emplacement models. Twenty two accurate channel cross sections were constructed by combining these profiles with digitized pre-flow topographic measurements. Levee heights, shear zone widths, and flow depths could then be read directly from the cross sections and input into the models. The profiles were also compared with ones constructed for some Martian lava flows.

  5. Do inverse ecosystem models accurately reconstruct plankton trophic flows? Comparing two solution methods using field data from the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Samo, Ty; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2012-03-01

    Despite the increasing use of linear inverse modeling techniques to elucidate fluxes in undersampled marine ecosystems, the accuracy with which they estimate food web flows has not been resolved. New Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) solution methods have also called into question the biases of the commonly used L2 minimum norm (L 2MN) solution technique. Here, we test the abilities of MCMC and L 2MN methods to recover field-measured ecosystem rates that are sequentially excluded from the model input. For data, we use experimental measurements from process cruises of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE-LTER) Program that include rate estimates of phytoplankton and bacterial production, micro- and mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from eight study sites varying from rich coastal upwelling to offshore oligotrophic conditions. Both the MCMC and L 2MN methods predicted well-constrained rates of protozoan and mesozooplankton grazing with reasonable accuracy, but the MCMC method overestimated primary production. The MCMC method more accurately predicted the poorly constrained rate of vertical carbon export than the L 2MN method, which consistently overestimated export. Results involving DOC and bacterial production were equivocal. Overall, when primary production is provided as model input, the MCMC method gives a robust depiction of ecosystem processes. Uncertainty in inverse ecosystem models is large and arises primarily from solution under-determinacy. We thus suggest that experimental programs focusing on food web fluxes expand the range of experimental measurements to include the nature and fate of detrital pools, which play large roles in the model.

  6. High- and low-pressure pneumotachometers measure respiration rates accurately in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagot, R. J.; Mc Donald, R. T.; Roman, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Respiration-rate transducers in the form of pneumotachometers measure respiration rates of pilots operating high performance research aircraft. In each low pressure or high pressure oxygen system a sensor is placed in series with the pilots oxygen supply line to detect gas flow accompanying respiration.

  7. Planetary heat flow from shallow subsurface measurements: Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Marc; Hagermann, Axel

    2016-10-01

    Planetary heat flow probes measure heat flow (depth-resolved temperature and thermal conductivity) to provide insight into the internal state of a planet. The probes have been utilized extensively on Earth, twice on the Moon, and once on the Surface of comet 67P-CG. Mars is an important target for heat flow measurement as heat flow is a critical parameter in Martian thermal history models. Earlier studies indicate that Martian planetary heat flow can be accessed at 5 m below the surface in dry regolith monitored over at least one Martian year. A one Martian year monitoring period is necessary because, in the shallow subsurface, heat flow from the interior is superposed with time varying heat flow contributions, primarily due to insolation. Given that a heat flow probe may not achieve its target depth or monitoring period, this study investigates how the depth (2-5 m), duration (0-1 Martian year) and quality of measurements influence the accuracy of planetary heat flow. An inverse model is used to show that, in the preceding scenarios, the accuracy of planetary heat flow directly estimated from depth-dependent thermal conductivity with 10-20% precision errors, temperatures with 50-100 mK precision errors and modelling uncertainties up to 500 mK, can, on average, be improved by a factor of 27 with optimization to 13%. Accuracies increase with sensor penetration depth and regolith monitoring period. Heat flow optimized from instantaneous measurements or those with the shortest regolith monitoring periods have increased accuracy where the frequency and amplitude of the temperature variation are lowest. The inverse model is based on the Function Specification Inversion method. This study demonstrates that a solution subspace can be identified within a space of uncertainties modelled for the temperature measurements and planetary heat flow: the subspace is defined by a constant log-ratio of their respective standard deviations. Optimized heat flow estimates display

  8. Perspectives of anisotropic flow measurements at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, V. L.; Lokhtin, I. P.; Malinina, L. V.; Petrushanko, S. V.; Snigirev, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    High-accuracy and high-luminosity measurements of anisotropic flow for various hadron types over full NICA energy range will provide important constraints on the early dynamics of heavy-ion reactions under the conditions where a first-order quark-hadron phase transition may occur. The statistical reach for elliptic flow measurements at NICA is estimated with HYDJET++ heavy-ion event generator.

  9. Overview of anisotropic flow measurements from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic flow is an important observable to study the properties of the hot and dense matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), created in heavy-ion collisions. Measurements of anisotropic flow for inclusive and identified charged hadrons are reported in Pb-Pb, p-Pb and pp collisions with the ALICE detector. The comparison of experimental measurements to various theoretical calculations are also presented in these proceedings.

  10. Accurate measurement of spatial noise portraits of photosensors of digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Krasnov, V. V.; Kulakov, M. N.; Starikov, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Method of measurement of accurate portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors is described. The method consists of four steps: creation of spatially homogeneous illumination; shooting light and dark frames; digital processing and filtering. Unlike standard technique, this method uses iterative creation of spatially homogeneous illumination by display, compensation of photosensor dark spatial noise portrait and improved procedure of elimination of dark temporal noise. Portraits of light and dark spatial noise of photosensors of a scientific digital camera were found. Characteristics of the measured portraits were compared with values of photo response and dark signal non-uniformities of camera's photosensor.

  11. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  12. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  13. Rapid, high-order accurate calculation of flows due to free source or vortex distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsey, D.

    1981-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques are applied to the problem of finding the flow due to source or vortex distributions in the field outside an airfoil or other two-dimensional body. Either the complex potential or the complex velocity may be obtained to a high order of accuracy, with computational effort similar to that required by second-order fast Poisson solvers. These techniques are applicable to general flow problems with compressibility and rotation. An example is given of their use for inviscid compressible flow.

  14. Material interactions with the low earth orbital environment Accurate reaction rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, J. T.; Leger, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between spacecraft surfaces and atomic oxygen within the low earth orbital (LEO) environment have been observed and measured during Space Shuttle flights over the past 3 yr. The results of these experiments have demonstrated that interaction rates for many materials proposed for spacecraft applications are high and that protective coatings must be developed to enable long-lived operation of spacecraft structures in the LEO environment. A flight experiment discussed herein uses the Space Shuttle as an orbiting exposure laboratory to obtain accurate reaction rate measurements for materials typically used in spacecraft construction. An ion-neutral mass spectrometer, installed in the Orbiter cargo bay, will measure diurnal ambient oxygen densities while material samples are exposed at low altitude (222 km) to the orbital environment. From in situ atomic oxygen density information and postflight material recession measurements, accurate reaction rates can be derived to update the Space Station materials interaction data base. Additionally, gases evolved from a limited number of material surfaces subjected to direct oxygen impingement will be identified using the mass spectrometer. These measurements will aid in mechanistic definitions of chemical reactions which cause atom-surface interactions and in validating results of upcoming degradation studies conducted in ground-based neutral beam laboratories.

  15. Accurate time-of-flight measurement of particle based on ECL-TTL Timer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deping; Liu, Jianguo; Huang, Shuhua; Gui, Huaqiao; Cheng, Yin; Wang, Jie; Lu, Yihuai

    2014-11-01

    Because of its aerodynamic diameter of the aerosol particles are stranded in different parts of different human respiratory system, thus affecting human health. Therefore, how to continue to effectively monitor the aerosol particles become increasingly concerned about. Use flight time of aerosol particle beam spectroscopy of atmospheric aerosol particle size distribution is the typical method for monitoring atmospheric aerosol particle size and particle concentration measurement , and it is the key point to accurate measurement of aerosol particle size spectra that measurement of aerosol particle flight time. In order to achieve accurate measurements of aerosol particles in time-of-flight, this paper design an ECL-TTL high-speed timer with ECL counter and TTL counter. The high-speed timer includes a clock generation, high-speed timer and the control module. Clock Generation Module using a crystal plus multiplier design ideas, take advantage of the stability of the crystal to provide a stable 500MHz clock signal is high counter. High count module design using ECL and TTL counter mix design, timing accuracy while effectively maintaining , expanding the timing range, and simplifies circuit design . High-speed counter control module controls high-speed counter start, stop and reset timely based on aerosol particles time-of-flight, is a key part of the high-speed counting. The high-speed counting resolution of 4ns, the full scale of 4096ns, has been successfully applied Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, to meet the precise measurement of aerosol particles time-of-flight.

  16. Accurate Critical Stress Intensity Factor Griffith Crack Theory Measurements by Numerical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Critical stress intensity factor (KIc) has been an approximation for fracture toughness using only load-cell measurements. However, artificial man-made cracks several orders of magnitude longer and wider than natural flaws have required a correction factor term (Y) that can be up to about 3 times the recorded experimental value [1-3]. In fact, over 30 years ago a National Academy of Sciences advisory board stated that empirical KIc testing was of serious concern and further requested that an accurate bulk fracture toughness method be found [4]. Now that fracture toughness can be calculated accurately by numerical integration from the load/deflection curve as resilience, work of fracture (WOF) and strain energy release (SIc) [5, 6], KIc appears to be unnecessary. However, the large body of previous KIc experimental test results found in the literature offer the opportunity for continued meta analysis with other more practical and accurate fracture toughness results using energy methods and numerical integration. Therefore, KIc is derived from the classical Griffith Crack Theory [6] to include SIc as a more accurate term for strain energy release rate (𝒢Ic), along with crack surface energy (γ), crack length (a), modulus (E), applied stress (σ), Y, crack-tip plastic zone defect region (rp) and yield strength (σys) that can all be determined from load and deflection data. Polymer matrix discontinuous quartz fiber-reinforced composites to accentuate toughness differences were prepared for flexural mechanical testing comprising of 3 mm fibers at different volume percentages from 0-54.0 vol% and at 28.2 vol% with different fiber lengths from 0.0-6.0 mm. Results provided a new correction factor and regression analyses between several numerical integration fracture toughness test methods to support KIc results. Further, bulk KIc accurate experimental values are compared with empirical test results found in literature. Also, several fracture toughness mechanisms

  17. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  18. Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, M. Jake

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving vane-type flow-angle probes. Forces in the FLAP can be measured by various techniques, including those that involve conventional strain gauges (based on electrical resistance) and those that involve more advanced strain gauges (based on optical fibers). A correlation is used to convert force-measurement data to the local flow angle. The use of fiber optics will enable the construction of a miniature FLAP, leading to the possibility of flow measurement in very small or confined regions. This may also enable the tufting of a surface with miniature FLAPs, capable of quantitative flow-angle measurements, similar to attaching yarn tufts for qualitative measurements. The prototype FLAP was a small, aerodynamically shaped, low-aspect-ratio fin about 2 in. (approximately equal to 5 cm) long, 1 in. (approximately equal to 2.5 cm) wide, and 0.125 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) thick (see Figure 1). The prototype FLAP included simple electrical-resistance strain gauges for measuring forces. Four strain gauges were mounted on the FLAP; two on the upper surface and two on the lower surface. The gauges were connected to form a full Wheatstone bridge, configured as a bending bridge. In preparation for a flight test, the prototype FLAP was mounted on the airdata boom of a flight-test fixture (FTF) on the NASA Dryden F-15B flight research airplane.

  19. Damping measurements in flowing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, A.; Seeley, C.; Monette, C.; Nennemann, B.; Marmont, H.

    2012-11-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Water added mass and damping are both critical quantities in evaluating the dynamic response of the turbine component. Although the effect of fluid added mass is well documented, fluid damping, a critical quantity to limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore to help avoiding possible failure of the turbines, has received much less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. The experimental setup, designed to create dynamic characteristics similar to the ones of Francis turbine blades is discussed, together with the experimental protocol and examples of measurements obtained. The paper concludes with the calculated damping values and a discussion on the impact of the observed damping behaviour on the response of hydraulic turbine blades to FSI.

  20. No galaxy left behind: accurate measurements with the faintest objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, E.; Huff, E. M.; Aleksić, J.; Melchior, P.; Jouvel, S.; MacCrann, N.; Ross, A. J.; Crocce, M.; Gaztanaga, E.; Honscheid, K.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H. V.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Percival, W. J.; Reil, K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of detectable stars or galaxies. We have implemented our proposal in BALROG, software which embeds fake objects in real imaging to accurately characterize measurement biases. We demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for their sensitivity to depth and seeing variations. Using the synthetic galaxies as randoms in the Landy-Szalay estimator suppresses the effects of variable survey selection by at least two orders of magnitude. With this correction, our measured angular clustering is found to be in excellent agreement with that of a matched sample from much deeper, higher resolution space-based Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) imaging; over angular scales of 0.004° < θ < 0.2°, we find a best-fitting scaling amplitude between the DES and COSMOS measurements of 1.00 ± 0.09. We expect this methodology to be broadly useful for extending measurements' statistical reach in a variety of upcoming imaging surveys.

  1. No Galaxy Left Behind: Accurate Measurements with the Faintest Objects in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Suchyta, E.

    2016-01-27

    Accurate statistical measurement with large imaging surveys has traditionally required throwing away a sizable fraction of the data. This is because most measurements have have relied on selecting nearly complete samples, where variations in the composition of the galaxy population with seeing, depth, or other survey characteristics are small. We introduce a new measurement method that aims to minimize this wastage, allowing precision measurement for any class of stars or galaxies detectable in an imaging survey. We have implemented our proposal in Balrog, a software package which embeds fake objects in real imaging in order to accurately characterize measurement biases.more » We also demonstrate this technique with an angular clustering measurement using Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. We first show that recovery of our injected galaxies depends on a wide variety of survey characteristics in the same way as the real data. We then construct a flux-limited sample of the faintest galaxies in DES, chosen specifically for their sensitivity to depth and seeing variations. Using the synthetic galaxies as randoms in the standard LandySzalay correlation function estimator suppresses the effects of variable survey selection by at least two orders of magnitude. Now our measured angular clustering is found to be in excellent agreement with that of a matched sample drawn from much deeper, higherresolution space-based COSMOS imaging; over angular scales of 0.004° < θ < 0.2 ° , we find a best-fit scaling amplitude between the DES and COSMOS measurements of 1.00 ± 0.09. We expect this methodology to be broadly useful for extending the statistical reach of measurements in a wide variety of coming imaging surveys.« less

  2. Flow tagging measurements of a vortical, turbulent flow inside a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Scott R.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1998-11-01

    The flow inside a cylindrical cavity driven by a rotating lid has been the subject of much attention for a variety of reasons. Not only does this configuration give rise to interesting flow phenomena such as vortex breakdown, it also ideal for accurate computations and experiments because of its simple geometry. Most previous experimental work, however, has relied on standard dye techniques in order to visualize the flow, and as a result have been limited to steady and periodic flows occurring at moderate Reynolds numbers (0 <= Re <= 4000). In the current work, flow tagging velocimetry is used to study the development of turbulence in this flow as Reynolds number is varied from 0 to 10^5. Using a laser, fluorescent lines are written into the flow. The subsequent motion of these lines is imaged using two orthogonal cameras in order to provide a three dimensional view of the fluid motion. In addition to flow visualizations, we will present measurements of average velocity, turbulence intensity, and spatial correlations made in this flow over a wide range of Reynolds number.

  3. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-01-01

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework. PMID:26987587

  4. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-01-01

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework. PMID:26987587

  5. Direct measurement meter indicates real-time energy flow

    SciTech Connect

    Heyden, W.H.V. )

    1991-05-01

    The increased activity in transporting gas and the use of natural gas from widely varying sources has created a need to simplify measurement of energy transfers in natural gas operations. The natural gas industry requires an energy measurement device that is simple, cost effective and accurate. Such a device must be a direct measurement meter, easy to install, and one which will measure energy transfers in natural gas regardless of volume, composition, heating value, supercompressibility, inert fractions and temperature. These and other factors that are required for what presently is and remains, a calculation of energy in natural gas. The need then, is for a flow device which will measure and indicate direct, real-time energy flow and perform at pipe line conditions. A flow meter has been under development for seven years and has been in field testing for three years at 4 different sites under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) sponsored program. The field test objective is to measure and verify the meter's technical properties under actual field service conditions. In each field test site, the meter is continuously compared to existing gas flow measurement devices. Eact test site has different meter configurations which allow a broad scope of comparison and testing experience.

  6. NMRI Measurements of Flow of Granular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Masami; Waggoner, R. Allen; Fukushima, Eiichi

    1996-01-01

    We investigate complex 3D behavior of granular mixtures in shaking and shearing devices. NMRI can non-invasively measure concentration, velocity, and velocity fluctuations of flows of suitable particles. We investigate origins of wall-shear induced convection flow of single component particles by measuring the flow and fluctuating motion of particles near rough boundaries. We also investigate if a mixture of different size particles segregate into their own species under the influence of external shaking and shearing disturbances. These non-invasive measurements will reveal true nature of convecting flow properties and wall disturbance. For experiments in a reduced gravity environment, we will design a light weight NMR imager. The proof of principle development will prepare for the construction of a complete spaceborne system to perform experiments in space.

  7. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  8. Electromagnetic probe technique for fluid flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constant of the fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow stream. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  9. Electromagnetic Probe Technique for Fluid Flow Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.; Nguyen, T. X.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constants of each fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow steam. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this industry, a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans and program to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  10. Recommendations for accurate heat capacity measurements using a Quantum Design physical property measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Catherine A.; Stancescu, Maria; Marriott, Robert A.; White, Mary Anne

    2007-02-01

    A commercial instrument for determination of heat capacities of solids from ca. 400 K to 0.4 K, the physical property measurement system from Quantum Design, has been used to determine the heat capacities of a standard samples (sapphire [single crystal] and copper). We extend previous tests of the PPMS in three important ways: to temperatures as low as 0.4 K; to samples with poor thermal conductivity; to compare uncertainty with accuracy. We find that the accuracy of heat capacity determinations can be within 1% for 5 K < T < 300 K and 5% for 0.7 K < T < 5 K. Careful attention should be paid to the relative uncertainty for each data point, as determined from multiple measurements. While we have found that it is possible in some circumstances to obtain excellent results by measurement of samples that contribute more than ca. 1/3 to the total heat capacity, there is no "ideal" sample mass and sample geometry also is an important consideration. In fact, our studies of pressed pellets of zirconium tungstate, a poor thermal conductor, show that several samples of different masses should be determined for the highest degree of certainty.

  11. Ultrasonic flow measurements for irrigation process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziani, Elmostafa; Bennouna, Mustapha; Boissier, Raymond

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents the state of the art of the general principle of liquid flow measurements by ultrasonic method, and problems of flow measurements. We present an ultrasonic flowmeter designed according to smart sensors concept, for the measurement of irrigation water flowing through pipelines or open channels, using the ultrasonic transit time approach. The new flowmeter works on the principle of measuring time delay differences between sound pulses transmitted upstream and downstream in the flowing liquid. The speed of sound in the flowing medium is eliminated as a variable because the flowrate calculations are based on the reciprocals of the transmission times. The transit time difference is digitally measured by means of a suitable, microprocessor controlled logic. This type of ultrasonic flowmeter will be widely used in industry and water management, it is well studied in this work, followed by some experimental results. For pressurized channels, we use one pair of ultrasonic transducer arranged in proper positions and directions of the pipe, in this case, to determine the liquid velocity, a real time on-line analysis taking account the geometries of the hydraulic system, is applied to the obtained ultrasonic data. In the open channels, we use a single or two pairs of ultrasonic emitter-receiver according to the desired performances. Finally, the goals of this work consist in integrating the smart sensor into irrigation systems monitoring in order to evaluate potential advantages and demonstrate their performance, on the other hand, to understand and use ultrasonic approach for determining flow characteristics and improving flow measurements by reducing errors caused by disturbances of the flow profiles.

  12. Accurate Construction of Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) Images for Quantitative Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Kessler, Rene P.; Xiao, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Localization-based superresolution microscopy techniques such as Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM) and Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM) have allowed investigations of cellular structures with unprecedented optical resolutions. One major obstacle to interpreting superresolution images, however, is the overcounting of molecule numbers caused by fluorophore photoblinking. Using both experimental and simulated images, we determined the effects of photoblinking on the accurate reconstruction of superresolution images and on quantitative measurements of structural dimension and molecule density made from those images. We found that structural dimension and relative density measurements can be made reliably from images that contain photoblinking-related overcounting, but accurate absolute density measurements, and consequently faithful representations of molecule counts and positions in cellular structures, require the application of a clustering algorithm to group localizations that originate from the same molecule. We analyzed how applying a simple algorithm with different clustering thresholds (tThresh and dThresh) affects the accuracy of reconstructed images, and developed an easy method to select optimal thresholds. We also identified an empirical criterion to evaluate whether an imaging condition is appropriate for accurate superresolution image reconstruction with the clustering algorithm. Both the threshold selection method and imaging condition criterion are easy to implement within existing PALM clustering algorithms and experimental conditions. The main advantage of our method is that it generates a superresolution image and molecule position list that faithfully represents molecule counts and positions within a cellular structure, rather than only summarizing structural properties into ensemble parameters. This feature makes it particularly useful for cellular structures of heterogeneous densities and irregular geometries, and

  13. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  14. The road towards accurate optical width measurements at the industrial level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodermann, Bernd; Köning, Rainer; Bergmann, Detlef; Buhr, Egbert; Hässler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Flügge, Jens; Bosse, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Optical vision systems require both unidirectional and bidirectional measurements for the calibrations and the verification of the tool performance to enable accurate measurements traceable to the SI unit Metre. However, for bidirectional measurements up to now the national metrology institutes are unable to provide internationally recognized calibrations of suitable standards. Furthermore often users are not aware of the specific difficulties of these measurements. In this paper the current status and limitations of bidirectional optical measurements at the industrial level are summarised and compared to state-of-the-art optical linewidth measurements performed at PTB on measurement objects of semiconductor industry. It turns out, that for optical widths measurements at an uncertainty level below 1 μm edge localisation schemes are required, which are based on tool and sample dependent threshold values, which usually need to be determined by a rigorous simulation of the microscopic image. Furthermore the calibration samples and structures must have a sufficient quality, e. g. high edge angle and low edge roughness and the structure materials and their material parameters have to be known. The experience obtained within the accreditation process of industrial labs for width calibrations shows that, in order to be able to achieve a desired measurement uncertainties of about 100 nm, the imaging system needs to have a monochromatic Koehler illumination, numerical aperture larger than 0.5, a magnification greater than 50x and the ability to control the deviation of the focus position to better than 100 nm.

  15. Optical coherence tomography enables accurate measurement of equine cartilage thickness for determination of speed of sound.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, Pia H; Te Moller, Nikae C R; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Korhonen, Rami K; Brommer, Harold; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Arthroscopic estimation of articular cartilage thickness is important for scoring of lesion severity, and measurement of cartilage speed of sound (SOS)-a sensitive index of changes in cartilage composition. We investigated the accuracy of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in measurements of cartilage thickness and determined SOS by combining OCT thickness and ultrasound (US) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Material and methods - Cartilage thickness measurements from OCT and microscopy images of 94 equine osteochondral samples were compared. Then, SOS in cartilage was determined using simultaneous OCT thickness and US TOF measurements. SOS was then compared with the compositional, structural, and mechanical properties of cartilage. Results - Measurements of non-calcified cartilage thickness using OCT and microscopy were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.92; p < 0.001). With calcified cartilage included, the correlation was ρ = 0.85 (p < 0.001). The mean cartilage SOS (1,636 m/s) was in agreement with the literature. However, SOS and the other properties of cartilage lacked any statistically significant correlation. Interpretation - OCT can give an accurate measurement of articular cartilage thickness. Although SOS measurements lacked accuracy in thin equine cartilage, the concept of SOS measurement using OCT appears promising.

  16. Accurate and high-resolution boundary conditions and flow fields in the first-class cabin of an MD-82 commercial airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wen, Jizhou; Chao, Jiangyue; Yin, Weiyou; Shen, Chen; Lai, Dayi; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Liu, Junjie; Sun, Hejiang; Chen, Qingyan

    2012-09-01

    Flow fields in commercial airliner cabins are crucial for creating a thermally comfortable and healthy cabin environment. Flow fields depend on the thermo-fluid boundary conditions at the diffusers, in addition to the cabin geometry and furnishing. To study the flow fields in cabins, this paper describes a procedure to obtain the cabin geometry, boundary conditions at the diffusers, and flow fields. This investigation used a laser tracking system and reverse engineering to generate a digital model of an MD-82 aircraft cabin. Even though the measuring error by the system was very small, approximations and assumptions were needed to reduce the workload and data size. The geometric model can also be easily used to calculate the space volume. A combination of hot-sphere anemometers (HSA) and ultrasonic anemometers (UA) were applied to obtain the velocity magnitude, velocity direction, and turbulence intensity at the diffusers. The measured results indicate that the flow boundary conditions in a real cabin were rather complex and the velocity magnitude, velocity direction, and turbulence intensity varied significantly from one slot opening to another. UAs were also applied to measure the three-dimensional air velocity at 20 Hz, which could also be used to determine the turbulence intensity. Due to the instability of the flow, it should at least be measured for 4 min to obtain accurate averaged velocity and turbulence information. It was found that the flow fields were of low speed and high turbulence intensity. This study provides high quality data for validating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, including cabin geometry, boundary conditions of diffusers, and high-resolution flow field in the first-class cabin of a functional MD-82 commercial airliner.

