Science.gov

Sample records for accurate flow solutions

  1. Accurate solutions for transonic viscous flow over finite wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, V. N.

    1986-01-01

    An explicit multistage Runge-Kutta type time-stepping scheme is used for solving the three-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. A finite-volume formulation is employed to facilitate treatment of complex grid topologies encountered in three-dimensional calculations. Convergence to steady state is expedited through usage of acceleration techniques. Further numerical efficiency is achieved through vectorization of the computer code. The accuracy of the overall scheme is evaluated by comparing the computed solutions with the experimental data for a finite wing under different test conditions in the transonic regime. A grid refinement study ir conducted to estimate the grid requirements for adequate resolution of salient features of such flows.

  2. Do inverse ecosystem models accurately reconstruct plankton trophic flows? Comparing two solution methods using field data from the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukel, Michael R.; Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Samo, Ty; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2012-03-01

    Despite the increasing use of linear inverse modeling techniques to elucidate fluxes in undersampled marine ecosystems, the accuracy with which they estimate food web flows has not been resolved. New Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) solution methods have also called into question the biases of the commonly used L2 minimum norm (L 2MN) solution technique. Here, we test the abilities of MCMC and L 2MN methods to recover field-measured ecosystem rates that are sequentially excluded from the model input. For data, we use experimental measurements from process cruises of the California Current Ecosystem (CCE-LTER) Program that include rate estimates of phytoplankton and bacterial production, micro- and mesozooplankton grazing, and carbon export from eight study sites varying from rich coastal upwelling to offshore oligotrophic conditions. Both the MCMC and L 2MN methods predicted well-constrained rates of protozoan and mesozooplankton grazing with reasonable accuracy, but the MCMC method overestimated primary production. The MCMC method more accurately predicted the poorly constrained rate of vertical carbon export than the L 2MN method, which consistently overestimated export. Results involving DOC and bacterial production were equivocal. Overall, when primary production is provided as model input, the MCMC method gives a robust depiction of ecosystem processes. Uncertainty in inverse ecosystem models is large and arises primarily from solution under-determinacy. We thus suggest that experimental programs focusing on food web fluxes expand the range of experimental measurements to include the nature and fate of detrital pools, which play large roles in the model.

  3. Atypical late-time singular regimes accurately diagnosed in stagnation-point-type solutions of 3D Euler flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulungye, Rachel M.; Lucas, Dan; Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit, both numerically and analytically, the finite-time blowup of the infinite-energy solution of 3D Euler equations of stagnation-point-type introduced by Gibbon et al. (1999). By employing the method of mapping to regular systems, presented in Bustamante (2011) and extended to the symmetry-plane case by Mulungye et al. (2015), we establish a curious property of this solution that was not observed in early studies: before but near singularity time, the blowup goes from a fast transient to a slower regime that is well resolved spectrally, even at mid-resolutions of $512^2.$ This late-time regime has an atypical spectrum: it is Gaussian rather than exponential in the wavenumbers. The analyticity-strip width decays to zero in a finite time, albeit so slowly that it remains well above the collocation-point scale for all simulation times $t < T^* - 10^{-9000}$, where $T^*$ is the singularity time. Reaching such a proximity to singularity time is not possible in the original temporal variable, because floating point double precision ($\\approx 10^{-16}$) creates a `machine-epsilon' barrier. Due to this limitation on the \\emph{original} independent variable, the mapped variables now provide an improved assessment of the relevant blowup quantities, crucially with acceptable accuracy at an unprecedented closeness to the singularity time: $T^*- t \\approx 10^{-140}.$

  4. High order accurate solutions of viscous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. E.; Turkel, Eli

    1993-01-01

    We consider a fourth order extension to MacCormack's scheme. The original extension was fourth order only for the inviscid terms but was second order for the viscous terms. We show how to modify the viscous terms so that the scheme is uniformly fourth order in the spatial derivatives. Applications are given to some boundary layer flows. In addition, for applications to shear flows the effect of the outflow boundary conditions are very important. We compare the accuracy of several of these different boundary conditions for both boundary layer and shear flows. Stretching at the outflow usually increases the oscillations in the numerical solution but the addition of a filtered sponge layer (with or without stretching) reduces such oscillations. The oscillations are generated by insufficient resolution of the shear layer. When the shear layer is sufficiently resolved then oscillations are not generated and there is less of a need for a nonreflecting boundary condition.

  5. Accurate modelling of unsteady flows in collapsible tubes.

    PubMed

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    The context of this paper is the development of a general and efficient numerical haemodynamic tool to help clinicians and researchers in understanding of physiological flow phenomena. We propose an accurate one-dimensional Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RK-DG) method coupled with lumped parameter models for the boundary conditions. The suggested model has already been successfully applied to haemodynamics in arteries and is now extended for the flow in collapsible tubes such as veins. The main difference with cardiovascular simulations is that the flow may become supercritical and elastic jumps may appear with the numerical consequence that scheme may not remain monotone if no limiting procedure is introduced. We show that our second-order RK-DG method equipped with an approximate Roe's Riemann solver and a slope-limiting procedure allows us to capture elastic jumps accurately. Moreover, this paper demonstrates that the complex physics associated with such flows is more accurately modelled than with traditional methods such as finite difference methods or finite volumes. We present various benchmark problems that show the flexibility and applicability of the numerical method. Our solutions are compared with analytical solutions when they are available and with solutions obtained using other numerical methods. Finally, to illustrate the clinical interest, we study the emptying process in a calf vein squeezed by contracting skeletal muscle in a normal and pathological subject. We compare our results with experimental simulations and discuss the sensitivity to parameters of our model.

  6. Statistically accurate simulations for atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinkina, S.

    2009-04-01

    A Hamiltonian particle-mesh method for quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity flow is proposed. The microscopic vorticity field at any time is an area- and energy-conserving rearrangement of the initial field. We construct a statistical mechanics theory to explain the long-time behavior of the numerical solution. The statistical theory correctly predicts the spatial distribution of particles as a function of their point vorticity. A nonlinear relation between the coarse grained mean stream function and mean vorticity fields is predicted, consistent with the preservation of higher moments of potential vorticity reported in [R. V. Abramov, A. J. Majda 2003, PNAS 100 3841--3846].

  7. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  8. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  9. More-Accurate Model of Flows in Rocket Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Chenoweth, James; Brinckman, Kevin; Dash, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    An improved computational model for simulating flows in liquid-propellant injectors in rocket engines has been developed. Models like this one are needed for predicting fluxes of heat in, and performances of, the engines. An important part of predicting performance is predicting fluctuations of temperature, fluctuations of concentrations of chemical species, and effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species. Customarily, diffusion effects are represented by parameters known in the art as the Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. Prior formulations include ad hoc assumptions of constant values of these parameters, but these assumptions and, hence, the formulations, are inaccurate for complex flows. In the improved model, these parameters are neither constant nor specified in advance: instead, they are variables obtained as part of the solution. Consequently, this model represents the effects of turbulence on diffusion of heat and chemical species more accurately than prior formulations do, and may enable more-accurate prediction of mixing and flows of heat in rocket-engine combustion chambers. The model has been implemented within CRUNCH CFD, a proprietary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer program, and has been tested within that program. The model could also be implemented within other CFD programs.

  10. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  11. ACCURATE CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so accurate solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the Accurate CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare events can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables accurate and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks. PMID:27761104

  12. ACCURATE CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so accurate solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the Accurate CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare events can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables accurate and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks.

  13. A time-accurate implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    A new time accurate coupled solution procedure for solving the chemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers is described. The scheme is shown to be very efficient and robust for flows with velocities ranging from M less than or equal to 10(exp -10) to supersonic speeds.

  14. Accurate measurement of streamwise vortices in low speed aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Kudo, Jun; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    Low Reynolds number experiments with flapping animals (such as bats and small birds) are of current interest in understanding biological flight mechanics, and due to their application to Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) which operate in a similar parameter space. Previous PIV wake measurements have described the structures left by bats and birds, and provided insight to the time history of their aerodynamic force generation; however, these studies have faced difficulty drawing quantitative conclusions due to significant experimental challenges associated with the highly three-dimensional and unsteady nature of the flows, and the low wake velocities associated with lifting bodies that only weigh a few grams. This requires the high-speed resolution of small flow features in a large field of view using limited laser energy and finite camera resolution. Cross-stream measurements are further complicated by the high out-of-plane flow which requires thick laser sheets and short interframe times. To quantify and address these challenges we present data from a model study on the wake behind a fixed wing at conditions comparable to those found in biological flight. We present a detailed analysis of the PIV wake measurements, discuss the criteria necessary for accurate measurements, and present a new dual-plane PIV configuration to resolve these issues.

  15. A time-accurate algorithm for chemical non-equilibrium viscous flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J.-S.; Chen, K.-H.; Choi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A time-accurate, coupled solution procedure is described for the chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers. This method employs the strong conservation form of the governing equations, but uses primitive variables as unknowns. Real gas properties and equilibrium chemistry are considered. Numerical tests include steady convergent-divergent nozzle flows with air dissociation/recombination chemistry, dump combustor flows with n-pentane-air chemistry, nonreacting flow in a model double annular combustor, and nonreacting unsteady driven cavity flows. Numerical results for both the steady and unsteady flows demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the present algorithm for Mach numbers ranging from the incompressible limit to supersonic speeds.

  16. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  17. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  18. Trace hydrazines in aqueous solutions accurately determined by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, E. A., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Trace amounts of hydrazines in aqueous solutions can be determined by using polythyleneimine /PEI/ in conjunction with the gas chromatographic column. The PEI specifically retains water without altering the separability or elution order of the hydrazine and associated constituents.

  19. A high order accurate finite element algorithm for high Reynolds number flow prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Galerkin-weighted residuals formulation is employed to establish an implicit finite element solution algorithm for generally nonlinear initial-boundary value problems. Solution accuracy, and convergence rate with discretization refinement, are quantized in several error norms, by a systematic study of numerical solutions to several nonlinear parabolic and a hyperbolic partial differential equation characteristic of the equations governing fluid flows. Solutions are generated using selective linear, quadratic and cubic basis functions. Richardson extrapolation is employed to generate a higher-order accurate solution to facilitate isolation of truncation error in all norms. Extension of the mathematical theory underlying accuracy and convergence concepts for linear elliptic equations is predicted for equations characteristic of laminar and turbulent fluid flows at nonmodest Reynolds number. The nondiagonal initial-value matrix structure introduced by the finite element theory is determined intrinsic to improved solution accuracy and convergence. A factored Jacobian iteration algorithm is derived and evaluated to yield a consequential reduction in both computer storage and execution CPU requirements while retaining solution accuracy.

  20. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  1. Electroosmotic flow hysteresis for dissimilar ionic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is commonly encountered in various microfluidics applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during the displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar ionic species. In this investigation, electroosmotic displacement flow involving dissimilar ionic solutions was studied experimentally through a current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. The flow hysteresis can be characterized by the turning and displacement times; turning time refers to the abrupt gradient change of current-time curve while displacement time is the time for one solution to completely displace the other solution. Both experimental and simulation results illustrate that the turning and displacement times for a particular solution pair can be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions in the microchannel are not the same in the two different flow directions. The mechanics of EOF hysteresis was elucidated through the theoretical model which includes the ionic mobility of each species, a major governing parameter. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for the EOF hysteresis involving dissimilar ionic solutions: the widening/sharpening effect of interfacial region between the two solutions and the difference in ion concentration distributions (and thus average zeta potentials) in different flow directions. The outcome of this investigation contributes to the fundamental understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving solution pair with dissimilar ionic species. PMID:25945139

  2. A program for accurate solutions of two-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, Sverker; Åberg, Daniel; Uddholm, Per

    2005-02-01

    We present a comprehensible computer program capable of treating non-relativistic ground and excited states for a two-electron atom having infinite nuclear mass. An iterative approach based on the implicitly restarted Arnoldi method (IRAM) is employed. The Hamiltonian matrix is never explicitly computed. Instead the action of the Hamiltonian operator on discrete pair functions is implemented. The finite difference method is applied and subsequent extrapolations gives the continuous grid result. The program is written in C and is highly optimized. All computations are made in double precision. Despite this relatively low degree of floating point precision (48 digits are not uncommon), the accuracy in the results can reach about 10 significant figures. Both serial and parallel versions are provided. The parallel program is particularly suitable for shared memory machines such as the Sun Starcat series. The serial version is simple to compile and should run on any platform. Program summaryTitle of program: corr2el Catalogue identifier: ADUX Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUX Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Distribution format: tar.gz Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers: Sun Fire 15K StarCat, Sun Ultra SPARC III, PC Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Sun Solaris 9, Linux Programming language used: ANSI C Memory required to execute with typical data: 3 Mwords or more No. bits in a word: 32 No. processors used: arbitrary Has the code been vectorized or parallelized: parallelized Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:5885 Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26 199 Nature of physical problem: The Schrödinger equation for two-electron atoms is solved using finite differences. Method of solution: An iterative eigenvalue-solver that requires only

  3. Accurate calculation and instability of supersonic wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrius T.

    1990-01-01

    This study is concerned with the computation and linear stability of a class of laminar compressible wake flows. The emphasis is on correct basic flow profiles that satisfy the steady equations of motion, and to this end the unperturbed state is obtained through numerical integration of the compressible boundary-layer equations. The linear stability of the flow is examined via the Rayleigh equation that describes evolution of inviscid disturbances. Analytical results are given for short- and long-wavelength disturbances and some numerical results of the general eigenvalue problem are also reported.

  4. Comparison of PIV with 4D-Flow in a physiological accurate flow phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Kurt; Balu, Niranjan; Liu, Haining; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun; Canton, Maria De Gador

    2016-11-01

    Validation of 4D MRI flow sequences with planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) is performed in a physiologically-accurate flow phantom. A patient-specific phantom of a carotid artery is connected to a pulsatile flow loop to simulate the 3D unsteady flow in the cardiovascular anatomy. Cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI provides time-resolved 3D blood velocity measurements in clinical tool that is promising but lacks a robust validation framework. PIV at three different Reynolds numbers (540, 680, and 815, chosen based on +/- 20 % of the average velocity from the patient-specific CCA waveform) and four different Womersley numbers (3.30, 3.68, 4.03, and 4.35, chosen to reflect a physiological range of heart rates) are compared to 4D-MRI measurements. An accuracy assessment of raw velocity measurements and a comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, and Lagrangian particle residence time, will be presented, with justification for their biomechanics relevance to the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new 4D-Flow MRI sequence and post processing techniques to provide a quantitative assessment with the benchmarked data. Department of Education GAANN Fellowship.

  5. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  6. Control of microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. D.

    1994-11-01

    Controlling microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions involves different techniques when targeting the nutrient solution, hardware surfaces in contact with the solution, or the active root zone. This review presents basic principles and applications of a number of treatment techniques, including disinfection by chemicals, ultrafiltration, ultrasonics, and heat treatment, with emphasis on UV irradiation and ozone treatment. Procedures for control of specific pathogens by nutrient solution conditioning also are reviewed.

  7. Control of microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Evans, R D

    1994-11-01

    Controlling microorganisms in flowing nutrient solutions involves different techniques when targeting the nutrient solution, hardware surfaces in contact with the solution, or the active root zone. This review presents basic principles and applications of a number of treatment techniques, including disinfection by chemicals, ultrafiltration, ultrasonics, and heat treatment, with emphasis on UV irradiation and ozone treatment. Procedures for control of specific pathogens by nutrient solution conditioning also are reviewed.

  8. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  9. Multigrid solution of internal flows using unstructured solution adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne A.; Blake, Kenneth R.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report of the NASA Lewis SBIR Phase 2 Contract Number NAS3-25785, Multigrid Solution of Internal Flows Using Unstructured Solution Adaptive Meshes. The objective of this project, as described in the Statement of Work, is to develop and deliver to NASA a general three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code using unstructured solution-adaptive meshes for accuracy and multigrid techniques for convergence acceleration. The code will primarily be applied, but not necessarily limited, to high speed internal flows in turbomachinery.

  10. A More Accurate Solution to the Elastic-Plastic Problem of Pressurized Thick-Walled Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    ACCURATE SOLUTION TO THE ELASTIC- PLASTIC PROBLEM OF PRESSURIZED THICK-WALLED CYLINDERS S. TYPE OF REPORT 4’ PERIOD COVERED Final 8. PERFORMING...o £ ) A MORE ACCURATE SOLUTION TO THE ELASTIC- PLASTIC PROBLEM OF PREr SURIZED THICK-WALLED CYLINDERS < • Peter C. T. Chen U.S. Army Armament...Watervllet, NY 12189 I iJSTRACT. A new method has been developed for solving the partially plastic problems of thlc’ -walled cylinders made of strain

  11. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  12. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  13. A time-accurate finite volume method valid at all flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1993-07-01

    . The calculated streaklines are in very good comparison with the experimentally obtained smoke picture. The calculated turbulent viscosity contours show that the transition from laminar to turbulent state and the relaminarization occur widely in space as well as in time. The ensemble-averaged velocity profiles are also in good agreement with the measured data and the good comparison indicates that the numerical method as well as the multipletime-scale turbulence equations successfully predict the unsteady transitional turbulence field. The chemical reactions for the hydrogen in the vitiated supersonic airstream are described using 9 chemical species and 48 reaction-steps. Consider that a fast chemistry can not be used to describe the fine details (such as the instability) of chemically reacting flows while a reduced chemical kinetics can not be used confidently due to the uncertainty contained in the reaction mechanisms. However, the use of a detailed finite rate chemistry may make it difficult to obtain a fully converged solution due to the coupling between the large number of flow, turbulence, and chemical equations. flow and to the use of the multiple-time-scale turbulence equations that can accurately describe the mixing of the fuel and the oxidant.

  14. An Accurate Heading Solution using MEMS-based Gyroscope and Magnetometer Integrated System (Preliminary Results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Diasty, M.

    2014-11-01

    An accurate heading solution is required for many applications and it can be achieved by high grade (high cost) gyroscopes (gyros) which may not be suitable for such applications. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems-based (MEMS) is an emerging technology, which has the potential of providing heading solution using a low cost MEMS-based gyro. However, MEMS-gyro-based heading solution drifts significantly over time. The heading solution can also be estimated using MEMS-based magnetometer by measuring the horizontal components of the Earth magnetic field. The MEMS-magnetometer-based heading solution does not drift over time, but are contaminated by high level of noise and may be disturbed by the presence of magnetic field sources such as metal objects. This paper proposed an accurate heading estimation procedure based on the integration of MEMS-based gyro and magnetometer measurements that correct gyro and magnetometer measurements where gyro angular rates of changes are estimated using magnetometer measurements and then integrated with the measured gyro angular rates of changes with a robust filter to estimate the heading. The proposed integration solution is implemented using two data sets; one was conducted in static mode without magnetic disturbances and the second was conducted in kinematic mode with magnetic disturbances. The results showed that the proposed integrated heading solution provides accurate, smoothed and undisturbed solution when compared with magnetometerbased and gyro-based heading solutions.

  15. The Space-Time Conservative Schemes for Large-Scale, Time-Accurate Flow Simulations with Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Friedlander, David J.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of development of unstructured mesh methods, high-fidelity time-accurate simulations are still predominantly carried out on structured, or unstructured hexahedral meshes by using high-order finite-difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO), or hybrid schemes formed by their combinations. In this work, the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to simulate several flow problems including supersonic jet/shock interaction and its impact on launch vehicle acoustics, and direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. This paper provides a status report for the continuing development of the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) numerical and software framework under the Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) project. Solution accuracy and large-scale parallel performance of the numerical framework is assessed with the goal of providing a viable paradigm for future high-fidelity flow physics simulations.

  16. Correction for solute/solvent interaction extends accurate freezing point depression theory to high concentration range.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Keener, C R; Cameron, I L

    1994-12-01

    The authors describe empirical corrections to ideally dilute expressions for freezing point depression of aqueous solutions to arrive at new expressions accurate up to three molal concentration. The method assumes non-ideality is due primarily to solute/solvent interactions such that the correct free water mass Mwc is the mass of water in solution Mw minus I.M(s) where M(s) is the mass of solute and I an empirical solute/solvent interaction coefficient. The interaction coefficient is easily derived from the constant in the linear regression fit to the experimental plot of Mw/M(s) as a function of 1/delta T (inverse freezing point depression). The I-value, when substituted into the new thermodynamic expressions derived from the assumption of equivalent activity of water in solution and ice, provides accurate predictions of freezing point depression (+/- 0.05 degrees C) up to 2.5 molal concentration for all the test molecules evaluated; glucose, sucrose, glycerol and ethylene glycol. The concentration limit is the approximate monolayer water coverage limit for the solutes which suggests that direct solute/solute interactions are negligible below this limit. This is contrary to the view of many authors due to the common practice of including hydration forces (a soft potential added to the hard core atomic potential) in the interaction potential between solute particles. When this is recognized the two viewpoints are in fundamental agreement.

  17. Investigation of low frequency electrolytic solution behavior with an accurate electrical impedance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kung-Chu; Su, Vin-Cent; Huang, Da-Yo; Lee, Ming-Lun; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation of strong electrolytic solutions operated in low frequency regime through an accurate electrical impedance method realized with a specific microfluidic device and high resolution instruments. Experimental results show the better repeatability and accuracy of the proposed impedance method. Moreover, all electrolytic solutions appear the so-called relaxation frequency at each peak value of dielectric loss due to relaxing total polarization inside the device. The relaxation frequency of concentrated electrolytes becomes higher owing to the stronger total polarization behavior coming from the higher conductivity as well as the lower resistance in the electrolytic solutions.

  18. A novel numerical technique to obtain an accurate solution to the Thomas-Fermi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parand, Kourosh; Yousefi, Hossein; Delkhosh, Mehdi; Ghaderi, Amin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm based on the fractional order of rational Euler functions (FRE) is introduced to study the Thomas-Fermi (TF) model which is a nonlinear singular ordinary differential equation on a semi-infinite interval. This problem, using the quasilinearization method (QLM), converts to the sequence of linear ordinary differential equations to obtain the solution. For the first time, the rational Euler (RE) and the FRE have been made based on Euler polynomials. In addition, the equation will be solved on a semi-infinite domain without truncating it to a finite domain by taking FRE as basic functions for the collocation method. This method reduces the solution of this problem to the solution of a system of algebraic equations. We demonstrated that the new proposed algorithm is efficient for obtaining the value of y'(0) , y(x) and y'(x) . Comparison with some numerical and analytical solutions shows that the present solution is highly accurate.

  19. A higher order accurate solution decomposition scheme for a singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2015-03-01

    An initial-boundary value problem is considered for a singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation. For this problem, a technique is developed for constructing higher order accurate difference schemes that converge ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm (where ɛ is the perturbation parameter multiplying the highest order derivative, ɛ ∈ (0, 1]). A solution decomposition scheme is described in which the grid subproblems for the regular and singular solution components are considered on uniform meshes. The Richardson technique is used to construct a higher order accurate solution decomposition scheme whose solution converges ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at a rate of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], where N + 1 and N 0 + 1 are the numbers of nodes in uniform meshes in x and t, respectively. Also, a new numerical-analytical Richardson scheme for the solution decomposition method is developed. Relying on the approach proposed, improved difference schemes can be constructed by applying the solution decomposition method and the Richardson extrapolation method when the number of embedded grids is more than two. These schemes converge ɛ-uniformly with an order close to the sixth in x and equal to the third in t.

  20. ASYMPTOTICALLY OPTIMAL HIGH-ORDER ACCURATE ALGORITHMS FOR THE SOLUTION OF CERTAIN ELLIPTIC PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Kunyansky, PhD

    2008-11-26

    The main goal of the project, "Asymptotically Optimal, High-Order Accurate Algorithms for the Solution of Certain Elliptic PDE's" (DE-FG02-03ER25577) was to develop fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of scattering problems and spectral problems of photonic crystals theory. The results we obtained lie in three areas: (1) asymptotically fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of eigenvalue problems of photonics, (2) fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering problems in the inhomogeneous media, and (3) inversion formulas and fast algorithms for the inverse source problem for the acoustic wave equation, with applications to thermo- and opto- acoustic tomography.

  1. GENERAL SOLUTIONS FOR VISCOPLASTIC DEBRIS FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical velocity profile and theoretical pressure and concentration distributions for (steady) uniform debris flow in wide channels are derived from a generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model without imposing R. A. Bagnold's assumption of constant grain concentration. Good agreement between the theoretical velocity profile and the experimental data of Japanese scientists strongly supports the validity of both the GVF model and the proposed method of solution from the model. It is shown that both E. C. Bingham and Bagnold versions (or submodels) of the GVF model can be used to simulate debris flow at the dynamic state. Although Bagnold's dilatant submodel appears to fit the Japanese data better than the Bingham submodel for flow of noncohesive grains, the choice between them is by no means clear-cut.

  2. Exact solutions to magnetized plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2001-03-01

    Exact analytic solutions for steady-state magnetized plasma flow (MPF) using ideal magnetohydrodynamics formalism are presented. Several cases are considered. When plasma flow is included, a finite plasma pressure gradient {nabla}p can be maintained in a force-free state JxB=0 by the velocity gradient. Both incompressible and compressible MPF examples are discussed for a Taylor-state spheromak B field. A new magnetized nozzle solution is given for compressible plasma when U{parallel}B. Transition from a magnetized nozzle to a magnetic nozzle is possible when the B field is strong enough. No physical nozzle would be needed in the magnetic nozzle case. Diverging-, drum- and nozzle-shaped MPF solutions when U{perpendicular}B are also given. The electric field is needed to balance the UxB term in Ohm's law. The electric field can be generated in the laboratory with the proposed conducting electrodes. If such electric fields also exist in stars and galaxies, such as through a dynamo process, then these solutions can be candidates to explain single and double jets.

  3. Time-Accurate Solutions of Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations for Potential Turbopump Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    Two numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are outlined for obtaining time-accurate solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The performance of the two method are compared by obtaining unsteady solutions for the evolution of twin vortices behind a at plate. Calculated results are compared with experimental and other numerical results. For an un- steady ow which requires small physical time step, pressure projection method was found to be computationally efficient since it does not require any subiterations procedure. It was observed that the artificial compressibility method requires a fast convergence scheme at each physical time step in order to satisfy incompressibility condition. This was obtained by using a GMRES-ILU(0) solver in our computations. When a line-relaxation scheme was used, the time accuracy was degraded and time-accurate computations became very expensive.

  4. Analytical Solution for Isentropic Flows in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, Olivier

    2009-12-01

    In the XIXth century, Riemann gave the equations system and the exact solution for the isentropic flows in the case of the ideal gas. But to our knowledge, nothing has been done to apply it to condensed media. Many materials of practical interest, for instance metals, obey to the linear law D = c+s u, where D is the shock velocity, u the particle velocity, and c and s properties of the material. We notice that s is strongly linked to the fundamental derivative. This means that the assumption of constant fundamental derivative is useful in this case, as it was with the isentropic gamma in the Riemann solution. Then we can apply the exact Riemann solution for these materials. Although the use of the hypergeometric function is complicated in this case, we obtain a very good approximation with the development in power series.

  5. Accurate and economical solution of the pressure-head form of Richards' equation by the method of lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocci, Michael D.; Kelley, C. T.; Miller, Cass T.

    The pressure-head form of Richards' equation (RE) is difficult to solve accurately using standard time integration methods. For example, mass balance errors grow as the integration progresses unless very small time steps are taken. Further, RE may be solved for many problems more economically and robustly with variable-size time steps rather than with a constant time-step size, but variable step-size methods applied to date have relied upon empirical approaches to control step size, which do not explicitly control temporal truncation error of the solution. We show how a differential algebrain equation implementation of the method of lines can give solutions to RE that are accurate, have good mass balance properties, explicitly control temporal truncation error, and are more economical than standard approaches for a wide range of solution accuracy. We detail changes to a standard integrator, DASPK, that improves efficiency for the test problems considered, and we advocate the use of this approach for both RE and other problems involving subsurface flow and transport phenomena.

  6. Adjustable flow rate controller for polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Kenneth M.

    1981-01-01

    An adjustable device for controlling the flow rate of polymer solutions which results in only little shearing of the polymer molecules, said device comprising an inlet manifold, an outlet manifold, a plurality of tubes capable of providing communication between said inlet and outlet manifolds, said tubes each having an internal diameter that is smaller than that of the inlet manifold and large enough to insure that viscosity of the polymer solution passing through each said tube will not be reduced more than about 25 percent, and a valve associated with each tube, said valve being capable of opening or closing communication in that tube between the inlet and outlet manifolds, each said valve when fully open having a diameter that is substantially at least as great as that of the tube with which it is associated.