  17. Time-Accurate Computation of Viscous Flow Around Deforming Bodies Using Overset Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, P; Henshaw, W D

    2001-04-02

    Dynamically evolving boundaries and deforming bodies interacting with a flow are commonly encountered in fluid dynamics. However, the numerical simulation of flows with dynamic boundaries is difficult with current methods. We propose a new method for studying such problems. The key idea is to use the overset grid method with a thin, body-fitted grid near the deforming boundary, while using fixed Cartesian grids to cover most of the computational domain. Our approach combines the strengths of earlier moving overset grid methods for rigid body motion, and unstructured grid methods for Aow-structure interactions. Large scale deformation of the flow boundaries can be handled without a global regridding, and in a computationally efficient way. In terms of computational cost, even a full overset grid regridding is significantly cheaper than a full regridding of an unstructured grid for the same domain, especially in three dimensions. Numerical studies are used to verify accuracy and convergence of our flow solver. As a computational example, we consider two-dimensional incompressible flow past a flexible filament with prescribed dynamics.

  18. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  19. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  20. Accurate measurements of the collision stopping powers for 5 to 30 MeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Miller Shawn

    Accurate knowledge of electron stopping powers is crucial for accurate radiation dosimetry and radiation transport calculations. Current values for stopping powers are based on a theoretical model, with estimated uncertainties of 0.5-1% (1σ) for electron energies greater than 100 keV. This work presents the first measurements of electron collision stopping powers capable of testing the theoretical values within these stated uncertainties. A large NaI spectrometer was used to measure the change in electron energy when an absorbing disk of known thickness was placed in an electron beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the experiment were performed to account for the effects of surrounding materials. Energy differences between the calculated and measured spectra were used to determine corrections to the soft collision component of the theoretical stopping powers employed by the Monte Carlo simulations. Four different elemental materials were studied: Be, Al, Cu, and Ta. This provided a wide range of atomic numbers and densities over which to test the theory. In addition, stopping powers were measured for graphite (both standard and pyrolytic), A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, C-552 air equivalent plastic, and water. The incident electron energies ranged from 5 to 30 MeV. Generally, the measured stopping powers agree with the theoretical values within the experimental uncertainties, which range from 0.4% to 0.7% (1σ). Aluminum, however, exhibits a 0.7% discrepancy at higher electron energies. Furthermore, these measurements have established that the grain density stopping power is appropriate for graphite, contrary to the recommendations of ICRU Report 37. This removes a 0.2% uncertainty in air kerma calibrations, and impacts on dosimetric quantities determined via graphite calorimetry, such as ɛG for Fricke dosimetry and (W/ e)air for ion chamber measurements.

  1. Cardiac flow measurement by ultrafast CT: validation of continuous and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ludman, P F; Darby, M; Tomlinson, N; Poole-Wilson, P A; Rees, S

    1992-01-01

    To gauge the accuracy of ultrafast CT in measuring cardiac output and myocardial perfusion in humans, measurements of continuous and pulsatile flow were made in a large asymmetrical phantom. The variation in the relationship between Hounsfield number and contrast concentration was assessed in a human thorax phantom. Radiopaque contrast medium was injected during perfusion of the phantom at a range of flow rates between 1.5 and 8 L/min. The phantom was scanned in two modes (50 and 100 ms) during continuous and pulsatile flow and with the phantom surrounded by air and by water. Flow in the tubes was calculated using indicator dilution theory, and flow in the tissue-equivalent chamber was calculated by applying first-pass distribution principles. The standard deviation of the difference between calculated and measured flow varied from 0.2 to 0.6 L/min, giving 95% limits of agreement from 0.4 to 1.2 L/min. The constant (K) relating Hounsfield unit number to iodine concentration varied widely both in different locations within the phantom and under different scan conditions (17.2-27.6 HU/mg I). Within a human thorax phantom, K varied from 14.15 to 23.18 HU/mg I and was dependent on location within the thorax phantom, the scan mode, and the cross-sectional diameter of the phantom. These data suggest that though the ultrafast CT scanner can measure continuous and pulsatile flow accurately in tubes, precise measurements of cardiac output in humans will require K to be assessed for each subject. Measurements of flow in tissue should be possible. PMID:1522275

  2. Highly accurate isotope measurements of surface material on planetary objects in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Studies of isotope variations in solar system objects are of particular interest and importance. Highly accurate isotope measurements provide insight into geochemical processes, constrain the time of formation of planetary material (crystallization ages) and can be robust tracers of pre-solar events and processes. A detailed understanding of the chronology of the early solar system and dating of planetary materials require precise and accurate measurements of isotope ratios, e.g. lead, and abundance of trace element. However, such measurements are extremely challenging and until now, they never have been attempted in space research. Our group designed a highly miniaturized and self-optimizing laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for space flight for sensitive and accurate measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of extraterrestrial materials in situ. Current studies were performed by using UV radiation for ablation and ionization of sample material. High spatial resolution is achieved by focusing the laser beam to about Ø 20μm onto the sample surface. The instrument supports a dynamic range of at least 8 orders of magnitude and a mass resolution m/Δm of up to 800—900, measured at iron peak. We developed a measurement procedure, which will be discussed in detail, that allows for the first time to measure with the instrument the isotope distribution of elements, e.g. Ti, Pb, etc., with a measurement accuracy and precision in the per mill and sub per mill level, which is comparable to well-known and accepted measurement techniques, such as TIMS, SIMS and LA-ICP-MS. The present instrument performance offers together with the measurement procedure in situ measurements of 207Pb/206Pb ages with the accuracy for age in the range of tens of millions of years. Furthermore, and in contrast to other space instrumentation, our instrument can measure all elements present in the sample above 10 ppb concentration, which offers versatile applications

  3. Wastewater Sampling Methodologies and Flow Measurement Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Daniel J.; Keffer, William J.

    This document provides a ready source of information about water/wastewater sampling activities using various commercial sampling and flow measurement devices. The report consolidates the findings and summarizes the activities, experiences, sampling methods, and field measurement techniques conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),…

  4. Using turbine flowmeters to measure multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.H.; Fincke, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    Numerous ways of measuring multiphase flow are under research investigation. However, the concept of using turbine flowmeters has been largely overlooked. Testing of drag turbine mass flowmeter prototypes demonstrated that fluid flow past a turbine rotor produces a drag force that is proportional to momentum flux. Simultaneous measurements of momentum flux and velocity allow the extraction of density. Use of this type of meter to measure homogenized two-phase flow with void fractions below 90% appears feasible. Further mass turbine flowmeter research is encouraged. Drag turbine test data strongly suggests that a turbine flowmeter can be developed into a mass flowmeter by installing pressure taps across the rotor and using the differential pressure measurement to infer momentum flux. Also, using diamond film force sensing would allow the fabrication of a more compact, rugged, and faster-responding drag turbine mass flowmeter than is possible with alternative force sensing methods.

  5. Radial artery blood pressure measurement in neonates: an accurate and convenient technique in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; van Genderingen, H R; Lafeber, H N; Hack, W W

    1995-01-01

    To achieve accurate blood pressure measurement through radial artery catheters in infants, we previously developed an experimental high-fidelity catheter-manometer system (CMS). As this system lacks facilities for flushing and for blood sampling, we aimed to further develop this technique in order to make the system suitable for clinical practice. In addition, we aimed to develop methods to automate processing of the pressure wave forms. The high-fidelity system to be improved consisted of a 24 Gauge catheter, a threeway stopcock and a tip-manometer. We inserted this system in the catheter-manometer system as routinely used i.e. the remaining end of the stopcock was connected to the fluid-filled CMS as used routinely. This combined system became clinically applicable, since blood samples could be obtained and flushing could be performed. The measurement chain was completed by application of a modified physiological monitor and a computerized method to analyze pressure wave forms. In this manner accurate beat-to-beat pressure parameters were obtained. This technique was applied to 25 neonates admitted for intensive care and requiring arterial access. Gestational age of these infants ranged from 25-40 (median 29) weeks and birth weight ranges from 500-3375 (median 1060) grams. In all infants the technique was found to be convenient and the high-fidelity blood pressure measurements were performed without any problems. The advantage of the present system is the potential for both correct intermittent recordings of arterial wave forms in close relation to clinical condition and for the establishment of accurate radial artery beat-to-beat pressure values in clinical practice.

  6. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, <0.05) on time scales of <10 s for droplets containing involatile or volatile solutes. The approach is benchmarked for binary and ternary inorganic solution aerosols with typical uncertainties in water activity of <±0.2% at water activities >0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1). PMID:27285052

  7. Accurate Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave velocity and empirical Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxia; Feng, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a method for Young's modulus measurement based on Rayleigh wave speed. The error in Poisson's ratio has weak influence on the measurement of Young's modulus based on Rayleigh wave speed, and Poisson's ratio minimally varies in a certain material; thus, we can accurately estimate Young's modulus with surface wave speed and a rough Poisson's ratio. We numerically analysed three methods using Rayleigh, longitudinal, and transversal wave speed, respectively, and the error in Poisson's ratio shows the least influence on the result in the method involving Rayleigh wave speed. An experiment was performed and has proved the feasibility of this method. Device for speed measuring could be small, and no sample pretreatment is needed. Hence, developing a portable instrument based on this method is possible. This method makes a good compromise between usability and precision.

  8. A Flexible Fringe Projection Vision System with Extended Mathematical Model for Accurate Three-Dimensional Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Suzhi; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In order to acquire an accurate three-dimensional (3D) measurement, the traditional fringe projection technique applies complex and laborious procedures to compensate for the errors that exist in the vision system. However, the error sources in the vision system are very complex, such as lens distortion, lens defocus, and fringe pattern nonsinusoidality. Some errors cannot even be explained or rendered with clear expressions and are difficult to compensate directly as a result. In this paper, an approach is proposed that avoids the complex and laborious compensation procedure for error sources but still promises accurate 3D measurement. It is realized by the mathematical model extension technique. The parameters of the extended mathematical model for the ’phase to 3D coordinates transformation’ are derived using the least-squares parameter estimation algorithm. In addition, a phase-coding method based on a frequency analysis is proposed for the absolute phase map retrieval to spatially isolated objects. The results demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of the proposed flexible fringe projection vision system on spatially continuous and discontinuous objects for 3D measurement. PMID:27136553

  9. A Flexible Fringe Projection Vision System with Extended Mathematical Model for Accurate Three-Dimensional Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Suzhi; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In order to acquire an accurate three-dimensional (3D) measurement, the traditional fringe projection technique applies complex and laborious procedures to compensate for the errors that exist in the vision system. However, the error sources in the vision system are very complex, such as lens distortion, lens defocus, and fringe pattern nonsinusoidality. Some errors cannot even be explained or rendered with clear expressions and are difficult to compensate directly as a result. In this paper, an approach is proposed that avoids the complex and laborious compensation procedure for error sources but still promises accurate 3D measurement. It is realized by the mathematical model extension technique. The parameters of the extended mathematical model for the 'phase to 3D coordinates transformation' are derived using the least-squares parameter estimation algorithm. In addition, a phase-coding method based on a frequency analysis is proposed for the absolute phase map retrieval to spatially isolated objects. The results demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of the proposed flexible fringe projection vision system on spatially continuous and discontinuous objects for 3D measurement. PMID:27136553

  10. Tomographic segmentation in multiphase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sætre, Camilla; Tjugum, Stein-Arild; Anton Johansen, Geir

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of multiphase pipe flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain. These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime and the fluid properties, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. In this work the pipe flow is split into temporal segments using multiple gamma-ray measurements. One 241Am source with principal emission at 59.5 keV was used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as use of compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second and eventually the third are positioned to the sides so that these beams are close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward, that is to compare the measured intensities of these detectors, and through those identify the instantaneous cross sectional gas-liquid distribution, i.e. the instantaneous flow pattern. By counting the intensity in short time slots of <100 ms, experiments verify that rapid variations exist. The water salinity is one of the fluid properties which challenge most multiphase flow meters because its variations affects component volume fraction calculations based on gamma-ray, electrical conductance and other measurements methods. At the University of Bergen a dual modality method has been developed using simultaneous measurements of transmitted and scattered gamma-rays from a 241Am source. This allows the gas volume fraction to be determined independent of changes in the water salinity, provided that the fluid is fairly homogeneously mixed. Tomographic flow segmentation allows selection of low gas fraction segments where the salinity, in combination with running averaging methods, can be calculated with higher accuracy.

  11. Development of Filtered Rayleigh Scattering for Accurate Measurement of Gas Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Richard B.; Lempert, Walter R.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goals of this research were to develop new diagnostic tools capable of capturing unsteady and/or time-evolving, high-speed flow phenomena. The program centers around the development of Filtered Rayleigh Scattering (FRS) for velocity, temperature, and density measurement, and the construction of narrow linewidth laser sources which will be capable of producing an order MHz repetition rate 'burst' of high power pulses.

  12. Depth selective acousto-optic flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tsalach, Adi; Schiffer, Zeev; Ratner, Eliahu; Breskin, Ilan; Zeitak, Reuven; Shechter, Revital; Balberg, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical based methods for non-invasive measurement of regional blood flow tend to incorrectly assess cerebral blood flow, due to contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signal. We demonstrate that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. Validation of the model is conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. In-vitro experiments demonstrate good agreement with the simulations' results and provide a solid validation to depth discrimination ability. These results suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light. PMID:26713201

  13. Depth selective acousto-optic flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Tsalach, Adi; Schiffer, Zeev; Ratner, Eliahu; Breskin, Ilan; Zeitak, Reuven; Shechter, Revital; Balberg, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Optical based methods for non-invasive measurement of regional blood flow tend to incorrectly assess cerebral blood flow, due to contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signal. We demonstrate that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. Validation of the model is conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. In-vitro experiments demonstrate good agreement with the simulations' results and provide a solid validation to depth discrimination ability. These results suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light. PMID:26713201

  14. Flow measurement in mechanical ventilation: a review.

    PubMed

    Schena, Emiliano; Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Cecchini, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Accurate monitoring of flow rate and volume exchanges is essential to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury. Mechanical ventilators employ flowmeters to estimate the amount of gases delivered to patients and use the flow signal as a feedback to adjust the desired amount of gas to be delivered. Since flowmeters play a crucial role in this field, they are required to fulfill strict criteria in terms of dynamic and static characteristics. Therefore, mechanical ventilators are equipped with only the following kinds of flowmeters: linear pneumotachographs, fixed and variable orifice meters, hot wire anemometers, and ultrasonic flowmeters. This paper provides an overview of these sensors. Their working principles are described together with their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, the most promising emerging approaches for flowmeters design (i.e., fiber optic technology and three dimensional micro-fabrication) are briefly reviewed showing their potential for this application. PMID:25659299

  15. The Space-Time Conservative Schemes for Large-Scale, Time-Accurate Flow Simulations with Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Friedlander, David J.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of development of unstructured mesh methods, high-fidelity time-accurate simulations are still predominantly carried out on structured, or unstructured hexahedral meshes by using high-order finite-difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO), or hybrid schemes formed by their combinations. In this work, the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to simulate several flow problems including supersonic jet/shock interaction and its impact on launch vehicle acoustics, and direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. This paper provides a status report for the continuing development of the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) numerical and software framework under the Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) project. Solution accuracy and large-scale parallel performance of the numerical framework is assessed with the goal of providing a viable paradigm for future high-fidelity flow physics simulations.

  16. Object strength--an accurate measure for small objects that is insensitive to partial volume effects.

    PubMed

    Tofts, P S; Silver, N C; Barker, G J; Gass, A

    2005-07-01

    There are currently four problems in characterising small nonuniform lesions or other objects in Magnetic Resonance images where partial volume effects are significant. Object size is over- or under-estimated; boundaries are often not reproducible; mean object value cannot be measured; and fuzzy borders cannot be accommodated. A new measure, Object Strength, is proposed. This is the sum of all abnormal intensities, above a uniform background value. For a uniform object, this is simply the product of the increase in intensity and the size of the object. Biologically, this could be at least as relevant as existing measures of size or mean intensity. We hypothesise that Object Strength will perform better than traditional area measurements in characterising small objects. In a pilot study, the reproducibility of object strength measurements was investigated using MR images of small multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. In addition, accuracy was investigated using artificial lesions of known volume (0.3-6.2 ml) and realistic appearance. Reproducibility approached that of area measurements (in 33/90 lesion reports the difference between repeats was less than for area measurements). Total lesion volume was accurate to 0.2%. In conclusion, Object Strength has potential for improved characterisation of small lesions and objects in imaging and possibly spectroscopy.

  17. Accurate Measurements of Aircraft Engine Soot Emissions Using a CAPS PMssa Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, Timothy; Thompson, Kevin; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Smallwood, Greg; Make-Lye, Richard; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We present results of aircraft engine soot emissions measurements during the VARIAnT2 campaign using CAPS PMssa monitors. VARIAnT2, an aircraft engine non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) emissions field campaign, was focused on understanding the variability in nvPM mass measurements using different measurement techniques and accounting for possible nvPM sampling system losses. The CAPS PMssa monitor accurately measures both the optical extinction and scattering (and thus single scattering albedo and absorption) of an extracted sample using the same sample volume for both measurements with a time resolution of 1 second and sensitivity of better than 1 Mm-1. Absorption is obtained by subtracting the scattering signal from the total extinction. Given that the single scattering albedo of the particulates emitted from the aircraft engine measured at both 630 and 660 nm was on the order of 0.1, any inaccuracy in the scattering measurement has little impact on the accuracy of the ddetermined absorption coefficient. The absorption is converted into nvPM mass using a documented Mass Absorption Coefficient (MAC). Results of soot emission indices (mass soot emitted per mass of fuel consumed) for a turbojet engine as a function of engine power will be presented and compared to results obtained using an EC/OC monitor.

  18. Ocean Lidar Measurements of Beam Attenuation and a Roadmap to Accurate Phytoplankton Biomass Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Behrenfeld, Mike; Hostetler, Chris; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Hair, John; Slade, Wayne; Cetinic, Ivona; Vaughan, Mark; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhai, Pengwang; Weimer, Carl; Winker, David; Verhappen, Carolus C.; Butler, Carolyn; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hunt, Bill; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Lifermann, Anne; Josset, Damien; Hou, Weilin; MacDonnell, David; Rhew, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Beam attenuation coefficient, c, provides an important optical index of plankton standing stocks, such as phytoplankton biomass and total particulate carbon concentration. Unfortunately, c has proven difficult to quantify through remote sensing. Here, we introduce an innovative approach for estimating c using lidar depolarization measurements and diffuse attenuation coefficients from ocean color products or lidar measurements of Brillouin scattering. The new approach is based on a theoretical formula established from Monte Carlo simulations that links the depolarization ratio of sea water to the ratio of diffuse attenuation Kd and beam attenuation C (i.e., a multiple scattering factor). On July 17, 2014, the CALIPSO satellite was tilted 30° off-nadir for one nighttime orbit in order to minimize ocean surface backscatter and demonstrate the lidar ocean subsurface measurement concept from space. Depolarization ratios of ocean subsurface backscatter are measured accurately. Beam attenuation coefficients computed from the depolarization ratio measurements compare well with empirical estimates from ocean color measurements. We further verify the beam attenuation coefficient retrievals using aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) data that are collocated with in-water optical measurements.

  19. Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger; Zhou, Yiwen; Utku, Cuneyt; Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater at a frequency of 1.413 GHz, the center of the protected band (i.e., passive use only) used in the measurement of sea surface salinity from space. The objective of the measurements is to accurately determine the complex dielectric constant of seawater as a function of salinity and temperature. A resonant cylindrical microwave cavity in transmission mode has been employed to make the measurements. The measurements are made using standard seawater at salinities of 30, 33, 35, and 38 practical salinity units over a range of temperatures from 0 degree C to 35 degree C in 5 degree C intervals. Repeated measurements have been made at each temperature and salinity. Mean values and standard deviations are then computed. The total error budget indicates that the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant have a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.3 over the range of salinities and temperatures considered. The measurements are compared with the dielectric constants obtained from the model functions of Klein and Swift and those of Meissner and Wentz. The biggest differences occur at low and high temperatures.

  20. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid-particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid-particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge-Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and -0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered. This finding

  1. Recommendations for accurate numerical blood flow simulations of stented intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor; Berg, Philipp; Beuing, Oliver; Neugebauer, Mathias; Gasteiger, Rocco; Preim, Bernhard; Rose, Georg; Skalej, Martin; Thévenin, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    The number of scientific publications dealing with stented intracranial aneurysms is rapidly increasing. Powerful computational facilities are now available; an accurate computational modeling of hemodynamics in patient-specific configurations is, however, still being sought. Furthermore, there is still no general agreement on the quantities that should be computed and on the most adequate analysis for intervention support. In this article, the accurate representation of patient geometry is first discussed, involving successive improvements. Concerning the second step, the mesh required for the numerical simulation is especially challenging when deploying a stent with very fine wire structures. Third, the description of the fluid properties is a major challenge. Finally, a founded quantitative analysis of the simulation results is obviously needed to support interventional decisions. In the present work, an attempt has been made to review the most important steps for a high-quality computational fluid dynamics computation of virtually stented intracranial aneurysms. In consequence, this leads to concrete recommendations, whereby the obtained results are not discussed for their medical relevance but for the evaluation of their quality. This investigation might hopefully be helpful for further studies considering stent deployment in patient-specific geometries, in particular regarding the generation of the most appropriate computational model. PMID:23729530

  2. Measurement of intracellular ions by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Posey, Avery D; Kawalekar, Omkar U; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    Using flow cytometry, single-cell measurements of calcium can be made on isolated populations identified by one or more phenotypic characteristics. Most earlier techniques for measuring cellular activation parameters determined the mean value for a population of cells, which did not permit optimal resolution of the responses. The flow cytometer is particularly useful for this purpose because it can measure ion concentrations in large numbers of single cells and thereby allows ion concentration to be correlated with other parameters such as immunophenotype and cell cycle stage. A limitation of flow cytometry, however, is that it does not permit resolution of certain complex kinetic responses such as cellular oscillatory responses. This unit describes the preparation of cells, including labeling with antibodies and with calcium probes, and discusses the principles of data analysis and interpretation. PMID:25827486

  3. Devices for flow measurement and control -- 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Blechinger, C.J. ); Sherif, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This conference focuses on a small aspect of technological progress, specifically on the devices for flow measurement and control. Papers have been contributed from industry, academia, and government, providing a very broad view of the state of the art and needs for improvement of research. The number of international contributions at this symposium is particularly gratifying to the organizers. There are authors from Great Britain, France, Norway, Germany, and Korea as well as from the US. This implies that flow measurement and control is a topic of significant interest to the international community. It is the editors hope that this symposium volume will serve as a reference for future exchange of ideas and as a catalyst for furthering the state of the art of flow measurement and control. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. An improved method for accurate prediction of mass flows through combustor liner holes

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, R.C.; Gueroui, D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a simple approach to the solution of flow through combustor liner holes which can be used by practicing combustor engineers as well as providing the specialist modeler with a convenient boundary condition. For modeling, suppose that all relevant details of the incoming jets can be readily predicted, then the computational boundary can be limited to the inner wall of the liner and to the jets themselves. The scope of this paper is limited to the derivation of a simple analysis, the development of a reliable test technique, and to the correlation of data for plane holes having a diameter which is large when compared to the liner wall thickness. The effect of internal liner flow on the performance of the holes is neglected; this is considered to be justifiable because the analysis terminates at a short distance downstream of the hole and the significantly lower velocities inside the combustor have had little opportunity to have taken any effect. It is intended to extend the procedure to more complex hole forms and flow configurations in later papers.

  5. Multigrid Acceleration of Time-Accurate DNS of Compressible Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeze, Jan; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans; Streng, Martin

    1996-01-01

    An efficient scheme for the direct numerical simulation of 3D transitional and developed turbulent flow is presented. Explicit and implicit time integration schemes for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. The nonlinear system resulting from the implicit time discretization is solved with an iterative method and accelerated by the application of a multigrid technique. Since we use central spatial discretizations and no artificial dissipation is added to the equations, the smoothing method is less effective than in the more traditional use of multigrid in steady-state calculations. Therefore, a special prolongation method is needed in order to obtain an effective multigrid method. This simulation scheme was studied in detail for compressible flow over a flat plate. In the laminar regime and in the first stages of turbulent flow the implicit method provides a speed-up of a factor 2 relative to the explicit method on a relatively coarse grid. At increased resolution this speed-up is enhanced correspondingly.

  6. Superficial microcirculation flow measurement using polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiwei; Morgan, S. P.; Xiao, Yunshi

    2008-12-01

    Depth discrimination of polarized light is used in investigating laser Doppler measurement of the superficial microcirculation in tissue. Using polarization Monte Carlo simulation, temporal point spread function and power spectral distribution of backscattered polarization remaining light firstly are used to prove polarized light to be valid in measuring moving blood cell perfusion and mean flow velocity. Then simulation of layered medium model demonstrate that relationships between blood flow perfusion and mean frequency shift are linear to medium flowing velocity, and the Doppler shift information in polarization remaining light mainly comes from lower layer medium up to about 14 times of mean free path (MFP) of medium investigated and can be considered that Doppler effects come only from lower layer of the medium. Simulations in three-layer tissue model show that moving blood cell perfusion and mean blood cell moving velocity calculated from polarization remaining are much more sensitive to lower layer flow velocity variation, and more irrelevant to deeper layer flow rate fluctuations, that further confirms Doppler measurement from polarization remaining light to be effective for superficial microcirculation in tissue. Factors affecting Laser Doppler measurement like medium absorption, percentage of moving particles in blood detector size are discussed.