  7. Solution-Flow in the Phloem

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, D. A.; Christy, A. L.; Coulson, C. L.; Ferrier, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model for the reversible exchange of THO between the sieve tube lumen and its surrounding phloem tissue is used to explain the difference between the apparent velocities of THO and 14C-sucrose transport observed when both are supplied simultaneously. Theoretically predicted results show a close correlation with those obtained experimentally. This model may be used in evaluating previous work in which THO was used as a tracer. The calculations support the existence of a mass flow of sugars in aqueous solution along the path. PMID:16658029

  8. Direct Coupling Method for Time-Accurate Solution of Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soh, Woo Y.

    1992-01-01

    A noniterative finite difference numerical method is presented for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with second order accuracy in time and space. Explicit treatment of convection and diffusion terms and implicit treatment of the pressure gradient give a single pressure Poisson equation when the discretized momentum and continuity equations are combined. A pressure boundary condition is not needed on solid boundaries in the staggered mesh system. The solution of the pressure Poisson equation is obtained directly by Gaussian elimination. This method is tested on flow problems in a driven cavity and a curved duct.

  9. A New Method for Accurate Treatment of Flow Equations in Cylindrical Coordinates Using Series Expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, G.S.; Lele, S. K.

    2000-01-01

    The motivation of this work is the ongoing effort at the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) to use large eddy simulation (LES) techniques to calculate the noise radiated by jet engines. The focus on engine exhaust noise reduction is motivated by the fact that a significant reduction has been achieved over the last decade on the other main sources of acoustic emissions of jet engines, such as the fan and turbomachinery noise, which gives increased priority to jet noise. To be able to propose methods to reduce the jet noise based on results of numerical simulations, one first has to be able to accurately predict the spatio-temporal distribution of the noise sources in the jet. Though a great deal of understanding of the fundamental turbulence mechanisms in high-speed jets was obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) at low Reynolds numbers, LES seems to be the only realistic available tool to obtain the necessary near-field information that is required to estimate the acoustic radiation of the turbulent compressible engine exhaust jets. The quality of jet-noise predictions is determined by the accuracy of the numerical method that has to capture the wide range of pressure fluctuations associated with the turbulence in the jet and with the resulting radiated noise, and by the boundary condition treatment and the quality of the mesh. Higher Reynolds numbers and coarser grids put in turn a higher burden on the robustness and accuracy of the numerical method used in this kind of jet LES simulations. As these calculations are often done in cylindrical coordinates, one of the most important requirements for the numerical method is to provide a flow solution that is not contaminated by numerical artifacts. The coordinate singularity is known to be a source of such artifacts. In the present work we use 6th order Pade schemes in the non-periodic directions to discretize the full compressible flow equations. It turns out that the quality of jet-noise predictions

  10. Accurately predicting copper interconnect topographies in foundry design for manufacturability flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Daniel; Fan, Zhong; Tak, Ki Duk; Chang, Li-Fu; Zou, Elain; Jiang, Jenny; Yang, Josh; Zhuang, Linda; Chen, Kuang Han; Hurat, Philippe; Ding, Hua

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a model-based Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) Design for Manufacturability (DFM) () methodology that includes an accurate prediction of post-CMP copper interconnect topographies at the advanced process technology nodes. Using procedures of extensive model calibration and validation, the CMP process model accurately predicts post-CMP dimensions, such as erosion, dishing, and copper thickness with excellent correlation to silicon measurements. This methodology provides an efficient DFM flow to detect and fix physical manufacturing hotspots related to copper pooling and Depth of Focus (DOF) failures at both block- and full chip level designs. Moreover, the predicted thickness output is used in the CMP-aware RC extraction and Timing analysis flows for better understanding of performance yield and timing impact. In addition, the CMP model can be applied to the verification of model-based dummy fill flows.

  11. Solution of plane cascade flow using improved surface singularity methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A solution method has been developed for calculating compressible inviscid flow through a linear cascade of arbitrary blade shapes. The method uses advanced surface singularity formulations which were adapted from those found in current external flow analyses. The resulting solution technique provides a fast flexible calculation for flows through turbomachinery blade rows. The solution method and some examples of the method's capabilities are presented.

  12. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-07

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  13. An exact closed form solution for constant area compressible flow with friction and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturas, J. I.

    1971-01-01

    The well-known differential equation for the one-dimensional flow of a compressible fluid with heat transfer and wall friction has no known solution in closed form for the general case. This report presents a closed form solution for the special case of constant heat flux per unit length and constant specific heat. The solution was obtained by choosing the square of a dimensionless flow parameter as one of the independent variables to describe the flow. From this exact solution, an approximate simplified form is derived that is applicable for predicting subsonic flow performance characteristics for many types of constant area passages in internal flow. The data included in this report are considered sufficiently accurate for use as a guide in analyzing and designing internal gas flow systems.

  14. Accurate integral equation theory for the central force model of liquid water and ionic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1988-10-01

    The atom-atom pair correlation functions and thermodynamics of the central force model of water, introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, have been calculated accurately by an integral equation method which incorporates two new developments. First, a rapid new scheme has been used to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This scheme combines the renormalization methods of Allnatt, and Rossky and Friedman with an extension of the trigonometric basis-set solution of Labik and co-workers. Second, by adding approximate ``bridge'' functions to the hypernetted-chain (HNC) integral equation, we have obtained predictions for liquid water in which the hydrogen bond length and number are in good agreement with ``exact'' computer simulations of the same model force laws. In addition, for dilute ionic solutions, the ion-oxygen and ion-hydrogen coordination numbers display both the physically correct stoichiometry and good agreement with earlier simulations. These results represent a measurable improvement over both a previous HNC solution of the central force model and the ex-RISM integral equation solutions for the TIPS and other rigid molecule models of water.

  15. Implicit solution of three-dimensional internal turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelassi, V.; Liou, M.-S.; Povinelli, Louis A.; Martelli, F.

    1991-01-01

    The scalar form of the approximate factorization method was used to develop a new code for the solution of three dimensional internal laminar and turbulent compressible flows. The Navier-Stokes equations in their Reynolds-averaged form were iterated in time until a steady solution was reached. Evidence was given to the implicit and explicit artificial damping schemes that proved to be particularly efficient in speeding up convergence and enhancing the algorithm robustness. A conservative treatment of these terms at the domain boundaries was proposed in order to avoid undesired mass and/or momentum artificial fluxes. Turbulence effects were accounted for by the zero-equation Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the q-omega two-equation model. The flow in a developing S-duct was then solved in the laminar regime in a Reynolds number (Re) of 790 and in the turbulent regime at Re equals 40,000 by using the Baldwin-Lomax model. The Stanitz elbow was then solved by using an invicid version of the same code at M sub inlet equals 0.4. Grid dependence and convergence rate were investigated, showing that for this solver the implicit damping scheme may play a critical role for convergence characteristics. The same flow at Re equals 2.5 times 10(exp 6) was solved with the Baldwin-Lomax and the q-omega models. Both approaches show satisfactory agreement with experiments, although the q-omega model was slightly more accurate.

  16. Accurate and robust methods for variable density incompressible flows with discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.; Puckett, E.G.

    1996-09-01

    We are interested in the solution of incompressible flows which are characterized by large density variations, interfacial physics, arbitrary material topologies and strong vortical content. The issues present in constant density incompressible flow are exacerbated by the presence of density discontinuities. A much greater premium requirement is placed the positivity of computed quantities The mechanism of baroclinc vorticity generation exists ({gradient}p x {gradient}p) to further complicate the physics.

  17. [Effect of preoperative administration of Lugol's solution on thyroid blood flow in hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Rodier, J F; Janser, J C; Petit, H; Schneegans, O; Ott, G; Kaissling, A; Grob, J C; Velten, M

    1998-01-01

    A study of 50 patients with hyperthyroidism was conducted to evaluate the effect of preoperative administration of Lugol's iodine solution on thyroid blood flow. Highly significant reductions in diameter, time-averaged velocity, and volume flow of the superior thyroid artery were demonstrated after administration of Lugol's solution. The Duplex ultrasound scanning used in this study is a noninvasive, inexpensive, accurate, and reproducible technique suitable for analysis of thyroid blood flow in hyperthyroidism. On the basis of current ultrasonographic results and low postoperative morbidity in patients, Lugol's solution is well tolerated and may be recommended for use before thyroidectomy, especially for diffuse toxic goiters and Graves disease.

  18. High-order accurate solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henniger, R.; Obrist, D.; Kleiser, L.

    2010-05-01

    The emergence of "petascale" supercomputers requires us to develop today's simulation codes for (incompressible) flows by codes which are using numerical schemes and methods that are better able to exploit the offered computational power. In that spirit, we present a massively parallel high-order Navier-Stokes solver for large incompressible flow problems in three dimensions. The governing equations are discretized with finite differences in space and a semi-implicit time integration scheme. This discretization leads to a large linear system of equations which is solved with a cascade of iterative solvers. The iterative solver for the pressure uses a highly efficient commutation-based preconditioner which is robust with respect to grid stretching. The efficiency of the implementation is further enhanced by carefully setting the (adaptive) termination criteria for the different iterative solvers. The computational work is distributed to different processing units by a geometric data decomposition in all three dimensions. This decomposition scheme ensures a low communication overhead and excellent scaling capabilities. The discretization is thoroughly validated. First, we verify the convergence orders of the spatial and temporal discretizations for a forced channel flow. Second, we analyze the iterative solution technique by investigating the absolute accuracy of the implementation with respect to the different termination criteria. Third, Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire eigenmodes for plane Poiseuille flow are simulated and compared to analytical results. Fourth, the practical applicability of the implementation is tested for transitional and turbulent channel flow. The results are compared to solutions from a pseudospectral solver. Subsequently, the performance of the commutation-based preconditioner for the pressure iteration is demonstrated. Finally, the excellent parallel scalability of the proposed method is demonstrated with a weak and a strong scaling test on up to

  19. A Time-Accurate Upwind Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Compressible Flow with Cure of Pathological Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2007-01-01

    A time-accurate, upwind, finite volume method for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids is presented. The method is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. For efficiency, the Roe approximate Riemann solver with an entropy correction is employed. In the basic Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme, many concepts of high order upwind schemes are adopted: the surface flux integrals are carefully treated, a Cauchy-Kowalewski time-stepping scheme is used in the time-marching stage, and a multidimensional limiter is applied in the reconstruction stage. However even with these up-to-date improvements, the basic upwind scheme is still plagued by the so-called "pathological behaviors," e.g., the carbuncle phenomenon, the expansion shock, etc. A solution to these limitations is presented which uses a very simple dissipation model while still preserving second order accuracy. This scheme is referred to as the enhanced time-accurate upwind (ETAU) scheme in this paper. The unstructured grid capability renders flexibility for use in complex geometry; and the present ETAU Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme is capable of handling a broad spectrum of flow regimes from high supersonic to subsonic at very low Mach number, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics). Numerous examples are included to demonstrate the robustness of the methods.

  20. Approximate Solutions for Flow with a Stretching Boundary due to Partial Slip

    PubMed Central

    Filobello-Nino, U.; Vazquez-Leal, H.; Sarmiento-Reyes, A.; Benhammouda, B.; Jimenez-Fernandez, V. M.; Pereyra-Diaz, D.; Perez-Sesma, A.; Cervantes-Perez, J.; Huerta-Chua, J.; Sanchez-Orea, J.; Contreras-Hernandez, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    The homotopy perturbation method (HPM) is coupled with versions of Laplace-Padé and Padé methods to provide an approximate solution to the nonlinear differential equation that describes the behaviour of a flow with a stretching flat boundary due to partial slip. Comparing results between approximate and numerical solutions, we concluded that our results are capable of providing an accurate solution and are extremely efficient. PMID:27433526

  1. Recommendations for Achieving Accurate Numerical Simulation of Tip Clearance Flows in Transonic Compressor Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R,; Hathaway, Michael D.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    2000-01-01

    The tip clearance flows of transonic compressor rotors are important because they have a significant impact on rotor and stage performance. While numerical simulations of these flows are quite sophisticated. they are seldom verified through rigorous comparisons of numerical and measured data because these kinds of measurements are rare in the detail necessary to be useful in high-speed machines. In this paper we compare measured tip clearance flow details (e.g. trajectory and radial extent) with corresponding data obtained from a numerical simulation. Recommendations for achieving accurate numerical simulation of tip clearance flows are presented based on this comparison. Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) measurements acquired in a transonic compressor rotor, NASA Rotor 35, are used. The tip clearance flow field of this transonic rotor was simulated using a Navier-Stokes turbomachinery solver that incorporates an advanced k-epsilon turbulence model derived for flows that are not in local equilibrium. Comparison between measured and simulated results indicates that simulation accuracy is primarily dependent upon the ability of the numerical code to resolve important details of a wall-bounded shear layer formed by the relative motion between the over-tip leakage flow and the shroud wall. A simple method is presented for determining the strength of this shear layer.

  2. A time accurate prediction of the viscous flow in a turbine stage including a rotor in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavalikul, Akamol

    In this current study, the flow field in the Pennsylvania State University Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) was simulated. This study examined four sets of simulations. The first two sets are for an individual NGV and for an individual rotor. The last two sets use a multiple reference frames approach for a complete turbine stage with two different interface models: a steady circumferential average approach called a mixing plane model, and a time accurate flow simulation approach called a sliding mesh model. The NGV passage flow field was simulated using a three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes finite volume solver (RANS) with a standard kappa -- epsilon turbulence model. The mean flow distributions on the NGV surfaces and endwall surfaces were computed. The numerical solutions indicate that two passage vortices begin to be observed approximately at the mid axial chord of the NGV suction surface. The first vortex is a casing passage vortex which occurs at the corner formed by the NGV suction surface and the casing. This vortex is created by the interaction of the passage flow and the radially inward flow, while the second vortex, the hub passage vortex, is observed near the hub. These two vortices become stronger towards the NGV trailing edge. By comparing the results from the X/Cx = 1.025 plane and the X/Cx = 1.09 plane, it can be concluded that the NGV wake decays rapidly within a short axial distance downstream of the NGV. For the rotor, a set of simulations was carried out to examine the flow fields associated with different pressure side tip extension configurations, which are designed to reduce the tip leakage flow. The simulation results show that significant reductions in tip leakage mass flow rate and aerodynamic loss reduction are possible by using suitable tip platform extensions located near the pressure side corner of the blade tip. The computations used realistic turbine rotor inlet flow conditions in a linear cascade arrangement

  3. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  4. A solution for measuring accurate reaction time to visual stimuli realized with a programmable microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Ohyanagi, Toshio; Sengoku, Yasuhito

    2010-02-01

    This article presents a new solution for measuring accurate reaction time (SMART) to visual stimuli. The SMART is a USB device realized with a Cypress Programmable System-on-Chip (PSoC) mixed-signal array programmable microcontroller. A brief overview of the hardware and firmware of the PSoC is provided, together with the results of three experiments. In Experiment 1, we investigated the timing accuracy of the SMART in measuring reaction time (RT) under different conditions of operating systems (OSs; Windows XP or Vista) and monitor displays (a CRT or an LCD). The results indicated that the timing error in measuring RT by the SMART was less than 2 msec, on average, under all combinations of OS and display and that the SMART was tolerant to jitter and noise. In Experiment 2, we tested the SMART with 8 participants. The results indicated that there was no significant difference among RTs obtained with the SMART under the different conditions of OS and display. In Experiment 3, we used Microsoft (MS) PowerPoint to present visual stimuli on the display. We found no significant difference in RTs obtained using MS DirectX technology versus using the PowerPoint file with the SMART. We are certain that the SMART is a simple and practical solution for measuring RTs accurately. Although there are some restrictions in using the SMART with RT paradigms, the SMART is capable of providing both researchers and health professionals working in clinical settings with new ways of using RT paradigms in their work.

  5. A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Steinke, Robert C.; Zhu, Jianting; Talbot, Cary A.; Wilson, John L.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed an alternative to the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE) attributed to Richards (1931) that describes unsaturated porous media flow in homogeneous soil layers. Our solution is a set of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs) derived from unsaturated flux and mass conservation principles. We used a hodograph transformation, the Method of Lines, and a finite water-content discretization to produce ODEs that accurately simulate infiltration, falling slugs, and groundwater table dynamic effects on vadose zone fluxes. This formulation, which we refer to as "finite water-content", simulates sharp fronts and is guaranteed to conserve mass using a finite-volume solution. Our ODE solution method is explicitly integrable, does not require iterations and therefore has no convergence limits and is computationally efficient. The method accepts boundary fluxes including arbitrary precipitation, bare soil evaporation, and evapotranspiration. The method can simulate heterogeneous soils using layers. Results are presented in terms of fluxes and water content profiles. Comparing our method against analytical solutions, laboratory data, and the Hydrus-1D solver, we find that predictive performance of our finite water-content ODE method is comparable to or in some cases exceeds that of the solution of Richards' equation, with or without a shallow water table. The presented ODE method is transformative in that it offers accuracy comparable to the Richards (1931) PDE numerical solution, without the numerical complexity, in a form that is robust, continuous, and suitable for use in large watershed and land-atmosphere simulation models, including regional-scale models of coupled climate and hydrology.

  6. Time-accurate unsteady flow simulations supporting the SRM T+68-second pressure spike anomaly investigation (STS-54B)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Burnette, D. W.; Holt, J. B.; Matienzo, Jose

    1993-07-01

    Time-accurate unsteady flow simulations are being performed supporting the SRM T+68sec pressure 'spike' anomaly investigation. The anomaly occurred in the RH SRM during the STS-54 flight (STS-54B) but not in the LH SRM (STS-54A) causing a momentary thrust mismatch approaching the allowable limit at that time into the flight. Full-motor internal flow simulations using the USA-2D axisymmetric code are in progress for the nominal propellant burn-back geometry and flow conditions at T+68-sec--Pc = 630 psi, gamma = 1.1381, T(sub c) = 6200 R, perfect gas without aluminum particulate. In a cooperative effort with other investigation team members, CFD-derived pressure loading on the NBR and castable inhibitors was used iteratively to obtain nominal deformed geometry of each inhibitor, and the deformed (bent back) inhibitor geometry was entered into this model. Deformed geometry was computed using structural finite-element models. A solution for the unsteady flow has been obtained for the nominal flow conditions (existing prior to the occurrence of the anomaly) showing sustained standing pressure oscillations at nominally 14.5 Hz in the motor IL acoustic mode that flight and static test data confirm to be normally present at this time. Average mass flow discharged from the nozzle was confirmed to be the nominal expected (9550 lbm/sec). The local inlet boundary condition is being perturbed at the location of the presumed reconstructed anomaly as identified by interior ballistics performance specialist team members. A time variation in local mass flow is used to simulate sudden increase in burning area due to localized propellant grain cracks. The solution will proceed to develop a pressure rise (proportional to total mass flow rate change squared). The volume-filling time constant (equivalent to 0.5 Hz) comes into play in shaping the rise rate of the developing pressure 'spike' as it propagates at the speed of sound in both directions to the motor head end and nozzle. The

  7. A Weight-Averaged Interpolation Method for Coupling Time-Accurate Rarefied and Continuum Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Steven William

    A novel approach to coupling rarefied and continuum flow regimes as a single, hybrid model is introduced. The method borrows from techniques used in the simulation of spray flows to interpolate Lagrangian point-particles onto an Eulerian grid in a weight-averaged sense. A brief overview of traditional methods for modeling both rarefied and continuum domains is given, and a review of the literature regarding rarefied/continuum flow coupling is presented. Details of the theoretical development of the method of weighted interpolation are then described. The method evaluates macroscopic properties at the nodes of a CFD grid via the weighted interpolation of all simulated molecules in a set surrounding the node. The weight factor applied to each simulated molecule is the inverse of the linear distance between it and the given node. During development, the method was applied to several preliminary cases, including supersonic flow over an airfoil, subsonic flow over tandem airfoils, and supersonic flow over a backward facing step; all at low Knudsen numbers. The main thrust of the research centered on the time-accurate expansion of a rocket plume into a near-vacuum. The method proves flexible enough to be used with various flow solvers, demonstrated by the use of Fluent as the continuum solver for the preliminary cases and a NASA-developed Large Eddy Simulation research code, WRLES, for the full lunar model. The method is applicable to a wide range of Mach numbers and is completely grid independent, allowing the rarefied and continuum solvers to be optimized for their respective domains without consideration of the other. The work presented demonstrates the validity, and flexibility of the method of weighted interpolation as a novel concept in the field of hybrid flow coupling. The method marks a significant divergence from current practices in the coupling of rarefied and continuum flow domains and offers a kernel on which to base an ongoing field of research. It has the

  8. Automatically high accurate and efficient photomask defects management solution for advanced lithography manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Lijun; Ma, Lantao; Li, Dejian; Jiang, Wei; Pan, Lihong; Shen, Huiting; Jia, Hongmin; Hsiang, Chingyun; Cheng, Guojie; Ling, Li; Chen, Shijie; Wang, Jun; Liao, Wenkui; Zhang, Gary

    2014-04-01

    Defect review is a time consuming job. Human error makes result inconsistent. The defects located on don't care area would not hurt the yield and no need to review them such as defects on dark area. However, critical area defects can impact yield dramatically and need more attention to review them such as defects on clear area. With decrease in integrated circuit dimensions, mask defects are always thousands detected during inspection even more. Traditional manual or simple classification approaches are unable to meet efficient and accuracy requirement. This paper focuses on automatic defect management and classification solution using image output of Lasertec inspection equipment and Anchor pattern centric image process technology. The number of mask defect found during an inspection is always in the range of thousands or even more. This system can handle large number defects with quick and accurate defect classification result. Our experiment includes Die to Die and Single Die modes. The classification accuracy can reach 87.4% and 93.3%. No critical or printable defects are missing in our test cases. The missing classification defects are 0.25% and 0.24% in Die to Die mode and Single Die mode. This kind of missing rate is encouraging and acceptable to apply on production line. The result can be output and reloaded back to inspection machine to have further review. This step helps users to validate some unsure defects with clear and magnification images when captured images can't provide enough information to make judgment. This system effectively reduces expensive inline defect review time. As a fully inline automated defect management solution, the system could be compatible with current inspection approach and integrated with optical simulation even scoring function and guide wafer level defect inspection.

  9. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  10. An accurate solution of elastodynamic problems by numerical local Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, F. S.; Silva, J. E. A.; Mansur, W. J.

    2015-09-01

    Green's function based methodologies for elastodynamics in both time and frequency domains, which can be either numerical or analytical, appear in many branches of physics and engineering. Thus, the development of exact expressions for Green's functions is of great importance. Unfortunately, such expressions are known only for relatively few kinds of geometry, medium and boundary conditions. In this way, due to the difficulty in finding exact Green's functions, specially in the time domain, the present paper presents a solution of the transient elastodynamic equations by a time-stepping technique based on the Explicit Green's Approach method written in terms of the Green's and Step response functions, both being computed numerically by the finite element method. The major feature is the computation of these functions separately by the central difference time integration scheme and locally owing to the principle of causality. More precisely, Green's functions are computed only at t = Δt adopting two time substeps while Step response functions are computed directly without substeps. The proposed time-stepping method shows to be quite accurate with distinct numerical properties not presented in the standard central difference scheme as addressed in the numerical example.

  11. State Space Truncation with Quantified Errors for Accurate Solutions to Discrete Chemical Master Equation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    truncation and error analysis methods developed here can be used to ensure accurate direct solutions to the dCME for a large number of stochastic networks.

  12. State space truncation with quantified errors for accurate solutions to discrete Chemical Master Equation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    truncation and error analysis methods developed here can be used to ensure accurate direct solutions to the dCME for a large number of stochastic networks. PMID:27105653

  13. Linear stability of swirling flows computed as solutions to the quasi-cylindrical equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spall, Robert E.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability of numerical solutions to the quasi-cylindrical equations of motion for swirling flows is investigated. Initial conditions are derived from Batchelor's similarity solution for a trailing line vortex. The stability calculations are performed using a second-order-accurate finite-difference scheme on a staggered grid, with the accuracy of the computed eigenvalues enhanced through Richardson extrapolation. The streamwise development of both viscous and inviscid instability modes is presented. The possible relationship to vortex breakdown is discussed.

  14. Analytical solutions of moisture flow equations and their numerical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, A.G.

    1981-04-01

    The role of analytical solutions of idealized moisture flow problems is discussed. Some different formulations of the moisture flow problem are reviewed. A number of different analytical solutions are summarized, including the case of idealized coupled moisture and heat flow. The evaluation of special functions which commonly arise in analytical solutions is discussed, including some pitfalls in the evaluation of expressions involving combinations of special functions. Finally, perturbation theory methods are summarized which can be used to obtain good approximate analytical solutions to problems which are too complicated to solve exactly, but which are close to an analytically solvable problem.

  15. Unfitted Two-Phase Flow Simulations in Pore-Geometries with Accurate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Felix; Engwer, Christian; Ippisch, Olaf; Bastian, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The development of better macro scale models for multi-phase flow in porous media is still impeded by the lack of suitable methods for the simulation of such flow regimes on the pore scale. The highly complicated geometry of natural porous media imposes requirements with regard to stability and computational efficiency which current numerical methods fail to meet. Therefore, current simulation environments are still unable to provide a thorough understanding of porous media in multi-phase regimes and still fail to reproduce well known effects like hysteresis or the more peculiar dynamics of the capillary fringe with satisfying accuracy. Although flow simulations in pore geometries were initially the domain of Lattice-Boltzmann and other particle methods, the development of Galerkin methods for such applications is important as they complement the range of feasible flow and parameter regimes. In the recent past, it has been shown that unfitted Galerkin methods can be applied efficiently to topologically demanding geometries. However, in the context of two-phase flows, the interface of the two immiscible fluids effectively separates the domain in two sub-domains. The exact representation of such setups with multiple independent and time depending geometries exceeds the functionality of common unfitted methods. We present a new approach to pore scale simulations with an unfitted discontinuous Galerkin (UDG) method. Utilizing a recursive sub-triangulation algorithm, we extent the UDG method to setups with multiple independent geometries. This approach allows an accurate representation of the moving contact line and the interface conditions, i.e. the pressure jump across the interface. Example simulations in two and three dimensions illustrate and verify the stability and accuracy of this approach.

  16. Solute dispersion in open channel flow with bed absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Chen, G. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Reactive solute dispersion is of essential significance in various ecological and environmental applications. It is only qualitatively known that boundary absorption depletes pollutant around the boundary and reduces the concentration nearby. All the existing studies on this topic have been focused on the longitudinally distributed mean concentration, far from enough to fully characterize the transport process with tremendous cross-sectional concentration nonuniformity. This work presents an analytical study of the evolution of two-dimensional concentration distribution for solute dispersion in a laminar open channel flow with bed absorption. The fourth order Aris-Gill expansion proposed in our previous study (Wang and Chen, 2016b) is further extended for the case with bed absorption to cover the transitional effects of skewness and kurtosis. Results reveal the extremely nonuniform cross-sectional concentration distribution, and demonstrate that concentration at the bed instead of the mean should be used for reliable quantification of the absorption flux. The accurate two-dimensional concentration distribution presented in this study brings important environmental implications such as risk assessment associated with peak concentration position and duration of toxic pollutant cloud in open channel waters.

  17. Measurements of accurate x-ray scattering data of protein solutions using small stationary sample cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xinguo; Hao Quan

    2009-01-15

    In this paper, we report a method of precise in situ x-ray scattering measurements on protein solutions using small stationary sample cells. Although reduction in the radiation damage induced by intense synchrotron radiation sources is indispensable for the correct interpretation of scattering data, there is still a lack of effective methods to overcome radiation-induced aggregation and extract scattering profiles free from chemical or structural damage. It is found that radiation-induced aggregation mainly begins on the surface of the sample cell and grows along the beam path; the diameter of the damaged region is comparable to the x-ray beam size. Radiation-induced aggregation can be effectively avoided by using a two-dimensional scan (2D mode), with an interval as small as 1.5 times the beam size, at low temperature (e.g., 4 deg. C). A radiation sensitive protein, bovine hemoglobin, was used to test the method. A standard deviation of less than 5% in the small angle region was observed from a series of nine spectra recorded in 2D mode, in contrast to the intensity variation seen using the conventional stationary technique, which can exceed 100%. Wide-angle x-ray scattering data were collected at a standard macromolecular diffraction station using the same data collection protocol and showed a good signal/noise ratio (better than the reported data on the same protein using a flow cell). The results indicate that this method is an effective approach for obtaining precise measurements of protein solution scattering.

  18. Measurements of accurate x-ray scattering data of protein solutions using small stationary sample cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xinguo; Hao, Quan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a method of precise in situ x-ray scattering measurements on protein solutions using small stationary sample cells. Although reduction in the radiation damage induced by intense synchrotron radiation sources is indispensable for the correct interpretation of scattering data, there is still a lack of effective methods to overcome radiation-induced aggregation and extract scattering profiles free from chemical or structural damage. It is found that radiation-induced aggregation mainly begins on the surface of the sample cell and grows along the beam path; the diameter of the damaged region is comparable to the x-ray beam size. Radiation-induced aggregation can be effectively avoided by using a two-dimensional scan (2D mode), with an interval as small as 1.5 times the beam size, at low temperature (e.g., 4 °C). A radiation sensitive protein, bovine hemoglobin, was used to test the method. A standard deviation of less than 5% in the small angle region was observed from a series of nine spectra recorded in 2D mode, in contrast to the intensity variation seen using the conventional stationary technique, which can exceed 100%. Wide-angle x-ray scattering data were collected at a standard macromolecular diffraction station using the same data collection protocol and showed a good signal/noise ratio (better than the reported data on the same protein using a flow cell). The results indicate that this method is an effective approach for obtaining precise measurements of protein solution scattering.

  19. Orbital Advection by Interpolation: A Fast and Accurate Numerical Scheme for Super-Fast MHD Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B M; Guan, X; Gammie, F

    2008-04-11

    In numerical models of thin astrophysical disks that use an Eulerian scheme, gas orbits supersonically through a fixed grid. As a result the timestep is sharply limited by the Courant condition. Also, because the mean flow speed with respect to the grid varies with position, the truncation error varies systematically with position. For hydrodynamic (unmagnetized) disks an algorithm called FARGO has been developed that advects the gas along its mean orbit using a separate interpolation substep. This relaxes the constraint imposed by the Courant condition, which now depends only on the peculiar velocity of the gas, and results in a truncation error that is more nearly independent of position. This paper describes a FARGO-like algorithm suitable for evolving magnetized disks. Our method is second order accurate on a smooth flow and preserves {del} {center_dot} B = 0 to machine precision. The main restriction is that B must be discretized on a staggered mesh. We give a detailed description of an implementation of the code and demonstrate that it produces the expected results on linear and nonlinear problems. We also point out how the scheme might be generalized to make the integration of other supersonic/super-fast flows more efficient. Although our scheme reduces the variation of truncation error with position, it does not eliminate it. We show that the residual position dependence leads to characteristic radial variations in the density over long integrations.

  20. Accurate optical flow field estimation using mechanical properties of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Karimi, Hirad; Samani, Abbas

    2009-02-01

    A novel optical flow based technique is presented in this paper to measure the nodal displacements of soft tissue undergoing large deformations. In hyperelasticity imaging, soft tissues maybe compressed extensively [1] and the deformation may exceed the number of pixels ordinary optical flow approaches can detect. Furthermore in most biomedical applications there is a large amount of image information that represent the geometry of the tissue and the number of tissue types present in the organ of interest. Such information is often ignored in applications such as image registration. In this work we incorporate the information pertaining to soft tissue mechanical behavior (Neo-Hookean hyperelastic model is used here) in addition to the tissue geometry before compression into a hierarchical Horn-Schunck optical flow method to overcome this large deformation detection weakness. Applying the proposed method to a phantom using several compression levels proved that it yields reasonably accurate displacement fields. Estimated displacement results of this phantom study obtained for displacement fields of 85 pixels/frame and 127 pixels/frame are reported and discussed in this paper.

  1. An innovative algorithm to accurately solve the Euler equations for rotary wing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, S.; Kraemer, E.

    Due to the ability of Euler methods to treat rotational, nonisentropic flows and also to correctly transport on the rotation embedded in the flow field it is possible to correctly represent the inflow conditions on the blade in the stationary hovering flight of a helicopter, which are significantly influenced by the tip vortices (blade-vortex interaction) of all blades. It is shown that also the very complex starting procedure of a helicopter rotor can be very well described by a simple Euler method that is to say without a wake model. The algorithm based on the procedure is part of category upwind schemes, in which the difference formation orientates to the actual, local flow state that is to say to the typical distrubance expansion direction. Hence, the artificial dissipation required for the numerical stability is included in a natural way adapted to the real flow state over the break-up error of the difference equation and has not to be included from outside. This makes the procedure robust. An implicit solution algorithm is used, where the invertation of the coefficient matrix is carried out by means of a Point-Gauss-Seidel relaxation.

  2. A doubly-localized solution of plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Evan; Gibson, John

    2013-11-01

    We present a new equilibrium solution of plane Couette flow localized in two spatially extended directions. The solution is derived from the EQ7/HVS solution of plane Couette flow discovered independently by Itano and Generalis (PRL 2009) and Gibson et al. (JFM 2009), of which a spanwise localized version has also recently been produced (Gibson, these proceedings). The doubly localized solution displays relatively long length scales in comparison with the spatially periodic and spanwise localized solutions, suggesting the importance of these scales in capturing the spatial complexity of transitional and low-Reynolds number turbulence. The solution is comparable in size and appearance to the doubly-localized, chaotically evolving edge states previously computed in this flow by Duguet et al. (PoF 2009) and Schneider et al. (JFM 2010). Additionally, we address the structure of localized solutions in the ``tails,'' i.e. in the region approaching laminar.

  3. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  4. Physical and Numerical Model Studies of Cross-flow Turbines Towards Accurate Parameterization in Array Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cross-flow turbines, often referred to as vertical-axis turbines, show potential for success in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications, ranging from small- to utility-scale installations in tidal/ocean currents and offshore wind. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices to the optimization of turbine arrays. It would be expensive and time-consuming to conduct physical model studies of large arrays at large model scales (to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers), and hence numerical techniques are generally better suited to explore the array design parameter space. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries (e.g., grid resolution into the viscous sublayer on turbine blades), the turbines' interaction with the energy resource (water current or wind) needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Models used today--a common model is the actuator disk concept--are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. This wake structure has been shown to create "constructive" interference in some cases, improving turbine performance in array configurations, in contrast with axial-flow, or horizontal axis devices. Towards a more accurate parameterization of cross-flow turbines, an extensive experimental study was carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed with wake measurement capability in a large cross-section tow tank. The experimental results were then "interpolated" using high-fidelity Navier--Stokes simulations, to gain insight into the turbine's near-wake. The study was designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. The end product of

  5. A comparative study of computational solutions to flow over a backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.; Georgiadis, N. J.; Cannon, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted for computational fluid dynamic solutions to flow over a backward-facing step. This flow is a benchmark problem, with a simple geometry, but involves complicated flow physics such as free shear layers, reattaching flow, recirculation, and high turbulence intensities. Three Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solvers with k-epsilon turbulence models were used, each using a different solution algorithm: finite difference, finite element, and hybrid finite element - finite difference. Comparisons were made with existing experimental data. Results showed that velocity profiles and reattachment lengths were predicted reasonably well by all three methods, while the skin friction coefficients were more difficult to predict accurately. It was noted that, in general, selecting an appropriate solver for each problem to be considered is important.

  6. A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method for the solution of three-dimensional vortical flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felici, Helene Marie

    1992-01-01

    A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method is presented for the reduction of numerical diffusion observed in solutions of three-dimensional rotational flows using standard Eulerian finite-volume time-marching procedures. A Lagrangian particle tracking method using particle markers is added to the Eulerian time-marching procedure and provides a correction of the Eulerian solution. In turn, the Eulerian solutions is used to integrate the Lagrangian state-vector along the particles trajectories. The Lagrangian correction technique does not require any a-priori information on the structure or position of the vortical regions. While the Eulerian solution ensures the conservation of mass and sets the pressure field, the particle markers, used as 'accuracy boosters,' take advantage of the accurate convection description of the Lagrangian solution and enhance the vorticity and entropy capturing capabilities of standard Eulerian finite-volume methods. The combined solution procedures is tested in several applications. The convection of a Lamb vortex in a straight channel is used as an unsteady compressible flow preservation test case. The other test cases concern steady incompressible flow calculations and include the preservation of turbulent inlet velocity profile, the swirling flow in a pipe, and the constant stagnation pressure flow and secondary flow calculations in bends. The last application deals with the external flow past a wing with emphasis on the trailing vortex solution. The improvement due to the addition of the Lagrangian correction technique is measured by comparison with analytical solutions when available or with Eulerian solutions on finer grids. The use of the combined Eulerian/Lagrangian scheme results in substantially lower grid resolution requirements than the standard Eulerian scheme for a given solution accuracy.

  7. A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method for the solution of three-dimensional vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, Helene Marie

    1992-06-01

    A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method is presented for the reduction of numerical diffusion observed in solutions of three-dimensional rotational flows using standard Eulerian finite-volume time-marching procedures. A Lagrangian particle tracking method using particle markers is added to the Eulerian time-marching procedure and provides a correction of the Eulerian solution. In turn, the Eulerian solutions is used to integrate the Lagrangian state-vector along the particles trajectories. The Lagrangian correction technique does not require any a-priori information on the structure or position of the vortical regions. While the Eulerian solution ensures the conservation of mass and sets the pressure field, the particle markers, used as 'accuracy boosters,' take advantage of the accurate convection description of the Lagrangian solution and enhance the vorticity and entropy capturing capabilities of standard Eulerian finite-volume methods. The combined solution procedures is tested in several applications. The convection of a Lamb vortex in a straight channel is used as an unsteady compressible flow preservation test case. The other test cases concern steady incompressible flow calculations and include the preservation of turbulent inlet velocity profile, the swirling flow in a pipe, and the constant stagnation pressure flow and secondary flow calculations in bends. The last application deals with the external flow past a wing with emphasis on the trailing vortex solution. The improvement due to the addition of the Lagrangian correction technique is measured by comparison with analytical solutions when available or with Eulerian solutions on finer grids. The use of the combined Eulerian/Lagrangian scheme results in substantially lower grid resolution requirements than the standard Eulerian scheme for a given solution accuracy.

  8. A Coupled Eulerian/lagrangian Method for the Solution of Three-Dimensional Vortical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, Helene Marie

    1992-01-01

    A coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian method is presented for the reduction of numerical diffusion observed in solutions of three-dimensional rotational flows using standard Eulerian finite-volume time-marching procedures. A Lagrangian particle tracking method using particle markers is added to the Eulerian time-marching procedure and provides a correction of the Eulerian solution. In turn, the Eulerian solution is used to integrate the Lagrangian state-vector along the particles trajectories. The Lagrangian correction technique does not require any a-priori information on the structure or position of the vortical regions. While the Eulerian solution ensures the conservation of mass and sets the pressure field, the particle markers, used as 'accuracy boosters', take advantage of the accurate convection description of the Lagrangian solution and enhance the vorticity and entropy capturing capabilities of standard Eulerian finite-volume methods. The combined solution procedure is tested in several applications. The convection of a Lamb vortex in a straight channel is used as an unsteady compressible flow preservation test case. The other test cases concern steady incompressible flow calculations and include the preservation of a turbulent inlet velocity profile, the swirling flow in a pipe, the constant stagnation pressure flow and secondary flow calculations in bends. The last application deals with the external flow past a wing with emphasis on the trailing vortex solution. The improvement due to the addition of the Lagrangian correction technique is measured by comparison with analytical solutions when available or with Eulerian solutions on finer grids. The use of the combined Eulerian/Lagrangian scheme results in substantially lower grid resolution requirements than the standard Eulerian scheme for a given solution accuracy. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  9. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  10. Birefringence of Polymer Solutions in Time-Dependent Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffroy-Aguilar, Enrique

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of changes of conformation of macromolecules in polymeric solutions which are subjected to time-dependent extensional flows generated by a two -roll mill flow device. The flows produced by the two-roll mill are linear, and two-dimensional. It has a stagnation point at the center of the flow field where the magnitudes of the strain-rates are greater than the vorticity. This study of conformational changes is based on data around the vicinity of the stagnation point, I for steady state flows, and several transient flow histories such as start -up, cessation, and double-step flows. We also present an analytical solution for the creeping flow generated by an infinitely long two-roll mill embedded in an unbounded fluid. This solution is used as a benchmark to compare the behavior of the polymer solutions when subjected to flows with different values for the ratio of rate-of-strain to vorticity. The conformational changes are determined experimentally using the Two-color Flow-Birefringence which provides an instantaneous and point-wise measure of the anisotropy of the fluid, together with the relative orientation of the anisotropy with respect to the principal axes of the flow field. Based on relaxation of the fluid anisotropy the characteristic time-scales of the polymer have been evaluated as a function of the flow field properties and the degree of conformational change of the macromolecules. Data for two polymeric solutions is presented. The first polymer system is the so-called test-fluid M1. This polymeric solution is shown to degrade significantly, even for small values of the velocity gradient, as measured by the changes in the macroscopic relaxation time-scales. The second solution is a concentrated polystyrene solution that presents overshoots and undershoots of the polymer conformation dependent of the ratio of vorticity to rate-of-strain. When subjected to large deformations, this polystyrene solution shows not only the possibility of a

  11. General exact solution of incompressible potential flows around two circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qianxi, Wang; Lixian, Zhuang; Binggang, Tong

    1993-02-01

    Three exact solutions are obtained for 2-D incompressible potential flows around two moving circles in three cases: (i) expansion (or contraction) of themselves, (ii) approaching (or departing from) each other, (iii) moving perpendicularly to the line connecting the centres in opposite directions. Meanwhile, another set of two exact solutions is obtained for 2-D incompressible potential flows between two moving eccentric circles in two cases: moving parallely or perpendicularly to the line connecting the centres.

  12. Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-30

    To address future grid requirements, a U.S. Department of Energy ARRA Storage Demonstration program was launched in 2009 to commercialize promising technologies needed for stronger and more renewables-intensive grids. Raytheon Ktech and EnerVault received a cost-share grant award from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a grid-scale storage system based on EnerVault’s iron-chromium redox flow battery technology.

  13. Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for the leeside flow over delta wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, S. N.; Thomas, J. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1987-01-01

    Distinctly different types of leeside flowfields over highly swept sharp leading edge delta wings in supersonic flow were numerically simulated using Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers. The Euler code was seen to be adequate only in predicting primary flow structures (leading edge vortex and cross flow shock) whereas the Navier-Stokes code was capable of predicting secondary flow structures (i.e., secondary vortex). A comparison of laminar and turbulent Navier-Stokes solutions indicated that the turbulent boundary layer model is more accurate in predicting the effect of the boundary layer model on the flowfield. Also, the Navier-Stokes code indicated detailed flow structures not observed in the qualitative experimental data available (i.e., vapor screen photographs) indicating a need for quantitative flow field data.

  14. Some exact solutions for debris and avalanche flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2011-04-01

    Exact analytical solutions to simplified cases of nonlinear debris avalanche model equations are necessary to calibrate numerical simulations of flow depth and velocity profiles on inclined surfaces. These problem-specific solutions provide important insight into the full behavior of the system. In this paper, we present some new analytical solutions for debris and avalanche flows and then compare these solutions with experimental data to measure their performance and determine their relevance. First, by combining the mass and momentum balance equations with a Bagnold rheology, a new and special kinematic wave equation is constructed in which the flux and the wave celerity are complex nonlinear functions of the pressure gradient and the flow depth itself. The new model can explain the mechanisms of wave advection and distortion, and the quasiasymptotic front bore observed in many natural and laboratory debris and granular flows. Exact time-dependent solutions for debris flow fronts and associated velocity profiles are then constructed. We also present a novel semiexact two-dimensional plane velocity field through the flow depth. Second, starting with the force balance between gravity, the pressure gradient, and Bagnold's grain-inertia or macroviscous forces, we construct a simple and very special nonlinear ordinary differential equation to model the steady state debris front profile. An empirical pressure gradient enhancement factor is introduced to adequately stretch the flow front and properly model nonhydrostatic pressure in granular and debris avalanches. An exact solution in explicit form is constructed, and is expressed in terms of the Lambert-Euler omega function. Third, we consider rapid flows of frictional granular materials down a channel. The steady state mass and the momentum balance equations are combined together with the Coulomb friction law. The Chebyshev radicals are employed and the exact solutions are developed for the velocity profile and the

  15. Lagrangian solution of supersonic real gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching-Yuen; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1993-01-01

    The present extention of a Lagrangian approach of the Riemann solution procedure, which was originally proposed for perfect gases, to real gases, is nontrivial and requires the development of an exact real-gas Riemann solver for the Lagrangian form of the conservation laws. Calculations including complex wave interactions of various types were conducted to test the accuracy and robustness of the approach. Attention is given to the case of 2D oblique waves' capture, where a slip line is clearly in evidence; the real gas effect is demonstrated in the case of a generic engine nozzle.

  16. Time-dependent solution for axisymmetric flow over a blunt body with ideal gas, CF4, or equilibrium air chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II; Spall, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A time-asymptotic method has been used to obtain steady-flow solutions for axisymmetric inviscid flow over several blunt bodies including spheres, paraboloids, ellipsoids, and spherically blunted cones. Comparisons with experimental data and results of other computational methods have demonstrated that accurate solutions can be obtained using this approach. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing with experimental data and for making engineering calculations for blunt reentry vehicles.

  17. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous flow around the profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slouka, Martin; Kozel, Karel; Prihoda, Jaromir

    2015-05-01

    This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox's k-ω model. Calculations are done in GAMM channel computational domain with 10% DCA profile and in turbine cascade computational domain with 8% DCA profile. Numerical methods are based on a finite volume solution and compared with experimental measurements for 8% DCA profile.

  18. Wind-US Unstructured Flow Solutions for a Transonic Diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, Stanley R., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Wind-US Computational Fluid Dynamics flow solver computed flow solutions for a transonic diffusing duct. The calculations used an unstructured (hexahedral) grid. The Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model was used. Static pressures along the upper and lower wall agreed well with experiment, as did velocity profiles. The effect of the smoothing input parameters on convergence and solution accuracy was investigated. The meaning and proper use of these parameters are discussed for the benefit of Wind-US users. Finally, the unstructured solver is compared to the structured solver in terms of run times and solution accuracy.

  19. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  20. Solution of three-dimensional flow problems using a flux-spline method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karki, K.; Mongia, H.; Patankar, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the application of a flux-spline scheme to three-dimensional fluid flow problems. The performance of this scheme is contrasted with that of the power-law differencing scheme. The numerical results are compared with reference solutions available in the literature. For the problems considered in this study, the flux-spline scheme is significantly more accurate than the power-law scheme.

  1. Exact expressions and accurate approximations for the dependences of radius and index of refraction of solutions of inorganic solutes on relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.R.; Schwartz, S.

    2010-03-15

    Light scattering by aerosols plays an important role in Earth’s radiative balance, and quantification of this phenomenon is important in understanding and accounting for anthropogenic influences on Earth’s climate. Light scattering by an aerosol particle is determined by its radius and index of refraction, and for aerosol particles that are hygroscopic, both of these quantities vary with relative humidity RH. Here exact expressions are derived for the dependences of the radius ratio (relative to the volume-equivalent dry radius) and index of refraction on RH for aqueous solutions of single solutes. Both of these quantities depend on the apparent molal volume of the solute in solution and on the practical osmotic coefficient of the solution, which in turn depend on concentration and thus implicitly on RH. Simple but accurate approximations are also presented for the RH dependences of both radius ratio and index of refraction for several atmospherically important inorganic solutes over the entire range of RH values for which these substances can exist as solution drops. For all substances considered, the radius ratio is accurate to within a few percent, and the index of refraction to within ~0.02, over this range of RH. Such parameterizations will be useful in radiation transfer models and climate models.

  2. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang

    2015-09-01

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  3. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang

    2015-07-07

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  4. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

    2014-01-14

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  5. Free-Flowing Solutions for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Licensed to over 1,500 customers worldwide, an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) post-processor with a quick learning curve is consistently providing engineering solutions, with just the right balance of visual insight and hard data. FIELDVIEW is the premier product of JMSI, Inc., d.b.a. Intelligent Light, a woman-owned, small business founded in 1994 and located in Lyndhurst, New Jersey. In the early 1990s, Intelligent Light entered into a joint development contract with a research based company to commercialize the post-processing FIELDVIEW code. As Intelligent Light established itself, it purchased the exclusive rights to the code, and structured its business solely around the software technology. As a result, it is enjoying profits and growing at a rate of 25 to 30 percent per year. Advancements made from the earliest commercial launch of FIELDVIEW, all the way up to the recently released versions 8 and 8.2 of the program, have been backed by research collaboration with NASA's Langley Research Center, where some of the world's most progressive work in transient (also known as time-varying) CFD takes place.

  6. A guide to properly select the defocusing distance for accurate solution of transport of intensity equation while testing aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Peyman; Darudi, Ahmad; Moradi, Ali Reza; Amiri, Javad; Nehmetallah, Georges

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) for testing of an aspheric surface is verified experimentally. Using simulation, a proper defocus distance Δ𝑧 that leads to an accurate solution of TIE is estimated whenever the conic constant and configuration of the experiment are known. To verify this procedure a non-nulled experiment for testing an aspheric is used. For verification of the solution, the results are compared with the Shack-Hartmann sensor. The theoretical method and experimental results are compared to validate the results.

  7. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  8. Flow of wormlike micellar solutions around confined microfluidic cylinders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya; Shen, Amy Q; Haward, Simon J

    2016-10-26

    Wormlike micellar (WLM) solutions are frequently used in enhanced oil and gas recovery applications in porous rock beds where complex microscopic geometries result in mixed flow kinematics with strong shear and extensional components. Experiments with WLM solutions through model microfluidic porous media have revealed a variety of complex flow phenomena, including the formation of stable gel-like structures known as a Flow-Induced Structured Phase (FISP), which undoubtedly play an important role in applications of WLM fluids, but are still poorly understood. A first step in understanding flows of WLM fluids through porous media can be made by examining the flow around a single micro-scale cylinder aligned on the flow axis. Here we study flow behavior of an aqueous WLM solution consisting of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and a stable hydrotropic salt 3-hydroxy naphthalene-2-carboxylate (SHNC) in microfluidic devices with three different cylinder blockage ratios, β. We observe a rich sequence of flow instabilities depending on β as the Weissenberg number (Wi) is increased to large values while the Reynolds number (Re) remains low. Instabilities upstream of the cylinder are associated with high stresses in fluid that accelerates into the narrow gap between the cylinder and the channel wall; vortex growth upstream is reminiscent of that seen in microfluidic contraction geometries. Instability downstream of the cylinder is associated with stresses generated at the trailing stagnation point and the resulting flow modification in the wake, coupled with the onset of time-dependent flow upstream and the asymmetric division of flow around the cylinder.

  9. Solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated fractures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Geller, J.T.; Pruess, K.; Hunt, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated, inclined fractures. Qualitative aspects of solute transport were identified in a miscible dye tracer experiment conducted in a transparent replica of a natural granite fracture. Additional experiments were conducted to measure the breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer introduced into an established preferential flow path in two different fracture replicas and a rock-replica combination. The influence of gravity was investigated by varying fracture inclination. The relationship between the travel times of the solute and the relative influence of gravity was substantially affected by two modes of intermittent flow that occurred: the snapping rivulet and the pulsating blob modes. The measured travel times of the solute were evaluated with three transfer function models: the axial dispersion, the reactors-in-series, and the lognormal models. The three models described the solute travel times nearly equally well. A mechanistic model was also formulated to describe transport when the pulsating blob mode occurred which assumed blobs of water containing solute mixed with residual pools of water along the flow path.

  10. Highly Accurate Beam Torsion Solutions Using the p-Version Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1996-01-01

    A new treatment of the classical beam torsion boundary value problem is applied. Using the p-version finite element method with shape functions based on Legendre polynomials, torsion solutions for generic cross-sections comprised of isotropic materials are developed. Element shape functions for quadrilateral and triangular elements are discussed, and numerical examples are provided.

  11. Low-order invariant solutions in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muhammad; Sharma, Ati

    2016-11-01

    Ten new equilibrium solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in plane Couette flow are presented. The new solutions add to the inventory of known equilibria in plane Couette flow found by Nagata JFM 1990, Gibson JFM 2008, 2009, and Halcrow JFM 2008, who together found 13. These new solutions elucidate the low-dimensional nature of exact coherent structures, which are essential to defining simplified mechanisms that explain the self-sustaining nature of wall-bounded flows. In particular, one of the solutions found has a one-dimensional unstable manifold in the symmetry-invariant subspace and otherwise, like the lower branch equilibrium solution found by Nagata JFM 1990. A new method for generating initial guesses for Newton-Krylov-hookstep (NKH) searches is also presented. This method allows the NKH algorithm to find equilibrium solutions that are derived from previous solutions. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (European Office of Aerospace Research and Development) under award FA9550-14-1-0042.

  12. Isomorphism and solid solution as shown by an accurate high-resolution diffraction experiment.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Agnieszka; Kubicki, Maciej; Lecomte, Claude

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution crystal structure determination and spherical and multipolar refinement enabled an organic solid solution of 1-(4'-chlorophenyl)-2-methyl-4-nitro-1H-imidazole-5-carbonitrile and 5-bromo-1-(4'-chlorophenyl)-2-methyl-4-nitro-1H-imidazole to be found, which would not normally be revealed using only standard resolution data (ca 0.8 Å), as the disordered part is only visible at high resolution. Therefore, this new structure would have been reported as just another polymorphic form, even more reasonably as isostructural with other derivatives. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of organic solid solution modelled via charge density Hansen-Coppens formalism and analysed by means of quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) theory.

  13. High-Order Accurate Solutions to the Helmholtz Equation in the Presence of Boundary Singularities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    restoring the design accuracy of the scheme in the presence of singularities at the boundary. While this method is well studied for low order methods...boundary. While this method is well studied for low order methods and for problems in which singularities arise from the geometry (e.g., corners), we adapt...Solution of multiple problems at low cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3.3.2 Parameters of the computational setting

  14. The accurate solution of Poisson's equation by expansion in Chebyshev polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haidvogel, D. B.; Zang, T.

    1979-01-01

    A Chebyshev expansion technique is applied to Poisson's equation on a square with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions. The spectral equations are solved in two ways - by alternating direction and by matrix diagonalization methods. Solutions are sought to both oscillatory and mildly singular problems. The accuracy and efficiency of the Chebyshev approach compare favorably with those of standard second- and fourth-order finite-difference methods.

  15. Flow of DNA solutions in a microfluidic gradual contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Shelly; Muller, Susan J.; Liepmann, Dorian

    2015-01-01

    The flow of λ-DNA solutions in a gradual micro-contraction was investigated using direct measurement techniques. The effects on DNA transport in microscale flows are significant because the flow behavior is influenced by macromolecular conformations, both viscous and elastic forces dominate inertial forces at this length scale, and the fully extended length of the molecule approaches the characteristic channel length wc (L/wc ∼ 0.13). This study examines the flow of semi-dilute and entangled DNA solutions in a gradual planar micro-contraction for low Reynolds numbers (3.7 × 10−6 < Re < 3.1 × 10−1) and high Weissenberg numbers (0.4 < Wi < 446). The semi-dilute DNA solutions have modest elasticity number, El = Wi/Re = 55, and do not exhibit viscoelastic behavior. For the entangled DNA solutions, we access high elasticity numbers (7.9 × 103 < El < 6.0 × 105). Video microscopy and streak images of entangled DNA solution flow reveal highly elastic behavior evidenced by the presence of large, stable vortices symmetric about the centerline and upstream of the channel entrance. Micro-particle image velocimetry measurements are used to obtain high resolution, quantitative velocity measurements of the vortex growth in this micro-contraction flow. These direct measurements provide a deeper understanding of the underlying physics of macromolecular transport in microfluidic flow, which will enable the realization of enhanced designs of lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26392834

  16. Dual Solutions for Nonlinear Flow Using Lie Group Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Awais, Muhammad; Hayat, Tasawar; Irum, Sania; Saleem, Salman

    2015-01-01

    `The aim of this analysis is to investigate the existence of the dual solutions for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a porous shrinking wall. We have employed the Lie group analysis for the simplification of the nonlinear differential system and computed the absolute invariants explicitly. An efficient numerical technique namely the shooting method has been employed for the constructions of solutions. Dual solutions are computed for velocity profile of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid flow. Plots reflecting the impact of dual solutions for the variations of Deborah number, Hartman number, wall mass transfer are presented and analyzed. Streamlines are also plotted for the wall mass transfer effects when suction and blowing situations are considered. PMID:26575996

  17. Dual Solutions for Nonlinear Flow Using Lie Group Analysis.

    PubMed

    Awais, Muhammad; Hayat, Tasawar; Irum, Sania; Saleem, Salman

    2015-01-01

    `The aim of this analysis is to investigate the existence of the dual solutions for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a porous shrinking wall. We have employed the Lie group analysis for the simplification of the nonlinear differential system and computed the absolute invariants explicitly. An efficient numerical technique namely the shooting method has been employed for the constructions of solutions. Dual solutions are computed for velocity profile of an upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid flow. Plots reflecting the impact of dual solutions for the variations of Deborah number, Hartman number, wall mass transfer are presented and analyzed. Streamlines are also plotted for the wall mass transfer effects when suction and blowing situations are considered.

  18. Further solutions in streamwise corner flow with wall suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, W. H.; El-Gamal, H. A.