  7. Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Utku, Cuneyt; Tarkocin, Yalcin; LeVine, David M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes measurements of the dielectric constant of seawater at a frequency of 1.413 GHz that is at the center of the L-Sand radiometric protected frequency spectrum. Aquarius will be sensing the sea surface salinity from space in this band. The objective of the project is to refine the model function for the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature so that remote sensing measurements can be made with the accuracy needed to meet the measurement goals (0.2 psu) of the Aquarius mission. The measurements were made, using a microwave cavity operated in the transmission configuration. The cavity's temperature was accurately regulated to 0.02 C by immersing it in a temperature controlled bath of distilled water and ethanol glycol. Seawater had been purchased from Ocean Scientific International Limited (OS1L) at salinities of 30, 35 and 38 psu. Measurements of these seawater samples were then made over a range of temperatures, from l0 C to 35 C in 5 C intervals. Repeated measurements were made at each temperature and salinity, Mean values and standard deviations were then computed. Total error budgets indicated that the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant had a relative accuracy of about l%.

  8. A New Test Rig for Accurate Nonparametric Measurement and Characterization of Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecucco, Andrea; Buckle, James; Siviter, Jonathan; Knox, Andrew R.

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are increasingly employed in large-scale applications, therefore accurate performance data are necessary to permit precise designs and simulations. However, there is still no standardized method to test the electrical and thermal performance of TEGs. This paper presents an innovative test system to assess device performance in the "real world." The fixture allows the hot temperature to be increased up to 800°C with minimal thermal losses and thermal shock; the clamping load can be adjusted up to 5 kN, and the temperatures are sensed by thermocouples placed directly on the TEG's surfaces. A computer program controls all the instruments in order to minimize errors and to aid accurate measurement and test repeatability. The test rig can measure four TEGs simultaneously, each one individually controlled and heated by a maximum electrical power of 2 kW. This allows testing of the effects of series and parallel connection of TEGs under mismatched conditions, e.g., dimensions, clamping force, temperature, etc. The test rig can be employed both as a performance evaluator and as a quality control unit, due to the ability to provide nonparametric testing of four TEGs concurrently. It can also be used to rapidly characterize devices of different dimensions at the same time.

  9. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU.

  10. Accurate and precise measurement of selenium by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Watson, Russell P; Lindstrom, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    An accurate and precise measurement of selenium in Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3149, a primary calibration standard for the quantitative determination of selenium, has been accomplished by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in order to resolve a question arising during the certification process of the standard. Each limiting factor of the uncertainty in the activation analysis, including the sample preparation, irradiation, and γ-ray spectrometry steps, has been carefully monitored to minimize the uncertainty in the determined mass fraction. Neutron and γ-ray self-shielding within the elemental selenium INAA standards contributed most significantly to the uncertainty of the measurement. An empirical model compensating for neutron self-shielding and reducing the self-shielding uncertainty was successfully applied to these selenium standards. The mass fraction of selenium in the new lot of SRM 3149 was determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.6%.

  11. Highly accurate thickness measurement of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimi, Soufiene; Klier, Jens; Jonuscheit, Joachim; von Freymann, Georg; Urbansky, Ralph; Beigang, René

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present a highly accurate approach for thickness measurements of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz time domain spectroscopy in reflection geometry. The proposed method combines the benefits of a model-based material parameters extraction method to calibrate the paint coatings, a generalized Rouard's method to simulate the terahertz radiation behavior within arbitrary thin films, and the robustness of a powerful evolutionary optimization algorithm to increase the sensitivity of the minimum thickness measurement limit. Within the framework of this work, a self-calibration model is introduced, which takes into consideration the real industrial challenges such as the effect of wet-on-wet spray in the painting process.

  12. Apparatus for accurate density measurements of fluids based on a magnetic suspension balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Maoqiong; Li, Huiya; Guo, Hao; Dong, Xueqiang; Wu, J. F.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus for accurate pressure, density and temperature (p, ρ, T) measurements over wide ranges of (p, ρ, T) (90 K to 290 K; 0 MPa to 3 MPa; 0 kg/m3 to 2000 kg/m3) is described. This apparatus is based on a magnetic suspension balance which applies the Archimedes' buoyancy principle. In order to verify the new apparatus, comprehensive (p, ρ, T) measurements on pure nitrogen were carried out. The maximum relative standard uncertainty is 0.09% in density. The maximum standard uncertainty in temperature is 5 mK, and that in pressure is 250 Pa for 1.5 MPa and 390 Pa for 3MPa full scale range respectively. The experimental data were compared with selected literature data and good agreements were found.

  13. A Time-Accurate Upwind Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Compressible Flow with Cure of Pathological Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2007-01-01

    A time-accurate, upwind, finite volume method for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids is presented. The method is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. For efficiency, the Roe approximate Riemann solver with an entropy correction is employed. In the basic Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme, many concepts of high order upwind schemes are adopted: the surface flux integrals are carefully treated, a Cauchy-Kowalewski time-stepping scheme is used in the time-marching stage, and a multidimensional limiter is applied in the reconstruction stage. However even with these up-to-date improvements, the basic upwind scheme is still plagued by the so-called "pathological behaviors," e.g., the carbuncle phenomenon, the expansion shock, etc. A solution to these limitations is presented which uses a very simple dissipation model while still preserving second order accuracy. This scheme is referred to as the enhanced time-accurate upwind (ETAU) scheme in this paper. The unstructured grid capability renders flexibility for use in complex geometry; and the present ETAU Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme is capable of handling a broad spectrum of flow regimes from high supersonic to subsonic at very low Mach number, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics). Numerous examples are included to demonstrate the robustness of the methods.

  14. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  15. Slip length measurement of gas flow.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas. PMID:27505860

  16. Slip length measurement of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  17. Slip length measurement of gas flow.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  18. Accuracy of dilution techniques for access flow measurement during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Krivitski, N M; MacGibbon, D; Gleed, R D; Dobson, A

    1998-03-01

    , Gambro, Hospal, Medisystem, and National Medical Care). Because of the smaller volume of the venous bubble chamber in Cobe tubing (Cobe, Centrysystem 3), this brand showed approximately a 20% increase in Qb. Moving the site of bolus injections to before the bubble trap in the sheep experiments also eliminated the influence of changes in access flow. An additional error in access flow measurement of 20% or more arises from the use of flow reading taken from pump setting rather than a measured flow. The discrepancy between the real flow and pump setting is attributable to needle size, vascular access conditions, or pump calibration. The results show that problems can be minimized by using a dual sensor system that retains the precise timing necessary for separation of access recirculation from CPR; by accurate measurement of dialyzer blood flow; by moving the site of injection to before the venous bubble trap, sufficiently far from the patient, and correcting for any remaining deviations in flow in the venous line concurrent with the dilution curve.

  19. Accuracy of dilution techniques for access flow measurement during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Krivitski, N M; MacGibbon, D; Gleed, R D; Dobson, A

    1998-03-01

    , Gambro, Hospal, Medisystem, and National Medical Care). Because of the smaller volume of the venous bubble chamber in Cobe tubing (Cobe, Centrysystem 3), this brand showed approximately a 20% increase in Qb. Moving the site of bolus injections to before the bubble trap in the sheep experiments also eliminated the influence of changes in access flow. An additional error in access flow measurement of 20% or more arises from the use of flow reading taken from pump setting rather than a measured flow. The discrepancy between the real flow and pump setting is attributable to needle size, vascular access conditions, or pump calibration. The results show that problems can be minimized by using a dual sensor system that retains the precise timing necessary for separation of access recirculation from CPR; by accurate measurement of dialyzer blood flow; by moving the site of injection to before the venous bubble trap, sufficiently far from the patient, and correcting for any remaining deviations in flow in the venous line concurrent with the dilution curve. PMID:9506688

  20. Device for Measuring Low Flow Speed in a Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Frank; Magee, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  1. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid–particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid–particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge–Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and −0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered

  2. Home Circadian Phase Assessments with Measures of Compliance Yield Accurate Dim Light Melatonin Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Wyatt, James K.; Park, Margaret; Fogg, Louis F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is a need for the accurate assessment of circadian phase outside of the clinic/laboratory, particularly with the gold standard dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). We tested a novel kit designed to assist in saliva sampling at home for later determination of the DLMO. The home kit includes objective measures of compliance to the requirements for dim light and half-hourly saliva sampling. Design: Participants were randomized to one of two 10-day protocols. Each protocol consisted of two back-to-back home and laboratory phase assessments in counterbalanced order, separated by a 5-day break. Setting: Laboratory or participants' homes. Participants: Thirty-five healthy adults, age 21–62 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Most participants received at least one 30-sec epoch of light > 50 lux during the home phase assessments (average light intensity 4.5 lux), but on average for < 9 min of the required 8.5 h. Most participants collected every saliva sample within 5 min of the scheduled time. Ninety-two percent of home DLMOs were not affected by light > 50 lux or sampling errors. There was no significant difference between the home and laboratory DLMOs (P > 0.05); on average the home DLMOs occurred 9.6 min before the laboratory DLMOs. The home DLMOs were highly correlated with the laboratory DLMOs (r = 0.91, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Participants were reasonably compliant to the home phase assessment procedures. The good agreement between the home and laboratory dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) demonstrates that including objective measures of light exposure and sample timing during home saliva sampling can lead to accurate home DLMOs. Clinical Trial Registration: Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Citation: Burgess HJ, Wyatt JK, Park M, Fogg LF. Home circadian phase assessments with measures of compliance yield accurate dim light melatonin onsets. SLEEP 2015;38(6):889–897

  3. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  4. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement.

  5. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability was developed that makes it possible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) procedure was applied to the analysis of flow field measurements within a low aspect ratio transonic axial flow fan rotor obtained with 2-D laser anemometry. The procedure generates input for the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamics problems. The relative Mach number contour plots obtained by this method resemble the conventional contour plots obtained by more traditional methods. The results show that the MMS procedure can be used to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analysis tools developed for data from numerical flow field simulations. They show that an experimenter can apply the MMS procedure to his data and then use an interactive graphics program to display scalar quantities like the Mach number by profiles, carpet plots, contour lines, and surfaces using various colors. Also, flow directionality can be shown by display of vector fields and particle traces.

  6. Accurate and automatic extrinsic calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wantao; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Shi, Yusheng; Zhao, Can; Cheng, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Fast and precise 3D inspection system is in great demand in modern manufacturing processes. At present, the available sensors have their own pros and cons, and hardly exist an omnipotent sensor to handle the complex inspection task in an accurate and effective way. The prevailing solution is integrating multiple sensors and taking advantages of their strengths. For obtaining a holistic 3D profile, the data from different sensors should be registrated into a coherent coordinate system. However, some complex shape objects own thin wall feather such as blades, the ICP registration method would become unstable. Therefore, it is very important to calibrate the extrinsic parameters of each sensor in the integrated measurement system. This paper proposed an accurate and automatic extrinsic parameter calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors. In this system, fringe projection sensor (FPS) and conoscopic holography sensor (CHS) is integrated into a multi-axis motion platform, and the sensors can be optimally move to any desired position at the object's surface. In order to simple the calibration process, a special calibration artifact is designed according to the characteristics of the two sensors. An automatic registration procedure based on correlation and segmentation is used to realize the artifact datasets obtaining by FPS and CHS rough alignment without any manual operation and data pro-processing, and then the Generalized Gauss-Markoff model is used to estimate the optimization transformation parameters. The experiments show the measurement result of a blade, where several sampled patches are merged into one point cloud, and it verifies the performance of the proposed method.

  7. NMR Measurements of Granular Flow and Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can be used to measure statistical distributions of granular flow velocity and fluctuations of velocity, as well as spatial distributions of particulate concentration, flow velocity, its fluctuations, and other parameters that may be derived from these. All measurements have been of protons in liquid-containing particles such as mustard seeds or pharmaceutical pills. Our favorite geometry has been the slowly rotating partially filled rotating drum with granular flow taking place along the free surface of the particles. All the above-mentioned parameters have been studied as well as a spatial distribution of particulate diffusion coefficients, energy dissipation due to collisions, as well as segregation of non-uniform mixtures of granular material. Finally, we describe some motions of granular material under periodic vibrations.

  8. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity.

  9. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  10. Measuring nonlinear oscillations using a very accurate and low-cost linear optical position transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2016-09-01

    An accurate linear optical displacement transducer of about 0.2 mm resolution over a range of ∼40 mm is presented. This device consists of a stack of thin cellulose acetate strips, each strip longitudinally slid ∼0.5 mm over the precedent one so that one end of the stack becomes a stepped wedge of constant step. A narrowed light beam from a white LED orthogonally incident crosses the wedge at a known point, the transmitted intensity being detected with a phototransistor whose emitter is connected to a diode. We present the interesting analytical proof that the voltage across the diode is linearly dependent upon the ordinate of the point where the light beam falls on the wedge, as well as the experimental validation of such a theoretical proof. Applications to nonlinear oscillations are then presented—including the interesting case of a body moving under dry friction, and the more advanced case of an oscillator in a quartic energy potential—whose time-varying positions were accurately measured with our transducer. Our sensing device can resolve the dynamics of an object attached to it with great accuracy and precision at a cost considerably less than that of a linear neutral density wedge. The technique used to assemble the wedge of acetate strips is described.

  11. Aeroacoustic Flow Phenomena Accurately Captured by New Computational Fluid Dynamics Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blech, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the challenges in the computational fluid dynamics area is the accurate calculation of aeroacoustic phenomena, especially in the presence of shock waves. One such phenomenon is "transonic resonance," where an unsteady shock wave at the throat of a convergent-divergent nozzle results in the emission of acoustic tones. The space-time Conservation-Element and Solution-Element (CE/SE) method developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center can faithfully capture the shock waves, their unsteady motion, and the generated acoustic tones. The CE/SE method is a revolutionary new approach to the numerical modeling of physical phenomena where features with steep gradients (e.g., shock waves, phase transition, etc.) must coexist with those having weaker variations. The CE/SE method does not require the complex interpolation procedures (that allow for the possibility of a shock between grid cells) used by many other methods to transfer information between grid cells. These interpolation procedures can add too much numerical dissipation to the solution process. Thus, while shocks are resolved, weaker waves, such as acoustic waves, are washed out.

  12. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  13. Accurate Measurement of the Effects of All Amino-Acid Mutations on Influenza Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Doud, Michael B.; Bloom, Jesse D.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza genes evolve mostly via point mutations, and so knowing the effect of every amino-acid mutation provides information about evolutionary paths available to the virus. We and others have combined high-throughput mutagenesis with deep sequencing to estimate the effects of large numbers of mutations to influenza genes. However, these measurements have suffered from substantial experimental noise due to a variety of technical problems, the most prominent of which is bottlenecking during the generation of mutant viruses from plasmids. Here we describe advances that ameliorate these problems, enabling us to measure with greatly improved accuracy and reproducibility the effects of all amino-acid mutations to an H1 influenza hemagglutinin on viral replication in cell culture. The largest improvements come from using a helper virus to reduce bottlenecks when generating viruses from plasmids. Our measurements confirm at much higher resolution the results of previous studies suggesting that antigenic sites on the globular head of hemagglutinin are highly tolerant of mutations. We also show that other regions of hemagglutinin—including the stalk epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies—have a much lower inherent capacity to tolerate point mutations. The ability to accurately measure the effects of all influenza mutations should enhance efforts to understand and predict viral evolution. PMID:27271655

  14. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1).

  15. Accurate Measurement of the Effects of All Amino-Acid Mutations on Influenza Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Doud, Michael B; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-01-01

    Influenza genes evolve mostly via point mutations, and so knowing the effect of every amino-acid mutation provides information about evolutionary paths available to the virus. We and others have combined high-throughput mutagenesis with deep sequencing to estimate the effects of large numbers of mutations to influenza genes. However, these measurements have suffered from substantial experimental noise due to a variety of technical problems, the most prominent of which is bottlenecking during the generation of mutant viruses from plasmids. Here we describe advances that ameliorate these problems, enabling us to measure with greatly improved accuracy and reproducibility the effects of all amino-acid mutations to an H1 influenza hemagglutinin on viral replication in cell culture. The largest improvements come from using a helper virus to reduce bottlenecks when generating viruses from plasmids. Our measurements confirm at much higher resolution the results of previous studies suggesting that antigenic sites on the globular head of hemagglutinin are highly tolerant of mutations. We also show that other regions of hemagglutinin-including the stalk epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies-have a much lower inherent capacity to tolerate point mutations. The ability to accurately measure the effects of all influenza mutations should enhance efforts to understand and predict viral evolution. PMID:27271655

  16. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1). PMID:23498117

  17. Accurate measurements of ozone absorption cross-sections in the Hartley band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallon, J.; Lee, S.; Moussay, P.; Tworek, K.; Petersen, M.; Wielgosz, R. I.

    2015-03-01

    Ozone plays a crucial role in tropospheric chemistry, is the third largest contributor to greenhouse radiative forcing after carbon dioxide and methane and also a toxic air pollutant affecting human health and agriculture. Long-term measurements of tropospheric ozone have been performed globally for more than 30 years with UV photometers, all relying on the absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have re-determined this cross-section and report a value of 11.27 x 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.86% (coverage factor k= 2). This is lower than the conventional value currently in use and measured by Hearn (1961) with a relative difference of 1.8%, with the consequence that historically reported ozone concentrations should be increased by 1.8%. In order to perform the new measurements of cross-sections with reduced uncertainties, a system was set up to generate pure ozone in the gas phase together with an optical system based on a UV laser with lines in the Hartley band, including accurate path length measurement of the absorption cell and a careful evaluation of possible impurities in the ozone sample by mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This resulted in new measurements of absolute values of ozone absorption cross-sections of 9.48 x 10-18, 10.44 x 10-18 and 11.07 x 10-18 cm2 molecule-1, with relative expanded uncertainties better than 0.7%, for the wavelengths (in vacuum) of 244.06, 248.32, and 257.34 nm respectively. The cross-section at the 253.65 nm line of mercury was determined by comparisons using a Standard Reference Photometer equipped with a mercury lamp as the light source. The newly reported value should be used in the future to obtain the most accurate measurements of ozone concentration, which are in closer agreement with non-UV-photometry based methods such as the gas phase titration of ozone with nitrogen monoxide.

  18. Accurate laser measurements of ozone absorption cross-sections in the Hartley band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallon, J.; Lee, S.; Moussay, P.; Tworek, K.; Petersen, M.; Wielgosz, R. I.

    2014-08-01

    Ozone plays a crucial role in tropospheric chemistry, is the third largest contributor to greenhouse radiative forcing after carbon dioxide and methane and also a toxic air pollutant affecting human health and agriculture. Long-term measurements of tropospheric ozone have been performed globally for more than 30 years with UV photometers, all relying on the absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have re-determined this cross-section and report a value of 11.27 × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.84 %. This is lower than the conventional value currently in use and measured by Hearn in 1961 with a relative difference of 1.8%, with the consequence that historically reported ozone concentrations should be increased by 1.8%. In order to perform the new measurements of cross sections with reduced uncertainties, a system to generate pure ozone in the gas phase together with an optical system based on a UV laser with lines in the Hartley band, including accurate path length measurement of the absorption cell and a careful evaluation of possible impurities in the ozone sample by mass spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy was setup. This resulted in new measurements of absolute values of ozone absorption cross sections of 9.48 × 10-18, 10.44 × 10-18, and 11.07 × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1, with relative expanded uncertainties better than 0.6%, for the wavelengths (in vacuum) of 244.062, 248.32, and 257.34 nm respectively. The cross-section at the 253.65 nm line of mercury was determined by comparisons using a Standard Reference Photometer equipped with a mercury lamp as the light source. The newly reported value should be used in the future to obtain the most accurate measurements of ozone concentration, which are in closer agreement with non UV photometry based methods such as the gas phase titration of ozone with nitrogen monoxide.

  19. Accurate Measurement of Velocity and Acceleration of Seismic Vibrations near Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Syed Javed; Imdadullah; Asghar, Mohammad Syed Jamil

    In spite of all prerequisite geological study based precautions, the sites of nuclear power plants are also susceptible to seismic vibrations and their consequent effects. The effect of the ongoing nuclear tragedy in Japan caused by an earthquake and its consequent tsunami on March 11, 2011 is currently beyond contemplations. It has led to a rethinking on nuclear power stations by various governments around the world. Therefore, the prediction of location and time of large earthquakes has regained a great importance. The earth crust is made up of several wide, thin and rigid plates like blocks which are in constant motion with respect to each other. A series of vibrations on the earth surface are produced by the generation of elastic seismic waves due to sudden rupture within the plates during the release of accumulated strain energy. The range of frequency of seismic vibrations is from 0 to 10 Hz. However, there appears a large variation in magnitude, velocity and acceleration of these vibrations. The response of existing or conventional methods of measurement of seismic vibrations is very slow, which is of the order of tens of seconds. A systematic and high resolution measurement of velocity and acceleration of these vibrations are useful to interpret the pattern of waves and their anomalies more accurately, which are useful for the prediction of an earthquake. In the proposed work, a fast rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used to measure the velocity and acceleration of seismic vibrations in the millisecond range. The broad spectrum of pulses within one second range, measured by proposed method, gives all possible values of instantaneous velocity and instantaneous acceleration of the seismic vibrations. The spectrum of pulses in millisecond range becomes available which is useful to measure the pattern of fore shocks to predict the time and location of large earthquakes more accurately. Moreover, instead of average, the peak values of these quantities are helpful

  20. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  1. Nonequilibrium invariant measure under heat flow.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Luca; Lepri, Stefano; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio

    2008-09-19

    We provide an explicit representation of the nonequilibrium invariant measure for a chain of harmonic oscillators with conservative noise in the presence of stationary heat flow. By first determining the covariance matrix, we are able to express the measure as the product of Gaussian distributions aligned along some collective modes that are spatially localized with power-law tails. Numerical studies show that such a representation applies also to a purely deterministic model, the quartic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain.

  2. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  3. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  4. Field methods for measuring concentrated flow erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; James, M. R.; Quinton, J. N.; Taguas, E. V.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    techniques (3D) for measuring erosion from concentrated flow (pole, laser profilemeter, photo-reconstruction and terrestrial LiDAR) The comparison between two- and three-dimensional methods has showed the superiority of the 3D techniques for obtaining accurate cross sectional data. The results from commonly-used 2D methods can be subject to systematic errors in areal cross section that exceed magnitudes of 10 % on average. In particular, the pole simplified method has showed a clear tendency to understimate areas. Laser profilemeter results show that further research on calibrating optical devices for a variety of soil conditions must be carried out to improve its performance. For volume estimations, photo-reconstruction results provided an excellent approximation to terrestrial laser data and demonstrate that this new remote sensing technique has a promising application field in soil erosion studies. 2D approaches involved important errors even over short measurement distances. However, as well as accuracy, the cost and time requirements of a technique must be considered.

  5. Accurate measurement of intraarterial pressure through radial artery catheters in neonates.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; Westerhof, N; Leenhoven, T; Okken, A

    1990-07-01

    A technique is described for accurate measurement of intraarterial pressure through radial artery catheters in neonates. The technique, which can be used for short-term monitoring, uses cannulation of the radial artery with a 24-gauge Teflon catheter, connected by a Luer-Lok fitting to a three-way stopcock and a high-fidelity tip transducer. In vitro studies showed that the system is linear and the frequency response is flat (+/- 3 dB) up to 50 Hz. The technique permits gathering of high-quality pressure data and can be used in the area of neonatal clinical research for short-term monitoring. It needs to be developed further before routine application in clinical practice can be recommended.

  6. Simple yet accurate noncontact device for measuring the radius of curvature of a spherical mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Spiridonov, Maxim; Toebaert, David

    2006-09-10

    An easily reproducible device is demonstrated to be capable of measuring the radii of curvature of spherical mirrors, both convex and concave, without resorting to high-end interferometric or tactile devices. The former are too elaborate for our purposes,and the latter cannot be used due to the delicate nature of the coatings applied to mirrors used in high-power CO2 laser applications. The proposed apparatus is accurate enough to be useful to anyone using curved optics and needing a quick way to assess the values of the radii of curvature, be it for entrance quality control or trouble shooting an apparently malfunctioning optical system. Specifically, the apparatus was designed for checking 50 mm diameter resonator(typically flat or tens of meters concave) and telescope (typically some meters convex and concave) mirrors for a high-power CO2 laser, but it can easily be adapted to any other type of spherical mirror by a straightforward resizing.