    1984-08-01

    Following Barclay and El-Gamal's (1983) solutions for the boundary layer flow along a rectangular, streamwise corner, when the flow is subjected to a uniform suction at the walls, attention is given to the reconsideration of the boundary layer problem for the simpler case of suction that is proportional to the square root of the reciprocal of the local Reynolds number. The conclusions drawn from the results of the approximate solution are exactly the same as for the case of arbitrary sigma value.

  19. Flow of Viscoelastic Polymer Solutions through Filter Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machač, Ivan; Surý, Alexander; Šiška, Bedřich

    2011-07-01

    In this contribution, the measurements are presented of the pressure drop in the creeping flow of viscoelastic solution of polyacrylamides through metal wire screens, differing in wire diameter, aperture dimension, and type of weaving. In this flow, a strong elastic pressure drop excess manifest itself. Analysing the extensive set of experimental data, it was verified that for engineering estimation of the pressure drop excess, a simple form of the corrective Deborah number function can be used.

  20. Direct Generation of Electric Currents from Flowing Neutral Ionic Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have discovered a new method of generating electric currents, directly from high pressure-induced flow of neutral ionic solutions. The mechanism is that the cations and anions have different flow velocities, if their atomic masses are dramatically different, due to different accelerations generated from the high applied pressure. The generated electric current is very sensitive to the strengths of the applied pressure, and it might be potentially used for detection of atomic masses and pressures. PMID:24187520

  1. Instabilities in stagnation point flows of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haward, S. J.; McKinley, G. H.

    2013-08-01

    A recently developed microfluidic device, the optimized shape cross-slot extensional rheometer or OSCER [S. J. Haward, M. S. N. Oliveira, M. A. Alves, and G. H. McKinley, "Optimized cross-slot flow geometry for microfluidic extensional rheometry," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 128301 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.128301], is used to investigate the stability of viscoelastic polymer solutions in an idealized planar stagnation point flow. Aqueous polymer solutions, consisting of poly(ethylene oxide) and of hyaluronic acid with various molecular weights and concentrations, are formulated in order to provide fluids with a wide range of rheological properties. Semi-dilute solutions of high molecular weight polymers provide highly viscoelastic fluids with long relaxation times, which achieve a high Weissenberg number (Wi) at flow rates for which the Reynolds number (Re) remains low; hence the elasticity number El = Wi/Re is high. Lower concentration solutions of moderate molecular weight polymers provide only weakly viscoelastic fluids in which inertia remains important and El is relatively low. Flow birefringence observations are used to visualize the nature of flow instabilities in the fluids as the volumetric flow rate through the OSCER device is steadily incremented. At low Wi and Re, all of the fluids display a steady, symmetric, and uniform "birefringent strand" of highly oriented polymer molecules aligned along the outflowing symmetry axis of the test geometry, indicating the stability of the flow field under such conditions. In fluids of El > 1, we observe steady elastic flow asymmetries beyond a critical Weissenberg number,Wicrit, that are similar in character to those already reported in standard cross-slot geometries [e.g., P. E. Arratia, C. C. Thomas, J. Diorio, and J. P. Gollub, "Elastic instabilities of polymer solutions in cross-channel flow," Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 144502 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.144502]. However, in fluids with El < 1 we observe a sequence

  2. FLUID FLOW, SOLUTE MIXING AND PRECIPITATION IN POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, George D; Y. Fang; T.D. Scheibe; A.M. Tartakovsky; Fox, Don T; Fujita, Yoshiko; White, Timothy A

    2006-09-01

    Reactions that lead to the formation of mineral precipitates, colloids or growth of biofilms in porous media often depend on the molecular-level diffusive mixing. For example, for the formation of mineral phases, exceeding the saturation index for a mineral is a minimum requirement for precipitation to proceed. Solute mixing frequently occurs at the interface between two solutions each containing one or more soluble reactants, particularly in engineered systems where contaminant degradation or modification or fluid flow are objectives. Although many of the fundamental component processes involved in the deposition or solubilization of solid phases are reasonably well understood, including precipitation equilibrium and kinetics, fluid flow and solute transport, the deposition of chemical precipitates, biofilms and colloidal particles are all coupled to flow, and the science of such coupled processes is not well developed. How such precipitates (and conversely, dissolution of solids) are distributed in the subsurface along flow paths with chemical gradients is a complex and challenging problem. This is especially true in systems that undergo rapid change where equilibrium conditions cannot be assumed, particularly in subsurface systems where reactants are introduced rapidly, compared to most natural flow conditions, and where mixing fronts are generated. Although the concept of dispersion in porous media is frequently used to approximate mixing at macroscopic scales, dispersion does not necessarily describe pore-level or molecular level mixing that must occur for chemical and biological reactions to be possible. An example of coupling between flow, mixing and mineral precipitation, with practical applications to controlling fluid flow or contaminant remediation in subsurface environments is shown in the mixing zone between parallel flowing solutions. Two- and three-dimensional experiments in packed-sand media were conducted where solutions containing calcium and

  3. Accurate measurements of thermodynamic properties of solutes in ionic liquids using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mutelet, Fabrice; Jaubert, Jean-Noël

    2006-01-13

    Activity coefficients at infinite dilution of 29 organic compounds in two room temperature ionic liquids were determined using inverse gas chromatography. The measurements were carried out at different temperatures between 323.15 and 343.15K. To establish the influence of concurrent retention mechanisms on the accuracy of activity coefficients at infinite dilution for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate, phase loading studies of the net retention volume per gram of packing as a function of the percent phase loading were used. It is shown that most of the solutes are retained largely by partition with a small contribution from adsorption on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium octyl sulfate and that the n-alkanes are retained predominantly by interfacial adsorption on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tosylate.

  4. Design and Construction Solutions in the Accurate Realization of NCSX Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzenroeder, P.; Dudek, Lawrence E.; Brooks, Arthur W.; Viola, Michael E.; Brown, Thomas; Neilson, George H.; Zarnstorff, Michael C.; Rej, Donald; Cole,Michael J.; Freudenberg, Kevin D.; Harris J. H.; McGinnis, Gary

    2008-09-29

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment, NCSX, is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in partnership with the Oak Ridge national Laboratory. The goal of NCSX is to provide the understanding necessary to develop an attractive, disruption free, steady state compact stellaratorbased reactor design. This paper describes the recently revised designs of the critical interfaces between the modular coils, the construction solutions developed to meet assembly tolerances, and the recently revised trim coil system that provides the required compensation to correct for the “as built” conditions and to allow flexibility in the disposition of as-built conditions. In May, 2008, the sponsor decided to terminate the NCSX project due to growth in the project’s cost and schedule estimates. However significant technical challenges in design and construction were overcome, greatly reducing the risk in the remaining work to complete the project.

  5. Multi-stencils fast marching methods: a highly accurate solution to the eikonal equation on cartesian domains.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, M Sabry; Farag, A A

    2007-09-01

    A wide range of computer vision applications require an accurate solution of a particular Hamilton- Jacobi (HJ) equation, known as the Eikonal equation. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the fast marching method (FMM) that is highly accurate for both 2D and 3D Cartesian domains. The new method is called multi-stencils fast marching (MSFM), which computes the solution at each grid point by solving the Eikonal equation along several stencils and then picks the solution that satisfies the upwind condition. The stencils are centered at each grid point and cover its entire nearest neighbors. In 2D space, 2 stencils cover the 8-neighbors of the point, while in 3D space, 6 stencils cover its 26-neighbors. For those stencils that are not aligned with the natural coordinate system, the Eikonal equation is derived using directional derivatives and then solved using higher order finite difference schemes. The accuracy of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art FMM-based techniques has been demonstrated through comprehensive numerical experiments.

  6. A Green's function formulation for a nonlinear potential flow solution applicable to transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Fox, C. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Routine determination of inviscid subsonic flow fields about wing-body-tail configurations employing a Green's function approach for numerical solution of the perturbation velocity potential equation is successfully extended into the high subsonic subcritical flow regime and into the shock-free supersonic flow regime. A modified Green's function formulation, valid throughout a range of Mach numbers including transonic, that takes an explicit accounting of the intrinsic nonlinearity in the parent governing partial differential equations is developed. Some considerations pertinent to flow field predictions in the transonic flow regime are discussed.

  7. Reference Solutions for Benchmark Turbulent Flows in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Pandya, Mohagna J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    A grid convergence study is performed to establish benchmark solutions for turbulent flows in three dimensions (3D) in support of turbulence-model verification campaign at the Turbulence Modeling Resource (TMR) website. The three benchmark cases are subsonic flows around a 3D bump and a hemisphere-cylinder configuration and a supersonic internal flow through a square duct. Reference solutions are computed for Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model using a linear eddy-viscosity model for the external flows and a nonlinear eddy-viscosity model based on a quadratic constitutive relation for the internal flow. The study involves three widely-used practical computational fluid dynamics codes developed and supported at NASA Langley Research Center: FUN3D, USM3D, and CFL3D. Reference steady-state solutions computed with these three codes on families of consistently refined grids are presented. Grid-to-grid and code-to-code variations are described in detail.

  8. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-12-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space.

  9. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-01-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space. PMID:27929105

  10. Energy expenditure during level human walking: seeking a simple and accurate predictive solution.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Lindsay W; Weyand, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the metabolic energy that walking requires can inform numerous health, bodily status, and fitness outcomes. We adopted a two-step approach to identifying a concise, generalized equation for predicting level human walking metabolism. Using literature-aggregated values we compared 1) the predictive accuracy of three literature equations: American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), Pandolf et al., and Height-Weight-Speed (HWS); and 2) the goodness-of-fit possible from one- vs. two-component descriptions of walking metabolism. Literature metabolic rate values (n = 127; speed range = 0.4 to 1.9 m/s) were aggregated from 25 subject populations (n = 5-42) whose means spanned a 1.8-fold range of heights and a 4.2-fold range of weights. Population-specific resting metabolic rates (V̇o2 rest) were determined using standardized equations. Our first finding was that the ACSM and Pandolf et al. equations underpredicted nearly all 127 literature-aggregated values. Consequently, their standard errors of estimate (SEE) were nearly four times greater than those of the HWS equation (4.51 and 4.39 vs. 1.13 ml O2·kg(-1)·min(-1), respectively). For our second comparison, empirical best-fit relationships for walking metabolism were derived from the data set in one- and two-component forms for three V̇o2-speed model types: linear (∝V(1.0)), exponential (∝V(2.0)), and exponential/height (∝V(2.0)/Ht). We found that the proportion of variance (R(2)) accounted for, when averaged across the three model types, was substantially lower for one- vs. two-component versions (0.63 ± 0.1 vs. 0.90 ± 0.03) and the predictive errors were nearly twice as great (SEE = 2.22 vs. 1.21 ml O2·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Our final analysis identified the following concise, generalized equation for predicting level human walking metabolism: V̇o2 total = V̇o2 rest + 3.85 + 5.97·V(2)/Ht (where V is measured in m/s, Ht in meters, and V̇o2 in ml O2·kg(-1)·min(-1)).

  11. Cold flow properties of biodiesel: A guide to getting an accurate analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel has several advantages compared to conventional diesel fuel (petrodiesel). Nevertheless, biodiesel has poor cold flow properties that may restrict its use in moderate climates. It is essential that the cold flow properties of biodiesel and its blends with petrodiesel be measured as accurat...

  12. Measurement of temperature profiles in turbulent pipe flow of polymer and surfactant drag-reducing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasljevic, K.; Aguilar, G.; Matthys, E. F.

    2007-08-01

    A device was built to measure temperature profiles of turbulent pipe flows of various drag-reducing fluids. It is easy to use and reliable. We measured temperature profiles over a range of conditions leading to accurate measurements down to y+≈10, for tests carried over Reynolds numbers (Re) between 10 000 and 90 000. The effects of high heat fluxes and buoyancy, in particular, were quantified to ascertain the parameter range for accurate measurements. Temperature profiles measured for type-A polymer solution and for cationic surfactant solutions allowed us to see strong similarity between velocity and temperature profiles for drag-reducing surfactant solutions. A comparison between the slopes of the thermal and velocity buffer layers resulted in calculated turbulent Prandtl numbers between 6 and 9 for those drag-reducing solutions. We also used this tool to investigate drag reduction for a nonionic surfactant solution, which showed a significantly different fan-type profile, and also for a type-B drag-reducing polymer solution (Xanthan gum).

  13. On the accurate long-time solution of the wave equation in exterior domains: Asymptotic expansions and corrected boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the solution of scattering problems for the wave equation using approximate boundary conditions at artificial boundaries. These conditions are explicitly viewed as approximations to an exact boundary condition satisfied by the solution on the unbounded domain. We study the short and long term behavior of the error. It is provided that, in two space dimensions, no local in time, constant coefficient boundary operator can lead to accurate results uniformly in time for the class of problems we consider. A variable coefficient operator is developed which attains better accuracy (uniformly in time) than is possible with constant coefficient approximations. The theory is illustrated by numerical examples. We also analyze the proposed boundary conditions using energy methods, leading to asymptotically correct error bounds.

  14. Preliminary investigations into solutal flow about growing tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc; Witherow, William; Naumann, Robert

    1988-01-01

    A series of preliminary experiments were done to investigate solutal flow about growing lysozyme crystals and its effects. Density-gradient-driven flow was observed using a schlieren optical system. Crystals used ranged from 0.3 to 1.72 mm across the (110) face, and protein concentrations were from 3.7 to 23.7 mg/ml. The convective plume velocities were found to be from 10 to 50 microns/s, which correlated with those predicted to occur based upon a diffusive-convective model. When microcrystals of lysozyme, less than 20 microns across the (110) face were subjected to directed solution flows, the growth rate was found to rapidly decrease over the 8-20 h course of the experiment. Solution flow rates used ranged from 18 to 40 microns/s, and protein concentrations were from 7.3 to 11.7 mg/ml, conditions typical of larger (greater than 0.5 mm) crystals in the terminal phases of a typical crystal growth procedure.

  15. Flow-induced structured phase in nonionic micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Joshua J; Tonggu, Lige; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Zhao, Ya; Pozzo, Danilo C; Wang, Liguo; Shen, Amy Q

    2013-12-17

    In this work, we consider the flow of a nonionic micellar solution (precursor) through an array of microposts, with focus on its microstructural and rheological evolution. The precursor contains polyoxyethylene(20) sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) and cosurfactant monolaurin (ML). An irreversible flow-induced structured phase (NI-FISP) emerges after the nonionic precursor flows through the hexagonal micropost arrays, when subjected to strain rates ~10(4) s(-1) and strain ~10(3). NI-FISP consists of close-looped micellar bundles and multiconnected micellar networks as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). We also conduct small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements in both precursor and NI-FISP to illustrate the structural transition. We propose a potential mechanism for the NI-FISP formation that relies on the micropost arrays and the flow kinematics in the microdevice to induce entropic fluctuations in the micellar solution. Finally, we show that the rheological variation from a viscous precursor solution to a viscoelastic micellar structured phase is associated with the structural evolution from the precursor to NI-FISP.

  16. Gridding guidelines for numerical solutions of simple flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Milton Edward, Jr.

    Numerical solutions are systematically computed for simple flat plate flows and compared with known analytical calculations and/or measurements to determine if quantitative relationships can be established between grid construction parameters and solution accuracy. Computational grids are created for plates at incompressible speeds without any pressure gradient for both laminar and turbulent types of boundary layers. Then the computed drag force coefficients, skin friction curves and velocity profiles are assessed against the known quantities. When examining turbulent flows, application is made of the Spalart-Allmaras, one-equation Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RAMS) turbulence model; the Menter Shear Stress Transport, two-equation BANS turbulence model; and the Nichols-Nelson Hybrid (RANS/Large Eddy Simulation) turbulence technique. In addition, the structured, RANS Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver named Wind-US is used to perform the flowfield computations, while Gridgen(TM), interactive grid generation code, is used to create the computational grids and vary their parameters. It is found that quantitative relationships do in fact exist between grid parameters and solution accuracy. These relationships are formulated as rules of thumb that can be used to guide the generation of CFD grids. Although developed for simple flows, these guidelines will be helpful in creating grids for complex bodies with subregions characterized by simple flows.

  17. Flow-based solution-liquid-solid nanowire synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan; Palaniappan, Kumaranand; Smith, Nickolaus A.; Dickerson, Robert M.; Werder, Donald J.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2013-09-01

    Discovered almost two decades ago, the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method for semiconductor nanowire synthesis has proven to be an important route to high-quality, single-crystalline anisotropic nanomaterials. In execution, the SLS technique is similar to colloidal quantum-dot synthesis in that it entails the injection of chemical precursors into a hot surfactant solution, but mechanistically it is considered the solution-phase analogue to vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) growth. Both SLS and VLS methods make use of molten metal nanoparticles to catalyse the nucleation and elongation of single-crystalline nanowires. Significantly, however, the methods differ in how chemical precursors are introduced to the metal catalysts. In SLS, precursors are added in a one-off fashion in a flask, whereas in VLS they are carried by a flow of gas through the reaction chamber, and by-products are removed similarly. The ability to dynamically control the introduction of reactants and removal of by-products in VLS synthesis has enabled a degree of synthetic control not possible with SLS growth. We show here that SLS synthesis can be transformed into a continuous technique using a microfluidic reactor. The resulting flow-based SLS (`flow-SLS') platform allows us to slow down the synthesis of nanowires and capture mechanistic details concerning their growth in the solution phase, as well as synthesize technologically relevant axially heterostructured semiconductor nanowires, while maintaining the propensity of SLS for accessing ultrasmall diameters below 10 nm.

  18. Flow Interface for Charge Reduced Electrospray of Nanoparticle Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Adou, Kouame; Johnston, Murray V.

    2009-01-01

    A charge reduction (CR) interface for electrospray ionization was characterized that permits simultaneous analysis of nanoparticle solutions by multiple detection methods. In the direct infusion configuration, a constant flow of analyte solution undergoes electrospray ionization (ESI). The charged aerosol is sampled directly into the atmospheric pressure inlet of a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QTOF) and to a CR device followed by a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and condensation particle counter (CPC). In the plug injection configuration, analyte solution is injected into a liquid chromatograph. The effluent is split to an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) and the ESI interface. The charged aerosol is then sampled through the CR device directly into the CPC. Performance characteristics of the two configurations were studied with sucrose and protein solutions. When a liquid flow rate in the low µL/min range was used, the reconstructed droplet size distribution from the ESI interface had an average diameter of 184 nm with a geometric standard deviation of 1.4. For the first configuration, the linear working range was wider for ESI-MS than CR-DMA-CPC. For the second configuration, the detection efficiency, defined as the fraction of molecules flowing through the ESI interface that are ultimately detected by the CPC, was on the order of 10−6. Simultaneous measurements with ELSD and CPC were consistent with analyte molecular size and may provide a means of estimating the size of unknown particles. PMID:19924869

  19. An accurate numerical solution to the Saint-Venant-Hirano model for mixed-sediment morphodynamics in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecca, Guglielmo; Siviglia, Annunziato; Blom, Astrid

    2016-07-01

    We present an accurate numerical approximation to the Saint-Venant-Hirano model for mixed-sediment morphodynamics in one space dimension. Our solution procedure originates from the fully-unsteady matrix-vector formulation developed in [54]. The principal part of the problem is solved by an explicit Finite Volume upwind method of the path-conservative type, by which all the variables are updated simultaneously in a coupled fashion. The solution to the principal part is embedded into a splitting procedure for the treatment of frictional source terms. The numerical scheme is extended to second-order accuracy and includes a bookkeeping procedure for handling the evolution of size stratification in the substrate. We develop a concept of balancedness for the vertical mass flux between the substrate and active layer under bed degradation, which prevents the occurrence of non-physical oscillations in the grainsize distribution of the substrate. We suitably modify the numerical scheme to respect this principle. We finally verify the accuracy in our solution to the equations, and its ability to reproduce one-dimensional morphodynamics due to streamwise and vertical sorting, using three test cases. In detail, (i) we empirically assess the balancedness of vertical mass fluxes under degradation; (ii) we study the convergence to the analytical linearised solution for the propagation of infinitesimal-amplitude waves [54], which is here employed for the first time to assess a mixed-sediment model; (iii) we reproduce Ribberink's E8-E9 flume experiment [46].

  20. Assessment of a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method for turbomachinery flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, F.; Botti, L.; Colombo, A.; Crivellini, A.; Franchina, N.; Ghidoni, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this work the capabilities of a high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method applied to the computation of turbomachinery flows are investigated. The Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the two equations k-ω turbulence model are solved to predict the flow features, either in a fixed or rotating reference frame, to simulate the fluid flow around bodies that operate under an imposed steady rotation. To ensure, by design, the positivity of all thermodynamic variables at a discrete level, a set of primitive variables based on pressure and temperature logarithms is used. The flow fields through the MTU T106A low-pressure turbine cascade and the NASA Rotor 37 axial compressor have been computed up to fourth-order of accuracy and compared to the experimental and numerical data available in the literature.

  1. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-01-01

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework. PMID:26987587

  2. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-03-01

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework.

  3. Tuning-free controller to accurately regulate flow rates in a microfluidic network.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young Jin; Kang, Junsu; Kim, Min Jun; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2016-03-18

    We describe a control algorithm that can improve accuracy and stability of flow regulation in a microfluidic network that uses a conventional pressure pump system. The algorithm enables simultaneous and independent control of fluid flows in multiple micro-channels of a microfluidic network, but does not require any model parameters or tuning process. We investigate robustness and optimality of the proposed control algorithm and those are verified by simulations and experiments. In addition, the control algorithm is compared with a conventional PID controller to show that the proposed control algorithm resolves critical problems induced by the PID control. The capability of the control algorithm can be used not only in high-precision flow regulation in the presence of disturbance, but in some useful functions for lab-on-a-chip devices such as regulation of volumetric flow rate, interface position control of two laminar flows, valveless flow switching, droplet generation and particle manipulation. We demonstrate those functions and also suggest further potential biological applications which can be accomplished by the proposed control framework.

  4. Elastic instabilities in planar elongational flow of monodisperse polymer solutions

    PubMed Central

    Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Shen, Amy Q.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate purely elastic flow instabilities in the almost ideal planar stagnation point elongational flow field generated by a microfluidic optimized-shape cross-slot extensional rheometer (OSCER). We use time-resolved flow velocimetry and full-field birefringence microscopy to study the behavior of a series of well-characterized viscoelastic polymer solutions under conditions of low fluid inertia and over a wide range of imposed deformation rates. At low deformation rates the flow is steady and symmetric and appears Newtonian-like, while at high deformation rates we observe the onset of a flow asymmetry resembling the purely elastic instabilities reported in standard-shaped cross-slot devices. However, for intermediate rates, we observe a new type of elastic instability characterized by a lateral displacement and time-dependent motion of the stagnation point. At the onset of this new instability, we evaluate a well-known dimensionless criterion M that predicts the onset of elastic instabilities based on geometric and rheological scaling parameters. The criterion yields maximum values of M which compare well with critical values of M for the onset of elastic instabilities in viscometric torsional flows. We conclude that the same mechanism of tension acting along curved streamlines governs the onset of elastic instabilities in both extensional (irrotational) and torsional (rotational) viscoelastic flows. PMID:27616181

  5. Elastic instabilities in planar elongational flow of monodisperse polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J; McKinley, Gareth H; Shen, Amy Q

    2016-09-12

    We investigate purely elastic flow instabilities in the almost ideal planar stagnation point elongational flow field generated by a microfluidic optimized-shape cross-slot extensional rheometer (OSCER). We use time-resolved flow velocimetry and full-field birefringence microscopy to study the behavior of a series of well-characterized viscoelastic polymer solutions under conditions of low fluid inertia and over a wide range of imposed deformation rates. At low deformation rates the flow is steady and symmetric and appears Newtonian-like, while at high deformation rates we observe the onset of a flow asymmetry resembling the purely elastic instabilities reported in standard-shaped cross-slot devices. However, for intermediate rates, we observe a new type of elastic instability characterized by a lateral displacement and time-dependent motion of the stagnation point. At the onset of this new instability, we evaluate a well-known dimensionless criterion M that predicts the onset of elastic instabilities based on geometric and rheological scaling parameters. The criterion yields maximum values of M which compare well with critical values of M for the onset of elastic instabilities in viscometric torsional flows. We conclude that the same mechanism of tension acting along curved streamlines governs the onset of elastic instabilities in both extensional (irrotational) and torsional (rotational) viscoelastic flows.

  6. Elastic instabilities in planar elongational flow of monodisperse polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Shen, Amy Q.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate purely elastic flow instabilities in the almost ideal planar stagnation point elongational flow field generated by a microfluidic optimized-shape cross-slot extensional rheometer (OSCER). We use time-resolved flow velocimetry and full-field birefringence microscopy to study the behavior of a series of well-characterized viscoelastic polymer solutions under conditions of low fluid inertia and over a wide range of imposed deformation rates. At low deformation rates the flow is steady and symmetric and appears Newtonian-like, while at high deformation rates we observe the onset of a flow asymmetry resembling the purely elastic instabilities reported in standard-shaped cross-slot devices. However, for intermediate rates, we observe a new type of elastic instability characterized by a lateral displacement and time-dependent motion of the stagnation point. At the onset of this new instability, we evaluate a well-known dimensionless criterion M that predicts the onset of elastic instabilities based on geometric and rheological scaling parameters. The criterion yields maximum values of M which compare well with critical values of M for the onset of elastic instabilities in viscometric torsional flows. We conclude that the same mechanism of tension acting along curved streamlines governs the onset of elastic instabilities in both extensional (irrotational) and torsional (rotational) viscoelastic flows.

  7. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of dilute polymer solutions in flow.

    PubMed

    Latinwo, Folarin; Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Schroeder, Charles M

    2014-11-07

    Modern materials processing applications and technologies often occur far from equilibrium. To this end, the processing of complex materials such as polymer melts and nanocomposites generally occurs under strong deformations and flows, conditions under which equilibrium thermodynamics does not apply. As a result, the ability to determine the nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of polymeric materials from measurable quantities such as heat and work is a major challenge in the field. Here, we use work relations to show that nonequilibrium thermodynamic quantities such as free energy and entropy can be determined for dilute polymer solutions in flow. In this way, we determine the thermodynamic properties of DNA molecules in strong flows using a combination of simulations, kinetic theory, and single molecule experiments. We show that it is possible to calculate polymer relaxation timescales purely from polymer stretching dynamics in flow. We further observe a thermodynamic equivalence between nonequilibrium and equilibrium steady-states for polymeric systems. In this way, our results provide an improved understanding of the energetics of flowing polymer solutions.

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of dilute polymer solutions in flow

    SciTech Connect

    Latinwo, Folarin; Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-11-07

    Modern materials processing applications and technologies often occur far from equilibrium. To this end, the processing of complex materials such as polymer melts and nanocomposites generally occurs under strong deformations and flows, conditions under which equilibrium thermodynamics does not apply. As a result, the ability to determine the nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of polymeric materials from measurable quantities such as heat and work is a major challenge in the field. Here, we use work relations to show that nonequilibrium thermodynamic quantities such as free energy and entropy can be determined for dilute polymer solutions in flow. In this way, we determine the thermodynamic properties of DNA molecules in strong flows using a combination of simulations, kinetic theory, and single molecule experiments. We show that it is possible to calculate polymer relaxation timescales purely from polymer stretching dynamics in flow. We further observe a thermodynamic equivalence between nonequilibrium and equilibrium steady-states for polymeric systems. In this way, our results provide an improved understanding of the energetics of flowing polymer solutions.

  9. Solution of groundwater-flow equations using an orthogonal finite-element scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    A new finite-element scheme is presented for approximating the groundwater-flow equation, that will result in a matrix having the properties of the positive type and diagonal dominance. Because of these properties, the matrix equation is amenable to the pointwise iteration solution strategies. This scheme differs from the standard Galerkin scheme in that discretization is performed using a general weighted residual procedure and weighting functions orthogonal to basis functions. Numerical results have been obtained for two verification examples and are compared with results using the conventional Galerkin scheme and with analytical solutions. It is shown that both the direct elimination and pointwise iteration solutions of the new orthogonal finite-element equation yield as accurate results as those obtained by the direct elimination solution of the Galerkin finite-element scheme. However, while the pointwise iteration solution of the Galerkin finite-element method converges for one example, it generated divergent solutions for the other. A demonstration example of steady-state flow in a homogeneous medium is used to compare the utility and versatility of the new scheme with the conventional Galerkin finite-element method.

  10. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  11. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  12. Use of flow cytometry for rapid and accurate enumeration of live pathogenic Leptospira strains.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Célia; Crussard, Steve; Simon-Dufay, Nathalie; Pialot, Daniel; Bomchil, Natalia; Reyes, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Enumeration of Leptospira, the causative agent of leptospirosis, is arduous mainly because of its slow growth rate. Rapid and reliable tools for numbering leptospires are still lacking. The current standard for Leptospira cultures is the count on Petroff-Hausser chamber under dark-field microscopy, but this method remains time-consuming, requires well-trained operators and lacks reproducibility. Here we present the development of a flow-cytometry technique for counting leptospires. We showed that upon addition of fluorescent dyes, necessary to discriminate the bacterial population from debris, several live Leptospira strains could be enumerated at different physiologic states. Flow cytometry titers were highly correlated to counts with Petroff-Hausser chambers (R(2)>0.99). Advantages of flow cytometry lie in its rapidity, its reproducibility significantly higher than Petroff-Hausser method and its wide linearity range, from 10(4) to 10(8)leptospires/ml. Therefore, flow cytometry is a fast, reproducible and sensitive tool representing a promising technology to replace current enumeration techniques of Leptospira in culture. We were also able to enumerate Leptospira in artificially infected urine and blood with a sensitivity limit of 10(5)leptospires/ml and 10(6)leptospires/ml, respectively, demonstrating the feasibility to use flow cytometry as first-line tool for diagnosis or bacterial dissemination studies.

  13. Time-Accurate Computation of Viscous Flow Around Deforming Bodies Using Overset Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, P; Henshaw, W D

    2001-04-02

    Dynamically evolving boundaries and deforming bodies interacting with a flow are commonly encountered in fluid dynamics. However, the numerical simulation of flows with dynamic boundaries is difficult with current methods. We propose a new method for studying such problems. The key idea is to use the overset grid method with a thin, body-fitted grid near the deforming boundary, while using fixed Cartesian grids to cover most of the computational domain. Our approach combines the strengths of earlier moving overset grid methods for rigid body motion, and unstructured grid methods for Aow-structure interactions. Large scale deformation of the flow boundaries can be handled without a global regridding, and in a computationally efficient way. In terms of computational cost, even a full overset grid regridding is significantly cheaper than a full regridding of an unstructured grid for the same domain, especially in three dimensions. Numerical studies are used to verify accuracy and convergence of our flow solver. As a computational example, we consider two-dimensional incompressible flow past a flexible filament with prescribed dynamics.

  14. Solute Transport in Soils Under Conditions of Variable Flow Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liwang; Selim, H. M.

    1996-11-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities of flow distribution significantly influence solute transport in soils. This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effects of temporal variation in flow velocity on pesticide transport in soils. Two pesticides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and atrazine (moderately adsorbed), were chosen along with the following two soils: Cecil (<2 mm) and Sharkey (2-4 mm). Several tritium pulses were introduced into packed soil columns (15 or 30 cm in length) under different flow velocities to obtain velocity-dependent dispersion coefficients (D). Subsequently, several atrazine and metribuzin pulses were introduced under conditions of constant and variable velocities. For each experiment, changes in flow velocity were stepwise using a piston flow pump and were carried out during pulse application and leaching. For constant and variable flow velocity experiments, approximately similar pulse volumes and average flow velocities were maintained. Values of D versus pore water velocity (ν) from tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using a linear equation for both soils. Identical BTCs for metribuzin were observed under conditions of constant or variable flow velocities in the Cecil soil column. However, metribuzin transport in the Sharkey soil was significantly influenced by velocity variations. Atrazine transport in the Sharkey soil was also significantly affected by variations in flow velocity. We further examined the error when an average rather than actual velocity distribution was used in BTC representation. The resulting experimental BTCs (concentration versus velocity-averaged pore volume) exhibited early arrival and the appearance of multiple peaks. Moreover, predictions of such BTCs based on the convective-dispersive equation were not successful. We concluded that actual water velocity distributions should be used in BTC representation, and, whenever possible, the use of an average velocity should be avoided.

  15. Finite-amplitude solutions in rotating Hagen-Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Benoît; Kumar, Abhishek; Govindarajan, Rama

    2015-11-01

    While the pipe Poiseuille base flow is linearly stable at all Reynolds numbers, a small amount of rotation of the pipe around its axis induces linear instability beyond a low critical Reynolds number Rc ~= 83 [Pedley, J. Fluid Mech. 1969]. More recently [Fernandez-Feria and del Pino, Phys. Fluids 2002], this configuration has been shown to become absolutely unstable at Reynolds numbers of the same order of magnitude. Using direct numerical simulations, we investigate here finite-amplitude solutions resulting from saturation of exponentially growing small-amplitude initial perturbations. The base flow depends on two dynamical parameters (axial Reynolds number and rotation rate) and the initial perturbation is characterized by its axial wavenumber and its azimuthal mode number. The range of nonlinear waves prevailing in this configuration, the associated nonlinear dispersion relation and the spatial structure of these solutions are systematically obtained by exploring the parameter space. Funding from CEFIPRA is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for high Reynolds number incompressible turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1980-05-01

    The full Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible turbulent flow must be solved to accurately represent all flow phenomena which occur in a high Reynolds number incompressible flow. A two layer algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model is used to represent the Reynolds stress in the primitive variable formulation. The development of the boundary-fitted coordinate systems makes the numerical solution of these equations feasible for arbitrarily shaped bodies. The nondimensional time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, including the turbulence mode, are represented by finite difference approximations in the transformed plane. The resulting coupled system of nonlinear algebraic equations is solved using a point successive over relaxation iteration. The test case considered was a NACA 64A010 airfoil section at an angle of attack of two degrees and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000.

  17. Hysteresis in Analytical Solutions for Three-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambers, J. V.; LaForce, T.

    2011-12-01

    Hysteresis in relative permeability is a widely-recognized phenomenon that impacts oil recovery in water and gas (WAG) injection. Several authors (1-3) have constructed analytical solutions for two-phase oil/water or gas/water flow in enhanced oil recovery however, analytical solutions have not previously been constructed for the three-phase flow problem for immiscible water, oil and gas including hysteresis. In this work analytical solutions are constructed for water and gas floods in a previously water-flooded oil reservoir with and without hysteresis. A simplified model is used in the analysis that qualitatively captures the behavior of oil-phase hysteresis for repeated water imbibition and drainage cycles. Many of the displacements considered have a reversal of flow direction within the displacement, requiring a matching condition to be enforced between the imbibition and drainage relative permeability curves at the point of flow reversal. A suitable matching criterion for the hysteretic curves is presented. A single water/gas injection mixture is considered, with varying initial oil and water volumes present in the reservoir. When hysteresis occurs in a displacement the entire saturation path depends on the initial volumes of oil and water present at the onset of WAG flooding. When hysteresis is ignored most of the displacement is identical for a large range of initial oil and water mixtures, with only the velocity of the leading shock changing. For the displacements which only encounter drainage of the water phase, solutions with and without hysteresis are identical. 1) K. M. Furati, ``Effects of Relative Permeability History Dependence on Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media,'' Transport in Porous Media 28: 181-203, 1997. 2) B. Plohr, D. Marchesin, P. Bedrikovetsky and P. Krause, ``Modeling hysteresis in porous media flow via relaxation,'' Computational Geosciences 5: 225-256, 2001. 3) F. M. Van Kats and C. J. Van Duijn, ``A Mathematical Model for Hysteretic Two

  18. Parameter-free prediction of DNA dynamics in planar extensional flow of semidilute solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Chandi; Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Schroeder, Charles M.; Ravi Prakash, J.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of individual DNA molecules in semidilute solutions undergoing planar extensional flow is simulated using a multi-particle Brownian dynamics algorithm, which incorporates hydrodynamic and excluded volume interactions in the context of a coarse-grained bead-spring chain model for DNA. The successive fine-graining protocol [1, 2], in which simulation data acquired for bead-spring chains with increasing values of the number of beads $N_b$, is extrapolated to the number of Kuhn steps $N_\\text{K}$ in DNA (while keeping key physical parameters invariant), is used to obtain parameter-free predictions for a range of Weissenberg numbers and Hencky strain units. A systematic comparison of simulation predictions is carried out with the experimental observations of [3], who have recently used single molecule techniques to investigate the dynamics of dilute and semidilute solutions of $\\lambda$-phage DNA in planar extensional flow. In particular, they examine the response of individual chains to step-strain deformation followed by cessation of flow, thereby capturing both chain stretch and relaxation in a single experiment. The successive fine-graining technique is shown to lead to quantitatively accurate predictions of the experimental observations in the stretching and relaxation phases. Additionally, the transient chain stretch following a step strain deformation is shown to be much smaller in semidilute solutions than in dilute solutions, in agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Towards Accurate Prediction of Turbulent, Three-Dimensional, Recirculating Flows with the NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, A.; Tacina, R.; Jeng, S.-M.; Cai, J.

    2001-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to calculate the steady state, nonreacting flow field of a prototype Lean Direct Injection (LDI) swirler. This configuration used nine groups of eight holes drilled at a thirty-five degree angle to induce swirl. These nine groups created swirl in the same direction, or a corotating pattern. The static pressure drop across the holes was fixed at approximately four percent. Computations were performed on one quarter of the geometry, because the geometry is considered rotationally periodic every ninety degrees. The final computational grid used was approximately 2.26 million tetrahedral cells, and a cubic nonlinear k - epsilon model was used to model turbulence. The NCC results were then compared to time averaged Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) data. The LDV measurements were performed on the full geometry, but four ninths of the geometry was measured. One-, two-, and three-dimensional representations of both flow fields are presented. The NCC computations compare both qualitatively and quantitatively well to the LDV data, but differences exist downstream. The comparison is encouraging, and shows that NCC can be used for future injector design studies. To improve the flow prediction accuracy of turbulent, three-dimensional, recirculating flow fields with the NCC, recommendations are given.

  1. The application of intraoperative transit time flow measurement to accurately assess anastomotic quality in sequential vein grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Ming-Xin; Li, Hai-Tao; Li, Jing-Xing; Song, Wei; Huang, Xin-Sheng; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Intraoperative transit time flow measurement (TTFM) is widely used to assess anastomotic quality in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, in sequential vein grafting, the flow characteristics collected by the conventional TTFM method are usually associated with total graft flow and might not accurately indicate the quality of every distal anastomosis in a sequential graft. The purpose of our study was to examine a new TTFM method that could assess the quality of each distal anastomosis in a sequential graft more reliably than the conventional TTFM approach. METHODS Two TTFM methods were tested in 84 patients who underwent sequential saphenous off-pump CABG in Beijing An Zhen Hospital between April and August 2012. In the conventional TTFM method, normal blood flow in the sequential graft was maintained during the measurement, and the flow probe was placed a few centimetres above the anastomosis to be evaluated. In the new method, blood flow in the sequential graft was temporarily reduced during the measurement by placing an atraumatic bulldog clamp at the graft a few centimetres distal to the anastomosis to be evaluated, while the position of the flow probe remained the same as in the conventional method. This new TTFM method was named the flow reduction TTFM. Graft flow parameters measured by both methods were compared. RESULTS Compared with the conventional TTFM, the flow reduction TTFM resulted in significantly lower mean graft blood flow (P < 0.05); in contrast, yielded significantly higher pulsatility index (P < 0.05). Diastolic filling was not significantly different between the two methods and was >50% in both cases. Interestingly, the flow reduction TTFM identified two defective middle distal anastomoses that the conventional TTFM failed to detect. Graft flows near the defective distal anastomoses were improved substantially after revision. CONCLUSIONS In this study, we found that temporary reduction of graft flow during TTFM seemed to

  2. Characterization of the hairpin vortex solution in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalis, Sotos C.; Itano, Tomoaki

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative evidence that establishes the existence of the hairpin vortex state (HVS) [T. Itano and S. C. Generalis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 114501 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.114501] in plane Couette flow (PCF) is provided in this work. The evidence presented in this paper shows that the HVS can be obtained via homotopy from a flow with a simple geometrical configuration, namely, the laterally heated flow (LHF). Although the early stages of bifurcations of LHF have been previously investigated, our linear stability analysis reveals that the root in the LHF yields multiple branches via symmetry breaking. These branches connect to the PCF manifold as steady nonlinear amplitude solutions. Moreover, we show that the HVS has a direct bifurcation route to the Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  3. Solution adaptive grids applied to low Reynolds number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de With, G.; Holdø, A. E.; Huld, T. A.

    2003-08-01

    A numerical study has been undertaken to investigate the use of a solution adaptive grid for flow around a cylinder in the laminar flow regime. The main purpose of this work is twofold. The first aim is to investigate the suitability of a grid adaptation algorithm and the reduction in mesh size that can be obtained. Secondly, the uniform asymmetric flow structures are ideal to validate the mesh structures due to mesh refinement and consequently the selected refinement criteria. The refinement variable used in this work is a product of the rate of strain and the mesh cell size, and contains two variables Cm and Cstr which determine the order of each term. By altering the order of either one of these terms the refinement behaviour can be modified.

  4. High resolution solutions of the Euler equations for vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.; Powell, K. G.; Rizzi, A.

    1985-01-01

    Solutions of the Euler equations are presented for M = 1.5 flow past a 70-degree-swept delta wing. At an angle of attack of 10 degrees, strong leading-edge vortices are produced. Two computational approaches are taken, based upon fully three-dimensional and conical flow theory. Both methods utilize a finite-volume discretization solved by a pseudounsteady multistage scheme. Results from the two approaches are in good agreement. Computations have been done on a 16-million-word CYBER 205 using 196 x 56 x 96 and 128 x 128 cells for the two methods. A sizable data base is generated, and some of the practical aspects of manipulating it are mentioned. The results reveal many interesting physical features of the compressible vortical flow field and also suggest new areas needing research.

  5. Comparison of uniform perturbation solutions and numerical solutions for some potential flows past slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, T. C.; Liu, C. H.; Geer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate solutions for potential flow past an axisymmetric slender body and past a thin airfoil are calculated using a uniform perturbation method and then compared with either the exact analytical solution or the solution obtained using a purely numerical method. The perturbation method is based upon a representation of the disturbance flow as the superposition of singularities distributed entirely within the body, while the numerical (panel) method is based upon a distribution of singularities on the surface of the body. It is found that the perturbation method provides very good results for small values of the slenderness ratio and for small angles of attack. Moreover, for comparable accuracy, the perturbation method is simpler to implement, requires less computer memory, and generally uses less computation time than the panel method. In particular, the uniform perturbation method yields good resolution near the regions of the leading and trailing edges where other methods fail or require special attention.

  6. Exact solutions and physical analogies for unidirectional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-06-01

    Unidirectional flow is the simplest phenomenon of fluid mechanics. Its mathematical description, the Dirichlet problem for Poisson's equation in two dimensions with constant forcing, arises in many physical contexts, such as the torsion of elastic beams, first solved by de Saint-Venant for complex shapes. Here the literature is unified and extended by identifying 17 physical analogies for unidirectional flow and describing their common mathematical structure. Besides classical analogies in fluid and solid mechanics, applications are discussed in stochastic processes (first passage in two dimensions), pattern formation (river growth by erosion), and electrokinetics (ion transport in nanochannels), which also involve Poisson's equation with nonconstant forcing. Methods are given to construct approximate geometries that admit exact solutions, by adding harmonic functions to quadratic forms or by truncating eigenfunction expansions. Exact solutions for given geometries are also derived by conformal mapping. We prove that the remarkable geometrical interpretation of Poiseuille flow in an equilateral triangular pipe (the product of the distances from an interior point to the sides) is only shared by parallel plates and unbounded equilateral wedges (with the third side hidden behind the apex). We also prove Onsager reciprocity for linear electrokinetic phenomena in straight pores of arbitrary shape and surface charge, based on the mathematics of unidirectional flow.

  7. Stability of Inviscid Flow over Airfoils Admitting Multiple Numerical Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Xiong, Juntao; Liu, Feng; Luo, Shijun

    2012-11-01

    Multiple numerical solutions at the same flight condition are found of inviscid transonic flow over certain airfoils (Jameson et al., AIAA 2011-3509) within some Mach number range. Both symmetric and asymmetric solutions exist for a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack. Global linear stability analysis of the multiple solutions is conducted. Linear perturbation equations of the Euler equations around a steady-state solution are formed and discretized numerically. An eigenvalue problem is then constructed using the modal analysis approach. Only a small portion of the eigen spectrum is needed and thus can be found efficiently by using Arnoldi's algorithm. The least stable or unstable mode corresponds to the eigenvalue with the largest real part. Analysis of the NACA 0012 airfoil indicates stability of symmetric solutions of the Euler equations at conditions where buffet is found from unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Euler solutions of the same airfoil but modified to include the displacement thickness of the boundary layer computed from the Navier-Stokes equations, however, exhibit instability based on the present linear stability analysis. Graduate Student.

  8. An Integrated Numerical Hydrodynamic Shallow Flow-Solute Transport Model for Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alias, N. A.; Mohd Sidek, L.

    2016-03-01

    The rapidly changing on land profiles in the some urban areas in Malaysia led to the increasing of flood risk. Extensive developments on densely populated area and urbanization worsen the flood scenario. An early warning system is really important and the popular method is by numerically simulating the river and flood flows. There are lots of two-dimensional (2D) flood model predicting the flood level but in some circumstances, still it is difficult to resolve the river reach in a 2D manner. A systematic early warning system requires a precisely prediction of flow depth. Hence a reliable one-dimensional (1D) model that provides accurate description of the flow is essential. Research also aims to resolve some of raised issues such as the fate of pollutant in river reach by developing the integrated hydrodynamic shallow flow-solute transport model. Presented in this paper are results on flow prediction for Sungai Penchala and the convection-diffusion of solute transports simulated by the developed model.

  9. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid-particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid-particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge-Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and -0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered. This finding

  10. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 1: Investigation of candidate algoriths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1979-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing a numerical scheme for solving the time dependent viscous compressible three dimensional flow to aid in the design of helicopter rotors. Numerical algorithms are examined to determine their overall suitability for the efficient and routine solution of an appropriate system of partial differential equations. It is concluded that a consistently split time linearized block implicit scheme using either quintic B spline collocation or the generalized operator compact implicit approach to generate a fourth order accurate algorithm is particularly well suited for use on the present problem. High cell Reynolds number behavior leads to favoring the generalized operator compact implicit approach over the quintic B spline collocation method.

  11. An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential force displacement model for granular-flow simulations: Displacement-driven formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Vu-Quoc, Loc

    2007-07-01

    We present in this paper the displacement-driven version of a tangential force-displacement (TFD) model that accounts for both elastic and plastic deformations together with interfacial friction occurring in collisions of spherical particles. This elasto-plastic frictional TFD model, with its force-driven version presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, L. Lesburg, X. Zhang. An accurate tangential force-displacement model for granular-flow simulations: contacting spheres with plastic deformation, force-driven formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 196(1) (2004) 298-326], is consistent with the elasto-plastic frictional normal force-displacement (NFD) model presented in [L. Vu-Quoc, X. Zhang. An elasto-plastic contact force-displacement model in the normal direction: displacement-driven version, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series A 455 (1991) 4013-4044]. Both the NFD model and the present TFD model are based on the concept of additive decomposition of the radius of contact area into an elastic part and a plastic part. The effect of permanent indentation after impact is represented by a correction to the radius of curvature. The effect of material softening due to plastic flow is represented by a correction to the elastic moduli. The proposed TFD model is accurate, and is validated against nonlinear finite element analyses involving plastic flows in both the loading and unloading conditions. The proposed consistent displacement-driven, elasto-plastic NFD and TFD models are designed for implementation in computer codes using the discrete-element method (DEM) for granular-flow simulations. The model is shown to be accurate and is validated against nonlinear elasto-plastic finite-element analysis.

  12. Multigrid Acceleration of Time-Accurate DNS of Compressible Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeze, Jan; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans; Streng, Martin

    1996-01-01

    An efficient scheme for the direct numerical simulation of 3D transitional and developed turbulent flow is presented. Explicit and implicit time integration schemes for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. The nonlinear system resulting from the implicit time discretization is solved with an iterative method and accelerated by the application of a multigrid technique. Since we use central spatial discretizations and no artificial dissipation is added to the equations, the smoothing method is less effective than in the more traditional use of multigrid in steady-state calculations. Therefore, a special prolongation method is needed in order to obtain an effective multigrid method. This simulation scheme was studied in detail for compressible flow over a flat plate. In the laminar regime and in the first stages of turbulent flow the implicit method provides a speed-up of a factor 2 relative to the explicit method on a relatively coarse grid. At increased resolution this speed-up is enhanced correspondingly.

  13. An affordable and accurate conductivity probe for density measurements in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Marco; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In stratified flow experiments, conductivity (combined with temperature) is often used to measure density. The probes typically used can provide very fine spatial scales, but can be fragile, expensive to replace, and sensitive to environmental noise. A complementary instrument, comprising a low-cost conductivity probe, would prove valuable in a wide range of applications where resolving extremely small spatial scales is not needed. We propose using micro-USB cables as the actual conductivity sensors. By removing the metallic shield from a micro-B connector, 5 gold-plated microelectrodes are exposed and available for 4-wire measurements. These have a cell constant ~550m-1, an intrinsic thermal noise of at most 30pA/Hz1/2, as well as sub-millisecond time response, making them highly suitable for many stratified flow measurements. In addition, we present the design of a custom electronic board (Arduino-based and Matlab-controlled) for simultaneous acquisition from 4 sensors, with resolution (in conductivity, and resulting density) exceeding the performance of typical existing probes. We illustrate the use of our conductivity-measuring system through stratified flow experiments, and describe plans to release simple instructions to construct our complete system for around 200.

  14. Third-order-accurate numerical methods for efficient, large time-step solutions of mixed linear and nonlinear problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate numerical methods for large-scale nonlinear magneto-fluid turbulence calculations. These methods should not only increase the current state of the art in terms of accuracy, but should also continue to optimize other desired properties such as simplicity, minimized computation, minimized memory requirements, and robust stability. This includes the ability to stably solve stiff problems with long time-steps. This work discusses a general methodology for deriving higher-order numerical methods. It also discusses how the selection of various choices can affect the desired properties. The explicit discussion focuses on third-order Runge-Kutta methods, including general solutions and five examples. The study investigates the linear numerical analysis of these methods, including their accuracy, general stability, and stiff stability. Additional appendices discuss linear multistep methods, discuss directions for further work, and exhibit numerical analysis results for some other commonly used lower-order methods.

  15. Higher and lowest order mixed finite element approximation of subsurface flow problems with solutions of low regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, Markus

    2008-02-01

    In this work we study mixed finite element approximations of Richards' equation for simulating variably saturated subsurface flow and simultaneous reactive solute transport. Whereas higher order schemes have proved their ability to approximate reliably reactive solute transport (cf., e.g. [Bause M, Knabner P. Numerical simulation of contaminant biodegradation by higher order methods and adaptive time stepping. Comput Visual Sci 7;2004:61-78]), the Raviart- Thomas mixed finite element method ( RT0) with a first order accurate flux approximation is popular for computing the underlying water flow field (cf. [Bause M, Knabner P. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods. Adv Water Resour 27;2004:565-581, Farthing MW, Kees CE, Miller CT. Mixed finite element methods and higher order temporal approximations for variably saturated groundwater flow. Adv Water Resour 26;2003:373-394, Starke G. Least-squares mixed finite element solution of variably saturated subsurface flow problems. SIAM J Sci Comput 21;2000:1869-1885, Younes A, Mosé R, Ackerer P, Chavent G. A new formulation of the mixed finite element method for solving elliptic and parabolic PDE with triangular elements. J Comp Phys 149;1999:148-167, Woodward CS, Dawson CN. Analysis of expanded mixed finite element methods for a nonlinear parabolic equation modeling flow into variably saturated porous media. SIAM J Numer Anal 37;2000:701-724]). This combination might be non-optimal. Higher order techniques could increase the accuracy of the flow field calculation and thereby improve the prediction of the solute transport. Here, we analyse the application of the Brezzi- Douglas- Marini element ( BDM1) with a second order accurate flux approximation to elliptic, parabolic and degenerate problems whose solutions lack the regularity that is assumed in optimal order error analyses. For the flow field calculation a superiority of the BDM1 approach to the RT0 one is

  16. Using a highly accurate self-stop Cu-CMP model in the design flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izuha, Kyoko; Sakairi, Takashi; Shibuki, Shunichi; Bora, Monalisa; Hatem, Osama; Ghulghazaryan, Ruben; Strecker, Norbert; Wilson, Jeff; Takeshita, Noritsugu

    2010-03-01

    An accurate model for the self-stop copper chemical mechanical polishing (Cu-CMP) process has been developed using CMP modeling technology from Mentor Graphics. This technology was applied on data from Sony to create and optimize copper electroplating (ECD), Cu-CMP, and barrier metal polishing (BM-CMP) process models. These models take into account layout pattern dependency, long range diffusion and planarization effects, as well as microloading from local pattern density. The developed ECD model accurately predicted erosion and dishing over the entire range of width and space combinations present on the test chip. Then, the results of the ECD model were used as an initial structure to model the Cu-CMP step. Subsequently, the result of Cu-CMP was used for the BM-CMP model creation. The created model was successful in reproducing the measured data, including trends for a broad range of metal width and densities. Its robustness is demonstrated by the fact that it gives acceptable prediction of final copper thickness data although the calibration data included noise from line scan measurements. Accuracy of the Cu-CMP model has a great impact on the prediction results for BM-CMP. This is a critical feature for the modeling of high precision CMP such as self-stop Cu-CMP. Finally, the developed model could successfully extract planarity hotspots that helped identify potential problems in production chips before they were manufactured. The output thickness values of metal and dielectric can be used to drive layout enhancement tools and improve the accuracy of timing analysis.

  17. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid–particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid–particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge–Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and −0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered

  18. Fast and accurate advection of sharp discontinuities in Geophysical flows using hybrid implicit surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Henri

    2010-05-01

    Advection is one of the major processes that commonly acts on various scales in nature (core formation, mantle convective stirring, multi-phase flows in magma chambers, salt diapirism ...). While this process can be modeled numerically by solving conservation equations, various geodynamic scenarios involve advection of quantities with sharp discontinuities. Unfortunately, in these cases modeling numerically pure advection becomes very challenging, in particular because sharp discontinuities lead to numerical instabilities, which prevent the local use of high order numerical schemes. Several approaches have been used in computational geodynamics in order to overcome this difficulty, with variable amounts of success. Despite the use of correcting filters or non-oscillatory, shock-preserving schemes, Eulerian (fixed grid) techniques generally suffer from artificial numerical diffusion. Lagrangian approaches (dynamic grids or particles) tend to be more popular in computational geodynamics because they are not prone to excessive numerical diffusion. However, these approaches are generally computationally expensive, especially in 3D, and can suffer from spurious statistical noise. As an alternative to these aforementioned approaches, I have applied a relatively recent Particle Level set method [Enright et al., 2002] for modeling advection of quantities with the presence of sharp discontinuities. I have adapted this improved method, which combines the best of Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, and I have tested it against well known benchmarks and classical Geodynamic flows. In each case the Particle Level Set method accuracy equals or is better than other Eulerian and Lagrangian methods, and leads to significantly smaller computational cost, in particular in three-dimensional flows, where the reduction of computational time for modeling advection processes is most needed.

  19. Step Bunching: Influence of Impurities and Solution Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Vekilov, P. G.; Coriell, S. R.; Murray, B. T.; McFadden, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    Step bunching results in striations even at relatively early stages of its development and in inclusions of mother liquor at the later stages. Therefore, eliminating step bunching is crucial for high crystal perfection. At least 5 major effects causing and influencing step bunching are known: (1) Basic morphological instability of stepped interfaces. It is caused by concentration gradient in the solution normal to the face and by the redistribution of solute tangentially to the interface which redistribution enhances occasional perturbations in step density due to various types of noise; (2) Aggravation of the above basic instability by solution flowing tangentially to the face in the same directions as the steps or stabilization of equidistant step train if these flows are antiparallel; (3) Enhanced bunching at supersaturation where step velocity v increases with relative supersaturation s much faster than linear. This v(s) dependence is believed to be associated with impurities. The impurities of which adsorption time is comparable with the time needed to deposit one lattice layer may also be responsible for bunching; (4) Very intensive solution flow stabilizes growing interface even at parallel solution and step flows; (5) Macrosteps were observed to nucleate at crystal corners and edges. Numerical simulation, assuming step-step interactions via surface diffusion also show that step bunching may be induced by random step nucleation at the facet edge and by discontinuity in the step density (a ridge) somewhere in the middle of a face. The corresponding bunching patterns produce the ones observed in experiment. The nature of step bunching generated at the corners and edges and by dislocation step sources, as well as the also relative importance and interrelations between mechanisms 1-5 is not clear, both from experimental and theoretical standpoints. Furthermore, several laws controlling the evolution of existing step bunches have been suggested, though

  20. Ghost particle velocimetry: accurate 3D flow visualization using standard lab equipment.

    PubMed

    Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Secchi, Eleonora; Piazza, Roberto

    2013-07-26

    We describe and test a new approach to particle velocimetry, based on imaging and cross correlating the scattering speckle pattern generated on a near-field plane by flowing tracers with a size far below the diffraction limit, which allows reconstructing the velocity pattern in microfluidic channels without perturbing the flow. As a matter of fact, adding tracers is not even strictly required, provided that the sample displays sufficiently refractive-index fluctuations. For instance, phase separation in liquid mixtures in the presence of shear is suitable to be directly investigated by this "ghost particle velocimetry" technique, which just requires a microscope with standard lamp illumination equipped with a low-cost digital camera. As a further bonus, the peculiar spatial coherence properties of the illuminating source, which displays a finite longitudinal coherence length, allows for a 3D reconstruction of the profile with a resolution of few tenths of microns and makes the technique suitable to investigate turbid samples with negligible multiple scattering effects.