  7. Simple yet accurate noncontact device for measuring the radius of curvature of a spherical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Maxim; Toebaert, David

    2006-09-01

    An easily reproducible device is demonstrated to be capable of measuring the radii of curvature of spherical mirrors, both convex and concave, without resorting to high-end interferometric or tactile devices. The former are too elaborate for our purposes, and the latter cannot be used due to the delicate nature of the coatings applied to mirrors used in high-power CO2 laser applications. The proposed apparatus is accurate enough to be useful to anyone using curved optics and needing a quick way to assess the values of the radii of curvature, be it for entrance quality control or trouble shooting an apparently malfunctioning optical system. Specifically, the apparatus was designed for checking 50 mm diameter resonator (typically flat or tens of meters concave) and telescope (typically some meters convex and concave) mirrors for a high-power CO2 laser, but it can easily be adapted to any other type of spherical mirror by a straightforward resizing.

  8. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Vlassak, J J

    2013-05-01

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious.

  9. Development of microcontroller based water flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Muhammad Miftahul; Surachman, Arif; Fathonah, Indra Wahyudin; Billah, Muhammad Aziz; Khairurrijal, Mahfudz, Hernawan; Rimawan, Ririn; Lestari, Slamet

    2015-04-01

    A digital instrument for measuring water flow was developed using an AT89S52 microcontroller, DS1302 real time clock (RTC), and EEPROM for an external memory. The sensor used for probing the current was a propeller that will rotate if immersed in a water flow. After rotating one rotation, the sensor sends one pulse and the number of pulses are counted for a certain time of counting. The measurement data, i.e. the number of pulses per unit time, are converted into water flow velocity (m/s) through a mathematical formula. The microcontroller counts the pulse sent by the sensor and the number of counted pulses are stored into the EEPROM memory. The time interval for counting is provided by the RTC and can be set by the operator. The instrument was tested under various time intervals ranging from 10 to 40 seconds and several standard propellers owned by Experimental Station for Hydraulic Structure and Geotechnics (BHGK), Research Institute for Water Resources (Pusair). Using the same propellers and water flows, it was shown that water flow velocities obtained from the developed digital instrument and those found by the provided analog one are almost similar.

  10. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  11. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  12. Measuring solar reflectance - Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-09-15

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective ''cool colored'' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland US latitudes, this metric R{sub E891BN} can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {<=} 5:12 [23 ]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear sky air mass one global horizontal (''AM1GH'') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. (author)

  13. Accurate quadrupole MS peak reconstruction in optimized gas-flow comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Sciarrone, Danilo; Dugo, Paola; Dugo, Giovanni; Mondello, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    In the present research, a split-flow comprehensive 2-D GC-quadrupole MS (qMS) method was developed using: a primary apolar 30 m×0.25 mm id×0.25 μm d(f) capillary linked, via a T-union, to a secondary polar 1.0 m×0.05 mm id×0.05 μm d(f) capillary and to a 0.10 m×0.05 mm id×0.05 μm d(f) uncoated column segment. The GC×GC-qMS instrument was equipped with two GC ovens and a loop-type modulator. The polar column was connected to the MS, whereas the uncoated column directed most of the first-dimension effluent to waste and enabled the generation of optimum gas velocities in both dimensions, namely circa 20 and 80 cm/s in the first and second dimensions, respectively. The rapid-scanning qMS was operated at a scan speed of 10,000 amu/s, a 25-Hz data acquisition frequency (scan time+interscan time: 40 ms), and with a normal GC mass range (m/z 40-360). Chromatography bands at the second-dimension outlet were never less than 360 ms wide (6σ), enabling the acquisition of at least 10 spectra/peak.

  14. Extracting accurate strain measurements in bone mechanics: A critical review of current methods.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Isaksson, Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis related fractures are a social burden that advocates for more accurate fracture prediction methods. Mechanistic methods, e.g. finite element models, have been proposed as a tool to better predict bone mechanical behaviour and strength. However, there is little consensus about the optimal constitutive law to describe bone as a material. Extracting reliable and relevant strain data from experimental tests is of fundamental importance to better understand bone mechanical properties, and to validate numerical models. Several techniques have been used to measure strain in experimental mechanics, with substantial differences in terms of accuracy, precision, time- and length-scale. Each technique presents upsides and downsides that must be carefully evaluated when designing the experiment. Moreover, additional complexities are often encountered when applying such strain measurement techniques to bone, due to its complex composite structure. This review of literature examined the four most commonly adopted methods for strain measurements (strain gauges, fibre Bragg grating sensors, digital image correlation, and digital volume correlation), with a focus on studies with bone as a substrate material, at the organ and tissue level. For each of them the working principles, a summary of the main applications to bone mechanics at the organ- and tissue-level, and a list of pros and cons are provided. PMID:26099201

  15. An Accurate Method for Measuring Airplane-Borne Conformal Antenna's Radar Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuxia; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yafeng; Hu, Chufeng

    2016-09-01

    The airplane-borne conformal antenna attaches itself tightly with the airplane skin, so the conventional measurement method cannot determine the contribution of the airplane-borne conformal antenna to its radar cross section (RCS). This paper uses the 2D microwave imaging to isolate and extract the distribution of the reflectivity of the airplane-borne conformal antenna. It obtains the 2D spatial spectra of the conformal antenna through the wave spectral transform between the 2D spatial image and the 2D spatial spectrum. After the interpolation from the rectangular coordinate domain to the polar coordinate domain, the spectral domain data for the variation of the scatter of the conformal antenna with frequency and angle is obtained. The experimental results show that the measurement method proposed in this paper greatly enhances the airplane-borne conformal antenna's RCS measurement accuracy, essentially eliminates the influences caused by the airplane skin and more accurately reveals the airplane-borne conformal antenna's RCS scatter properties.

  16. Flow rate measurement in aggressive conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, Nataliia; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Karcher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Two non-contact experimental methods of flow rate measurements for aggressive conductive liquids are described. The techniques are based on electromagnetic forces and Faraday's law: Lorentz force is induced inside moving conductive liquid under influence of variable magnetic field of permanent magnets. They are mounted along a liquid metal channel or (in case of the second method) inserted into rotated metal wheels. The force acts in the opposite of fluids' velocity direction and hence it is possible to measure reaction force of it that takes place according to Newton's law on magnetic field source - permanent magnets. And by knowing the force, which linearly depends on velocity, one can calculate mean flow rate of liquid. In addition experimental "dry" calibration and its results are described for one of the measurements' techniques.

  17. Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Measurement of Blood Volume Flow in the Umbilical Cord

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Stephen Z.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Treadwell, Marjorie C.; Romero, Vivian C.; Richards, Michael S.; Zhang, Man; Hall, Anne L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Three-dimensional (3D) umbilical cord blood volume flow measurement with the intention of providing a straightforward, consistent, and accurate method that overcomes the limitations associated with traditional pulsed-wave Doppler flow measurement and provides a means by which to recognize and manage at-risk pregnancies. Methods The first study involved 3D ultrasound volume flow measurements in seven healthy ewes whose pregnancies ranged from 18 to 19 weeks’ gestation (7 singletons). Sonographic umbilical arterial and venous flow measurements from each fetus were compared to the corresponding average measured arterial/venous flow to assess feasibility of measurement in a static vessel. A second complementary study involved 3D ultrasound volume flow measurements in seven healthy women whose pregnancies ranged from 17.9 to 36.3 weeks’ gestation (6 singletons, 1 twin). Umbilical venous flow measurements were compared to similar flow measurements reported in the literature. Pregnancy outcomes were abstracted from the medical records of the recruited patients. Results In the fetal sheep model, arterial/venous flow comparisons yielded errors of 10% or less for eight out of the nine measurements. In the clinical study, venous flow measurements showed agreement with the literature over a range of gestational ages. Two of the seven patients in the clinical study demonstrated lower flow than anticipated for gestational age; one was subsequently diagnosed with intrauterine growth restriction and the other with preeclampsia. Conclusions Accurate measurements of umbilical blood volume flow can be performed with relative ease in both the sheep model and in humans using the proposed 3D ultrasound flow measurement technique. Results encourage further development of the method as a means for diagnosis and identification of at-risk pregnancies. PMID:23197545

  18. Accurate calculation of Stokes drag for point-particle tracking in two-way coupled flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, J. A. K.; Mani, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose and test a method for calculating Stokes drag applicable to particle-laden fluid flows where two-way momentum coupling is important. In the point-particle formulation, particle dynamics are coupled to fluid dynamics via a source term that appears in the respective momentum equations. When the particle Reynolds number is small and the particle diameter is smaller than the fluid scales, it is common to approximate the momentum coupling source term as the Stokes drag. The Stokes drag force depends on the difference between the undisturbed fluid velocity evaluated at the particle location, and the particle velocity. However, owing to two-way coupling, the fluid velocity is modified in the neighborhood of a particle, relative to its undisturbed value. This causes the computed Stokes drag force to be underestimated in two-way coupled point-particle simulations. We develop estimates for the drag force error as function of the particle size relative to the grid size. Because the disturbance field created by the particle contaminates the surrounding fluid, correctly calculating the drag force cannot be done solely by direct interpolation of the fluid velocity. Instead, we develop a correction method that calculates the undisturbed fluid velocity from the computed disturbed velocity field by adding an estimate of the velocity disturbance created by the particle. The correction scheme is tested for a particle settling in an otherwise quiescent fluid and is found to reduce the error in computed settling velocity by an order of magnitude compared with common interpolation schemes.

  19. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  20. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  1. Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Carlo; Burriesci, Matthew S.; Cella, Kristen; Pringle, John R.

    2015-01-01

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue. PMID:26291447

  2. Rapid, Precise, and Accurate Counts of Symbiodinium Cells Using the Guava Flow Cytometer, and a Comparison to Other Methods.

    PubMed

    Krediet, Cory J; DeNofrio, Jan C; Caruso, Carlo; Burriesci, Matthew S; Cella, Kristen; Pringle, John R

    2015-01-01

    In studies of both the establishment and breakdown of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, it is often necessary to determine the number of Symbiodinium cells relative to the quantity of host tissue. Ideally, the methods used should be rapid, precise, and accurate. In this study, we systematically evaluated methods for sample preparation and storage and the counting of algal cells using the hemocytometer, a custom image-analysis program for automated counting of the fluorescent algal cells, the Coulter Counter, or the Millipore Guava flow-cytometer. We found that although other methods may have value in particular applications, for most purposes, the Guava flow cytometer provided by far the best combination of precision, accuracy, and efficient use of investigator time (due to the instrument's automated sample handling), while also allowing counts of algal numbers over a wide range and in small volumes of tissue homogenate. We also found that either of two assays of total homogenate protein provided a precise and seemingly accurate basis for normalization of algal counts to the total amount of holobiont tissue. PMID:26291447

  3. Multiphase Flow Measurement System of Oil Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiyao; He, Chaohong; Liang, Qilin

    2007-06-01

    A new multiphase flow measurement system of oil well was developed. This measurement system was based on the combination of a separator, two level meters and three commercial flowmeters. The separator separated the crude oil into three components: gas, water and oil-water mixture. By means of the automatic control of two interface levels (the oil-water interface level and the oil-gas interface level), three components were measured by the corresponding commercial flowmeters. The developed measurement system had been tested at Shengli Oilfield in China. The test results show that the developed measurement system is effective. It is suitable for the flowrate measurement of Chinese oil well with high water fraction and its accuracy is also satisfactory.

  4. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  5. Time-Accurate Unsteady Flow Simulations Supporting the SRM T+68-Second Pressure Spike Anomaly Investigation (STS-54B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Burnette, D. W.; Holt, J. B.; Matienzo, Jose

    1993-01-01

    Time-accurate unsteady flow simulations are being performed supporting the SRM T+68sec pressure 'spike' anomaly investigation. The anomaly occurred in the RH SRM during the STS-54 flight (STS-54B) but not in the LH SRM (STS-54A) causing a momentary thrust mismatch approaching the allowable limit at that time into the flight. Full-motor internal flow simulations using the USA-2D axisymmetric code are in progress for the nominal propellant burn-back geometry and flow conditions at T+68-sec--Pc = 630 psi, gamma = 1.1381, T(sub c) = 6200 R, perfect gas without aluminum particulate. In a cooperative effort with other investigation team members, CFD-derived pressure loading on the NBR and castable inhibitors was used iteratively to obtain nominal deformed geometry of each inhibitor, and the deformed (bent back) inhibitor geometry was entered into this model. Deformed geometry was computed using structural finite-element models. A solution for the unsteady flow has been obtained for the nominal flow conditions (existing prior to the occurrence of the anomaly) showing sustained standing pressure oscillations at nominally 14.5 Hz in the motor IL acoustic mode that flight and static test data confirm to be normally present at this time. Average mass flow discharged from the nozzle was confirmed to be the nominal expected (9550 lbm/sec). The local inlet boundary condition is being perturbed at the location of the presumed reconstructed anomaly as identified by interior ballistics performance specialist team members. A time variation in local mass flow is used to simulate sudden increase in burning area due to localized propellant grain cracks. The solution will proceed to develop a pressure rise (proportional to total mass flow rate change squared). The volume-filling time constant (equivalent to 0.5 Hz) comes into play in shaping the rise rate of the developing pressure 'spike' as it propagates at the speed of sound in both directions to the motor head end and nozzle. The

  6. Maximum Mass of Strange Stars and Pulsars with the Most Accurately Measured Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, Yu. L.; Grigoryan, A. K.; Shahinyan, H. A.

    2015-06-01

    Strange quark matter (SQM) is studied using a bag model in which the transition to the SQM state takes place at energy densities of no more than twice the density in atomic nuclei. Thus, low mass neutron stars with a configuration consisting of SQM form a single family on a plot of the mass M of equilibrium superdense configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c (the M(ρ c ) curve). The bag model considered here depends on three constants: the vacuum pressure B, the quark-gluon interaction constant α c , and the strange quark mass m s . Sets of values of these constants are determined, which if used in the equation of state for SQM yield a maximal mass M max of the equilibrium quark configurations which exceeds the recently accurately determined mass of 2.01 M ⊙ for the binary radio pulsar PSR J0348+0432. The mass, radius, total baryon number, and red shift from the surface of the strange star are calculated for these configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c . The values of these integrated parameters are also calculated for each series with M max > 2.01 M ⊙ for superdense configurations with masses of 2.01, 1.97, and 1.44 solar masses, which have been determined with great accuracy from observations. It turns out that, according to the resulting equations of state, all of the three pulsars with the most accurately measured masses, may be possible candidate strange stars.

  7. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  8. Accurate, in vivo NIR measurement of skeletal muscle oxygenation through fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chunguang; Zou, Fengmei; Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Scott, Peter; Peshlov, Boyan; Soller, Babs R.

    2010-02-01

    Noninvasive near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurement of muscle oxygenation requires the penetration of light through overlying skin and fat layers. We have previously demonstrated a dual-light source design and orthogonalization algorithm that corrects for inference from skin absorption and fat scattering. To achieve accurate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) measurement, one must select the appropriate source-detector distance (SD) to completely penetrate the fat layer. Methods: Six healthy subjects were supine for 15min to normalize tissue oxygenation across the body. NIR spectra were collected from the calf, shoulder, lower and upper thigh muscles with long SD distances of 30mm, 35mm, 40mm and 45mm. Spectral preprocessing with the short SD (3mm) spectrum preceded SmO2 calculation with a Taylor series expansion method. Three-way ANOVA was used to compare SmO2 values over varying fat thickness, subjects and SD distances. Results: Overlying fat layers varied in thickness from 4.9mm to 19.6mm across all subjects. SmO2 measured at the four locations were comparable for each subject (p=0.133), regardless of fat thickness and SD distance. SmO2 (mean+/-std dev) measured at calf, shoulder, low and high thigh were 62+/-3%, 59+/-8%, 61+/-2%, 61+/-4% respectively for SD distance of 30mm. In these subjects no significant influence of SD was observed (p=0.948). Conclusions: The results indicate that for our sensor design a 30mm SD is sufficient to penetrate through a 19mm fat layer and that orthogonalization with short SD effectively removed spectral interference from fat to result in a reproducible determination of SmO2.

  9. Accurate measurement of interferometer group delay using field-compensated scanning white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian

    2010-10-10

    Interferometers are key elements in radial velocity (RV) experiments in astronomy observations, and accurate calibration of the group delay of an interferometer is required for high precision measurements. A novel field-compensated white light scanning Michelson interferometer is introduced as an interferometer calibration tool. The optical path difference (OPD) scanning was achieved by translating a compensation prism, such that even if the light source were in low spatial coherence, the interference stays spatially phase coherent over a large interferometer scanning range. In the wavelength region of 500-560 nm, a multimode fiber-coupled LED was used as the light source, and high optical efficiency was essential in elevating the signal-to-noise ratio of the interferogram signal. The achromatic OPD scanning required a one-time calibration, and two methods using dual-laser wavelength references and an iodine absorption spectrum reference were employed and cross-verified. In an experiment measuring the group delay of a fixed Michelson interferometer, Fourier analysis was employed to process the interferogram data. The group delay was determined at an accuracy of 1×10(-5), and the phase angle precision was typically 2.5×10(-6) over the wide wavelength region.

  10. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, Boy-Santhos; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2013-04-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the 150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  11. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Sterre, B.; Hut, R.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2012-12-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the $150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  12. Describing and compensating gas transport dynamics for accurate instantaneous emission measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Ajtay, Delia

    Instantaneous emission measurements on chassis dynamometers and engine test benches are becoming increasingly usual for car-makers and for environmental emission factor measurement and calculation, since much more information about the formation conditions can be extracted than from the regulated bag measurements (integral values). The common exhaust gas analysers for the "regulated pollutants" (carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide) allow measurement at a rate of one to ten samples per second. This gives the impression of having after-the-catalyst emission information with that chronological precision. It has been shown in recent years, however, that beside the reaction time of the analysers, the dynamics of gas transport in both the exhaust system of the car and the measurement system last significantly longer than 1 s. This paper focuses on the compensation of all these dynamics convoluting the emission signals. Most analysers show linear and time-invariant reaction dynamics. Transport dynamics can basically be split into two phenomena: a pure time delay accounting for the transport of the gas downstream and a dynamic signal deformation since the gas is mixed by turbulence along the way. This causes emission peaks to occur which are smaller in height and longer in time at the sensors than they are after the catalyst. These dynamics can be modelled using differential equations. Both mixing dynamics and time delay are constant for modelling a raw gas analyser system, since the flow in that system is constant. In the exhaust system of the car, however, the parameters depend on the exhaust volume flow. For gasoline cars, the variation in overall transport time may be more than 6 s. It is shown in this paper how all these processes can be described by invertible mathematical models with the focus on the more complex case of the car's exhaust system. Inversion means that the sharp emission signal at the catalyst out location can be

  13. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  14. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  15. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  16. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for raw testing but is allowed for dilute testing. (b) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  17. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  18. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  19. Measurement of Flow Patterns and Dispersion in the Human Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresconi, Frank E.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2006-03-01

    A detailed knowledge of the flow and dispersion within the human respiratory tract is desirable for numerous reasons. Both risk assessments of exposure to toxic particles in the environment and the design of medical delivery systems targeting both lung-specific conditions (asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)) and system-wide ailments (diabetes, cancer, hormone replacement) would profit from such an understanding. The present work features experimental efforts aimed at elucidating the fluid mechanics of the lung. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of oscillatory flows were undertaken in anatomically accurate models (single and multi-generational) of the conductive region of the lung. PIV results captured primary and secondary velocity fields. LIF was used to determine the amount of convective dispersion across an individual generation of the lung.

  20. PIV Measurements of Bioreactor Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, G. P.; Brown, J. B.

    1999-11-01

    Spinner-flask bioreactors are operated with several stationary tissue constructs mounted on long needles; the culture medium is stirred by a magnetic stir bar at the vessel bottom. Flow-visualization and PIV measurements have been performed in a scaled-up model system in which the curved, outer vessel wall has been eliminated and the vessel body, culture-medium simulant and tissue-construct models are all index-of-refraction matched. Measurements in the vicinity of the tissue constructs indicate high instantaneous shear stresses at some locations, which may be detrimental to tissue growth. Since the flow is driven by a periodic source, turbulence properties are determined using phase-locked ensemble averaging.

  1. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  2. A particle-tracking approach for accurate material derivative measurements with tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio

    2013-08-01

    The evaluation of the instantaneous 3D pressure field from tomographic PIV data relies on the accurate estimate of the fluid velocity material derivative, i.e., the velocity time rate of change following a given fluid element. To date, techniques that reconstruct the fluid parcel trajectory from a time sequence of 3D velocity fields obtained with Tomo-PIV have already been introduced. However, an accurate evaluation of the fluid element acceleration requires trajectory reconstruction over a relatively long observation time, which reduces random errors. On the other hand, simple integration and finite difference techniques suffer from increasing truncation errors when complex trajectories need to be reconstructed over a long time interval. In principle, particle-tracking velocimetry techniques (3D-PTV) enable the accurate reconstruction of single particle trajectories over a long observation time. Nevertheless, PTV can be reliably performed only at limited particle image number density due to errors caused by overlapping particles. The particle image density can be substantially increased by use of tomographic PIV. In the present study, a technique to combine the higher information density of tomographic PIV and the accurate trajectory reconstruction of PTV is proposed (Tomo-3D-PTV). The particle-tracking algorithm is applied to the tracers detected in the 3D domain obtained by tomographic reconstruction. The 3D particle information is highly sparse and intersection of trajectories is virtually impossible. As a result, ambiguities in the particle path identification over subsequent recordings are easily avoided. Polynomial fitting functions are introduced that describe the particle position in time with sequences based on several recordings, leading to the reduction in truncation errors for complex trajectories. Moreover, the polynomial regression approach provides a reduction in the random errors due to the particle position measurement. Finally, the acceleration

  3. How Accurate is Your Sclerostin Measurement? Comparison Between Three Commercially Available Sclerostin ELISA Kits.

    PubMed

    Piec, Isabelle; Washbourne, Christopher; Tang, Jonathan; Fisher, Emily; Greeves, Julie; Jackson, Sarah; Fraser, William D

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin, bone formation antagonist is in the spotlight as a potential biomarker for diseases presenting with associated bone disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CDK-MBD). Accurate measurement of sclerostin is therefore important. Several immunoassays are available to measure sclerostin in serum and plasma. We compared the performance of three commercial ELISA kits. We measured sclerostin concentrations in serum and EDTA plasma obtained from healthy young (18-26 years) human subjects using kits from Biomedica, TECOmedical and from R&D Systems. The circulating sclerostin concentrations were systematically higher when measured with the Biomedica assay (serum: 35.5 ± 1.1 pmol/L; EDTA: 39.4 ± 2.0 pmol/L; mean ± SD) as compared with TECOmedical (serum: 21.8 ± 0.7 pmol/L; EDTA: 27.2 ± 1.3 pmol/L) and R&D Systems (serum: 7.6 ± 0.3 pmol/L; EDTA: 30.9 ± 1.5 pmol/L). We found a good correlation between the assay for EDTA plasma (r > 0.6; p < 0.001) while in serum, only measurements obtained using TECOmedical and R&D Systems assays correlated significantly (r = 0.78; p < 0.001). There was no correlation between matrices results when using the Biomedica kit (r = 0.20). The variability in values generated from Biomedica, R&D Systems and TECOmedical assays raises questions regarding the accuracy and specificity of the assays. Direct comparison of studies using different kits is not possible and great care should be given to measurement of sclerostin, with traceability of reagents. Standardization with appropriate material is required before different sclerostin assays can be introduced in clinical practice. PMID:26749312

  4. How Accurate is Your Sclerostin Measurement? Comparison Between Three Commercially Available Sclerostin ELISA Kits.

    PubMed

    Piec, Isabelle; Washbourne, Christopher; Tang, Jonathan; Fisher, Emily; Greeves, Julie; Jackson, Sarah; Fraser, William D

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin, bone formation antagonist is in the spotlight as a potential biomarker for diseases presenting with associated bone disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CDK-MBD). Accurate measurement of sclerostin is therefore important. Several immunoassays are available to measure sclerostin in serum and plasma. We compared the performance of three commercial ELISA kits. We measured sclerostin concentrations in serum and EDTA plasma obtained from healthy young (18-26 years) human subjects using kits from Biomedica, TECOmedical and from R&D Systems. The circulating sclerostin concentrations were systematically higher when measured with the Biomedica assay (serum: 35.5 ± 1.1 pmol/L; EDTA: 39.4 ± 2.0 pmol/L; mean ± SD) as compared with TECOmedical (serum: 21.8 ± 0.7 pmol/L; EDTA: 27.2 ± 1.3 pmol/L) and R&D Systems (serum: 7.6 ± 0.3 pmol/L; EDTA: 30.9 ± 1.5 pmol/L). We found a good correlation between the assay for EDTA plasma (r > 0.6; p < 0.001) while in serum, only measurements obtained using TECOmedical and R&D Systems assays correlated significantly (r = 0.78; p < 0.001). There was no correlation between matrices results when using the Biomedica kit (r = 0.20). The variability in values generated from Biomedica, R&D Systems and TECOmedical assays raises questions regarding the accuracy and specificity of the assays. Direct comparison of studies using different kits is not possible and great care should be given to measurement of sclerostin, with traceability of reagents. Standardization with appropriate material is required before different sclerostin assays can be introduced in clinical practice.