  1. An adaptive solution domain algorithm for solving multiphase flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, A. K.; Parker, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive solution domain (ASD) finite-element model for simulating hydrocarbon spills has been developed that is computationally more efficient than conventional numerical methods. Coupled flow of water and oil with an air phase at constant pressure is considered. In the ASD formulation, the solution domain for water- and oil-flow equations is restricted by eliminating elements from the global matrix assembly which are not experiencing significant changes in fluid saturations or pressures. When any nodes of an element exhibit changes in fluid pressures more than a stipulated tolerance τ, or changes in fluid saturations greater than tolerance τ 2 during the current time step, it is labeled active and included in the computations for the next iteration. This formulation achieves computational efficiency by solving the flow equations for only the part of the domain where changes in fluid pressure or the saturations take place above stipulated tolerances. Examples involving infiltration and redistribution of oil in 1- and 2-D spatial domains are described to illustrate the application of the ASD method and the savings in the processor time achieved by this formulation. Savings in the computational effort up to 84% during infiltration and 63% during redistribution were achieved for the 2-D example problem.

  2. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5 m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  3. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions.

  4. Unsteady fluid flow in a slightly curved pipe: A comparative study of a matched asymptotic expansions solution with a single analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaris, Gerasimos A. T.; Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Karahalios, George T.

    2016-08-01

    The present work is motivated by the fact that blood flow in the aorta and the main arteries is governed by large finite values of the Womersley number α and for such values of α there is not any analytical solution in the literature. The existing numerical solutions, although accurate, give limited information about the factors that affect the flow, whereas an analytical approach has an advantage in that it can provide physical insight to the flow mechanism. Having this in mind, we seek analytical solution to the equations of the fluid flow driven by a sinusoidal pressure gradient in a slightly curved pipe of circular cross section when the Womersley number varies from small finite to infinite values. Initially the equations of motion are expanded in terms of the curvature ratio δ and the resulting linearized equations are solved analytically in two ways. In the first, we match the solution for the main core to that for the Stokes boundary layer. This solution is valid for very large values of α. In the second, we derive a straightforward single solution valid to the entire flow region and for 8 ≤ α < ∞, a range which includes the values of α that refer to the physiological flows. Each solution contains expressions for the axial velocity, the stream function, and the wall stresses and is compared to the analogous forms presented in other studies. The two solutions give identical results to each other regarding the axial flow but differ in the secondary flow and the circumferential wall stress, due to the approximations employed in the matched asymptotic expansion process. The results on the stream function from the second solution are in agreement with analogous results from other numerical solutions. The second solution predicts that the atherosclerotic plaques may develop in any location around the cross section of the aortic wall unlike to the prescribed locations predicted by the first solution. In addition, it gives circumferential wall stresses

  5. ElVis: A System for the Accurate and Interactive Visualization of High-Order Finite Element Solutions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B; Liu, E; Kirby, R M; Haimes, R

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the Element Visualizer (ElVis), a new, open-source scientific visualization system for use with high-order finite element solutions to PDEs in three dimensions. This system is designed to minimize visualization errors of these types of fields by querying the underlying finite element basis functions (e.g., high-order polynomials) directly, leading to pixel-exact representations of solutions and geometry. The system interacts with simulation data through runtime plugins, which only require users to implement a handful of operations fundamental to finite element solvers. The data in turn can be visualized through the use of cut surfaces, contours, isosurfaces, and volume rendering. These visualization algorithms are implemented using NVIDIA's OptiX GPU-based ray-tracing engine, which provides accelerated ray traversal of the high-order geometry, and CUDA, which allows for effective parallel evaluation of the visualization algorithms. The direct interface between ElVis and the underlying data differentiates it from existing visualization tools. Current tools assume the underlying data is composed of linear primitives; high-order data must be interpolated with linear functions as a result. In this work, examples drawn from aerodynamic simulations-high-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element solutions of aerodynamic flows in particular-will demonstrate the superiority of ElVis' pixel-exact approach when compared with traditional linear-interpolation methods. Such methods can introduce a number of inaccuracies in the resulting visualization, making it unclear if visual artifacts are genuine to the solution data or if these artifacts are the result of interpolation errors. Linear methods additionally cannot properly visualize curved geometries (elements or boundaries) which can greatly inhibit developers' debugging efforts. As we will show, pixel-exact visualization exhibits none of these issues, removing the visualization scheme as a source of

  6. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  7. CFD and PTV steady flow investigation in an anatomically accurate abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Boutsianis, Evangelos; Guala, Michele; Olgac, Ufuk; Wildermuth, Simon; Hoyer, Klaus; Ventikos, Yiannis; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in computational and experimental flow investigations within abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). This task stipulates advanced grid generation techniques and cross-validation because of the anatomical complexity. The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of velocity measurements by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in realistic AAA models. Computed tomography and rapid prototyping were combined to digitize and construct a silicone replica of a patient-specific AAA. Three-dimensional velocity measurements were acquired using PTV under steady averaged resting boundary conditions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were subsequently carried out with identical boundary conditions. The computational grid was created by splitting the luminal volume into manifold and nonmanifold subsections. They were filled with tetrahedral and hexahedral elements, respectively. Grid independency was tested on three successively refined meshes. Velocity differences of about 1% in all three directions existed mainly within the AAA sack. Pressure revealed similar variations, with the sparser mesh predicting larger values. PTV velocity measurements were taken along the abdominal aorta and showed good agreement with the numerical data. The results within the aneurysm neck and sack showed average velocity variations of about 5% of the mean inlet velocity. The corresponding average differences increased for all velocity components downstream the iliac bifurcation to as much as 15%. The two domains differed slightly due to flow-induced forces acting on the silicone model. Velocity quantification through narrow branches was problematic due to decreased signal to noise ratio at the larger local velocities. Computational wall pressure and shear fields are also presented. The agreement between CFD simulations and the PTV experimental data was confirmed by three-dimensional velocity comparisons at several locations within the investigated AAA

  8. TRIM—3D: a three-dimensional model for accurate simulation of shallow water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, Vincenzo; Bertolazzi, Enrico; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1993-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference formulation for the numerical solution of three-dimensional tidal circulation is discussed. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds equations in which the pressure is assumed to be hydrostatic. A minimal degree of implicitness has been introduced in the finite difference formula so that the resulting algorithm permits the use of large time steps at a minimal computational cost. This formulation includes the simulation of flooding and drying of tidal flats, and is fully vectorizable for an efficient implementation on modern vector computers. The high computational efficiency of this method has made it possible to provide the fine details of circulation structure in complex regions that previous studies were unable to obtain. For proper interpretation of the model results suitable interactive graphics is also an essential tool.

  9. A second-order accurate kinetic-theory-based method for inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Suresh M.

    1986-01-01

    An upwind method for the numerical solution of the Euler equations is presented. This method, called the kinetic numerical method (KNM), is based on the fact that the Euler equations are moments of the Boltzmann equation of the kinetic theory of gases when the distribution function is Maxwellian. The KNM consists of two phases, the convection phase and the collision phase. The method is unconditionally stable and explicit. It is highly vectorizable and can be easily made total variation diminishing for the distribution function by a suitable choice of the interpolation strategy. The method is applied to a one-dimensional shock-propagation problem and to a two-dimensional shock-reflection problem.

  10. Lie group analysis and similarity solution for fractional Blasius flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Mingyang; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation for boundary layer flow of viscoelastic fluids past a flat plate. Fractional-order Blasius equation with spatial fractional Riemann-Liouville derivative is derived firstly by using Lie group transformation. The solution is obtained numerically by the generalized shooting method, employing the shifted Grünwald formula and classical fourth order Runge-Kutta method as the iterative scheme. The effects of the order of fractional derivative and the generalized Reynolds number on the velocity profiles are analyzed and discussed. Numerical results show that the smaller the value of the fractional order derivative leads to the faster velocity of viscoelastic fluids near the plate but not to hold near the outer flow. As the Reynolds number increases, the fluid is moving faster in the whole boundary layer consistently.

  11. Multidomain solution algorithm for potential flow computations around complex configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquotte, Olivier-Pierre; Godard, Jean-Luc

    1994-04-01

    A method is presented for the computation of irrotational transonic flows of perfect gas around a wide class of geometries. It is based on the construction of a multidomain structured grid and then on the solution of the full potential equation discretized with finite elements. The novelty of the paper is the combination of three embedded algorithms: a mixed fixed-point/Newton algorithm to treat the non-linearity, a multidomain conjugate gradient algorithm to handle the grid topology and another conjugate gradient algorithm in each of the structured domains. This method has made possible the calculations of flows around geometries that cannot be treated in a structured approach without the multidomain algorithm; an application of this method to the study of the wing-pylon-nacelle interactions is presented.

  12. Analytical solution for inviscid flow inside an evaporating sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Felske, James D

    2009-01-01

    Inviscid flow within an evaporating sessile drop is analyzed. The field equation E;{2}psi=0 is solved for the stream function. The exact analytical solution is obtained for arbitrary contact angle and distribution of evaporative flux along the free boundary. Specific results and computations are presented for evaporation corresponding to both uniform flux and purely diffusive gas phase transport into an infinite ambient. Wetting and nonwetting contact angles are considered, with flow patterns in each case being illustrated. The limiting behaviors of small contact angle and droplets of hemispherical shape are treated. All of the above categories are considered for the cases of droplets whose contact lines are either pinned or free to move during evaporation.

  13. Numerical solution of periodic vortical flows about a thin airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.; Atassi, Hafiz M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for computing periodic, three-dimensional, vortical flows around isolated airfoils. The unsteady velocity is split into a vortical component which is a known function of the upstream flow conditions and the Lagrangian coordinates of the mean flow, and an irrotational field whose potential satisfies a nonconstant-coefficient, inhomogeneous, convective wave equation. Solutions for thin airfoils at zero degrees incidence to the mean flow are presented in this paper. Using an elliptic coordinate transformation, the computational domain is transformed into a rectangle. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is applied to the unsteady pressure on the grid line corresponding to the far field boundary. The results are compared with a Possio solver, and it is shown that for maximum accuracy the grid should depend on both the Mach number and reduced frequency. Finally, in order to assess the range of validity of the classical thin airfoil approximation, results for airfoils with zero thickness are compared with results for airfoils with small thickness.

  14. A 'similarity' solution for laminar swirling core flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D. G.

    1984-05-01

    The far downstream region of laminar core flows with weak, strong, or very strong swirl embedded in a uniform parallel following stream is investigated analytically. Linearized similarity solutions based on the small-axial-disturbance-velocity assumption of Oseen are obtained using methods similar to those employed by Batchelor (1964) for strong trailing vortices. Strong swirl is shown to reduce axial velocity on and near the core axis, with two reversals as distance from the axis increases. Very strong swirl (a momentumless jet) is associated with an axial velocity profile having its maximum off the center line.

  15. New discretization and solution techniques for incompressible viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Several topics arising in the finite element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are considered. Specifically, the question of choosing finite element velocity/pressure spaces is addressed, particularly from the viewpoint of achieving stable discretizations leading to convergent pressure approximations. The role of artificial viscosity in viscous flow calculations is studied, emphasizing work by several researchers for the anisotropic case. The last section treats the problem of solving the nonlinear systems of equations which arise from the discretization. Time marching methods and classical iterative techniques, as well as some modifications are mentioned.

  16. Solution of the complete Curtiss-Bird model for polymeric liquids subjected to simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanou, Pavlos S.; Kröger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The complete kinetic theory model for concentrated polymer solutions and melts proposed by Curtiss and Bird is solved for shear flow: (a) analytically by providing a solution for the single-link (or configurational) distribution function as a real basis spherical harmonics expansion and then calculating the materials functions in shear flow up to second order in the dimensionless shear rate and, (b) numerically via the execution of Brownian dynamics simulations. These two methods are actually complementary to each other as the former is accurate only for small dimensionless shear rates where the latter produces results with increasingly large uncertainties. The analytical expansions of the material functions with respect to the dimensionless shear rate reduce to those of the extensively studied, simplified Curtiss-Bird model when ɛ' = 0, and to the rigid rod when ɛ' = 1. It is known that the power-law behavior at high shear rates is very different for these two extremal cases. We employ Brownian dynamics simulation to not only recover the limiting cases but to find a gradual variation of the power-law behaviors at large dimensionless shear rates upon varying ɛ'. The fact that experimental data are usually located between these two extremes strongly advocates the significance of studying the solution of the Curtiss-Bird model. This is exemplified in this work by comparing the solution of this model with available rheological data for semiflexible biological systems that are clearly not captured by the original Doi-Edwards or simplified Curtiss-Bird models.

  17. Numerical Treatment of Stokes Solvent Flow and Solute-Solvent Interfacial Dynamics for Nonpolar Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Zhou, Shenggao; Moore, David K; Cheng, Li-Tien; Li, Bo

    2016-05-01

    We design and implement numerical methods for the incompressible Stokes solvent flow and solute-solvent interface motion for nonpolar molecules in aqueous solvent. The balance of viscous force, surface tension, and van der Waals type dispersive force leads to a traction boundary condition on the solute-solvent interface. To allow the change of solute volume, we design special numerical boundary conditions on the boundary of a computational domain through a consistency condition. We use a finite difference ghost fluid scheme to discretize the Stokes equation with such boundary conditions. The method is tested to have a second-order accuracy. We combine this ghost fluid method with the level-set method to simulate the motion of the solute-solvent interface that is governed by the solvent fluid velocity. Numerical examples show that our method can predict accurately the blow up time for a test example of curvature flow and reproduce the polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of some simple model molecular systems.

  18. Approximate solutions for Forchheimer flow during water injection and water production in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Moutsopoulos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the hydraulics around injection and production wells in unconfined aquifers associated with rainwater and reclaimed water aquifer storage schemes is an issue of increasing importance. Much work has been done previously to understand the mathematics associated with Darcy's law in this context. However, groundwater flow velocities around injection and production wells are likely to be sufficiently large such as to induce significant non-Darcy effects. This article presents a mathematical analysis to look at Forchheimer's equation in the context of water injection and water production in unconfined aquifers. Three different approximate solutions are derived using quasi-steady-state assumptions and the method of matched asymptotic expansion. The resulting approximate solutions are shown to be accurate for a wide range of practical scenarios by comparison with a finite difference solution to the full problem of concern. The approximate solutions have led to an improved understanding of the flow dynamics. They can also be used as verification tools for future numerical models in this context.

  19. MAST solution of advection problems in irrotational flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2007-03-01

    A new numerical-analytical Eulerian procedure is proposed for the solution of convection-dominated problems in the case of existing scalar potential of the flow field. The methodology is based on the conservation inside each computational elements of the 0th and 1st order effective spatial moments of the advected variable. This leads to a set of small ODE systems solved sequentially, one element after the other over all the computational domain, according to a MArching in Space and Time technique. The proposed procedure shows the following advantages: (1) it guarantees the local and global mass balance; (2) it is unconditionally stable with respect to the Courant number, (3) the solution in each cell needs information only from the upstream cells and does not require wider and wider stencils as in most of the recently proposed higher-order methods; (4) it provides a monotone solution. Several 1D and 2D numerical test have been performed and results have been compared with analytical solutions, as well as with results provided by other recent numerical methods.

  20. Preferential flow and segregation of porewater solutes in Wetland sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Chambers, R.M.; Hoelscher, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Sediment macropores (with effective diameters larger than 100 ??m) comprise 11% of the bulk sediment volume in a tidal freshwater wetland vegetated with Peltandra virginica. In order to determine effects of macroporous sediment structure on solute transport, we conducted a solute tracer experiment in the sediment. The effective transport volume (??eff, the volume of sediment through which solute was transported normalized to sediment bulk volume) was 0.15 cm3 cm-3, which is considerably smaller than the total pore space that is potentially available for transport (porosity of sediment is 0.63 cm3 cm-3). A mean transport time of 13 d was required to flush preferential flow paths in Peltandra hummocks; hydrologic turnover of the volumetrically dominant matrix pores (0.53 cm3 cm-3) was apparently much slower. Based on porewater sampler design and hydrological principles, we suggest that N2-purged tension solution samplers and diffusion equilibrators preferentially sample porewater from macropore and matrix domains, respectively. Dissolved ammonium and orthophosphate concentrations were three-fold higher in matrix pores compared to macropores, which is consistent with our finding that more rapid hydrological flushing occurred in macropores compared to matrix pores. Further evaluation of porewater sampler designs in macroporous sediment is needed to improve studies of hydrologic transport and biogeochemical cycling in wetlands. ?? 1995 Estuarine Research Federation.

  1. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  2. Electrochemical valveless flow microsystems for ultra fast and accurate analysis of total isoflavones with integrated calibration.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Antonio Javier; Crevillén, Agustín González; de la Fuente, Pedro; González, María Cristina; Escarpa, Alberto

    2007-04-01

    A novel strategy integrating methodological calibration and analysis on board on a planar first-generation microfluidics system for the determination of total isoflavones in soy samples is proposed. The analytical strategy is conceptually proposed and successfully demonstrated on the basis of (i) the microchip design (with the possibility to use both reservoirs), (ii) the analytical characteristics of the developed method (statically zero intercept and excellent robustness between calibration slopes, RSDs < 5%), (iii) the irreversible electrochemical behaviour of isoflavone oxidation (no significant electrode fouling effect was observed between calibration and analysis runs) and (iv) the inherent versatility of the electrochemical end-channel configurations (possibility of use different pumping and detection media). Repeatability obtained in both standard (calibration) and real soy samples (analysis) with values of RSD less than 1% for the migration times indicated the stability of electroosmotic flow (EOF) during both integrated operations. The accuracy (an error of less than 6%) is demonstrated for the first time in these microsystems using a documented secondary standard from the Drug Master File (SW/1211/03) as reference material. Ultra fast calibration and analysis of total isoflavones in soy samples was integrated successfully employing 60 s each; enhancing notably the analytical performance of these microdevices with an important decrease in overall analysis times (less than 120 s) and with an increase in accuracy by a factor of 3.

  3. A computationally efficient and accurate numerical representation of thermodynamic properties of steam and water for computations of non-equilibrium condensing steam flow in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubý, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical modeling of the non-equilibrium condensing transonic steam flow in the complex 3D geometry of a steam turbine is a demanding problem both concerning the physical concepts and the required computational power. Available accurate formulations of steam properties IAPWS-95 and IAPWS-IF97 require much computation time. For this reason, the modelers often accept the unrealistic ideal-gas behavior. Here we present a computation scheme based on a piecewise, thermodynamically consistent representation of the IAPWS-95 formulation. Density and internal energy are chosen as independent variables to avoid variable transformations and iterations. On the contrary to the previous Tabular Taylor Series Expansion Method, the pressure and temperature are continuous functions of the independent variables, which is a desirable property for the solution of the differential equations of the mass, energy, and momentum conservation for both phases.

  4. Numerical solution of transonic wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Gundy, K. L.; Thomas, S. D.; Chaderjian, N. M.; Flores, J.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic flow fields about wing geometries are computed using an Euler/Navier-Stokes approach in which the flow field is divided into several zones. The grid zones immediately adjacent to the wing surface are suitably clustered and solved with the Navier-Stokes equations. Grid zones removed from the wing are less finely clustered and are solved with the Euler equations. Wind tunnel wall effects are easily and accurately modeled with the new grid-zoning algorithm because the wind tunnel grid is constructed as an exact subset of the corresponding free-air grid. Solutions are obtained that are in good agreement with experiment, including cases with significant wind tunnel wall effects and shock-induced separation on the upper wing surface.

  5. Flow induced/ refined solution crystallization of a semiconducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc A.

    Organic photovoltaics, a new generation of solar cells, has gained scientific and economic interests due to the ability of solution-processing and potentially low-cost power production. Though, the low power conversion efficiency of organic/ plastic solar cells is one of the most pertinent challenges that has appealed to research communities from many different fields including materials science and engineering, electrical engineering, chemical engineering, physics and chemistry. This thesis focuses on investigating and controlling the morphology of a semi-conducting, semi-crystalline polymer formed under shear-flow. Molecular structures and processing techniques are critical factors that significantly affect the morphology formation in the plastic solar cells, thus influencing device performance. In this study, flow-induced solution crystallization of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a poor solvent, 2-ethylnapthalene (2-EN) was utilized to make a paint-like, structural liquid. The polymer crystals observed in this structured paint are micrometers long, nanometers in cross section and have a structure similar to that formed under quiescent conditions. There is pi-pi stacking order along the fibril axis, while polymer chain folding occurs along the fibril width and the order of the side-chain stacking is along fibril height. It was revealed that shear-flow not only induces P3HT crystallization from solution, but also refines and perfects the P3HT crystals. Thus, a general strategy to refine the semiconducting polymer crystals from solution under shear-flow has been developed and employed by simply tuning the processing (shearing) conditions with respect to the dissolution temperature of P3HT in 2-EN. The experimental results demonstrated that shear removes defects and allows more perfect crystals to be formed. There is no glass transition temperature observed in the crystals formed using the flow-induced crystallization indicating a significantly different

  6. Two touching spherical drops in uniaxial extensional flow: analytic solution to the creeping flow problem.

    PubMed

    Baldessari, Fabio; Leal, L Gary

    2005-09-01

    We solve the problem of the creeping motion of a uniaxial extensional flow past two touching spherical drops when the line of centers is parallel to the axis of symmetry of the flow, using tangent sphere coordinates. We apply this solution to the case of two equal size drops. It provides an exact result for the equal and opposite force acting on each drop along the line of centers. We also use it to determine the magnitude of the internal recirculating flow in the vicinity of the rear stagnation point, which can be used to evaluate the importance of this flow on the film drainage process for two (nearly) touching drops in a coalescence process for the limiting case, Ca < 1.

  7. Low- and high-order accurate boundary conditions: From Stokes to Darcy porous flow modeled with standard and improved Brinkman lattice Boltzmann schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Goncalo; Talon, Laurent; Ginzburg, Irina

    2017-04-01

    is thoroughly evaluated in three benchmark tests, which are run throughout three distinctive permeability regimes. The first configuration is a horizontal porous channel, studied with a symbolic approach, where we construct the exact solutions of FEM and BF/IBF with different boundary schemes. The second problem refers to an inclined porous channel flow, which brings in as new challenge the formation of spurious boundary layers in LBM; that is, numerical artefacts that arise due to a deficient accommodation of the bulk solution by the low-accurate boundary scheme. The third problem considers a porous flow past a periodic square array of solid cylinders, which intensifies the previous two tests with the simulation of a more complex flow pattern. The ensemble of numerical tests provides guidelines on the effect of grid resolution and the TRT free collision parameter over the accuracy and the quality of the velocity field, spanning from Stokes to Darcy permeability regimes. It is shown that, with the use of the high-order accurate boundary schemes, the simple, uniform-mesh-based TRT-LBM formulation can even surpass the accuracy of FEM employing hardworking body-fitted meshes.

  8. FILMPAR: A parallel algorithm designed for the efficient and accurate computation of thin film flow on functional surfaces containing micro-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Thompson, H. M.; Gaskell, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    , industrial and physical applications. However, despite recent modelling advances, the accurate numerical solution of the equations governing such problems is still at a relatively early stage. Indeed, recent studies employing a simplifying long-wave approximation have shown that highly efficient numerical methods are necessary to solve the resulting lubrication equations in order to achieve the level of grid resolution required to accurately capture the effects of micro- and nano-scale topographical features. Solution method: A portable parallel multigrid algorithm has been developed for the above purpose, for the particular case of flow over submerged topographical features. Within the multigrid framework adopted, a W-cycle is used to accelerate convergence in respect of the time dependent nature of the problem, with relaxation sweeps performed using a fixed number of pre- and post-Red-Black Gauss-Seidel Newton iterations. In addition, the algorithm incorporates automatic adaptive time-stepping to avoid the computational expense associated with repeated time-step failure. Running time: 1.31 minutes using 128 processors on BlueGene/P with a problem size of over 16.7 million mesh points.

  9. A Highly Accurate Technique for the Treatment of Flow Equations at the Polar Axis in Cylindrical Coordinates using Series Expansions. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, George S.; Lele, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical methods for solving the flow equations in cylindrical or spherical coordinates should be able to capture the behavior of the exact solution near the regions where the particular form of the governing equations is singular. In this work we focus on the treatment of these numerical singularities for finite-differences methods by reinterpreting the regularity conditions developed in the context of pseudo-spectral methods. A generally applicable numerical method for treating the singularities present at the polar axis, when nonaxisymmetric flows are solved in cylindrical, coordinates using highly accurate finite differences schemes (e.g., Pade schemes) on non-staggered grids, is presented. Governing equations for the flow at the polar axis are derived using series expansions near r=0. The only information needed to calculate the coefficients in these equations are the values of the flow variables and their radial derivatives at the previous iteration (or time) level. These derivatives, which are multi-valued at the polar axis, are calculated without dropping the accuracy of the numerical method using a mapping of the flow domain from (0,R)*(0,2pi) to (-R,R)*(0,pi), where R is the radius of the computational domain. This allows the radial derivatives to be evaluated using high-order differencing schemes (e.g., compact schemes) at points located on the polar axis. The proposed technique is illustrated by results from simulations of laminar-forced jets and turbulent compressible jets using large eddy simulation (LES) methods. In term of the general robustness of the numerical method and smoothness of the solution close to the polar axis, the present results compare very favorably to similar calculations in which the equations are solved in Cartesian coordinates at the polar axis, or in which the singularity is removed by employing a staggered mesh in the radial direction without a mesh point at r=0, following the method proposed recently by Mohseni and Colonius

  10. Better Strategies for Finite Element Solutions of Variable Viscosity Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Phipps Morgan, Jason; Shi, Chao

    2010-05-01

    Accurate numerical solution of variable viscosity Stokes Flow is one of the most important issues for better geodynamic understanding of mantle convection and mantle melting. While a good Stokes solver is usually an integral part of a good Navier-Stokes solver, typically Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow of a fluid with uniform viscosity. The lumped-mass-matrix is an excellent and cheap preconditioner for uniform viscosity Stokes flow (cf. Maday and Patera, 1989), therefore for most applications to Navier-Stokes flow the ‘Stokes' part of the problem is viewed as well-resolved. Unfortunately, the inverse-viscosity-scaled lumped mass matrix does not work nearly as well to precondition Stokes flow in a fluid with strongly varying viscosity. This issue is already central to accurate numerical studies of convection in Earth's silicate-fluid mantle (May and Moresi, 2008; van Geenen et al., 2009; Burstedde et al., 2009) and may become central for researchers investigating Navier-Stokes problems with lateral variations in viscosity. Here we discuss several known computational hurdles to progress, and suggest strategies that offer promise in overcoming them. The choices for solving the discrete pressure equation arising from Stokes flow typically involve several tradeoffs between speed and storage requirements. In exact math, the discrete pressure matrix S is symmetric, so that it should be possible to use a symmetric preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) Krylov algorithm instead of needing an asymmetric GMRES (cf. Saad, 2003) or GCR (Generalized Conjugate Residual, cf. Van der Vorst, 2003) that would require ~10-50 times more storage of past search directions. However, a CG-like method requires that the action of both S and any pressure preconditioner must be almost perfectly symmetric. This means that we must be very careful about the effects of roundoff in any iterative solver-based pressure preconditioner that may introduce numerically asymmetric operators

  11. Photovoltaic Inverter Controllers Seeking AC Optimal Power Flow Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Dhople, Sairaj V.; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers future distribution networks featuring inverter-interfaced photovoltaic (PV) systems, and addresses the synthesis of feedback controllers that seek real- and reactive-power inverter setpoints corresponding to AC optimal power flow (OPF) solutions. The objective is to bridge the temporal gap between long-term system optimization and real-time inverter control, and enable seamless PV-owner participation without compromising system efficiency and stability. The design of the controllers is grounded on a dual ..epsilon..-subgradient method, while semidefinite programming relaxations are advocated to bypass the non-convexity of AC OPF formulations. Global convergence of inverter output powers is analytically established for diminishing stepsize rules for cases where: i) computational limits dictate asynchronous updates of the controller signals, and ii) inverter reference inputs may be updated at a faster rate than the power-output settling time.