  5. Accurate and precise Pb isotope ratio measurements in environmental samples by MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik J.; Kober, Bernd; Dolgopolova, Alla; Gallagher, Kerry; Spiro, Baruch; Le Roux, Gaël; Mason, Thomas F. D.; Kylander, Malin; Coles, Barry J.

    2004-04-01

    Analytical protocols for accurate and precise Pb isotope ratio determinations in peat, lichen, vegetable, chimney dust, and ore-bearing granites using MC-ICP-MS and their application to environmental studies are presented. Acid dissolution of various matrix types was achieved using high temperature/high pressure microwave and hot plate digestion procedures. The digests were passed through a column packed with EiChrom Sr-resin employing only hydrochloric acid and one column passage. This simplified column chemistry allowed high sample throughput. Typically, internal precisions for approximately 30 ng Pb were below 100 ppm (+/-2[sigma]) on all Pb ratios in all matrices. Thallium was employed to correct for mass discrimination effects and the achieved accuracy was below 80 ppm for all ratios. This involved an optimization procedure for the 205Tl/203Tl ratio using least square fits relative to certified NIST-SRM 981 Pb values. The long-term reproducibility (+/-2[sigma]) for the NIST-SRM 981 Pb standard over a 5-month period (35 measurements) was better than 350 ppm for all ratios. Selected ore-bearing granites were measured with TIMS and MC-ICP-MS and showed good correlation (e.g., r=0.999 for 206Pb/207Pb ratios, slope=0.996, n=13). Mass bias and signal intensities of Tl spiked into natural (after matrix separation) and in synthetic samples did not differ significantly, indicating that any residual components of the complex peat and lichen matrix did not influence mass bias correction. Environmental samples with very different matrices were analyzed during two different studies: (i) lichens, vegetables, and chimney dust around a Cu smelter in the Urals, and (ii) peat samples from an ombrotrophic bog in the Faroe Islands. The presented procedure for sample preparation, mass spectrometry, and data processing tools resulted in accurate and precise Pb isotope data that allowed the reliable differentiation and identification of Pb sources with variations as small as 0

  6. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  7. An accurate mass and radius measurement for an ultracool white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Bergeron, P.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Bento, J.; Littlefair, S. P.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2012-11-01

    Studies of cool white dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood have placed a limit on the age of the Galactic disc of 8-9 billion years. However, determining their cooling ages requires the knowledge of their effective temperatures, masses, radii and atmospheric composition. So far, these parameters could only be inferred for a small number of ultracool white dwarfs for which an accurate distance is known, by fitting their spectral energy distributions in conjunction with a theoretical mass-radius relation. However, the mass-radius relation remains largely untested, and the derived cooling ages are hence model dependent. Here we report direct measurements of the mass and radius of an ultracool white dwarf in the double-lined eclipsing binary SDSS J013851.54-001621.6. We find MWD = 0.529 ± 0.010 M⊙ and RWD = 0.0131 ± 0.0003 R⊙. Our measurements are consistent with the mass-radius relation and we determine a robust cooling age of 9.5 billion years for the 3570 K white dwarf. We find that the mass and radius of the low-mass companion star, Msec = 0.132 ± 0.003 M⊙ and Rsec = 0.165 ± 0.001 R⊙, are in agreement with evolutionary models. We also find evidence that this >9.5 Gyr old M5 star is still active, far beyond the activity lifetime for a star of its spectral type. This is likely caused by the high tidally enforced rotation rate of the star. The companion star is close to filling its Roche lobe and the system will evolve into a cataclysmic variable in only 70 Myr. Our direct measurements demonstrate that this system can be used to calibrate ultracool white dwarf atmospheric models.

  8. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  9. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  10. Accurate Permittivity Measurements for Microwave Imaging via Ultra-Wideband Removal of Spurious Reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Mathew G.; Viera, Joseph A.; Wanjura, John; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The use of microwave imaging is becoming more prevalent for detection of interior hidden defects in manufactured and packaged materials. In applications for detection of hidden moisture, microwave tomography can be used to image the material and then perform an inverse calculation to derive an estimate of the variability of the hidden material, such internal moisture, thereby alerting personnel to damaging levels of the hidden moisture before material degradation occurs. One impediment to this type of imaging occurs with nearby objects create strong reflections that create destructive and constructive interference, at the receiver, as the material is conveyed past the imaging antenna array. In an effort to remove the influence of the reflectors, such as metal bale ties, research was conducted to develop an algorithm for removal of the influence of the local proximity reflectors from the microwave images. This research effort produced a technique, based upon the use of ultra-wideband signals, for the removal of spurious reflections created by local proximity reflectors. This improvement enables accurate microwave measurements of moisture in such products as cotton bales, as well as other physical properties such as density or material composition. The proposed algorithm was shown to reduce errors by a 4:1 ratio and is an enabling technology for imaging applications in the presence of metal bale ties. PMID:22163668

  11. An improved method for accurate and rapid measurement of flight performance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Daniel T; Ganetzky, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has proven to be a useful model system for analysis of behavior, including flight. The initial flight tester involved dropping flies into an oil-coated graduated cylinder; landing height provided a measure of flight performance by assessing how far flies will fall before producing enough thrust to make contact with the wall of the cylinder. Here we describe an updated version of the flight tester with four major improvements. First, we added a "drop tube" to ensure that all flies enter the flight cylinder at a similar velocity between trials, eliminating variability between users. Second, we replaced the oil coating with removable plastic sheets coated in Tangle-Trap, an adhesive designed to capture live insects. Third, we use a longer cylinder to enable more accurate discrimination of flight ability. Fourth we use a digital camera and imaging software to automate the scoring of flight performance. These improvements allow for the rapid, quantitative assessment of flight behavior, useful for large datasets and large-scale genetic screens. PMID:24561810

  12. Produced water toxicity tests accurately measure the produced water toxicity in marine environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, W.S.; Veil, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region VI has issued a general permit for offshore oil and gas discharges to the Gulf of Mexico that places numerical limits on whole effluent toxicity (WEI) for produced water. Recently proposed EPA general permits for other produced water discharges in Regions VI and X also include enforceable numerical limits on WET. Clearly, the industry will be conducting extensive produced water WET testing. Unfortunately, the WET test may not accurately measure the toxicity of the chemical constituents of produced water. Rather the mortality of test organisms may be attributable to (1) the high salinity of produced water, which causes salinity shock to the organisms, or (2) an ionic imbalance caused by excesses or deficiencies of one or more of seawater`s essential ions in the test chambers. Both of these effects are likely to be mitigated in actual offshore discharge settings, where the receiving water will be seawater and substantial dilution will be probable. Thus, the additional salinity of produced water will be rapidly assimilated, and the proper marine ionic balance will be quickly restored. Regulatory authorities should be aware of these factors when interpreting WET test results.

  13. Accurate measurement of refraction and dispersion of a solid by a double-layer interferometer.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A Y

    1997-02-01

    A silica plate of plane-parallel faces is inserted into one gap of a double-layer interferometer that transmits white light to a prism spectrograph in order to produce elliptic rings of equal chromatic order (RECO's). The silica plate is rotated and the expanding RECO's are counted at their center while this center is coincident with a standard wavelength. An analytic formula that relates the fringe count to the rotated angle enables the refractive index of the rotated plate to be accurately determined for different wavelengths. The results are fitted to a single-term Sellmeier dispersion function to find the peak wavelength of the ultraviolet absorption band and the atomic number density for such a transition. The variation of either the dispersion coefficient or the group-velocity factor with wavelength is determined from either the displacement of the RECO center across the visible spectrum if one of the double-layer interferometer's mirrors is displaced parallel to itself or from measurements on the RECO diameters. PMID:18250738

  14. Measurement of Liver Blood Flow: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stansby, G. P.; Hobbs, K. E. F.; Hawkes, D. J.; Colchester, A. C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The study of hepatic haemodynamics is of importance in understanding both hepatic physiology and disease processes as well as assessing the effects of portosystemic shunting and liver transplantation. The liver has the most complicated circulation of any organ and many physiological and pathological processes can affect it1,2. This review surveys the methods available for assessing liver blood flow, examines the different parameters being measured and outlines problems of applicability and interpretation for each technique. The classification of these techniques is to some extent arbitrary and several so called “different” methods may share certain common principles. The methods reviewed have been classified into two groups (Table 1): those primarily reflecting flow through discrete vessels or to the whole organ and those used to assess local microcirculatory blood flow. All techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and in some situations a combination may provide the most information. In addition, because of the many factors affecting liver blood flow and sinusoidal perfusion, readings in a single subject may vary depending on positioning, recent food intake, anxiety, anaesthesia and drug therapy. This must be borne in mind if different studies are to be meaningfully compared. PMID:1931785

  15. Muscle function during brief maximal exercise: accurate measurements on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Arsac, L M; Belli, A; Lacour, J R

    1996-01-01

    A friction loaded cycle ergometer was instrumented with a strain gauge and an incremental encoder to obtain accurate measurement of human mechanical work output during the acceleration phase of a cycling sprint. This device was used to characterise muscle function in a group of 15 well-trained male subjects, asked to perform six short maximal sprints on the cycle against a constant friction load. Friction loads were successively set at 0.25, 0.35, 0.45, 0.55, 0.65 and 0.75 N.kg-1 body mass. Since the sprints were performed from a standing start, and since the acceleration was not restricted, the greatest attention was paid to the measurement of the acceleration balancing load due to flywheel inertia. Instantaneous pedalling velocity (v) and power output (P) were calculated each 5 ms and then averaged over each downstroke period so that each pedal downstroke provided a combination of v, force and P. Since an 8-s acceleration phase was composed of about 21 to 34 pedal downstrokes, this many v-P combinations were obtained amounting to 137-180 v-P combinations for all six friction loads in one individual, over the widest functional range of pedalling velocities (17-214 rpm). Thus, the individual's muscle function was characterised by the v-P relationships obtained during the six acceleration phases of the six sprints. An important finding of the present study was a strong linear relationship between individual optimal velocity (vopt) and individual maximal power output (Pmax) (n = 15, r = 0.95, P < 0.001) which has never been observed before. Since vopt has been demonstrated to be related to human fibre type composition both vopt, Pmax and their inter-relationship could represent a major feature in characterising muscle function in maximal unrestricted exercise. It is suggested that the present method is well suited to such analyses.

  16. Measurement of flow diverter hydraulic resistance to model flow modification in and around intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Szikora, István; Paál, György

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (FDs) have been successfully applied in the recent decade to the treatment of intracranial aneurysms by impairing the communication between the flows in the parent artery and the aneurysm and, thus, the blood within the aneurysm sac. It would be desirable to have a simple and accurate computational method to follow the changes in the peri- and intraaneurysmal flow caused by the presence of FDs. The detailed flow simulation around the intricate wire structure of the FDs has three disadvantages: need for high amount of computational resources and highly skilled professionals to prepare the computational grid, and also the lack of validation that makes the invested effort questionable. In this paper, we propose a porous layer method to model the hydraulic resistance (HR) of one or several layers of the FDs. The basis of this proposal is twofold: first, from an application point of view, the only interesting parameter regarding the function of the FD is its HR; second, we have developed a method to measure the HR with a simple apparatus. We present the results of these measurements and demonstrate their utility in numerical simulations of patient-specific aneurysm simulations. PMID:24936307

  17. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of 2 percent of the engine maximum fuel flow rate. The...

  18. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of 2 percent of the engine maximum fuel flow rate. The...

  19. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of 2 percent of the engine maximum fuel flow rate. The...

  20. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of 2 percent of the engine maximum fuel flow rate. The...

  1. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... percent of the measuring weight. (3) If the mass of fuel consumed is measured electronically (load cell... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  2. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... percent of the measuring weight. (3) If the mass of fuel consumed is measured electronically (load cell... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have...

  3. Can the Dupuit-Thiem equation accurately describe the flow pattern induced by injection in a laboratory scale aquifer-well system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Jose; Kalwa, Fritz; Händel, Falk; Binder, Martin; Stefan, Catalin

    2016-04-01

    The Dupuit-Thiem equation is normally used to assess flow towards a pumping well in unconfined aquifers under steady-state conditions. For the formulation of the equation it is assumed that flow is laminar, radial and horizontal towards the well. It is well known that these assumptions are not met in the vicinity of the well; some authors restrict the application of the equation only to a radius larger than 1.5-fold the aquifer thickness. In this study, the equation accuracy to predict the pressure head is evaluated as a simple and quick analytical method to describe the flow pattern for different injection rates in the LSAW. A laboratory scale aquifer-well system (LSAW) was implemented to study the aquifer recharge through wells. The LSAW consists of a 1.0 m-diameter tank with a height of 1.1 meters, filled with sand and a screened well in the center with a diameter of 0.025 m. A regulated outflow system establishes a controlled water level at the tank wall to simulate various aquifer thicknesses. The pressure head at the bottom of the tank along one axis can be measured to assess the flow profile every 0.1 m between the well and the tank wall. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the Dupuit-Thiem equation, a combination of different injection rates and aquifer thicknesses were simulated in the LSAW. Contrary to what was expected (significant differences between the measured and calculated pressure heads in the well), the absolute difference between the calculated and measured pressure head is less than 10%. Beside this, the highest differences are not observed in the well itself, but in the near proximity of it, at a radius of 0.1 m. The results further show that the difference between the calculated and measured pressure heads tends to decrease with higher flow rates. Despite its limitations (assumption of laminar and horizontal flow throughout the whole aquifer), the Dupuit-Thiem equation is considered to accurately represent the flow system in the LSAW.

  4. Flow Measurement by Means of Light Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobel, Th.

    1949-01-01

    There has been under development for the high-speed wind tunnel of the LFA an optical measuring arrangement for the qualitative and quantitative investigation of flow. By the use of interference measurements, the determination of density at the surface of the bodies being tested in the air stream and in the vicinity of these bodies can be undertaken. The results obtained so far in the simple preliminary investigations show that it is possible, even at a low Reynolds number, to obtain the density field in the neighborhood of a test body by optical means. Simple analytical expressions give the relation between density, pressure, velocity, and temperature. In addition to this, the interference measurement furnishes valuable data on the state of the boundary layer, that is, the sort of boundary layer (whether laminar or turbulent), as well as the temperature and velocity distribution.

  5. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  6. A new direct absorption measurement for high precision and accurate measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Highly accurate and precise water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are critical to understanding the climate feedbacks of water vapor and clouds in that region. However, the continued disagreement among water vapor measurements (~1 - 2 ppmv) are too large to constrain the role of different hydration and dehydration mechanisms operating in the UT/LS, with model validation dependent upon which dataset is chosen. In response to these issues, we present a new instrument for measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS that was flown during the April 2011 MACPEX mission out of Houston, TX. The dual axis instrument combines the heritage and validated accuracy of the Harvard Lyman-alpha instrument with a newly designed direct IR absorption instrument, the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The Lyman-alpha detection axis has flown aboard NASA's WB-57 and ER2 aircraft since 1994, and provides a requisite link between the new HHH instrument and the long history of Harvard water vapor measurements. The instrument utilizes the highly sensitive Lyman-alpha photo-fragment fluorescence detection method; its accuracy has been demonstrated though rigorous laboratory calibrations and in situ diagnostic procedures. The Harvard Herriott Hygrometer employs a fiber coupled near-IR laser with state-of-the-art electronics to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a spherical Herriott cell of 10 cm length. The instrument demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1-sec, 1-sigma) at mixing ratios as low as 5 ppmv with accuracies of 10% based on careful laboratory calibrations and in-flight performance. We present a description of the measurement technique along with our methodology for calibration and details of the measurement uncertainties. The simultaneous utilization of radically different measurement techniques in a single duct in the new Harvard Water Vapor (HWV) instrument allows for the constraint of systematic errors inherent in each technique

  7. An accurate air temperature measurement system based on an envelope pulsed ultrasonic time-of-flight technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Huang, Y P; Huang, K N; Young, M S

    2007-11-01

    A new microcomputer based air temperature measurement system is presented. An accurate temperature measurement is derived from the measurement of sound velocity by using an ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The study proposes a novel algorithm that combines both amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) to get the TOF measurement. The proposed system uses the AM and PM envelope square waveform (APESW) to reduce the error caused by inertia delay. The APESW ultrasonic driving waveform causes an envelope zero and phase inversion phenomenon in the relative waveform of the receiver. To accurately achieve a TOF measurement, the phase inversion phenomenon was used to sufficiently identify the measurement pulse in the received waveform. Additionally, a counter clock technique was combined to compute the phase shifts of the last incomplete cycle for TOF. The presented system can obtain 0.1% TOF resolution for the period corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency ultrasonic wave. Consequently, with the integration of a humidity compensation algorithm, a highly accurate and high resolution temperature measurement can be achieved using the accurate TOF measurement. Experimental results indicate that the combined standard uncertainty of the temperature measurement is approximately 0.39 degrees C. The main advantages of this system are high resolution measurements, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang; Klocke, Axel

    1997-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide insights int eh dynamic and structural properties of dyes and their micro- environment. The implementation of fluorescence lifetime measurements in flow cytometric systems allows to monitor large cell and particle populations with high statistical significance. In our system, a modulated laser beam is used for excitation and the phase shift of the fluorescence signal recorded with a fast computer controlled digital oscilloscope is processed digitally to determine the phase shift with respect to a reference beam by fast fourier transform. Total fluorescence intensity as well as other parameters can be determined simultaneously from the same fluorescence signal. We use the epi-illumination design to allow the use of high numerical apertures to collect as much light as possible to ensure detection of even weak fluorescence. Data storage and processing is done comparable to slit-scan flow cytometric data using data analysis system. The results are stored, displayed, combined with other parameters and analyzed as normal listmode data. In our report we discuss carefully the signal to noise ratio for analog and digital processed lifetime signals to evaluate the theoretical minimum fluorescence intensity for lifetime measurements. Applications to be presented include DNA staining, parameters of cell functions as well as different applications in non-mammalian cells such as algae.

  9. Two-dimensional flow nanometry of biological nanoparticles for accurate determination of their size and emission intensity

    PubMed Central

    Block, Stephan; Fast, Björn Johansson; Lundgren, Anders; Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Biological nanoparticles (BNPs) are of high interest due to their key role in various biological processes and use as biomarkers. BNP size and composition are decisive for their functions, but simultaneous determination of both properties with high accuracy remains challenging. Optical microscopy allows precise determination of fluorescence/scattering intensity, but not the size of individual BNPs. The latter is better determined by tracking their random motion in bulk, but the limited illumination volume for tracking this motion impedes reliable intensity determination. Here, we show that by attaching BNPs to a supported lipid bilayer, subjecting them to hydrodynamic flows and tracking their motion via surface-sensitive optical imaging enable determination of their diffusion coefficients and flow-induced drifts, from which accurate quantification of both BNP size and emission intensity can be made. For vesicles, the accuracy of this approach is demonstrated by resolving the expected radius-squared dependence of their fluorescence intensity for radii down to 15 nm. PMID:27658367

  10. A robust and accurate numerical method for transcritical turbulent flows at supercritical pressure with an arbitrary equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Terashima, Hiroshi; Negishi, Hideyo

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses issues in high-fidelity numerical simulations of transcritical turbulent flows at supercritical pressure. The proposed strategy builds on a tabulated look-up table method based on REFPROP database for an accurate estimation of non-linear behaviors of thermodynamic and fluid transport properties at the transcritical conditions. Based on the look-up table method we propose a numerical method that satisfies high-order spatial accuracy, spurious-oscillation-free property, and capability of capturing the abrupt variation in thermodynamic properties across the transcritical contact surface. The method introduces artificial mass diffusivity to the continuity and momentum equations in a physically-consistent manner in order to capture the steep transcritical thermodynamic variations robustly while maintaining spurious-oscillation-free property in the velocity field. The pressure evolution equation is derived from the full compressible Navier-Stokes equations and solved instead of solving the total energy equation to achieve the spurious pressure oscillation free property with an arbitrary equation of state including the present look-up table method. Flow problems with and without physical diffusion are employed for the numerical tests to validate the robustness, accuracy, and consistency of the proposed approach.

  11. Mixing problems in using indicators for measuring regional blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ushioda, E.; Nuwayhid, B.; Tabsh, K.; Erkkola, R.; Brinkman, C.R.; Assali, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    A basic requirement for using indicators for measuring blood flow is adequate mixing of the indicator with blood prior to sampling the site. This requirement has been met by depositing the indicator in the heart and sampling from an artery. Recently, authors have injected microspheres into veins and sampled from venous sites. The present studies were designed to investigate the mixing problems in sheep and rabbits by means of Cardio-Green and labeled microspheres. The indicators were injected at different points in the circulatory system, and blood was sampled at different levels of the venous and arterial systems. Results show the following: (a) When an indicator of small molecular size (Cardio-Green) is allowed to pass through the heart chambers, adequate mixing is achieved, yielding accurate and reproducible results. (b) When any indicator (Cardio-Green or microspheres) is injected into veins, and sampling is done at any point in the venous system, mixing is inadequate, yielding flow results which are inconsistent and erratic. (c) For an indicator or large molecular size (microspheres), injecting into the left side of the heart and sampling from arterial sites yield accurate and reproducible results regardless of whether blood is sampled continuously or intermittently.

  12. Accurate measurement of the sticking time and sticking probability of Rb atoms on a polydimethylsiloxane coating

    SciTech Connect

    Atutov, S. N. Plekhanov, A. I.

    2015-01-15

    We present the results of a systematic study of Knudsen’s flow of Rb atoms in cylindrical capillary cells coated with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) compound. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the characterization of the coating in terms of the sticking probability and sticking time of Rb on the two types of coating of high and medium viscosities. We report the measurement of the sticking probability of a Rb atom to the coating equal to 4.3 × 10{sup −5}, which corresponds to the number of bounces 2.3 × 10{sup 4} at room temperature. These parameters are the same for the two kinds of PDMS used. We find that at room temperature, the respective sticking times for high-viscosity and medium-viscosity PDMS are 22 ± 3 μs and 49 ± 6 μs. These sticking times are about million times larger than the sticking time derived from the surface Rb atom adsorption energy and temperature of the coating. A tentative explanation of this surprising result is proposed based on the bulk diffusion of the atoms that collide with the surface and penetrate inside the coating. The results can be important in many resonance cell experiments, such as the efficient magnetooptical trapping of rare elements or radioactive isotopes and in experiments on the light-induced drift effect.

  13. Basic Requirements for Collecting, Documenting, and Reporting Precipitation and Stormwater-Flow Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Granato, Gregory E.; Owens, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate and representative precipitation and stormwater-flow data are crucial for use of highway- or urban-runoff study results, either individually or in a regional or national synthesis of stormwater-runoff data. Equally important is information on the level of accuracy and representativeness of this precipitation and stormwaterflow data. Accurate and representative measurements of precipitation and stormwater flow, however, are difficult to obtain because of the rapidly changing spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation and flows during a storm. Many hydrologic and hydraulic factors must be considered in performing the following: selecting sites for measuring precipitation and stormwater flow that will provide data that adequately meet the objectives and goals of the study, determining frequencies and durations of data collection to fully characterize the storm and the rapidly changing stormwater flows, and selecting methods that will yield accurate data over the full range of both rainfall intensities and stormwater flows. To ensure that the accuracy and representativeness of precipitation and stormwater-flow data can be evaluated, decisions as to (1) where in the drainage system precipitation and stormwater flows are measured, (2) how frequently precipitation and stormwater flows are measured, (3) what methods are used to measure precipitation and stormwater flows, and (4) on what basis are these decisions made, must all be documented and communicated in an accessible format, such as a project description report, a data report or an appendix to a technical report, and (or) archived in a State or national records center. A quality assurance/quality control program must be established to ensure that this information is documented and reported, and that decisions made in the design phase of a study are continually reviewed, internally and externally, throughout the study. Without the supporting data needed to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness

  14. Measurements of accurate x-ray scattering data of protein solutions using small stationary sample cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xinguo; Hao Quan

    2009-01-15

    In this paper, we report a method of precise in situ x-ray scattering measurements on protein solutions using small stationary sample cells. Although reduction in the radiation damage induced by intense synchrotron radiation sources is indispensable for the correct interpretation of scattering data, there is still a lack of effective methods to overcome radiation-induced aggregation and extract scattering profiles free from chemical or structural damage. It is found that radiation-induced aggregation mainly begins on the surface of the sample cell and grows along the beam path; the diameter of the damaged region is comparable to the x-ray beam size. Radiation-induced aggregation can be effectively avoided by using a two-dimensional scan (2D mode), with an interval as small as 1.5 times the beam size, at low temperature (e.g., 4 deg. C). A radiation sensitive protein, bovine hemoglobin, was used to test the method. A standard deviation of less than 5% in the small angle region was observed from a series of nine spectra recorded in 2D mode, in contrast to the intensity variation seen using the conventional stationary technique, which can exceed 100%. Wide-angle x-ray scattering data were collected at a standard macromolecular diffraction station using the same data collection protocol and showed a good signal/noise ratio (better than the reported data on the same protein using a flow cell). The results indicate that this method is an effective approach for obtaining precise measurements of protein solution scattering.