  12. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schonherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support

  13. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  14. Analytical solutions to non-Fickian subsurface dispersion in uniform groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zou, S.; Xia, J.; Koussis, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained by the Fourier transform technique for the one-, two-, and three-dimensional transport of a conservative solute injected instantaneously in a uniform groundwater flow. These solutions account for dispersive non-linearity caused by the heterogeneity of the hydraulic properties of aquifer systems and can be used as building blocks to construct solutions by convolution (principle of superposition) for source conditions other than slug injection. The dispersivity is assumed to vary parabolically with time and is thus constant for the entire system at any given time. Two approaches for estimating time-dependent dispersion parameters are developed for two-dimensional plumes. They both require minimal field tracer test data and, therefore, represent useful tools for assessing real-world aquifer contamination sites. The first approach requires mapped plume-area measurements at two specific times after the tracer injection. The second approach requires concentration-versus-time data from two sampling wells through which the plume passes. Detailed examples and comparisons with other procedures show that the methods presented herein are sufficiently accurate and easier to use than other available methods.

  15. Prediction of Flow and Solute Transport in Fractured Media: Comparison of Metrics to Describe Effects of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slottke, D.; Ketcham, R. A.; Sharp, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    Fractures dominate fluid flow and transport of solutes when they are open and connected. The prediction of flow through fractured media has implications for development of water resources, petroleum reservoir exploitation, contamination and remediation assessment, and site evaluation for waste repositories. Assessing the impact of surface roughness on fluid flow and solute transport through fractured media from samples on the order of 100 cm2 assumes the existence of a relationship between fracture morphology and discharge that is scale invariant or at least smoothly transformable. Although some studies assume that the length scale at which surface roughness significantly contributes to the discharge through a fracture falls within the size of a typical hand sample, there is a dearth of empirical data supporting an extension of the relationships found at small scales to larger samples. Furthermore, an appropriate metric to describe a fracture volume accurately must be chosen. We compile data from physical flow tests and numerical modeling of two discrete natural fractures of different scales in rhyolitc tuff. The University of Texas HRXCT facility provided computed tomography representations of the fractures that allow analysis of surface roughness and aperture statistics at 0.25mm grid resolution, which form the basis for transmissivity field inputs to numerical models. We show that although a small (10cm2) representative surface can describe roughness, aperture fields are not so well behaved. We compare physical flow test results, modeled flow, and analytical solutions of the cubic law using various methods of assigning a meaningful aperture to illustrate the challenges of accurate modeling of fracture flow without a priori flow information. While a geometric mean aperture of the entire aperture field closely approximates the hydraulic aperture, an arbitrary profile mean aperture has little utility for predictive purposes.

  16. Two-dimensional flow nanometry of biological nanoparticles for accurate determination of their size and emission intensity

    PubMed Central

    Block, Stephan; Fast, Björn Johansson; Lundgren, Anders; Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Biological nanoparticles (BNPs) are of high interest due to their key role in various biological processes and use as biomarkers. BNP size and composition are decisive for their functions, but simultaneous determination of both properties with high accuracy remains challenging. Optical microscopy allows precise determination of fluorescence/scattering intensity, but not the size of individual BNPs. The latter is better determined by tracking their random motion in bulk, but the limited illumination volume for tracking this motion impedes reliable intensity determination. Here, we show that by attaching BNPs to a supported lipid bilayer, subjecting them to hydrodynamic flows and tracking their motion via surface-sensitive optical imaging enable determination of their diffusion coefficients and flow-induced drifts, from which accurate quantification of both BNP size and emission intensity can be made. For vesicles, the accuracy of this approach is demonstrated by resolving the expected radius-squared dependence of their fluorescence intensity for radii down to 15 nm. PMID:27658367

  17. Strategy for Accurate Detection of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Ground Pork Using a Lateral Flow Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Song; Chen, Ming-Hui; Zhang, Gang-Gang; Yu, Zhi-Biao; Liu, Dao-Feng; Xiong, Yong-Hua; Wei, Hua; Lai, Wei-Hua

    2017-04-02

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is known to cause serious diseases including hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. A gold nanoparticle lateral flow immunoassay (Au-LFIA) was used to detect Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground pork samples. False-positive results were detected using Au-LFIA; a Citrobacterfreundii strain was isolated from the ground pork samples and identified by using CHROmagar(TM) plates, API 20E, and 16S RNA sequencing. Since C.freundii showed cross-reactivity with E. coli O157:H7 when Au-LFIA test strips were used, a novel method combining modified enrichment with a lateral flow immunoassay for accurate and convenient detection of E. coli O157:H7 in ground pork was developed in this study to minimize these false positives. MacConkey broth was optimized for E. coli O157:H7 enrichment and C.freundii inhibition by the addition of 5 mg/L potassium tellurite and 0.10 mg/L cefixime. Using the proposed modified enrichment procedure, the false-positive rate of ground pork samples spiked with 100 CFU/g C.freundii decreased to 5%.

  18. A robust and accurate numerical method for transcritical turbulent flows at supercritical pressure with an arbitrary equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Soshi; Terashima, Hiroshi; Negishi, Hideyo

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses issues in high-fidelity numerical simulations of transcritical turbulent flows at supercritical pressure. The proposed strategy builds on a tabulated look-up table method based on REFPROP database for an accurate estimation of non-linear behaviors of thermodynamic and fluid transport properties at the transcritical conditions. Based on the look-up table method we propose a numerical method that satisfies high-order spatial accuracy, spurious-oscillation-free property, and capability of capturing the abrupt variation in thermodynamic properties across the transcritical contact surface. The method introduces artificial mass diffusivity to the continuity and momentum equations in a physically-consistent manner in order to capture the steep transcritical thermodynamic variations robustly while maintaining spurious-oscillation-free property in the velocity field. The pressure evolution equation is derived from the full compressible Navier–Stokes equations and solved instead of solving the total energy equation to achieve the spurious pressure oscillation free property with an arbitrary equation of state including the present look-up table method. Flow problems with and without physical diffusion are employed for the numerical tests to validate the robustness, accuracy, and consistency of the proposed approach.

  19. The Entropy Solutions for the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards Traffic Flow Model with a Discontinuous Flow-Density Relationship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    The entropy solutions for the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards traffic flow model with a discontinuous flow-density relationship Yadong Lu1, S.C. Wong2...Mengping Zhang3, Chi-Wang Shu4 Abstract In this paper we explicitly construct the entropy solutions for the Lighthill-Whitham- Richards (LWR) traffic...polynomials meet, and with piecewise linear initial condition and piecewise constant boundary conditions. The existence and uniqueness of entropy solutions

  20. On the gravitational signature of zonal flows in Jupiter-like planets: An analytical solution and its numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    It is expected that the Juno spacecraft will provide an accurate spectrum of the Jovian zonal gravitational coefficients that would be affected by both the deep zonal flow, if it exists, and the basic rotational distortion. We derive the first analytical solution, under the spheroidal-shape approximation, for the density anomaly induced by an internal zonal flow in rapidly rotating Jupiter-like planets. We compare the density anomaly of the analytical solution to that obtained from a fully numerical solution based on a three-dimensional finite element method; the two show excellent agreement. We apply the analytical solution to a rapidly rotating Jupiter-like planet and show that there exists a close relationship between the spatial structure of the zonal flow and the spectrum of zonal gravitational coefficients. We check the accuracy of the spheroidal-shape approximation by computing both the spheroidal and non-spheroidal solutions with exactly the same physical parameters. We also discuss implications of the new analytical solution for interpreting the future high-precision gravitational measurements of the Juno spacecraft.

  1. Automatic determination of chlorine without standard solutions using a biamperometric flow-batch analysis system.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Valberes B; Selva, Thiago M G; Coelho, Elaine C S; Santos, Francyana P; Antônio, Jadielson L S; Silva, José R; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Araújo, Mário C U

    2010-04-15

    This study presents an automatic analysis system that does not require the use of standard solutions. The system uses an electrochemical flow cell for in line generation of the standards, and operates under the standard addition technique. The versatility of this system was demonstrated by the development of a one key touch fully automatic method for the determination of total available chlorine in real samples. The extremely simple, accurate and inexpensive method was based simply on the biamperometric monitoring of the well known redox reaction of chlorine with iodide ions in a flow-batch system, where the produced iodine (triiodide ions) generates an electrical current proportional to the chlorine concentration in the sample. The flow-batch parameters were optimized to maximize the sensitivity without losses on the precision of the analysis. An excellent linear dependence between the biamperometric signal and the chlorine concentration for the standard additions and a good agreement between the proposed approach and a reference method were obtained. The method was successfully applied to determine chlorine in several different bleach and chlorinated water samples (r=0.9995, LOD=8.261 x 10(-7) mol L(-1)) and could be easily extended to other oxidants and samples. Comparison to a reference method and recoveries close to 100% demonstrated the reliability of the proposed method. In addition, low residue disposal and reagent consumption, allied with high accuracy and precision, make it very promising for routine applications.

  2. Multidomain spectral solutions of high-speed flows over blunt cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.

    1992-01-01

    A shock-fitted multidomain spectral collocation method is used to solve steady inviscid supersonic flows over two blunt, axisymmetric cones. The calculations are compared to a conical flow solution and to experimental data.

  3. THE FLOW AROUND A COSMIC STRING. I. HYDRODYNAMIC SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2015-05-10

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects which are hypothesized to be produced during inflation. Most searches for strings have relied on the string’s lensing of background galaxies or the cosmic microwave background. In this paper, I obtained a solution for the supersonic flow of collisional gas past the cosmic string which has two planar shocks with a shock compression ratio that depends on the angle defect of the string and its speed. The shocks result in the compression and heating of the gas and, given favorable conditions, particle acceleration. Gas heating and over-density in an unusual wedge shape can be detected by observing the Hi line at high redshifts. Particle acceleration can occur in the present-day universe when the string crosses the hot gas contained in galaxy clusters and, since the consequences of such a collision persist for cosmological timescales, could be located by looking at unusual large-scale radio sources situated on a single spatial plane.

  4. Forced Solutions of Streamwise Constant Plane Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayme, Dennice; McKeon, Beverley; Bamieh, Bassam; Doyle, John; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2010-11-01

    A two-dimensional, three-velocity component (2D/3C) model simulated under small-amplitude Gaussian forcing has been shown to capture salient features of turbulent plane Couette flow (Gayme et. al 2010). Periodic spanwise/wall-normal plane stream functions are used as input to develop forced 2D/3C streamwise velocities. The resulting steady-state solutions are qualitatively similar to a fully turbulent spatial field of DNS. Our analysis indicates that the momentum transfer which produces a `turbulent-like' mean profile requires a nonlinear streamwise velocity equation. A system theoretic approach is used to study amplification mechanisms which arise through this 2D/3C nonlinear coupling. The forcing required to produce each input is used to define an induced norm. The associated input-output response determines the energy optimal spanwise wavelength over a range of Reynolds numbers. We identify an important tradeoff between the linear amplification mechanism and the nonlinearity required to develop an appropriately shaped turbulent velocity profile. Acknowledgements: The research is supported by Boeing and AFOSR. B.J.M. gratefully acknowledges NSF-CAREER award no. 0747672 (program managers W. W. Schultz & H. H. Winter).

  5. Global regularity and uniqueness of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhifei

    We prove the global existence and regularity of weak solution for the 2-D liquid crystal flows with the large initial velocity. The uniqueness of weak solution is also proved by using the Littlewood-Paley analysis.

  6. Existence and uniqueness of solutions in general multisolute renal flow problems.

    PubMed

    Garner, J B; Kellogg, R B

    1988-01-01

    This paper considers systems of differential equations that describe flows in renal networks. The flow geometry is of the type that occurs in modelling the renal medulla. The unknowns in the system include the flow rate, the hydrostatic pressure, and the concentrations of the various solutes. Existence and uniqueness of solutions of the appropriate boundary value problems are established, in the case of small permeability coefficients and transport rates, or large diffusion coefficients and small resistance to flow constants.

  7. Approximate analytic solutions of stagnation point flow in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, V.; Tamizharasi, R.; Vajravelu, K.

    2009-06-01

    An efficient and new implicit perturbation technique is used to obtain approximate analytical series solution of Brinkmann equation governing the two-dimensional stagnation point flow in a porous medium. Analytical approximate solution of the classical two-dimensional stagnation point flow is obtained as a limiting case. Also, it is shown that the obtained higher order series solutions agree well with the computed numerical solutions.

  8. Impact of numerical artifact of the forward model in the inverse solution of density-dependent flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Mohamed K.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the effect of computational error on the inversion of a density-dependent flow and transport model, using SEAWAT and UCODE-2005 in an inverse identification of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity using head and concentration data from a 2-D laboratory experiment. We investigated inversions using three different solution schemes including variation of number of particles and time step length, in terms of the three aspects: the shape and smoothness of the objective function surface, the consequent impacts to the optimization, and the resulting Pareto analyses. This study demonstrates that the inversion is very sensitive to the choice of the forward model solution scheme. In particular, standard finite difference methods provide the smoothest objective function surface; however, this is obtained at the cost of numerical artifacts that can lead to erroneous warping of the objective function surface. Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes limit these impacts at the cost of more computation time, while the hybrid method of characteristics (HMOC) approach with increased particle numbers and/or reduced time step gives both smoothed and accurate objective function surface. Use of the most accurate methods (TVD and HMOC) did lead to successful inversion of the two parameters; however, with distinct results for Pareto analyses. These results illuminate the sensitivity of the inversion to a number of aspects of the forward solution of the density-driven flow problem and reveal that parameter values may result that are erroneous but that counteract numerical errors in the solution.

  9. On obtaining spectrally accurate solutions of linear differential equations with complex interfaces using the immersed interface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sudipta; Saha, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    Numerical solution of engineering problems with interfacial discontinuities requires exact implementation of the jump conditions else the accuracy deteriorates significantly; particularly, achieving spectral accuracy has been limited due to complex interface geometry and Gibbs phenomenon. We adopt a novel implementation of the immersed-interface method that satisfies the jump conditions at the interfaces exactly, in conjunction with the Chebyshev-collocation method. We consider solutions to linear second order ordinary and partial differential equations having a discontinuity in their zeroth and first derivatives across an interface traced by a complex curve. The solutions obtained demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to achieve spectral accuracy for discontinuous solutions across tortuous interfaces. The solution methodology is illustrated using two model problems: (i) an ordinary differential equation with jump conditions forced by an infinitely differentiable function, (ii) Poisson's equation having a discontinuous solution across interfaces that are ellipses of varying aspect ratio. The use of more polynomials in the direction of the major axis than the minor axis of the ellipse increases the convergence rate of the solution.

  10. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace Woan-chee

    1999-10-01

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  11. Equilibria and Travelling wave solutions for Couette and channel flows with longitudinal grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadarevu, Sabarish; Sharma, Ati; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-11-01

    Several classes of exact solutions for canonical flows have been computed by earlier researchers. These solutions are known to inform the flow of turbulence in state-space. We extend two classes of exact solutions, equilibria and travelling wave solutions, from flat-walled Couette and channel flows to grooved geometries with groove-amplitudes as high as 20% of channel half-height. These solutions provide insight into the mechanics of how a wavy wall could influence turbulent flow. Plotting scalars such as the average shear stress at the wall and the bulk velocity (for channel flows) allows us to identify branches of solutions that could have greater contributions to turbulence, and reconcile the curious phenomenon of drag reduction observed in some riblet-mounted boundary layer flows. Earlier researchers have proposed using modified boundary conditions (imposed on flat surfaces) as a substitute to imposing the traditional no-slip and impermeability conditions on a rough wall. We compare solutions for grooved flows to those for flat-walled flows with modified boundary conditions to evaluate the validity of such simplification to non-laminar solutions.

  12. Numerical solutions of atmospheric flow over semielliptical simulated hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, C. F.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric motion over obstacles on plane surfaces to compute simulated wind fields over terrain features was studied. Semielliptical, two dimensional geometry and numerical simulation of flow over rectangular geometries is also discussed. The partial differential equations for the vorticity, stream function, turbulence kinetic energy, and turbulence length scale were solved by a finite difference technique. The mechanism of flow separation induced by a semiellipse is the same as flow over a gradually sloping surface for which the flow separation is caused by the interaction between the viscous force, the pressure force, and the turbulence level. For flow over bluff bodies, a downstream recirculation bubble is created which increases the aspect ratio and/or the turbulence level results in flow reattachment close behind the obstacle.

  13. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in groundwater. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented in this report for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configuration in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems with uniform groundwater flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of select solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are described. (USGS)

  14. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute-transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in ground water. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configurations in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems having uniform ground-water flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of selected solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are included.

  15. Linearized numerical solution method for rotating coaxial disk flows at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Delgado, A.; Rath, H. J.

    A linearized solution method for rotating coaxial disk flows at moderate Reynolds numbers is discussed below. The analytical or numerical linearized similarity solutions agree with the nonlinear ones for infinite disk flows of the Stewartson-type as well as of the Batchelor-type with a small difference between angular velocities of both the disks. Over the inner portion of shrouded flows the computed results of the linearized partial differential equations have, overall, a good agreement with the solutions of the nonlinear von Karman similarity one and also with the complete Navier-Stokes solution.

  16. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for high Reynolds number incompressible turbulent flow. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    The full Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible turbulent flow must be solved to accurately represent all flow phenomena which occur in a high Reynolds number incompressible flow. A two layer algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model is used to represent the Reynolds stress in the primitive variable formulation. The development of the boundary-fitted coordinate systems makes the numerical solution of these equations feasible for arbitrarily shaped bodies. The nondimensional time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, including the turbulence mode, are represented by finite difference approximations in the transformed plane. The resulting coupled system of nonlinear algebraic equations is solved using a point successive over relaxation iteration. The test case considered was a NACA 64A010 airfoil section at an angle of attack of two degrees and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000.

  17. Analytical solutions for solute transport in groundwater and riverine flow using Green's Function Method and pertinent coordinate transformation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanskrityayn, Abhishek; Suk, Heejun; Kumar, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    In this study, analytical solutions of one-dimensional pollutant transport originating from instantaneous and continuous point sources were developed in groundwater and riverine flow using both Green's Function Method (GFM) and pertinent coordinate transformation method. Dispersion coefficient and flow velocity are considered spatially and temporally dependent. The spatial dependence of the velocity is linear, non-homogeneous and that of dispersion coefficient is square of that of velocity, while the temporal dependence is considered linear, exponentially and asymptotically decelerating and accelerating. Our proposed analytical solutions are derived for three different situations depending on variations of dispersion coefficient and velocity, respectively which can represent real physical processes occurring in groundwater and riverine systems. First case refers to steady solute transport situation in steady flow in which dispersion coefficient and velocity are only spatially dependent. The second case represents transient solute transport in steady flow in which dispersion coefficient is spatially and temporally dependent while the velocity is spatially dependent. Finally, the third case indicates transient solute transport in unsteady flow in which both dispersion coefficient and velocity are spatially and temporally dependent. The present paper demonstrates the concentration distribution behavior from a point source in realistically occurring flow domains of hydrological systems including groundwater and riverine water in which the dispersivity of pollutant's mass is affected by heterogeneity of the medium as well as by other factors like velocity fluctuations, while velocity is influenced by water table slope and recharge rate. Such capabilities give the proposed method's superiority about application of various hydrological problems to be solved over other previously existing analytical solutions. Especially, to author's knowledge, any other solution doesn

  18. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  19. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; ...

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the firstmore » type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides

  20. Numerical Solution of Inviscid Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Euler equations in 2D compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. The results are compared with the solution using the software Ansys Fluent 15.0.7.

  1. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  2. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  3. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  4. Reducing the Need for Accurate Stream Flow Forecasting for Water Supply Planning by Augmenting Reservoir Operations with Seawater Desalination and Wastewater Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, R.; Ng, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate stream flow forecasts are critical for reservoir operations for water supply planning. As the world urban population increases, the demand for water in cities is also increasing, making accurate forecasts even more important. However, accurate forecasting of stream flows is difficult owing to short- and long-term weather variations. We propose to reduce this need for accurate stream flow forecasts by augmenting reservoir operations with seawater desalination and wastewater recycling. We develop a robust operating policy for the joint operation of the three sources. With the joint model, we tap into the unlimited reserve of seawater through desalination, and make use of local supplies of wastewater through recycling. However, both seawater desalination and recycling are energy intensive and relatively expensive. Reservoir water on the other hand, is generally cheaper but is limited and variable in its availability, increasing the risk of water shortage during extreme climate events. We operate the joint system by optimizing it using a genetic algorithm to maximize water supply reliability and resilience while minimizing vulnerability subject to a budget constraint and for a given stream flow forecast. To compute the total cost of the system, we take into account the pumping cost of transporting reservoir water to its final destination, and the capital and operating costs of desalinating seawater and recycling wastewater. We produce results for different hydro climatic regions based on artificial stream flows we generate using a simple hydrological model and an autoregressive time series model. The artificial flows are generated from precipitation and temperature data from the Canadian Regional Climate model for present and future scenarios. We observe that the joint operation is able to effectively minimize the negative effects of stream flow forecast uncertainty on system performance at an overall cost that is not significantly greater than the cost of a

  5. Effects of unstable flow on solute transport in the marsh soil and exchange with coastal water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengji; Zhang, Chenming; Jin, Guangqiu; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of marsh hydraulics have focused on tide-induced pore water circulation as the main drive for solute transport in the marsh soil and exchange with coastal water. Our study revealed another important mechanism provided by unstable fingering flow, which largely modified solute transport paths. In the marsh interior, downward penetration of salt fingers forced ambient pore water and solute plumes to move upward and exit the marsh soil through marsh platform at relatively high concentrations, up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than exit solute concentrations at the tidal creek bed. The mixing of solute with ambient pore water in the marsh interior was intensified greatly by fingering flow. A critical distance to the creek was determined based on a field-scale model simulation to distinguish tidal circulation-dominated and fingering flow-dominated solute transport zones. The new transport mechanism has implications for understanding the fate of solutes in particularly salt marshes of low creek densities.

  6. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of drag reducing surfactant solution in a helically coiled pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Aly, Wael I. A.; Haruki, Naoto; Horibe, Akihiko

    2005-08-01

    The reduction characteristic of turbulent drag and heat transfer of drag reduction surfactant solution flowing in a helically coiled pipe were experimentally investigated. The drag reduction surfactant used in the present study was the amine oxide type nonionic surfactant of oleyldihydroxyethylamineoxide (ODEAO, C22H45NO3=371). The zwitterion surfactant of cetyldimethylaminoaciticacidbetaine (CDMB, C20H41NO2=327) was added by 10% to the ODEAO solution in order to avoid the chemical degradation of ODEAO by ionic impurities in a test tape water. The experiments of flow drag and heat transfer reduction were carried out in the helically coiled pipe of coil to pipe diameter ratio of 37.5 and the helically coiled pipe length to pipe diameter of 1180.5 (pipe diameter of 14.4 mm) at various concentrations, temperatures and flow velocities of the ODEAO surfactant solution. The ODEAO solution showed a non-Newtonian behavior at high concentration of the ODEAO. From the experimental results, it was observed that the friction factor of the ODEAO surfactant solution flowing through the coiled pipe was decreased to a great extent in comparison with water as a Newtonian fluid in the turbulent flow region. Heat transfer measurements for water and the ODEAO solution were performed in both laminar and turbulent flow regions under the uniform heat flux boundary condition. The heat transfer coefficients for the ODEAO solution flow were the same as water flow in the laminar region. On the other hand, heat transfer reduction of the ODEAO solution flow was remarkedly reduced as compared with that of the water flow in the turbulent flow region.

  7. Numerical solutions for unsteady subsonic vortical flows around loaded cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J.; Atassi, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    A frequency domain linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis is presented for three-dimensional unsteady vortical flows around a cascade of loaded airfoils. The analysis fully accounts for the distortion of the impinging vortical disturbances by the mean flow. The entire unsteady flow field is calculated in response to upstream three-dimensional harmonic disturbances. Numerical results are presented for two standard cascade configurations representing turbine and compressor bladings for a reduced frequency range from 0.1 to 5. Results show that the upstream gust conditions and blade sweep strongly affect the unsteady blade response.

  8. On the emergence of diel solute signals in flowing waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Robert T.; Cohen, Matthew J.

    2016-02-01

    Biota imprint their stoichiometry on relative rates of elemental cycling in the environment. Despite this coupling, producer-driven diel solute variation in rivers and streams is more apparent for some solutes (e.g., dissolved oxygen—DO) than others (e.g., nitrate—NO3-). We hypothesized that these differences arise from atmospheric equilibration, with signals emerging and evolving differently for gaseous and nongaseous solutes. Measurements of DO and NO3 in a spring-fed river, where constant inputs isolate in-stream processing, support this hypothesis, as do results from reactive transport modeling of river solute dynamics. Atmospheric equilibration dramatically shortens the benthic footprint over which signals integrate, facilitating emergence of diel DO signals in response to in-stream metabolism. In contrast, upstream influences persist much further downstream for nongaseous solutes, confounding and potentially obscuring the diel signals from in-stream assimilatory processing. Isolating diel NO3 signals from in-stream processing requires a two-station approach wherein metabolic impacts on solute variation are measured by difference between upstream and downstream sensors. Notably, two-station inference improves markedly when hydraulic controls on signal propagation such as dispersion and storage are explicitly considered. We conclude that the absence of diel signals at a single station for nongaseous solutes such as NO3- cannot be interpreted as lack of autotroph demand or element coupling. As advances in sensors enable the acquisition of an increasingly rich array of solute signals, controlling for differences in the emergence and downstream evolution of gaseous versus nongaseous solutes will dramatically improve inferences regarding the timing and magnitude of coupled elemental processing.

  9. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  10. Scaling laws and accurate small-amplitude stationary solution for the motion of a planar vortex filament in the Cartesian form of the local induction approximation.

    PubMed

    Van Gorder, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    We provide a formulation of the local induction approximation (LIA) for the motion of a vortex filament in the Cartesian reference frame (the extrinsic coordinate system) which allows for scaling of the reference coordinate. For general monotone scalings of the reference coordinate, we derive an equation for the planar solution to the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation governing the LIA. We proceed to solve this equation perturbatively in small amplitude through an application of multiple-scales analysis, which allows for accurate computation of the period of the planar vortex filament. The perturbation result is shown to agree strongly with numerical simulations, and we also relate this solution back to the solution obtained in the arclength reference frame (the intrinsic coordinate system). Finally, we discuss nonmonotone coordinate scalings and their application for finding self-intersections of vortex filaments. These self-intersecting vortex filaments are likely unstable and collapse into other structures or dissipate completely.

  11. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous laminar and turbulent flow around the airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slouka, Martin; Kozel, Karel

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox k-omega model. Calculations are done for NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoil profile for the different angles of upstream flow. Numerical results are compared and discussed with experimental data.

  12. Solution of nonlinear flow equations for complex aerodynamic shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed

    1992-01-01

    Solution-adaptive CFD codes based on unstructured methods for 3-D complex geometries in subsonic to supersonic regimes were investigated, and the computed solution data were analyzed in conjunction with experimental data obtained from wind tunnel measurements in order to assess and validate the predictability of the code. Specifically, the FELISA code was assessed and improved in cooperation with NASA Langley and Imperial College, Swansea, U.K.

  13. Accurate Iterative Analysis Solution of theKapchinskij-Vladimirskij Equations for the Case of a Matched Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.A.

    2007-01-31

    The well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equations are difficult to solve in general, but the problem is simplified for the matched-beam case with sufficient symmetry. They show that the interdependence of the two KV equations is eliminated, so that only one needs to be solved--a great simplification. They present an iterative method of solution which can potentially yield any desired level of accuracy. The lowest level, the well-known smooth approximation, yields simple, explicit results with good accuracy for weak or moderate focusing fields. The next level improves the accuracy for high fields; they previously showed [Part. Accel. 52, 133 (1996)] how to maintain a simple explicit format for the results. That paper used expansion in a small parameter to obtain results of second-level accuracy. The present paper, using straightforward iteration, obtains equations of first, second, and third levels of accuracy. For a periodic lattice with beam matched to lattice, they use the lattice and beam parameters as input and solve for phase advances and envelope functions. They find excellent agreement with numerical solutions over a wide range of beam emittances and intensities.

  14. Accurate iterative analytic solution of theKapchinskij-Vladimirskij equations for the case of a matched beam

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    2006-08-06

    The well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equations are difficult to solve in general, but the problem is simplified for the matched-beam case with sufficient symmetry. They show that the interdependence of the two KV equations is eliminated, so that only one needs to be solved--a great simplification. They present an iterative method of solution which can potentially yield any desired level of accuracy. The lowest level, the well-known smooth approximation, yields simple, explicit results with good accuracy for weak or moderate focusing fields. The next level improves the accuracy for high fields; they previously showed how to maintain a simple explicit format for the results. That paper used expansion in a small parameter to obtain the second level. The present paper, using straightforward iteration, obtains equations of first, second, and third levels of accuracy. For a periodic lattice with beam matched to lattice, they use the lattice and beam parameters as input and solve for phase advances and envelope waveforms. They find excellent agreement with numerical solutions over a wide range of beam emittances and intensities.