  15. Deciphering the mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles by accurate evaluation of internalization using imaging flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) by cells remains to be better characterized in order to understand the mechanisms of potential NP toxicity as well as for a reliable risk assessment. Real NP uptake is still difficult to evaluate because of the adsorption of NPs on the cellular surface. Results Here we used two approaches to distinguish adsorbed fluorescently labeled NPs from the internalized ones. The extracellular fluorescence was either quenched by Trypan Blue or the uptake was analyzed using imaging flow cytometry. We used this novel technique to define the inside of the cell to accurately study the uptake of fluorescently labeled (SiO2) and even non fluorescent but light diffracting NPs (TiO2). Time course, dose-dependence as well as the influence of surface charges on the uptake were shown in the pulmonary epithelial cell line NCI-H292. By setting up an integrative approach combining these flow cytometric analyses with confocal microscopy we deciphered the endocytic pathway involved in SiO2 NP uptake. Functional studies using energy depletion, pharmacological inhibitors, siRNA-clathrin heavy chain induced gene silencing and colocalization of NPs with proteins specific for different endocytic vesicles allowed us to determine macropinocytosis as the internalization pathway for SiO2 NPs in NCI-H292 cells. Conclusion The integrative approach we propose here using the innovative imaging flow cytometry combined with confocal microscopy could be used to identify the physico-chemical characteristics of NPs involved in their uptake in view to redesign safe NPs. PMID:23388071

  16. Turbulence measurements in high-speed flows by resonant fluoresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Both mean flow and turbulence measurements were investigated using the resonant Doppler velocimeter in a Mach 3.2 nitrogen flow. Data are presented showing velocity, temperature and pressure measured point by point across the flow field. This data is compared with conventional pitot and temperature surveys. Turbulence was induced by a small metal tab in the flow and observed by both hot wire and RDV techniques. Photographs of the flow field demonstrate the utility of the RDV for quantitative flow field visualization.

  17. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  18. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Nguyen, Thanh X. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Method and apparatus for making measurements on fluids related to their complex permeability are disclosed. A microwave probe is provided for exposure to the fluids. The probe can be non-intrusive or can also be positioned at the location where measurements are to be made. The impedance of the probe is determined. in part. by the complex dielectric constant of the fluids at the probe. A radio frequency signal is transmitted to the probe and the reflected signal is phase and amplitude detected at a rapid rate for the purpose of identifying the fluids. Multiple probes may be selectively positioned to monitor the behavior of the fluids including their flow rate. Fluids may be identified as between two or more different fluids as well as multiple phases of the same fluid based on differences between their complex permittivities.

  19. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  20. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. C.

    1984-05-01

    A method of measuring binding assays is carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating.

  1. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  2. Fluid flow measurements by means of vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Mauro M.; Dinardo, Giuseppe; Fabbiano, Laura; Vacca, Gaetano

    2015-11-01

    The achievement of accurate fluid flow measurements is fundamental whenever the control and the monitoring of certain physical quantities governing an industrial process are required. In that case, non-intrusive devices are preferable, but these are often more sophisticated and expensive than those which are more common (such as nozzles, diaphrams, Coriolis flowmeters and so on). In this paper, a novel, non-intrusive, simple and inexpensive methodology is presented to measure the fluid flow rate (in a turbulent regime) whose physical principle is based on the acquisition of transversal vibrational signals induced by the fluid itself onto the pipe walls it is flowing through. Such a principle of operation would permit the use of micro-accelerometers capable of acquiring and transmitting the signals, even by means of wireless technology, to a control room for the monitoring of the process under control. A possible application (whose feasibility will be investigated by the authors in a further study) of this introduced technology is related to the employment of a net of micro-accelerometers to be installed on pipeline networks of aqueducts. This apparatus could lead to the faster and easier detection and location of possible leaks of fluid affecting the pipeline network with more affordable costs. The authors, who have previously proven the linear dependency of the acceleration harmonics amplitude on the flow rate, here discuss an experimental analysis of this functional relation with the variation in the physical properties of the pipe in terms of its diameter and constituent material, to find the eventual limits to the practical application of the measurement methodology.

  3. Quantitative transverse flow measurement using OCT speckle decorrelation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an inter-Ascan speckle decorrelation based method that can quantitatively assess blood flow normal to the direction of the OCT imaging beam. To validate this method, we performed a systematic study using both phantom and in vivo animal models. Results show that our speckle analysis method can accurately extract transverse flow speed with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:23455305

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  6. Measuring vortical flows in the solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfellner, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This thesis focuses on observations of the effects of rotation on solar convection at the length scales of supergranulation and larger (>30 Mm). Rotation drives vortical flows through the Coriolis force and causes anisotropic velocity correlations that are believed to influence the large-scale solar dynamics. We obtain horizontal flows using photospheric Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft via the techniques of time-distance helioseismology (TD) and local correlation tracking (LCT) of granules. In time-distance helioseismology, the local vertical vorticity can be measured by taking the difference between wave travel times measured in the anti-clockwise and clockwise directions along a closed contour. The agreement between the TD and LCT methods is excellent up to ±60° latitude, provided that a center-to-limb correction is applied. Averaging over longitude, one finds that there is a small but significant correlation between the horizontal divergence and the vertical vorticity component of supergranular flows away from the solar equator. By comparison to a noise model, we find that the TD technique can be used to probe the vertical vorticity of flows on spatial scales larger than about 15 Mm, thus including supergranules and also giant cells. We also find that the vertical vorticity signal is much easier to measure using SDO/HMI observations than previous observations. The impact of the Sun's rotation on supergranulation is studied in detail by making spatial maps of the vertical vorticity of the flows associated with the average supergranule. The average supergranule is constructed by co-aligning thousands of individual supergranules in a given latitude band. For the first time, we are able to spatially resolve vorticity associated with inflows and outflow regions. In the northern hemisphere, outflows are on average associated with a clockwise

  7. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-10-12

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible. 3 figures.

  8. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible.

  9. 40 CFR 91.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement is required only for...

  10. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  11. Experimental validation of Doppler echocardiographic measurement of volume flow through the stenotic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Otto, C M; Pearlman, A S; Gardner, C L; Enomoto, D M; Togo, T; Tsuboi, H; Ivey, T D

    1988-08-01

    In aortic stenosis, evaluation of aortic valve area by the continuity equation assumes that the volume of flow through the stenotic valve can be measured accurately in the left ventricular outflow tract. To test the accuracy of Doppler volume-flow measurement proximal to a stenotic valve, we developed an open-chest canine model in which the native leaflets were sutured together to create variable degrees of acute aortic stenosis. Left ventricular and aortic pressures were measured with micromanometer-tipped catheters. Volume flow was controlled and varied by directing systemic venous return through a calibrated roller pump and back to the right atrium. Because transaortic volume flow will not equal roller pump output when there is coexisting aortic insufficiency (present in 67% of studies), transaortic flow was measured by electromagnetic flowmeter with the flow probe placed around the proximal descending thoracic aorta, just beyond the ligated arch vessels. In 12 adult, mongrel dogs (mean weight, 25 kg), the mean transaortic pressure gradient ranged from 2 to 74 mm Hg, and transaortic volume flow ranged from 0.9 to 3.2 l/min. In four dogs, electromagnetic flow that was measured distal to the valve was accurate compared with volume flow determined by timed collection of total aortic flow into a graduated cylinder (n = 24, r = 0.97, electromagnetic flow = 0.87 Direct +0.13 l/min). In eight subsequent dogs, electromagnetic flow was compared with transaortic cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography in the left ventricular outflow tract as circular cross-sectional area [pi(D/2)2] x left ventricular outflow tract velocity-time integral x heart rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2969311

  12. Measurement of human cochlear blood flow.

    PubMed

    Miller, J M; Bredberg, G; Grenman, R; Suonpää, J; Lindström, B; Didier, A

    1991-01-01

    Cochlear blood flow (CBF) was measured with a laser-Doppler (L-D) flowmeter (Periflux PR2-B) in four unanesthetized human subjects with chronic tympanic membrane perforations and nine anesthetized human subjects undergoing middle ear operations. The L-D recordings were made over the promontory and/or the round window membrane during carbogen breathing and direct electrical stimulation of the cochlea in both groups and with warm water irrigation of the external ear canal in the anesthetized subjects. Carbogen led to little or no change in CBF as monitored with either measurement approach in either subject group. Electrical stimulation yielded an increase (15% to 25%) in CBF as recorded from the promontory in seven of the nine subjects tested. Warm (44 degrees C to 49 degrees C) water irrigation produced changes of 20% to 60% in CBF that were partially recoverable in the 10 minutes available for study. This study demonstrated the feasibility of direct CBF measurement in humans with the L-D method. Moreover, the data indicate that carbogen has little influence on CBF and that electrical stimulation at relatively safe levels and warm water irrigation of the ear canal produce increases in human CBF.

  13. COTS MEMS Flow-Measurement Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip; Smith, Floyd A.; Blank, Greg; Cruzan, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional tubing instrumentation for measuring airflow, designers and technicians at Glenn Research Center have been fabricating packaging components and assembling a set of unique probes that contain commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chips. MEMS sensor chips offer some compelling advantages over standard macroscopic measurement devices. MEMS sensor technology has matured through mass production and use in the automotive and aircraft industries. At present, MEMS are the devices of choice for sensors in such applications as tire-pressure monitors, altimeters, pneumatic controls, cable leak detectors, and consumer appliances. Compactness, minimality of power demand, rugged construction, and moderate cost all contribute to making MEMS sensors attractive for instrumentation for future research. Conventional macroscopic flow-measurement instrumentation includes tubes buried beneath the aerodynamic surfaces of wind-tunnel models or in wind-tunnel walls. Pressure is introduced at the opening of each such tube. The pressure must then travel along the tube before reaching a transducer that generates an electronic signal. The lengths of such tubes typically range from 20 ft (approx.= 6 m) to hundreds of feet (of the order of 100 m). The propagation of pressure signals in the tubes damps the signals considerably and makes it necessary to delay measurements until after test rigs have reached steady-state operation. In contrast, a MEMS pressure sensor that generates electronic output can take readings continuously under dynamic conditions in nearly real time. In order to use stainless-steel tubing for pressure measurements, it is necessary to clean many tubes, cut them to length, carefully install them, delicately deburr them, and splice them. A cluster of a few hundred 1/16-in.- (approx.=1.6-mm-) diameter tubes (such clusters are common in research testing facilities) can be several inches (of the order of 10

  14. Noncontact accurate measurement of cardiopulmonary activity using a compact quadrature Doppler radar sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhao, Zhangyan; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Fujiang

    2014-03-01

    The designed sensor enables accurate reconstruction of chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities, and the algorithm enables estimation of respiration, heartbeat rate, and some indicators of heart rate variability (HRV). In particular, quadrature receiver and arctangent demodulation with calibration are introduced for high linearity representation of chest displacement; 24-bit ADCs with oversampling are adopted for radar baseband acquisition to achieve a high signal resolution; continuous-wavelet filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based algorithm are applied for cardio/pulmonary signal recovery and separation so that accurate beat-to-beat interval can be acquired in time domain for HRV analysis. In addition, the wireless sensor is realized and integrated on a printed circuit board compactly. The developed sensor system is successfully tested on both simulated target and human subjects. In simulated target experiments, the baseband signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 73.27 dB, high enough for heartbeat detection. The demodulated signal has 0.35% mean squared error, indicating high demodulation linearity. In human subject experiments, the relative error of extracted beat-to-beat intervals ranges from 2.53% to 4.83% compared with electrocardiography (ECG) R-R peak intervals. The sensor provides an accurate analysis for heart rate with the accuracy of 100% for p = 2% and higher than 97% for p = 1%. PMID:24235293

  15. Noncontact accurate measurement of cardiopulmonary activity using a compact quadrature Doppler radar sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhao, Zhangyan; Wang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Fujiang

    2014-03-01

    The designed sensor enables accurate reconstruction of chest-wall movement caused by cardiopulmonary activities, and the algorithm enables estimation of respiration, heartbeat rate, and some indicators of heart rate variability (HRV). In particular, quadrature receiver and arctangent demodulation with calibration are introduced for high linearity representation of chest displacement; 24-bit ADCs with oversampling are adopted for radar baseband acquisition to achieve a high signal resolution; continuous-wavelet filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based algorithm are applied for cardio/pulmonary signal recovery and separation so that accurate beat-to-beat interval can be acquired in time domain for HRV analysis. In addition, the wireless sensor is realized and integrated on a printed circuit board compactly. The developed sensor system is successfully tested on both simulated target and human subjects. In simulated target experiments, the baseband signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 73.27 dB, high enough for heartbeat detection. The demodulated signal has 0.35% mean squared error, indicating high demodulation linearity. In human subject experiments, the relative error of extracted beat-to-beat intervals ranges from 2.53% to 4.83% compared with electrocardiography (ECG) R-R peak intervals. The sensor provides an accurate analysis for heart rate with the accuracy of 100% for p = 2% and higher than 97% for p = 1%.

  16. Micro-particle image velocimetry for velocity profile measurements of micro blood flows.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Katie L; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-04-25

    Micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) is used to visualize paired images of micro particles seeded in blood flows. The images are cross-correlated to give an accurate velocity profile. A protocol is presented for μPIV measurements of blood flows in microchannels. At the scale of the microcirculation, blood cannot be considered a homogeneous fluid, as it is a suspension of flexible particles suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. Shear rate, maximum velocity, velocity profile shape, and flow rate can be derived from these measurements. Several key parameters such as focal depth, particle concentration, and system compliance, are presented in order to ensure accurate, useful data along with examples and representative results for various hematocrits and flow conditions.

  17. Seeking: Accurate Measurement Techniques for Deep-Bone Density and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, Jean

    2009-01-01

    We are seeking a clinically-useful technology with enough sensitivity to assess the microstructure of "spongy" bone that is found in the marrow cavities of whole bones. However, this technology must be for skeletal sites surrounded by layers of soft tissues, such as the spine and the hip. Soft tissue interferes with conventional imaging and using a more accessible area -- for example, the wrist or the ankle of limbs-- as a proxy for the less accessible skeletal regions, will not be accurate. A non-radioactive technology is strongly preferred.

  18. A Fabry-Perot interferometer for accurate measurement of temporal changes in stellar Doppler shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, R. S.; Smith, P. H.; Frecker, J. E.; Merline, W. J.; Perry, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    The scrambling of incident light by an optical filter, and the stability obtainable through wavelength calibration by means of a tilt-tunable Fabry-Perot etalon, allow the accurate observation of Doppler shift changes in stellar absorption lines. Distinct, widely spaced monochromatic images of the entrance aperture are formed in the focal plane of the camera through a sampling of about 350 points on the profile of the stellar spectrum by successive orders of interferometric transmission through the etalon. Changes in Doppler shift modify the relative intensities of these images, in proportion to the slope of the spectral profile at each point sampled.

  19. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  20. Accurate measurement of the relative abundance of different DNA species in complex DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-06-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription.

  1. Accurate Measurement of the Relative Abundance of Different DNA Species in Complex DNA Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sangkyun; Yu, Hyunjoo; Pfeifer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    A molecular tool that can compare the abundances of different DNA sequences is necessary for comparing intergenic or interspecific gene expression. We devised and verified such a tool using a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction approach. For this approach, we adapted a competitor array, an artificially made plasmid DNA in which all the competitor templates for the target DNAs are arranged with a defined ratio, and melting analysis for allele quantitation for accurate quantitation of the fractional ratios of competitively amplified DNAs. Assays on two sets of DNA mixtures with explicitly known compositional structures of the test sequences were performed. The resultant average relative errors of 0.059 and 0.021 emphasize the highly accurate nature of this method. Furthermore, the method's capability of obtaining biological data is demonstrated by the fact that it can illustrate the tissue-specific quantitative expression signatures of the three housekeeping genes G6pdx, Ubc, and Rps27 by using the forms of the relative abundances of their transcripts, and the differential preferences of Igf2 enhancers for each of the multiple Igf2 promoters for the transcription. PMID:22334570

  2. Accurate Monitoring and Fault Detection in Wind Measuring Devices through Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Komal Saifullah; Tariq, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Many wind energy projects report poor performance as low as 60% of the predicted performance. The reason for this is poor resource assessment and the use of new untested technologies and systems in remote locations. Predictions about the potential of an area for wind energy projects (through simulated models) may vary from the actual potential of the area. Hence, introducing accurate site assessment techniques will lead to accurate predictions of energy production from a particular area. We solve this problem by installing a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to periodically analyze the data from anemometers installed in that area. After comparative analysis of the acquired data, the anemometers transmit their readings through a WSN to the sink node for analysis. The sink node uses an iterative algorithm which sequentially detects any faulty anemometer and passes the details of the fault to the central system or main station. We apply the proposed technique in simulation as well as in practical implementation and study its accuracy by comparing the simulation results with experimental results to analyze the variation in the results obtained from both simulation model and implemented model. Simulation results show that the algorithm indicates faulty anemometers with high accuracy and low false alarm rate when as many as 25% of the anemometers become faulty. Experimental analysis shows that anemometers incorporating this solution are better assessed and performance level of implemented projects is increased above 86% of the simulated models. PMID:25421739

  3. Accurate radiocarbon age estimation using "early" measurements: a new approach to reconstructing the Paleolithic absolute chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Takayuki; Sano, Katsuhiro; Yoneda, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents new correction approaches for "early" radiocarbon ages to reconstruct the Paleolithic absolute chronology. In order to discuss time-space distribution about the replacement of archaic humans, including Neanderthals in Europe, by the modern humans, a massive data, which covers a wide-area, would be needed. Today, some radiocarbon databases focused on the Paleolithic have been published and used for chronological studies. From a viewpoint of current analytical technology, however, the any database have unreliable results that make interpretation of radiocarbon dates difficult. Most of these unreliable ages had been published in the early days of radiocarbon analysis. In recent years, new analytical methods to determine highly-accurate dates have been developed. Ultrafiltration and ABOx-SC methods, as new sample pretreatments for bone and charcoal respectively, have attracted attention because they could remove imperceptible contaminates and derive reliable accurately ages. In order to evaluate the reliability of "early" data, we investigated the differences and variabilities of radiocarbon ages on different pretreatments, and attempted to develop correction functions for the assessment of the reliability. It can be expected that reliability of the corrected age is increased and the age applied to chronological research together with recent ages. Here, we introduce the methodological frameworks and archaeological applications.

  4. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1996-08-13

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  5. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y.

    1996-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  6. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1995-10-17

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  7. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y.

    1995-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  8. Simulation for the development of the continuous groundwater flow measurement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kumagai, Koki; Fujima, Ritsuko; Chikahisa, Hiroshi

    The flow of groundwater varies with time due to rainfall, atmospheric pressure change, tidal change, melting of snow during seasonal change, underground construction works etc. Therefore, to increase the precision of assessing in-situ groundwater flow characteristics, it is important to measure continuously the direction and velocity of the flow, in addition to obtaining accurate data for the afore mentioned environmental changes. The first part of this paper describes the development of a new device for measuring the direction and velocity of groundwater flow. The device was composed of a unique floating sensor with a hinge end at the bottom, which enabled continuous measurement of groundwater flow based on image data processing technique. In the second part, discussion is focused on clarifying the optimum cross-section shape and the behavior of the float sensor in saltwater and freshwater using numerical analysis.

  9. 40 CFR 89.415 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.415 Fuel flow measurement specifications. The fuel flow rate...

  10. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow...

  11. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specifications of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart C, instead of those in this paragraph (b). ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow...

  12. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specifications of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart C, instead of those in this paragraph (b). ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow...

  13. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specifications of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart C, instead of those in this paragraph (b). ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow...

  14. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart C, instead of those in this paragraph (b). ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow...

  15. Measurement of Soluble Biomarkers by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Béla; Debreceni, Ildikó Beke; Kappelmayer, János

    2013-01-01

    Microparticle based flow cytometric assays for determination of the level of soluble biomarkers are widely used in several research applications and in some diagnostic setups. The major advantages of these multiplex systems are that they can measure a large number of analytes (up to 500) at the same time reducing assay time, costs and sample volume. Most of these assays are based on antigen-antibody interactions and work as traditional immunoassays, but nucleic acid alterations – by using special hybridization probes –, enzyme- substrate or receptor-ligand interactions can be also studied with them. The applied beads are nowadays provided by the manufacturers, but cheaper biological microbeads can be prepared by any user. One part of the systems can be used on any research or clinical cytometers, but some companies provide dedicated analyzers for their multiplex bead arrays. Due to the high standardization of the bead production and the preparation of the assay components the analytical properties of these assays are quite reliable with a wide range of available applications. Cytokines, intracellular fusion proteins, activated/phosphorylated components of different signaling pathways, transcription factors and nuclear receptors can be identified and quantitated. The assays may serve the diagnostics of autoimmune disorders, different viral and bacterial infections, as well as genetic alterations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, small deletions/insertions or even nucleotide triplet expansions can be also identified. The most important principles, technical details and applications of these systems are discussed in this short review.

  16. Establishing traceability of photometric absorbance values for accurate measurements of the haemoglobin concentration in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, K.; Wolf, H. U.; Heuck, C.; Kammel, M.; Kummrow, A.; Neukammer, J.

    2013-10-01

    Haemoglobin concentration in blood is one of the most frequently measured analytes in laboratory medicine. Reference and routine methods for the determination of the haemoglobin concentration in blood are based on the conversion of haeme, haemoglobin and haemiglobin species into uniform end products. The total haemoglobin concentration in blood is measured using the absorbance of the reaction products. Traceable absorbance measurement values on the highest metrological level are a prerequisite for the calibration and evaluation of procedures with respect to their suitability for routine measurements and their potential as reference measurement procedures. For this purpose, we describe a procedure to establish traceability of spectral absorbance measurements for the haemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method and for the alkaline haematin detergent (AHD) method. The latter is characterized by a higher stability of the reaction product. In addition, the toxic hazard of cyanide, which binds to the iron ion of the haem group and thus inhibits the oxygen transport, is avoided. Traceability is established at different wavelengths by applying total least-squares analysis to derive the conventional quantity values for the absorbance from the measured values. Extrapolation and interpolation are applied to get access to the spectral regions required to characterize the Q-absorption bands of the HiCN and AHD methods, respectively. For absorbance values between 0.3 and 1.8, the contributions of absorbance measurements to the total expanded uncertainties (95% level of confidence) of absorbance measurements range from 1% to 0.4%.

  17. A More Accurate Measurement of the {sup 28}Si Lattice Parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, E. Sasso, C. P.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2015-09-15

    In 2011, a discrepancy between the values of the Planck constant measured by counting Si atoms and by comparing mechanical and electrical powers prompted a review, among others, of the measurement of the spacing of {sup 28}Si (220) lattice planes, either to confirm the measured value and its uncertainty or to identify errors. This exercise confirmed the result of the previous measurement and yields the additional value d{sub 220} = 192 014 711.98(34) am having a reduced uncertainty.

  18. Accurate respiration measurement using DC-coupled continuous-wave radar sensor for motion-adaptive cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Ruijiang; Zhang, Hualiang; Fung, Albert Y C; Torres, Carlos; Jiang, Steve B; Li, Changzhi

    2012-11-01

    Accurate respiration measurement is crucial in motion-adaptive cancer radiotherapy. Conventional methods for respiration measurement are undesirable because they are either invasive to the patient or do not have sufficient accuracy. In addition, measurement of external respiration signal based on conventional approaches requires close patient contact to the physical device which often causes patient discomfort and undesirable motion during radiation dose delivery. In this paper, a dc-coupled continuous-wave radar sensor was presented to provide a noncontact and noninvasive approach for respiration measurement. The radar sensor was designed with dc-coupled adaptive tuning architectures that include RF coarse-tuning and baseband fine-tuning, which allows the radar sensor to precisely measure movement with stationary moment and always work with the maximum dynamic range. The accuracy of respiration measurement with the proposed radar sensor was experimentally evaluated using a physical phantom, human subject, and moving plate in a radiotherapy environment. It was shown that respiration measurement with radar sensor while the radiation beam is on is feasible and the measurement has a submillimeter accuracy when compared with a commercial respiration monitoring system which requires patient contact. The proposed radar sensor provides accurate, noninvasive, and noncontact respiration measurement and therefore has a great potential in motion-adaptive radiotherapy.

  19. An Accurate, Flexible and Small Optical Fiber Sensor: A Novel Technological Breakthrough for Real-Time Analysis of Dynamic Blood Flow Data In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiao-ying; Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Dan; Zhao, Kun; Lin, Chun; Si, Liang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8), and the blood pressure and other detection data were determined directly through the veins. The fiber detection results were compared with test results obtained using color Doppler ultrasound and a physiological pressure sensor recorder. Pairwise comparisons among the blood pressure results obtained using the three methods indicated that real-time blood pressure information obtained through the fiber sensor technique exhibited better correlation than the data obtained with the other techniques. The highest correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.86) was obtained between the fiber sensor and pressure sensor. The blood pressure values were positively related to the total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein level, number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin level, with correlation coefficients of 0.033, 0.129, 0.358, and 0.373, respectively. The blood pressure values had no obvious relationship with the number of white blood cells and high-density lipoprotein and had a negative relationship with triglyceride levels, with a correlation coefficient of –0.031. The average ambulatory blood pressure measured by the fiber sensor exhibited a negative correlation with the quantity of blood platelets (correlation coefficient of −0.839, P<0.05). The novel fiber sensor can thus obtain in vivo blood pressure data accurately, stably, and in real time; the sensor can also determine the content and status of the blood flow to some extent. Therefore, the fiber sensor can obtain partially real

  20. An accurate, flexible and small optical fiber sensor: a novel technological breakthrough for real-time analysis of dynamic blood flow data in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiao-ying; Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Dan; Zhao, Kun; Lin, Chun; Si, Liang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8), and the blood pressure and other detection data were determined directly through the veins. The fiber detection results were compared with test results obtained using color Doppler ultrasound and a physiological pressure sensor recorder. Pairwise comparisons among the blood pressure results obtained using the three methods indicated that real-time blood pressure information obtained through the fiber sensor technique exhibited better correlation than the data obtained with the other techniques. The highest correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.86) was obtained between the fiber sensor and pressure sensor. The blood pressure values were positively related to the total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein level, number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin level, with correlation coefficients of 0.033, 0.129, 0.358, and 0.373, respectively. The blood pressure values had no obvious relationship with the number of white blood cells and high-density lipoprotein and had a negative relationship with triglyceride levels, with a correlation coefficient of -0.031. The average ambulatory blood pressure measured by the fiber sensor exhibited a negative correlation with the quantity of blood platelets (correlation coefficient of -0.839, P<0.05). The novel fiber sensor can thus obtain in vivo blood pressure data accurately, stably, and in real time; the sensor can also determine the content and status of the blood flow to some extent. Therefore, the fiber sensor can obtain partially real

  1. Archimedes Revisited: A Faster, Better, Cheaper Method of Accurately Measuring the Volume of Small Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2005-01-01

    A little-known method of measuring the volume of small objects based on Archimedes' principle is described, which involves suspending an object in a water-filled container placed on electronic scales. The suspension technique is a variation on the hydrostatic weighing technique used for measuring volume. The suspension method was compared with two…

  2. An Inexpensive, Stable, and Accurate Relative Humidity Measurement Method for Challenging Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Hong; Yang, Simon X.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, an improved psychrometer is developed to solve practical issues arising in the relative humidity measurement of challenging drying environments for meat manufacturing in agricultural and agri-food industries. The design in this research focused on the structure of the improved psychrometer, signal conversion, and calculation methods. The experimental results showed the effect of varying psychrometer structure on relative humidity measurement accuracy. An industrial application to dry-cured meat products demonstrated the effective performance of the improved psychrometer being used as a relative humidity measurement sensor in meat-drying rooms. In a drying environment for meat manufacturing, the achieved measurement accuracy for relative humidity using the improved psychrometer was ±0.6%. The system test results showed that the improved psychrometer can provide reliable and long-term stable relative humidity measurements with high accuracy in the drying system of meat products. PMID:26999161

  3. Measuring laser power as a force: a new paradigm to accurately monitor optical power during laser-based machining operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Simonds, Brian; Sowards, Jeffrey; Hadler, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    In laser manufacturing operations, accurate measurement of laser power is important for product quality, operational repeatability, and process validation. Accurate real-time measurement of high-power lasers, however, is difficult. Typical thermal power meters must absorb all the laser power in order to measure it. This constrains power meters to be large, slow and exclusive (that is, the laser cannot be used for its intended purpose during the measurement). To address these limitations, we have developed a different paradigm in laser power measurement where the power is not measured according to its thermal equivalent but rather by measuring the laser beam's momentum (radiation pressure). Very simply, light reflecting from a mirror imparts a small force perpendicular to the mirror which is proportional to the optical power. By mounting a high-reflectivity mirror on a high-sensitivity force transducer (scale), we are able to measure laser power in the range of tens of watts up to ~ 100 kW. The critical parameters for such a device are mirror reflectivity, angle of incidence, and scale sensitivity and accuracy. We will describe our experimental characterization of a radiation-pressure-based optical power meter. We have tested it for modulated and CW laser powers up to 92 kW in the laboratory and up to 20 kW in an experimental laser welding booth. We will describe present accuracy, temporal response, sources of measurement uncertainty, and hurdles which must be overcome to have an accurate power meter capable of routine operation as a turning mirror within a laser delivery head.

  4. Cell-based flow cytometry assay to measure cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Noto, Alessandra; Ngauv, Pearline; Trautmann, Lydie

    2013-12-17

    Cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells is rarely evaluated. We describe here a new cell-based assay to measure the capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to kill CD4+ T cells loaded with their cognate peptide. Target CD4+ T cells are divided into two populations, labeled with two different concentrations of CFSE. One population is pulsed with the peptide of interest (CFSE-low) while the other remains un-pulsed (CFSE-high). Pulsed and un-pulsed CD4+ T cells are mixed at an equal ratio and incubated with an increasing number of purified CD8+ T cells. The specific killing of autologous target CD4+ T cells is analyzed by flow cytometry after coculture with CD8+ T cells containing the antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells detected by peptide/MHCI tetramer staining. The specific lysis of target CD4+ T cells measured at different effector versus target ratios, allows for the calculation of lytic units, LU₃₀/10(6) cells. This simple and straightforward assay allows for the accurate measurement of the intrinsic capacity of CD8+ T cells to kill target CD4+ T cells.

  5. Heat transfer analysis for peripheral blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Hattori, Hideharu; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ichige, Yukiko; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    Some disorders such as circulatory disease and metabolic abnormality cause many problems to peripheral blood flow condition. Therefore, frequent measurement of the blood flow condition is bound to contribute to precaution against those disorders and to control of conditions of the diseases. We propose a convenient means of blood flow volume measurement at peripheral part, such as fingertips. Principle of this measurement is based on heat transfer characteristics of peripheral part containing the blood flow. Transition response analysis of skin surface temperature has provided measurement model of the peripheral blood flow volume. We developed the blood flow measurement system based on that model and evaluated it by using artificial finger under various temperature conditions of ambience and internal fluid. The evaluation results indicated that proposed method could estimate the volume of the fluid regardless of temperature condition of them. Finally we applied our system to real finger testing and have obtained results correlated well with laser Doppler blood flow meter values.

  6. Method and apparatus for coal analysis and flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rollwitz, W.L.; King, J.D.

    1985-07-23

    A flow meter apparatus and method for measuring the flow, composition and heat content of coal is set forth. In the preferred and illustrated embodiment, the free or unpaired electron population of flowing coal is measured by electron magnetic resonance (EMR); the hydrogen nucleii population is measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). By calibration utilizing a standard specimen for a given type of coal, a profile for various types of coal can be obtained wherein measurement data is converted into an indication of the heat content typically measured in BTU per pound. This enables provision of a volumetric flow meter, a flow meter indicating flow in calorie content. This device enables integration to provide total heat content flow. Other variables describing the coal can be obtained.

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  8. Technical Note: PRESAGE three-dimensional dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    PubMed Central

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and two-dimensional detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ± 0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors. PMID:25368961

  9. A Proposed Frequency Synthesis Approach to Accurately Measure the Angular Position of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagri, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an approach for measuring the angular position of a spacecraft with reference to a nearby calibration source (quasar) with an accuracy of a few tenths of a nanoradian using a very long baseline interferometer of two antennas that measures the interferometer phase with a modest accuracy. It employs (1) radio frequency phase to determine the spacecraft position with high precision and (2) multiple delay measurements using either frequency tones or telemetry signals at different frequency spacings to resolve ambiguity of the location of the fringe (cycle) containing the direction of the spacecraft.

  10. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application.

  11. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application. PMID:22497159

  12. Accurate VUV Laboratory Measurements of Fe III Transitions for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Pickering, J. C.; Smillie, D.; Nave, G.; Szabo, C. I.; Smith, Peter L.; Nielsen, K. E.; Peters, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of Fe III spectra in the 1150 to 2500 A wavelength interval. Spectra have been recorded with an iron-neon Penning discharge lamp (PDL) between 1600 and 2500 A at Imperial College (IC) using high resolution Fourier (FT) transform spectroscopy. These FT spectrometer measurements were extended beyond 1600 A to 1150 A using high-resolution grating spectroscopy at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These recorded spectra represent the first radiometrically calibrated measurements of a doubly-ionized iron-group element spectrum combining the techniques of vacuum ultraviolet FT and grating spectroscopy. The spectral range of the new laboratory measurements corresponds to recent HST/STIS observations of sharp-lined B stars and of Eta Carinae. The new improved atomic data can be applied to abundance studies and diagnostics of astrophysical plasmas.

  13. A more accurate method for measurement of tuberculocidal activity of disinfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, J M; Ezzell, R J; Wendt, T M

    1987-01-01

    The current Association of Official Analytical Chemists method for testing tuberculocidal activity of disinfectants has been shown to be inaccurate and to have a high degree of variability. An alternate test method is proposed which is more accurate, more precise, and quantitative. A suspension of Mycobacterium bovis BCG was exposed to a variety of disinfectant chemicals and a kill curve was constructed from quantitative data. Data are presented that show the discrepancy between current claims, determined by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists method, of selected commercially available products and claims generated by the proposed method. The effects of different recovery media were examined. The data indicated that Mycobacteria 7H11 and Middlebrook 7H10 agars were equal in recovery of the different chemically treated cells, with Lowenstein-Jensen agar having approximately the same recovery rate but requiring incubation for up to 3 weeks longer for countability. The kill curves generated for several different chemicals were reproducible, as indicated by the standard deviations of the slopes and intercepts of the linear regression curves. PMID:3314707

  14. Clinical use of diodes and micro-chambers to obtain accurate small field output factor measurements.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Charles, P H; Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crowe, S B; Langton, C M; Thwaites, D I; Trapp, J V

    2015-06-01

    There have been substantial advances in small field dosimetry techniques and technologies, over the last decade, which have dramatically improved the achievable accuracy of small field dose measurements. This educational note aims to help radiation oncology medical physicists to apply some of these advances in clinical practice. The evaluation of a set of small field output factors (total scatter factors) is used to exemplify a detailed measurement and simulation procedure and as a basis for discussing the possible effects of simplifying that procedure. Field output factors were measured with an unshielded diode and a micro-ionisation chamber, at the centre of a set of square fields defined by a micro-multileaf collimator. Nominal field sizes investigated ranged from 6 × 6 to 98 × 98 mm(2). Diode measurements in fields smaller than 30 mm across were corrected using response factors calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the diode geometry and daisy-chained to match micro-chamber measurements at intermediate field sizes. Diode measurements in fields smaller than 15 mm across were repeated twelve times over three separate measurement sessions, to evaluate the reproducibility of the radiation field size and its correspondence with the nominal field size. The five readings that contributed to each measurement on each day varied by up to 0.26  %, for the "very small" fields smaller than 15 mm, and 0.18 % for the fields larger than 15 mm. The diode response factors calculated for the unshielded diode agreed with previously published results, within uncertainties. The measured dimensions of the very small fields differed by up to 0.3 mm, across the different measurement sessions, contributing an uncertainty of up to 1.2 % to the very small field output factors. The overall uncertainties in the field output factors were 1.8 % for the very small fields and 1.1 % for the fields larger than 15 mm across. Recommended steps for acquiring small field output

  15. Evaluation of a watershed model for estimating daily flow using limited flow measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was evaluated for estimation of continuous daily flow based on limited flow measurements in the Upper Oyster Creek (UOC) watershed. SWAT was calibrated against limited measured flow data and then validated. The Nash-Sutcliffe model Efficiency (NSE) and...

  16. Uncertainty analysis of flow rate measurement for multiphase flow using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon-Hyung; Jung, Uk-Hee; Kim, Sung; Yoon, Joon-Yong; Choi, Young-Seok

    2015-10-01

    The venturi meter has an advantage in its use, because it can measure flow without being much affected by the type of the measured fluid or flow conditions. Hence, it has excellent versatility and is being widely applied in many industries. The flow of a liquid containing air is a representative example of a multiphase flow and exhibits complex flow characteristics. In particular, the greater the gas volume fraction (GVF), the more inhomogeneous the flow becomes. As a result, using a venturi meter to measure the rate of a flow that has a high GVF generates an error. In this study, the cause of the error occurred in measuring the flow rate for the multiphase flow when using the venturi meter for analysis by CFD. To ensure the reliability of this study, the accuracy of the multiphase flow models for numerical analysis was verified through comparison between the calculated results of numerical analysis and the experimental data. As a result, the Grace model, which is a multiphase flow model established by an experiment with water and air, was confirmed to have the highest reliability. Finally, the characteristics of the internal flow field about the multiphase flow analysis result generated by applying the Grace model were analyzed to find the cause of the uncertainty occurring when measuring the flow rate of the multiphase flow using the venturi meter. A phase separation phenomenon occurred due to a density difference of water and air inside the venturi, and flow inhomogeneity happened according to the flow velocity difference of each phase. It was confirmed that this flow inhomogeneity increased as the GVF increased due to the uncertainty of the flow measurement.

  17. Reducing the Need for Accurate Stream Flow Forecasting for Water Supply Planning by Augmenting Reservoir Operations with Seawater Desalination and Wastewater Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, R.; Ng, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate stream flow forecasts are critical for reservoir operations for water supply planning. As the world urban population increases, the demand for water in cities is also increasing, making accurate forecasts even more important. However, accurate forecasting of stream flows is difficult owing to short- and long-term weather variations. We propose to reduce this need for accurate stream flow forecasts by augmenting reservoir operations with seawater desalination and wastewater recycling. We develop a robust operating policy for the joint operation of the three sources. With the joint model, we tap into the unlimited reserve of seawater through desalination, and make use of local supplies of wastewater through recycling. However, both seawater desalination and recycling are energy intensive and relatively expensive. Reservoir water on the other hand, is generally cheaper but is limited and variable in its availability, increasing the risk of water shortage during extreme climate events. We operate the joint system by optimizing it using a genetic algorithm to maximize water supply reliability and resilience while minimizing vulnerability subject to a budget constraint and for a given stream flow forecast. To compute the total cost of the system, we take into account the pumping cost of transporting reservoir water to its final destination, and the capital and operating costs of desalinating seawater and recycling wastewater. We produce results for different hydro climatic regions based on artificial stream flows we generate using a simple hydrological model and an autoregressive time series model. The artificial flows are generated from precipitation and temperature data from the Canadian Regional Climate model for present and future scenarios. We observe that the joint operation is able to effectively minimize the negative effects of stream flow forecast uncertainty on system performance at an overall cost that is not significantly greater than the cost of a

  18. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  19. Accurate GPS measurement of the location and orientation of a floating platform. [for sea floor geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Wolf, S. K.; Meehan, T. K.; Duncan, C. B.; Fisher, S. S.; Spiess, F. N.; Austin, G.; Boegeman, D. E.; Lowenstein, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the design and initial tests of the GPS portion of a system for making seafloor geodesy measurements. In the planned system, GPS antennas on a floating platform will be used to measure the location of an acoustic transducer, attached below the platform, which interrogates an array of transponders on the seafloor. Since the GPS antennas are necessarily some distance above the transducer, a short-baseline GPS interferometer consisting of three antennas is used to measure the platform's orientation. A preliminary test of several crucial elements of the system was performed. The test involved a fixed antenna on the pier and a second antenna floating on a buoy about 80 m away. GPS measurements of the vertical component of this baseline, analyzed independently by two groups using different software, agree with each other and with an independent measurement within a centimeter. The first test of an integrated GPS/acoustic system took place in the Santa Cruz Basin off the coast of southern California in May 1990. In this test a much larger buoy, designed and built at SIO, was equipped with three GPS antennas and an acoustic transducer that interrogated a transponder on the ocean floor. Preliminary analysis indicates that the horizontal position of the transponder can be determined with a precision of about a centimeter.

  20. Three dimensional accurate morphology measurements of polystyrene standard particles on silicon substrate by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Malac, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticle (NP) sample is one of the most widely used standard materials. It is used for calibration of particle counters and particle size measurement tools. It has been reported that the measured NP sizes by various methods, such as Differential Mobility Analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), differ from each other. Deformation of PSL NPs on mica substrate has been reported in AFM measurements: the lateral width of PSL NPs is smaller than their vertical height. To provide a reliable calibration standard, the deformation must be measured by a method that can reliably visualize the entire three dimensional (3D) shape of the PSL NPs. Here we present a method for detailed measurement of PSL NP 3D shape by means of electron tomography in a transmission electron microscope. The observed shape of the PSL NPs with 100 nm and 50 nm diameter were not spherical, but squished in direction perpendicular to the support substrate by about 7.4% and 12.1%, respectively. The high difference in surface energy of the PSL NPs and that of substrate together with their low Young modulus appear to explain the squishing of the NPs without presence of water film.

  1. Accurate measurement of body weight and food intake in environmentally enriched male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Beale, Kylie E L; Murphy, Kevin G; Harrison, Eleanor K; Kerton, Angela J; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Smith, Kirsty L

    2011-08-01

    Laboratory animals are crucial in the study of energy homeostasis. In particular, rats are used to study alterations in food intake and body weight. To accurately record food intake or energy expenditure it is necessary to house rats individually, which can be stressful for social animals. Environmental enrichment may reduce stress and improve welfare in laboratory rodents. However, the effect of environmental enrichment on food intake and thus experimental outcome is unknown. We aimed to determine the effect of environmental enrichment on food intake, body weight, behavior and fecal and plasma stress hormones in male Wistar rats. Singly housed 5-7-week-old male rats were given either no environmental enrichment, chew sticks, a plastic tube of 67 mm internal diameter, or both chew sticks and a tube. No differences in body weight or food intake were seen over a 7-day period. Importantly, the refeeding response following a 24-h fast was unaffected by environmental enrichment. Rearing, a behavior often associated with stress, was significantly reduced in all enriched groups compared to controls. There was a significant increase in fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) in animals housed with both forms of enrichment compared to controls at the termination of the study, suggesting enrichment reduces hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in singly housed rats. In summary, environmental enrichment does not influence body weight and food intake in singly housed male Wistar rats and may therefore be used to refine the living conditions of animals used in the study of energy homeostasis without compromising experimental outcome.

  2. A method to measure the density of seawater accurately to the level of 10-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hannes; Wolf, Henning; Hassel, Egon

    2016-04-01

    A substitution method to measure seawater density relative to pure water density using vibrating tube densimeters was realized and validated. Standard uncertainties of 1 g m-3 at atmospheric pressure, 10 g m-3 up to 10 MPa, and 20 g m-3 to 65 MPa in the temperature range of 5 °C to 35 °C and for salt contents up to 35 g kg-1 were achieved. The realization was validated by comparison measurements with a hydrostatic weighing apparatus for atmospheric pressure. For high pressures, literature values of seawater compressibility were compared with substitution measurements of the realized apparatus.

  3. Accurate DOSY measure for out-of-equilibrium systems using permutated DOSY (p-DOSY).

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Maria; Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Velders, Aldrik H; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a excellent tool for monitoring in-situ chemical reactions. In particular, DOSY measurement is well suited to characterize transient species by the determination of their sizes. However, here we bring to light a difficulty in the DOSY experiments performed in out-of-equilibrium systems. On such a system, the evolution of the concentration of species interferes with the measurement process, and creates a bias on the diffusion coefficient determination that may lead to erroneous interpretations. We show that a random permutation of the series of gradient strengths used during the DOSY experiment allows to average out this bias. This approach, that we name p-DOSY does not require changes in the pulse sequences nor in the processing software, and restores completely the full accuracy of the measure. This technique is demonstrated on the monitoring of the anomerization reaction of α- to β-glucose.

  4. Accurate heteronuclear J-coupling measurements in dilute spin systems using the multiple-quantum filtered J-resolved experiment.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Charlotte; Fayon, Franck; Legein, Christophe; Buzaré, Jean-Yves; Silly, Gilles; Massiot, Dominique

    2007-07-14

    A new solid-state MAS NMR experiment is proposed to accurately measure heteronuclear (19)F-(207)Pb J-coupling constants, even though these couplings are not visible on high speed (19)F 1D MAS spectra; in particular, we demonstrate that the J-resolved experiment combined with scalar multiple-quantum filtering considerably improves the resolution of J-multiplet patterns for dilute spin systems. PMID:17594032

  5. Measurements of energy distribution and wall temperature in flowing hydrogen microwave plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. For a flow rate of 8900 micromoles/sec, a pressure of 7.4 torr, and an absorbed power level of 80 W, an energy transfer efficiency of 50 percent has been measured. A heat transfer model that characterizes the energy transfer processes in the plasma is developed. A wall temperature for the plasma system is calculated.

  6. Measurement of human cerebral blood flow with (15O)butanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, M.S.; Adler, L.P.; Nelson, A.D.; Cassidy, E.H.; Muzic, R.F.; Bednarczyk, E.M.; Miraldi, F. )

    1991-09-01

    Although H2(15)O is widely used for CBF measurement by positron tomography, it underestimates CBF, especially at elevated flow rates. Several tracers, including butanol, overcome this problem, but the short half-life of 15O provides advantages that cause water to remain the tracer of choice. The authors report the first use and evaluation of 15O-labeled butanol for CBF measurement. Flow measurements made in a similar fashion with water and butanol at 10-min intervals were compared in normal volunteers under resting and hypercapnic conditions. Regional analysis showed good agreement between the tracers at low flows, and significant underestimation of flow by water relative to butanol in regions of elevated flow. The observed relationship between the tracers and the curve-fitted permeability-surface area product for water (133 ml.100 g-1.min-1) follow the known relationship between water and true flow. These observations indicate that (15O)-butanol provided accurate measurements of human regional CBF under conditions of elevated perfusion. They conclude that butanol is a convenient and accurate method for routine CBF determination by positron emission tomography.

  7. Continuous flow measurements using fixed ultrasonic meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Rick

    1993-01-01

    USGS has or soon will be installing four continuous flow-monitoring stations in the delta that will use ultrasonic velocity meters (DVM). Funding for the stations has been provided by USGS, DWR, USBR, and Contra Costa Water District.

  8. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 6: Flow measurement instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    A summary is provided of information available on liquid and gaseous oxygen flowmetering including an evaluation of commercial meters. The instrument types, physical principles of measurement, and performance characteristics are described. Problems concerning flow measurements of less than plus or minus two percent uncertainty are reviewed. Recommendations concerning work on flow reference systems, the use of surrogate fluids, and standard tests for oxygen flow measurements are also presented.

  9. C-III flow measurements with a coherence imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, T. R.; Allen, S. L.; Howard, J.

    2012-10-15

    This work describes a coherence imaging spectrometer capable of making spatially resolved CIII flow measurements in the DIII-D lower divertor. The spectrometer exploits a periscope view of the plasma to produce line-of-sight averaged velocity measurements of CIII. From these chord averaged flow measurements, a 2D poloidal cross section of the CIII flow is tomographically reconstructed. Details of the diagnostic setup, acquired data, and data analysis will be presented, along with prospects for future applications.

  10. New insights for accurate chemically specific measurements of slow diffusing molecules.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianbo; Madsen, Louis A

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the myriad features of molecular transport in materials yields fundamental information for understanding processes such as ion conduction, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. Molecular transport especially impacts the performance of ion-containing liquids and polymeric materials when used as electrolytes and separation media, with applications encompassing battery electrolytes, reverse-osmosis membranes, mechanical transducers, and fuel cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a unique probe of molecular translations by allowing measurement of all mobile species via spectral selectivity, access to a broad range of transport coefficients, probing of any material direction, and investigation of variable lengthscales in a material, thus, tying morphology to transport. Here, we present new concepts to test for and guarantee robust diffusion measurements. We first employ a standard pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) calibration protocol using (2)H(2)O and obtain expected results, but we observe crippling artifacts when measuring (1)H-glycerol diffusion with the same experimental parameters. A mathematical analysis of (2)H(2)O and glycerol signals in the presence of PFG transients show tight agreement with experimental observations. These analyses lead to our principal findings that (1) negligible artifacts observed with low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) nuclei may become dominant when observing high γ nuclei, and (2) reducing the sample dimension along the gradient direction predictably reduces non-ideal behaviors of NMR signals. We further provide a useful quantitative strategy for error minimization when measuring diffusing species slower than the one used for gradient calibration. PMID:23406112

  11. New insights for accurate chemically specific measurements of slow diffusing molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jianbo; Madsen, Louis A.

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the myriad features of molecular transport in materials yields fundamental information for understanding processes such as ion conduction, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. Molecular transport especially impacts the performance of ion-containing liquids and polymeric materials when used as electrolytes and separation media, with applications encompassing battery electrolytes, reverse-osmosis membranes, mechanical transducers, and fuel cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a unique probe of molecular translations by allowing measurement of all mobile species via spectral selectivity, access to a broad range of transport coefficients, probing of any material direction, and investigation of variable lengthscales in a material, thus, tying morphology to transport. Here, we present new concepts to test for and guarantee robust diffusion measurements. We first employ a standard pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) calibration protocol using 2H2O and obtain expected results, but we observe crippling artifacts when measuring 1H-glycerol diffusion with the same experimental parameters. A mathematical analysis of 2H2O and glycerol signals in the presence of PFG transients show tight agreement with experimental observations. These analyses lead to our principal findings that (1) negligible artifacts observed with low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) nuclei may become dominant when observing high γ nuclei, and (2) reducing the sample dimension along the gradient direction predictably reduces non-ideal behaviors of NMR signals. We further provide a useful quantitative strategy for error minimization when measuring diffusing species slower than the one used for gradient calibration.

  12. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  13. GAP on EJSM: an accelerometer for accurate gravity and atmospheric measurements of Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Benjamin; Christophe, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    The Gravity Advanced Package (GAP) is an electrostatic accelerometer with a bias calibration system proposed on EJSM Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) for fundamental physics objectives - more precisely for testing the law of gravity at the scale of the solar system - and for planetary objectives. GAP can provide decisive information during the planetary phase of the mission. During the orbit of JGO around Ganymede or the flyby of Callisto, such an instrument will measure the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft, mainly due to the atmosphere. By combining these measurements with the ones provided by the radio-science instrument, which measures the total acceleration of the spacecraft, the gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft can be derived without using any model of the atmosphere. This is a major contribution of GAP to the mission considering the low altitude and the size of the solar panel, which would otherwise require precise models. Indeed, the presence of the instrument on board would provide data to better understand the atmosphere and the gravity field of Ganymede and Callisto. This combination of measurements from the accelerometer and from radio-science is similar to what is currently done for determining precise model of the Earth gravity potential with CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions. The GAP instrument is proposed by the ONERA team which has already built the 9 accelerometers in orbit for these geodetic missions. The presentation will describe the scientific objectives of the instrument with a review of the impact of the non-gravitational forces on the gravity measurement of Jupiter's moons. Then, a description of the instrument with its performance will be given, as well as the requirements for its implementation in the spacecraft.

  14. Measurement of testicular volume in smaller testes: how accurate is the conventional orchidometer?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chieh; Huang, William J S; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different methods, including the Seager orchidometer (SO) and ultrasonography (US), for assessing testicular volume of smaller testes (testes volume less than 18 mL). Moreover, the equations used for the calculations--the Hansen formula (length [L] x width [W](2) x 0.52, equation A), the prolate ellipsoid formula (L x W x height [H] x 0.52, equation B), and the Lambert equation (L x W x H x 0.71, equation C)--were also examined and compared with the gold standard testicular volume obtained by water displacement (Archimedes principle). In this study, 30 testes from 15 men, mean age 75.3 (+/-8.3) years, were included. They all had advanced prostate cancer and were admitted for orchiectomy. Before the procedure, all the testes were assessed using SO and US. The dimensions were then input into each equation to obtain the volume estimates. The testicular volume by water displacement was 8.1 +/- 3.5 mL. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) of the 2 different methods (SO, US) to the gold standard were 0.70 and 0.85, respectively. The calculated testicular volumes were 9.2 +/- 3.9 mL (measured by SO, equation A), 11.9 +/- 5.2 mL (measured by SO, equation C), 7.3 +/- 4.2 mL (measured by US, equation A), 6.5 +/- 3.3 mL (measured by US, equation B) and 8.9 +/- 4.5 mL (measured by US, equation C). Only the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Hansen equation (equation A) and the mean size measured by US and volume calculated with the Lambert equation (equation C) showed no significant differences when compared with the volumes estimated by water displacement (mean difference 0.81 mL, P = .053, and 0.81 mL, P = .056, respectively). Based on our measurements, we categorized testicular volume by different cutoff values (7.0 mL, 7.5 mL, 8.0 mL, and 8.5 mL) to calculate a new constant for use in the Hansen equation. The new constant was 0.59. We then reexamined the equations using the new 0.59 constant, and found

  15. A step toward standardization: development of accurate measurements of X-ray absorption and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chantler, Christopher T; Barnea, Zwi; Tran, Chanh Q; Rae, Nicholas A; de Jonge, Martin D

    2012-11-01

    This paper explains how to take the counting precision available for XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) and attenuation measurements, of perhaps one part in 10(6) in special cases, to produce a local variance below 0.01% and an accuracy of attenuation of the order 0.01%, with an XAFS accuracy at a similar level leading to the determination of dynamical bond lengths to an accuracy similar to that obtained by standard and experienced crystallographic measurements. This includes the necessary corrections for the detector response to be linear, including a correction for dark current and air-path energy dependencies; a proper interpretation of the range of sample thicknesses for absorption experiments; developments of methods to measure and correct for harmonic contamination, especially at lower energies without mirrors; the significance of correcting for the actual bandwidth of the beam on target after monochromation, especially for the portability of results and edge structure from one beamline to another; definitions of precision, accuracy and XAFS accuracy suitable for theoretical model analysis; the role of additional and alternative high-accuracy procedures; and discusses some principles regarding data formats for XAFS and for the deposition of data sets with manuscripts or to a database. Increasingly, the insight of X-ray absorption and the standard of accuracy needed requires data with high intrinsic precision and therefore with allowance for a range of small but significant systematic effects. This is always crucial for absolute measurements of absorption, and is of equal importance but traditionally difficult for (usually relative) measurements of fluorescence XAFS or even absorption XAFS. Robust error analysis is crucial so that the significance of conclusions can be tested within the uncertainties of the measurements. Errors should not just include precision uncertainty but should attempt to include estimation of the most significant systematic error

  16. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth W.; Scott, Mark M.; Reid, David R.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, Jeremy D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Marsh, Jeramy M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10-3 for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands.

  17. An X-band waveguide measurement technique for the accurate characterization of materials with low dielectric loss permittivity.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kenneth W; Scott, Mark M; Reid, David R; Bean, Jeffrey A; Ellis, Jeremy D; Morris, Andrew P; Marsh, Jeramy M

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a new X-band waveguide (WR90) measurement method that permits the broadband characterization of the complex permittivity for low dielectric loss tangent material specimens with improved accuracy. An electrically long polypropylene specimen that partially fills the cross-section is inserted into the waveguide and the transmitted scattering parameter (S21) is measured. The extraction method relies on computational electromagnetic simulations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to match the experimental S21 measurement. The sensitivity of the technique to sample length was explored by simulating specimen lengths from 2.54 to 15.24 cm, in 2.54 cm increments. Analysis of our simulated data predicts the technique will have the sensitivity to measure loss tangent values on the order of 10(-3) for materials such as polymers with relatively low real permittivity values. The ability to accurately characterize low-loss dielectric material specimens of polypropylene is demonstrated experimentally. The method was validated by excellent agreement with a free-space focused-beam system measurement of a polypropylene sheet. This technique provides the material measurement community with the ability to accurately extract material properties of low-loss material specimen over the entire X-band range. This technique could easily be extended to other frequency bands. PMID:27250447

  18. A Comparative Study of Simulated and Measured Gear-Flap Flow Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Mineck, Raymond E.; Yao, Chungsheng; Jenkins, Luther N.; Fares, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    The ability of two CFD solvers to accurately characterize the transient, complex, interacting flowfield asso-ciated with a realistic gear-flap configuration is assessed via comparison of simulated flow with experimental measurements. The simulated results, obtained with NASA's FUN3D and Exa's PowerFLOW® for a high-fidelity, 18% scale semi-span model of a Gulfstream aircraft in landing configuration (39 deg flap deflection, main landing gear on and off) are compared to two-dimensional and stereo particle image velocimetry measurements taken within the gear-flap flow interaction region during wind tunnel tests of the model. As part of the bench-marking process, direct comparisons of the mean and fluctuating velocity fields are presented in the form of planar contour plots and extracted line profiles at measurement planes in various orientations stationed in the main gear wake. The measurement planes in the vicinity of the flap side edge and downstream of the flap trailing edge are used to highlight the effects of gear presence on tip vortex development and the ability of the computational tools to accurately capture such effects. The present study indicates that both computed datasets contain enough detail to construct a relatively accurate depiction of gear-flap flow interaction. Such a finding increases confidence in using the simulated volumetric flow solutions to examine the behavior of pertinent aer-odynamic mechanisms within the gear-flap interaction zone.

  19. A Procedure for Accurately Measuring the Shaker Overturning Moment During Random Vibration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeri, Reza D.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: For large system level random vibration tests, there may be some concerns about the shaker's capability for the overturning moment. It is the test conductor's responsibility to predict and monitor the overturning moment during random vibration tests. If the predicted moment is close to the shaker's capability, test conductor must measure the instantaneous moment at low levels and extrapolate to higher levels. That data will be used to decide whether it is safe to proceed to the next test level. Challenge: Kistler analog formulation for computing the real-time moment is only applicable to very limited cases in which we have 3 or 4 load cells installed at shaker interface with hardware. Approach: To overcome that limitation, a simple procedure was developed for computing the overturning moment time histories using the measured time histories of the individual load cells.

  20. Optimum satellite orbits for accurate measurement of the earth's radiation budget, summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. G.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    The optimum set of orbit inclinations for the measurement of the earth radiation budget from spacially integrating sensor systems was estimated for two and three satellite systems. The best set of the two were satellites at orbit inclinations of 80 deg and 50 deg; of three the inclinations were 80 deg, 60 deg and 50 deg. These were chosen on the basis of a simulation of flat plate and spherical detectors flying over a daily varying earth radiation field as measured by the Nimbus 3 medium resolution scanners. A diurnal oscillation was also included in the emitted flux and albedo to give a source field as realistic as possible. Twenty three satellites with different inclinations and equator crossings were simulated, allowing the results of thousand of multisatellite sets to be intercompared. All were circular orbits of radius 7178 kilometers.

  1. Switched integration amplifier-based photocurrent meter for accurate spectral responsivity measurement of photometers.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongchong; Hong, Kee-Suk; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2016-03-20

    This work introduces a switched integration amplifier (SIA)-based photocurrent meter for femtoampere (fA)-level current measurement, which enables us to measure a 107 dynamic range of spectral responsivity of photometers even with a common lamp-based monochromatic light source. We described design considerations and practices about operational amplifiers (op-amps), switches, readout methods, etc., to compose a stable SIA of low offset current in terms of leakage current and gain peaking in detail. According to the design, we made six SIAs of different integration capacitance and different op-amps and evaluated their offset currents. They showed an offset current of (1.5-85) fA with a slow variation of (0.5-10) fA for an hour under opened input. Applying a detector to the SIA input, the offset current and its variation were increased and the SIA readout became noisier due to finite shunt resistance and nonzero shunt capacitance of the detector. One of the SIAs with 10 pF nominal capacitance was calibrated using a calibrated current source at the current level of 10 nA to 1 fA and at the integration time of 2 to 65,536 ms. As a result, we obtained a calibration formula for integration capacitance as a function of integration time rather than a single capacitance value because the SIA readout showed a distinct dependence on integration time at a given current level. Finally, we applied it to spectral responsivity measurement of a photometer. It is demonstrated that the home-made SIA of 10 pF was capable of measuring a 107 dynamic range of spectral responsivity of a photometer. PMID:27140564

  2. Accurate metrology of polarization curves measured at the speckle size of visible light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghabbach, A; Zerrad, M; Soriano, G; Amra, C

    2014-06-16

    An optical procedure is presented to measure at the speckle size and with high accuracy, the polarization degree of patterns scattered by disordered media. Whole mappings of polarization ratio, polarimetric phase and polarization degree are pointed out. Scattered clouds are emphasized on the Poincaré sphere, and are completed by probability density functions of the polarization degree. A special care is attributed to the accuracy of data. The set-up provides additional signatures of scattering media.

  3. Exercise-induced hyperthermia may prevent accurate core temperature measurement by tympanic membrane thermometer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, S; Scarbough, M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on brain and deep trunk temperature measurement in order to determine the optimal temperature site of the body for varying nursing practices in outpatient clinical settings. Eight women, 18 to 50 years old (30.9 +/- 12.6; mean +/- SD), participated in the study. Subjects were asked to perform their regular aerobic exercise in a natural environment while body temperature (ear and rectal) and heart rate (HR) were measured simultaneously and repeatedly before, during, and after exercise. Glass mercury rectal thermometers were used for measurement of deep trunk temperature, an infrared tympanic membrane thermometer for measurement of brain temperature, and a portable heart rate monitor for monitoring heart rate. Rectal temperature was higher than ear temperature for all but one of the 40 pairs of observation. The time pattern varied for the two modes of temperature (F = 9.67; df 4,28; p < .001). Rectal temperature changed over time (F = 7.86; df 4,28; p < .002), and ear temperature did not (F = 1.5; df 4,28; p = .25), indicating that ear temperature did not respond to exercise. While rectal temperature was strongly correlated with HR (r = .60), ear temperature did not correlate either with rectal temperature (r = .02) or with HR (r = .08). Thus deep trunk temperature responds to exercise at moderate levels. On the other hand, ear temperature does not increase due to exercise. Ear temperature is not a valid indicator of trunk temperature during and immediately after exercise.

  4. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  5. A Robust Method of Vehicle Stability Accurate Measurement Using GPS and INS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhibin; Zhang, Hongtian; Zhang, Jinzhu

    2015-12-01

    With the development of the vehicle industry, controlling stability has become more and more important. Techniques of evaluating vehicle stability are in high demand. Integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) is a very practical method to get high-precision measurement data. Usually, the Kalman filter is used to fuse the data from GPS and INS. In this paper, a robust method is used to measure vehicle sideslip angle and yaw rate, which are two important parameters for vehicle stability. First, a four-wheel vehicle dynamic model is introduced, based on sideslip angle and yaw rate. Second, a double level Kalman filter is established to fuse the data from Global Positioning System and Inertial Navigation System. Then, this method is simulated on a sample vehicle, using Carsim software to test the sideslip angle and yaw rate. Finally, a real experiment is made to verify the advantage of this approach. The experimental results showed the merits of this method of measurement and estimation, and the approach can meet the design requirements of the vehicle stability controller.

  6. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required.

  7. Regular, Fast and Accurate Airborne In-Situ Methane Measurements Around the Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, Christoph; Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Schuck, Tanja J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    We present a laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft. The instrument is based on a commercial fast methane analyzer (FMA, Los Gatos Res.), which was modified for fully unattended employment. A laboratory characterization was performed and the results with emphasis on the precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy are presented. An in-flight calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. By statistical comparison of the in-situ measurements with the flask samples we derive a total uncetrainty estimate of ~ 3.85 ppbv (1?) around the tropopause, and ~ 12.4 ppbv (1?) during aircraft ascent and descent. Data from the first two years of airborne operation are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere, with occasional crossings of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. With its high spatial resolution and high accuracy this data set is unprecedented in the highly important atmospheric layer of the tropopause.

  8. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required. PMID:18488965

  9. Optical aperture area determination for accurate illuminance and luminous efficacy measurements of LED lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dönsberg, Timo; Mäntynen, Henrik; Ikonen, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    The measurement uncertainty of illuminance and, consequently, luminous flux and luminous efficacy of LED lamps can be reduced with a recently introduced method based on the predictable quantum efficient detector (PQED). One of the most critical factors affecting the measurement uncertainty with the PQED method is the determination of the aperture area. This paper describes an upgrade to an optical method for direct determination of aperture area where superposition of equally spaced Gaussian laser beams is used to form a uniform irradiance distribution. In practice, this is accomplished by scanning the aperture in front of an intensity-stabilized laser beam. In the upgraded method, the aperture is attached to the PQED and the whole package is transversely scanned relative to the laser beam. This has the benefit of having identical geometry in the laser scanning of the aperture area and in the actual photometric measurement. Further, the aperture and detector assembly does not have to be dismantled for the aperture calibration. However, due to small acceptance angle of the PQED, differences between the diffraction effects of an overfilling plane wave and of a combination of Gaussian laser beams at the circular aperture need to be taken into account. A numerical calculation method for studying these effects is discussed in this paper. The calculation utilizes the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which is applied to the geometry of the PQED and the aperture. Calculation results for various aperture diameters and two different aperture-to-detector distances are presented.

  10. Flow Measurement. Training Module 3.315.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the principles of liquid flow and the methods of measuring open channel and fuel pipe flow rates. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. The module addresses the basic flow formula, and…

  11. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535ÀC. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535ÀC and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice wont be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  12. Recent Results on the Accurate Measurements of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at 1.413GHZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.H.; Tarkocin, Y.; Utku, C.; Le Vine, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the complex. dielectric constant of seawater at 30.00 psu, 35.00 psu and 38.27 psu over the temperature range from 5 C to 3 5 at 1.413 GHz are given and compared with the Klein-Swift results. A resonant cavity technique is used. The calibration constant used in the cavity perturbation formulas is determined experimentally using methanol and ethanediol (ethylene glycol) as reference liquids. Analysis of the data shows that the measurements are accurate to better than 1.0% in almost all cases studied.

  13. Examining factors that may influence accurate measurement of testosterone in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Graham, Katherine M; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Burns, Charlene M; Bettinger, Tammie L; Wheaton, Catharine J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in reported testosterone concentrations in male sea turtle blood samples are common in the veterinary literature, but may be accounted for by differences in sample handling and processing prior to assay. Therefore, our study was performed to determine best practices for testosterone analysis in male sea turtles (Caretta caretta and Chelonia mydas). Blood samples were collected into 5 collection tube types, and assay validation and measured testosterone concentrations were compared across different sample storage (fresh, refrigerated 1 week, or frozen), extraction (unextracted or ether-extracted), and processing treatment (untreated, homogenized, or dissociation reagent) conditions. Ether-extracted and dissociation reagent-treated samples validated in all conditions tested and are recommended for use, as unextracted samples validated only if assayed fresh. Dissociation reagent treatment was simpler to perform than ether extraction and resulted in total testosterone concentrations ~2.7-3.5 times greater than free testosterone measured in ether-extracted samples. Sample homogenization did not affect measured testosterone concentrations, and could be used to increase volume in gelled samples. An annual seasonal testosterone increase was observed in both species when ether extraction or dissociation reagent treatment was used. Annual deslorelin implant treatments in a Chelonia mydas male resulted in suppression of seasonal testosterone following the fourth treatment. Seasonal testosterone patterns resumed following discontinuation of deslorelin. Comparison of in-house and commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits revealed similar patterns of seasonal testosterone increases and deslorelin-induced suppression. Our study highlights the importance of methodological validation and provides laboratorians with best practices for testosterone enzyme immunoassay in sea turtles.

  14. Examining factors that may influence accurate measurement of testosterone in sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Graham, Katherine M; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Burns, Charlene M; Bettinger, Tammie L; Wheaton, Catharine J

    2016-01-01

    Differences in reported testosterone concentrations in male sea turtle blood samples are common in the veterinary literature, but may be accounted for by differences in sample handling and processing prior to assay. Therefore, our study was performed to determine best practices for testosterone analysis in male sea turtles (Caretta caretta and Chelonia mydas). Blood samples were collected into 5 collection tube types, and assay validation and measured testosterone concentrations were compared across different sample storage (fresh, refrigerated 1 week, or frozen), extraction (unextracted or ether-extracted), and processing treatment (untreated, homogenized, or dissociation reagent) conditions. Ether-extracted and dissociation reagent-treated samples validated in all conditions tested and are recommended for use, as unextracted samples validated only if assayed fresh. Dissociation reagent treatment was simpler to perform than ether extraction and resulted in total testosterone concentrations ~2.7-3.5 times greater than free testosterone measured in ether-extracted samples. Sample homogenization did not affect measured testosterone concentrations, and could be used to increase volume in gelled samples. An annual seasonal testosterone increase was observed in both species when ether extraction or dissociation reagent treatment was used. Annual deslorelin implant treatments in a Chelonia mydas male resulted in suppression of seasonal testosterone following the fourth treatment. Seasonal testosterone patterns resumed following discontinuation of deslorelin. Comparison of in-house and commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits revealed similar patterns of seasonal testosterone increases and deslorelin-induced suppression. Our study highlights the importance of methodological validation and provides laboratorians with best practices for testosterone enzyme immunoassay in sea turtles. PMID:26699527

  15. Possibility of detecting anisotropic expansion of the universe by very accurate astrometry measurements.

    PubMed

    Quercellini, Claudia; Quartin, Miguel; Amendola, Luca

    2009-04-17

    Refined astrometry measurements allow us to detect large-scale deviations from isotropy through real-time observations of changes in the angular separation between sources at cosmic distances. This "cosmic parallax" effect is a powerful consistency test of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric and may set independent constraints on cosmic anisotropy. We apply this novel general test to Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi cosmologies with off-center observers and show that future satellite missions such as Gaia might achieve accuracies that would put limits on the off-center distance which are competitive with cosmic microwave background dipole constraints. PMID:19518616

  16. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL* rf spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D.; Monsanglant, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Lebee, G.

    1999-01-15

    The MISTRAL* experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  17. The dark art of light measurement: accurate radiometry for low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mohammed A; Zainal, Siti A; Holder, Michelle J; Carroll, James D; Cooper, Paul R; Milward, Michael R; Palin, William M

    2016-05-01

    Lasers and light-emitting diodes are used for a range of biomedical applications with many studies reporting their beneficial effects. However, three main concerns exist regarding much of the low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation literature; (1) incomplete, inaccurate and unverified irradiation parameters, (2) miscalculation of 'dose,' and (3) the misuse of appropriate light property terminology. The aim of this systematic review was to assess where, and to what extent, these inadequacies exist and to provide an overview of 'best practice' in light measurement methods and importance of correct light measurement. A review of recent relevant literature was performed in PubMed using the terms LLLT and photobiomodulation (March 2014-March 2015) to investigate the contemporary information available in LLLT and photobiomodulation literature in terms of reporting light properties and irradiation parameters. A total of 74 articles formed the basis of this systematic review. Although most articles reported beneficial effects following LLLT, the majority contained no information in terms of how light was measured (73%) and relied on manufacturer-stated values. For all papers reviewed, missing information for specific light parameters included wavelength (3%), light source type (8%), power (41%), pulse frequency (52%), beam area (40%), irradiance (43%), exposure time (16%), radiant energy (74%) and fluence (16%). Frequent use of incorrect terminology was also observed within the reviewed literature. A poor understanding of photophysics is evident as a significant number of papers neglected to report or misreported important radiometric data. These errors affect repeatability and reliability of studies shared between scientists, manufacturers and clinicians and could degrade efficacy of patient treatments. Researchers need a physicist or appropriately skilled engineer on the team, and manuscript reviewers should reject papers that do not report beam measurement

  18. The dark art of light measurement: accurate radiometry for low-level light therapy.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mohammed A; Zainal, Siti A; Holder, Michelle J; Carroll, James D; Cooper, Paul R; Milward, Michael R; Palin, William M

    2016-05-01

    Lasers and light-emitting diodes are used for a range of biomedical applications with many studies reporting their beneficial effects. However, three main concerns exist regarding much of the low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation literature; (1) incomplete, inaccurate and unverified irradiation parameters, (2) miscalculation of 'dose,' and (3) the misuse of appropriate light property terminology. The aim of this systematic review was to assess where, and to what extent, these inadequacies exist and to provide an overview of 'best practice' in light measurement methods and importance of correct light measurement. A review of recent relevant literature was performed in PubMed using the terms LLLT and photobiomodulation (March 2014-March 2015) to investigate the contemporary information available in LLLT and photobiomodulation literature in terms of reporting light properties and irradiation parameters. A total of 74 articles formed the basis of this systematic review. Although most articles reported beneficial effects following LLLT, the majority contained no information in terms of how light was measured (73%) and relied on manufacturer-stated values. For all papers reviewed, missing information for specific light parameters included wavelength (3%), light source type (8%), power (41%), pulse frequency (52%), beam area (40%), irradiance (43%), exposure time (16%), radiant energy (74%) and fluence (16%). Frequent use of incorrect terminology was also observed within the reviewed literature. A poor understanding of photophysics is evident as a significant number of papers neglected to report or misreported important radiometric data. These errors affect repeatability and reliability of studies shared between scientists, manufacturers and clinicians and could degrade efficacy of patient treatments. Researchers need a physicist or appropriately skilled engineer on the team, and manuscript reviewers should reject papers that do not report beam measurement

  19. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.

  20. A simple and reliable sensor for accurate measurement of angular speed for low speed rotating machinery.

    PubMed

    Kuosheng, Jiang; Guanghua, Xu; Tangfei, Tao; Lin, Liang; Yi, Wang; Sicong, Zhang; Ailing, Luo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a novel sensor system for measuring the angular speed (AS) of a shaft rotating at a very low speed range, nearly zero speed. The sensor system consists mainly of an eccentric sleeve rotating with the shaft on which the angular speed to be measured, and an eddy current displacement sensor to obtain the profile of the sleeve for AS calculation. When the shaft rotates at constant speed the profile will be a pure sinusoidal trace. However, the profile will be a phase modulated signal when the shaft speed is varied. By applying a demodulating procedure, the AS can be obtained in a straightforward manner. The sensor system was validated experimentally based on a gearbox test rig and the result shows that the AS obtained are consistent with that obtained by a conventional encoder. However, the new sensor gives very smooth and stable traces of the AS, demonstrating its higher accuracy and reliability in obtaining the AS of the low speed operations with speed-up and down transients. In addition, the experiment also shows that it is easy and cost-effective to be realised in different applications such as condition monitoring and process control.