  15. Rheological properties and the mechanism of a viscous flow of aqueous pectin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netesova, G. A.; Kotov, V. V.; Bodyakina, I. M.; Lukin, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    The rheological properties and mechanisms of a viscous flow of diluted apple pectin solutions are investigated. It is found that the rise in solution viscosity upon an increase in concentration and a drop in temperature is, along with the corresponding degree to which the interaction between pectin molecules and solvent is reduced, associated with the processes of structuring. The entropy of a viscous flow of pectin solutions is found to be positive: it grows with a rise in concentration is virtually temperature independent. It is established that the entropy factor makes the main contribution to the free energy value of a viscous flow.

  16. Thin airfoil theory based on approximate solution of the transonic flow equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta Y

    1958-01-01

    A method is presented for the approximate solution of the nonlinear equations of transonic flow theory. Solutions are found for two-dimensional flows at a Mach number of 1 and for purely subsonic and purely supersonic flows. Results are obtained in closed analytic form for a large and significant class of nonlifting airfoils. At a Mach number of 1 general expressions are given for the pressure distribution on an airfoil of specified geometry and for the shape of an airfoil having a prescribed pressure distribution. Extensive comparisons are made with available data, particularly for a Mach number of 1, and with existing solutions.

  17. Thin airfoil theory based on approximate solution of the transonic flow equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta Y

    1957-01-01

    A method is presented for the approximate solution of the nonlinear equations transonic flow theory. Solutions are found for two-dimensional flows at a Mach number of 1 and for purely subsonic and purely supersonic flows. Results are obtained in closed analytic form for a large and significant class of nonlifting airfoils. At a Mach number of 1 general expressions are given for the pressure distribution on an airfoil of specified geometry and for the shape of an airfoil having a prescribed pressure distribution. Extensive comparisons are made with available data, particularly for a Mach number of 1, and with existing solutions.

  18. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  19. Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thareja, Rajiv R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Stewart, James R.; Morgan, Ken; Peraire, Jaime

    1989-01-01

    An upwind finite-element technique that uses cell-centered quantities and implicit and/or explicit time marching has been developed for computing hypersonic laminar viscous flows using adaptive unstructured grids in two and three dimensions. A perfect gas model as well as an equilibrium air model is implemented for solving high-speed flows. A first-order basic scheme and a higher-order flux-corrected transport (FCT) scheme have been implemented. This technique has been used to predict 'Type III and IV' shock interactions on a cylinder in two dimensions and a swept cylinder in three dimensions, with a view to determine the pressure and heating rate augmentation caused by an impinging shock on the leading edge of a cowl lip of an engine inlet. The predictions of wall pressure and heating rates compare very well with experimental data. The flow features are very distinctly captured with a sequence of adaptively-generated grids. Three-dimensional corner flow, typically encountered in engine inlets due to compression of the flow by ramps in the walls, is also modeled. This procedure is the first step in developing an integrated fluid, thermal, structural analysis capability for hypersonic flight vehicles like the National Aero-Space Plane.

  20. Venous and Arterial Flow Quantification, are Equally Accurate and Precise with Parallel Imaging Compressed Sensing 4D Phase Contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Umar; Hsiao, Albert; Alley, Marcus; Zhang, Tao; Lustig, Michael; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate precision and accuracy of parallel-imaging compressed-sensing 4D phase contrast (PICS-4DPC) MRI venous flow quantification in children with patients referred for cardiac MRI at our children’s hospital. Materials and Methods With IRB approval and HIPAA compliance, 22 consecutive patients without shunts underwent 4DPC as part of clinical cardiac MRI examinations. Flow measurements were obtained in the superior and inferior vena cava, ascending and descending aorta and the pulmonary trunk. Conservation of flow to the upper, lower and whole body was used as an internal physiologic control. The arterial and venous flow rates at each location were compared with paired t-tests and F-tests to assess relative accuracy and precision. RESULTS Arterial and venous flow measurements were strongly correlated for the upper (ρ=0.89), lower (ρ=0.96) and whole body (ρ=0.97); net aortic and pulmonary trunk flow rates were also tightly correlated (ρ=0.97). There was no significant difference in the value or precision of arterial and venous flow measurements in upper, lower or whole body, though there was a trend toward improved precision with lower velocity-encoding settings. Conclusion With PICS-4DPC MRI, the accuracy and precision of venous flow quantification are comparable to that of arterial flow quantification at velocity-encodings appropriate for arterial vessels. PMID:23172846

  1. Applications of the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and the Solution Element to Unsteady Chemically Reactive Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    2001-01-01

    This document reports the conclusion and findings of our research activities for this grant. The goal of the project is the development and application of the method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element, or the CE/SE method, to simulate chemically reacting flows. The product of this project will be a high-fidelity, time-accurate flow solver analyzing unsteady flow fields advanced propulsion concepts, including the low-emission turbojet engine combustion and flow fields of the Pulse Detonation Engines (PDE). Based on the documents and computer software of the CE/SE method that we have received from the CE/SE working group at NASA Lewis, we have focused our research effort on addressing outstanding technical issues related to the extension of the CE/SE method for unsteady, chemically reactive flows. In particular, we have made progresses in the following three aspects: (1) Derivation of the governing equations for reacting flows; (2) Numerical treatments of stiff source terms; and (3) Detailed simulations of ZND detonation waves.

  2. Traveling wave solution of higher-order traffic flow model with discontinuous fundamental diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Xiu

    2015-07-01

    The traveling wave solution of a unified higher-order traffic flow model is investigated with a discontinuous fundamental diagram under the Lagrange coordinate. The equilibrium velocity is a piecewise function which consists of two concave functions. The weak solution theory is applied to study the traveling wave solution of the model, in which a set of equations about the characteristic parameters are obtained. Through numerical simulation, the moving cluster solutions of the anisotropic and isotropic traffic flow models are reproduced, respectively. The numerical results agree with the analytical ones.

  3. Zonally-decoupled DSMC solutions of hypersonic blunt body wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Moss, James N.; Dogra, Virendra K.

    1993-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solutions are presented for the hypersonic flow behind a blunt body in which the wake region is solved in a zonally-decoupled manner. The forebody flow is solved separately using either a DSMC or a Navier-Stokes method, and the forebody exit plane solution is specified as the inflow condition to the decoupled DSMC solution of the wake region. Results are presented for a 70-deg, blunted cone at flow conditions that can be accommodated in existing low-density wind tunnels with the Knudsen number based on base diameter ranging from 0.03 to 0.001. The zonally-decoupled solutions show good agreement with fully-coupled DSMC solutions of the wake flow densities and velocities. The wake closure predicted by the zonally-decoupled solutions is in better agreement with fully-coupled results than that predicted by a fully-coupled Navier-Stokes method indicating the need to account for rarefaction in the wake for the cases considered. The combined use of Navier-Stokes for the forebody with a decoupled DSMC solution for the wake provides an efficient method for solving transitional blunt-body flows where the forebody flow is continuum and the wake is rarefied.

  4. Non-linear effects on solute transfer between flowing water and a sediment bed.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Makoto; Stefan, Heinz G

    2011-11-15

    A previously developed model of periodic pore water flow in space and time, and associated solute transport in a stream bed of fine sand is extended to coarse sand and fine gravel. The pore water flow immediately below the sediment/water interface becomes intermittently a non-Darcy flow. The periodic pressure and velocity fluctuations considered are induced by near-bed coherent turbulent motions in the stream flow; they penetrate from the sediment/water interface into the sediment pore system and are described by a wave number (χ) and a period (T) that are given as functions of the shear velocity (U(∗)) between the flowing water and the sediment bed. The stream bed has a flat surface without bed forms. The flow field in the sediment pore system is described by the continuity equation and a resistance law that includes both viscous (Darcy) and non-linear (inertial) effects. Simulation results show that non-linear (inertial) effects near the sediment/water interface increase flow resistance and reduce mean flow velocities. Compared to pure Darcy flow, non-linear (inertial) effects reduce solute exchange rates between overlying water and the sediment bed but only by a moderate amount (less than 50%). Turbulent coherent flow structures in the stream flow enhance solute transfer in the pore system of a stream bed compared to pure molecular diffusion, but by much less than standing surface waves or bed forms.

  5. Analytical solutions for flow fields near continuous wall reactive barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk

    2008-05-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are widely applied for in-situ remediation of contaminant plumes transported by groundwater. Besides the goal of a sufficient contaminant remediation inside the reactive cell (residence time) the width of plume intercepted by a PRB is of critical concern. A 2-dimensional analytical approach is applied to determine the flow fields towards rectangular PRBs of the continuous wall (CW) configuration with and without impermeable side walls (but yet no funnel). The approach is based on the conformal mapping technique and assumes a homogeneous aquifer with a uniform ambient flow field. The hydraulic conductivity of the reactive material is furthermore assumed to exceed the conductivity of the aquifer by at least one order of magnitude as to neglect the hydraulic gradient across the reactor. The flow fields are analyzed regarding the widths and shapes of the respective capture zones as functions of the dimensions (aspect ratio) of the reactive cell and the ambient groundwater flow direction. Presented are an improved characterization of the advantages of impermeable side walls, a convenient approach to improved hydraulic design (including basic cost-optimization) and new concepts for monitoring CW PRBs. Water level data from a CW PRB at the Seneca Army Depot site, NY, are used for field demonstration.

  6. Numerical Solution of Viscoplastic Flow Problems by Augmented Lagrangians.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Lagrange multipliers. RAIRO Anal. Numer. 8R2, p 129-151. CIARLET, P. G. (1978]: The finite element method for elliptic problems. Amsterdan, North...lineaires. RAIRO , serie rouge, Anal. Numer., 11, p 369-400. TANGUY, P. (19831: Numerical Simulation of a Pseudo 3-D Turbulent Flow in a iAplan Turbine

  7. Calcium phosphate crystallization on titania in a flowing Kokubo solution.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Satoshi; Tsuru, Kanji; Uetsuki, Keita; Akasaka, Keisuke; Shirosaki, Yuki; Osaka, Akiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    Dry titania layers on air-oxidized titanium substrates have been found to be active enough to cause apatite to be deposited in Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF) in narrow confined spaces, such as those in narrow grooves and thin gaps. Such in vitro apatite deposition is the basis of the GRAPE(®) technique. The aim of the present study is to determine why GRAPE conditions favor apatite deposition when laminar SBF flow (at 0.01-0.3 ml/min) passes through a shallow channel (0.5 mm) between a pair of titanium substrates each with a dry layer of titania. Assessing the factors that control the heterogeneous nucleation process led to the proposal of the working hypothesis that there are nucleation pre-embryos, ion assemblies that can be stabilized to form embryos, on the titania layer but that they are removed by the SBF flow. Specimens were subjected to different combinations of processes. One combination was that titania layers were exposed to still or flowing SBF, and the other was that half of a specimen, the inlet or outlet side, was exposed to still or flowing SBF with the other half being covered. The surface morphologies of the specimens were then compared in detail. The conclusion was that exposure to still SBF for 2 days before exposure to flowing SBF was required for apatite to be deposited. Some complicated apatite deposition modes were observed, e.g., apatite was deposited even on areas unexposed to still SBF. All of the results were successfully interpreted using the working hypothesis. The conclusion was that the GRAPE(®) technique depends on the confined space holding pre-embryo and embryo assemblies.

  8. Solution Approaches for Network Flow Problems with Multiple Criteria,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    34 Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications , 69, 2 (1979) 283-303. 12. R. Steuer and A. Schuler, "An Interactive Multiple-Objective Linear...Solutions in Linear Cases and a Multicriteria Siuplex Method," Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications , 49, 2 (1975) 430-468. 16. M. Zeleny, Linear

  9. Mechanisms of stochastic focusing and defocusing in biological reaction networks: insight from accurate chemical master equation (ACME) solutions.

    PubMed

    Gursoy, Gamze; Terebus, Anna; Youfang Cao; Jie Liang

    2016-08-01

    Stochasticity plays important roles in regulation of biochemical reaction networks when the copy numbers of molecular species are small. Studies based on Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (SSA) has shown that a basic reaction system can display stochastic focusing (SF) by increasing the sensitivity of the network as a result of the signal noise. Although SSA has been widely used to study stochastic networks, it is ineffective in examining rare events and this becomes a significant issue when the tails of probability distributions are relevant as is the case of SF. Here we use the ACME method to solve the exact solution of the discrete Chemical Master Equations and to study a network where SF was reported. We showed that the level of SF depends on the degree of the fluctuations of signal molecule. We discovered that signaling noise under certain conditions in the same reaction network can lead to a decrease in the system sensitivities, thus the network can experience stochastic defocusing. These results highlight the fundamental role of stochasticity in biological reaction networks and the need for exact computation of probability landscape of the molecules in the system.

  10. A GENERAL MASS-CONSERVATIVE NUMERICAL SOLUTION FOR THE UNSATURATED FLOW EQUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical approximations based on different forms of the governing partial differential equation can lead to significantly different results for unsaturated flow problems. Numerical solution based on the standard h-based form of Richards equation generally yields poor results, ch...

  11. MHD flow through a porous medium adjacent to a stretching sheet: Numerical and an approximate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, D. S.; Agrawal, R.

    2011-05-01

    A viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid flow through a porous medium over a stretching sheet is considered in the presence of a magnetic field. Such flow problems have relevance in the process of a polymer sheet extrusion from a dye, and the numerical and approximate solutions of these problems are of great interest as these solutions serve practical purposes. By using the technique of stretching variables of the flow concern in porous medium and minimizing the residual of the resulting governing differential equations by the least squares method, we obtained an approximate solution for this problem of flow through porous medium near a stretching sheet. The results are also compared to a numerical solution determined by using the shooting method along with the Runge-Kutta method. The effects of various pertinent parameters on the velocity distribution and the residual function are investigated. The results are depicted graphically and discussed.

  12. Microbial Growth, Water Flow, and Solute Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Bottomley, P. J.; Selker, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    We present an investigation that studied interactions between microbial growth, water flow, and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. The experimental system provided for continuous, noninvasive observation of microbial activity, while simultaneously monitoring water content and solute flow paths in a two-dimensional porous matrix. The spatial and temporal development of microbial colonization by a Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterium was monitored by induction of a bioluminescent phenotype. A model was developed that allowed quantification of population density from bioluminescence measurements. Liquid saturation was quantified from the transmission of light through the system, and solute flow paths were determined with a dye tracer. Dramatic changes in microbial colonization were observed, including upward migration against flow. This migration was particularly interesting because it cannot be explained by passive transport. Bacterial growth and accumulation significantly impacted the hydrologic properties of the media, including apparent desaturation within the colonized region, diversion of flow around the colonized region, and lowering of the capillary fringe height.

  13. An analytic solution for barotropic flow along a variable slope topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, Joseph J.

    2014-11-01

    An analytic solution is derived for the generic oceanographic situation of a barotropic current flowing along sloping topography. It is shown that the shallow water equations can be reduced to a heat-like equation in which βeffect is balanced by Ekman dissipation. For constant topography, the system is found to admit a well-known similarity solution and this solution is generalized to the case of variable topography. Several properties of the solution are explored, and an example is given for flow along the northern Gulf of Mexico slope, between the De Soto Canyon and the Mississippi Canyon. This "Topographic β-plume" solution may serve as a model for further research concerning the influence exerted by geophysical boundary layers on the interior flow via their structure and stability.

  14. Breakdown of Burton Prim Slichter approach and lateral solute segregation in radially converging flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priede, J.; Gerbeth, G.

    2005-11-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the effect of a radially converging melt flow, which is directed away from the solidification front, on the radial solute segregation in simple solidification models. We show that the classical Burton-Prim-Slichter (BPS) solution describing the effect of a diverging flow on the solute incorporation into the solidifying material breaks down for the flows converging along the solidification front. The breakdown is caused by a divergence of the integral defining the effective boundary layer thickness which is the basic concept of the BPS theory. Although such a divergence can formally be avoided by restricting the axial extension of the melt to a layer of finite height, radially uniform solute distributions are possible only for weak melt flows with an axial velocity away from the solidification front comparable to the growth rate. There is a critical melt velocity for each growth rate at which the solution passes through a singularity and becomes physically inconsistent for stronger melt flows. To resolve these inconsistencies we consider a solidification front presented by a disk of finite radius R0 subject to a strong converging melt flow and obtain an analytic solution showing that the radial solute concentration depends on the radius r as ˜ln(R0/r) and ˜ln(R0/r) close to the rim and at large distances from it. The logarithmic increase of concentration is limited in the vicinity of the symmetry axis by the diffusion becoming effective at a distance comparable to the characteristic thickness of the solute boundary layer. The converging flow causes a solute pile-up forming a logarithmic concentration peak at the symmetry axis which might be an undesirable feature for crystal growth processes.

  15. Coupling 1D Navier Stokes equation with autoregulation lumped parameter networks for accurate cerebral blood flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaiyoung; Hu, Xiao; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    The cerebral circulation is unique in its ability to maintain blood flow to the brain under widely varying physiologic conditions. Incorporating this autoregulatory response is critical to cerebral blood flow modeling, as well as investigations into pathological conditions. We discuss a one-dimensional nonlinear model of blood flow in the cerebral arteries that includes coupling of autoregulatory lumped parameter networks. The model is tested to reproduce a common clinical test to assess autoregulatory function - the carotid artery compression test. The change in the flow velocity at the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during carotid compression and release demonstrated strong agreement with published measurements. The model is then used to investigate vasospasm of the MCA, a common clinical concern following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm was modeled by prescribing vessel area reduction in the middle portion of the MCA. Our model showed similar increases in velocity for moderate vasospasms, however, for serious vasospasm (~ 90% area reduction), the blood flow velocity demonstrated decrease due to blood flow rerouting. This demonstrates a potentially important phenomenon, which otherwise would lead to false-negative decisions on clinical vasospasm if not properly anticipated.

  16. Solution of transonic flows by an integro-differential equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogana, W.

    1978-01-01

    Solutions of steady transonic flow past a two-dimensional airfoil are obtained from a singular integro-differential equation which involves a tangential derivative of the perturbation velocity potential. Subcritical flows are solved by taking central differences everywhere. For supercritical flows with shocks, central differences are taken in subsonic flow regions and backward differences in supersonic flow regions. The method is applied to a nonlifting parabolic-arc airfoil and to a lifting NACA 0012 airfoil. Results compare favorably with those of finite-difference schemes.

  17. Comparison of NACA 0012 Laminar Flow Solutions: Structured and Unstructured Grid Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Langer, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a class of laminar airfoil flows. The principal objective of this paper is to demonstrate that members of this class of laminar flows have steady-state solutions. These laminar airfoil flow cases are often used to evaluate accuracy, stability and convergence of numerical solution algorithms for the Navier-Stokes equations. In recent years, such flows have also been used as test cases for high-order numerical schemes. While generally consistent steady-state solutions have been obtained for these flows using higher order schemes, a number of results have been published with various solutions, including unsteady ones. We demonstrate with two different numerical methods and a range of meshes with a maximum density that exceeds 8 × 106 grid points that steady-state solutions are obtained. Furthermore, numerical evidence is presented that even when solving the equations with an unsteady algorithm, one obtains steady-state solutions.

  18. An analytical solution for transient flow of Bingham viscoplastic materials in rock fractures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Savage, W.Z.

    2001-01-01

    We present below an analytical solution to model the one-dimensional transient flow of a Bingham viscoplastic material in a fracture with parallel walls (smooth or rough) that is subjected to an applied pressure gradient. The solution models the acceleration and the deceleration of the material as the pressure gradient changes with time. Two cases are considered: A pressure gradient applied over a finite time interval and an applied pressure gradient that is constant over time. The solution is expressed in dimensionless form and can therefore be used for a wide range of Bingham viscoplastic materials. The solution is also capable of capturing the transition that takes place in a fracture between viscoplastic flow and rigid plug flow. Also, it shows the development of a rigid central layer in fractures, the extent of which depends on the fluid properties (viscosity and yield stress), the magnitude of the pressure gradient, and the fracture aperture and surface roughness. Finally, it is shown that when a pressure gradient is applied and kept constant, the solution for the fracture flow rate converges over time to a steady-state solution that can be defined as a modified cubic law. In this case, the fracture transmissivity is found to be a non-linear function of the head gradient. This solution provides a tool for a better understanding of the flow of Bingham materials in rock fractures, interfaces, and cracks. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the `flow monograms` describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the `interface monograms`, whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system `operational monogram`. The `operational monogram` enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop.

  20. Numerical Solution of Boundary Layer MHD Flow with Viscous Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, S. R.; Jena, S.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with a steady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid over a shrinking sheet in the presence of uniform transverse magnetic field with viscous dissipation. Using suitable similarity transformations the governing partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically by fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with shooting technique. Results for velocity and temperature profiles for different values of the governing parameters have been discussed in detail with graphical representation. The numerical evaluation of skin friction and Nusselt number are also given in this paper. PMID:24672367

  1. Flow and Stability of Wormlike Micellar and Polymeric Solutions in Converging and T-Shaped Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulages, J.; McKinley, G. H.

    2008-07-01

    The flow and stability of wormlike micellar and polymeric solutions is investigated in two prototypical converging and elongational geometries; (i) microfabricated hyperbolic contractions and (ii) converging flow in T-shaped microchannels. Understanding the flow behavior of such fluids at the microscale is important to the design and optimization of microfluidic devices for lab-on-a-chip processes and fluidic computing applications as well as to industrial applications such as extensional flow through porous media. The controlled flow rates and very well-defined geometries achievable with microfluidic fabrication technologies enable us to gain insight into the extensional rheology of complex fluids at high extension rates and to investigate the onset of elastically-driven flow asymmetries. In the present study, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) wormlike micelles in aqueous solutions of sodium salicylate as well as dilute polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions are selected as test fluids. Using the micellar fluids, it is possible to quantify the two-dimensional distribution of both the velocity and stress fields in hyperbolic-shaped micro-contractions using a new microscope-based flow-induced birefringence technique in conjunction with microparticle imaging velocimetry (μPIV). The knowledge of both the deformation and velocity data allows us to better understand the behavior of shear-banding fluids in inhomogeneous extensional flows. In the case of dilute PEO solutions flowing through perfectly symmetric T-shaped microchannels, a local extensional flow develops where the two streams meet. The resulting birefringent strand of highly-oriented material can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations in the flow at high Weissenberg number which can be quantified using microparticle imaging velocimetry. The spatio-temporal characteristics of these purely elastic flow asymmetries can also be compared to predictions of numerical simulation.

  2. A 3D Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme for Particulate Flows with Boundary Conditions based on Stokes Flow Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, A.; Hu, H.

    2006-11-01

    We have extended previous work on an 2D explicit finite-difference code for direct simulation of the motion of solid particles in a fluid to 3D. It is challenging to enforce the no-slip condition on the surface of spherical particles in a uniform Cartesian grid. We have implemented a treatment of the boundary condition similar to that in the PHYSALIS method of Takagi et. al. (2003), which is based on matching the Stokes flow solutions next to the particle surface with a numerical solution away from it. The original PHYSALIS method was developed for implicit flow solvers, and required an iterative process to match the Stokes flow solutions with the numerical solution. However, it was easily adapted to work with the present explicit scheme, and found to be more efficient since no iterative process is required in the matching. The method proceeds by approximating the flow next to the particle surface as a Stokes flow in the particle’s local coordinates, which is then matched to the numerically computed external flow on a ``cage'' of grid points near the particle surface. Advantages of the method include superior accuracy of the scheme on a relatively coarse grid for intermediate Reynolds numbers, ease of implementation, and the elimination of the need to track the particle surface. Several examples are presented, including flow over a stationary sphere in a square tube, sedimentation of a particle, and dropping, kissing, and tumbling of two particles. This research is supported by a GAANN fellowship from the U.S. Dept. of Education.

  3. The effect of viscosity on steady transonic flow with a nodal solution topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Zank, Gary P.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of viscosity on a steady, transonic flow for which the inviscid limit has a nodal solution topology near the critical point is investigated. For the accelerating case, viscous solutions tend to repel each other, so that a very delicate choice of initial conditions is required to prevent them from diverging. Only the two critical solutions extend to arbitrarily large distances into both the subsonic and supersonic flows. For the decelerating case, the solutions tend to attract, and so an entire two-parameter family of solutions now extends over large distances. The general effect of viscosity on the solution degeneracy of a nodal topology is thus to reduce or limit it for the accelerating case and to enhance it for the decelerating case. The astrophysical implications of these findings are addressed.

  4. Travelling-wave solutions bifurcating from relative periodic orbits in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Subhandu; Cossu, Carlo; Rincon, François

    2016-06-01

    Travelling-wave solutions are shown to bifurcate from relative periodic orbits in plane Poiseuille flow at Re = 2000 in a saddle-node infinite-period bifurcation. These solutions consist in self-sustaining sinuous quasi-streamwise streaks and quasi-streamwise vortices located in the bulk of the flow. The lower branch travelling-wave solutions evolve into spanwise localized states when the spanwise size Lz of the domain in which they are computed is increased. On the contrary, the upper branch of travelling-wave solutions develops multiple streaks when Lz is increased. Upper-branch travelling-wave solutions can be continued into coherent solutions to the filtered equations used in large-eddy simulations where they represent turbulent coherent large-scale motions.

  5. Progress in accurate measurements of sub-surface flows near the solar limb using ring-diagram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldner, Charles; Bogart, Richard S.

    2016-05-01

    The use of helioseismology to study the properties of the Sun has yielded very high precision measurements of solar flows throughout much of the interior. It has been apparent for many years, however, that the accuracy of many of these measurements is suspect due to significant systematic effects in helioseismic techniques. The most well-known effect in flow measurements is sometimes referred to as the `center-to-limb' effect, in which flow measurements depend strongly on the distance of the measurement from the center of the observed solar disk. Attempts have already been made to explain the origin of this error (e.g. Balder & Schou 2012) and to correct it (e.g. Zhao et al. 2011). Significant work remains, however.In this work, we report on continued efforts to precisely characterize the effect of position on the observed disk on flow measurements in the HMI ring diagram pipeline, and from other HMI data. Our efforts are focused on 1) quantifying the non-radial systematic effect in flow measurements; 2) understanding the effect of the underlying model used in the mode parameter estimations; and 3) characterizing the difference between helioseismic measurements made with different observed quantities.

  6. Hypergeometric steady solution of hydromagnetic nano liquid film flow over an unsteady stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metri, Prashant G.; Narayana, Mahesha; Silvestrov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the hydromagnetic boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics of a laminar nanoliquid film over an unsteady stretching sheet is presented. The highly nonlinear partial differential equations governing flow and heat transport are simplified using similarity transformation. The analytical solutions of the resulting ODEs are obtained for some special case of nano liquid film using hypergeometric power series functions, and from which the analytical solutions of the original problem are presented. The influence of pertinent parameters such as the magnetic parameter, the solid volume fraction of nanoparticles and the type of nanofluid on the flow, heat transfer, Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient is discussed analytically.

  7. STUDIES ON THE ANOMALOUS VISCOSITY AND FLOW-BIREFRINGENCE OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A. S. C.; Needham, Joseph; Shen, Shih-Chang

    1944-01-01

    1. A coaxial viscosimeter which permits the simultaneous determination of relative and anomalous viscosity and of flow-birefringence is described. Flow-anomaly and flow-birefringence are regarded as characteristic of elongated micelles and molecules. 2. Such methods have been applied to dilute solutions of proteins. The conditions under which the coaxial (Couette) viscosimeter measures the viscosity of the bulk phase and the surface film phase respectively have been investigated and are described. 3. The general behaviour of protein solutions subjected to shear is summarised. PMID:19873384

  8. Depth-averaged analytic solutions for free-surface granular flows impacting rigid walls down inclines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faug, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, flows of granular materials impacting wall-like obstacles down inclines are described by depth-averaged analytic solutions. Particular attention is paid to extending the existing depth-averaged equations initially developed for frictionless and incompressible fluids down a horizontal plane. The effects of the gravitational acceleration along the slope, and of the retarding acceleration caused by friction as well, are systematically taken into account. The analytic solutions are then used to revisit existing data on rigid walls impacted by granular flows. This approach allows establishing a complete phase diagram for granular flow-wall interaction.

  9. A pressure based method for the solution of viscous incompressible turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, Garth Victor; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique was developed for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical technique, derived from a pressure substitution method (PSM), overcomes many of the deficiencies of the pressure correction method. This technique allows for the direct solution of the actual pressure in the form of a Poisson equation which is derived from the pressure weighted substitution of the full momentum equations into the continuity equation. Two dimensional internal flows are computed with this method. The prediction of cascade performance is presented. The extention of the pressure correction method for the solution of three dimensional flows is also presented.

  10. Theory and Simulation of Cholesteric Film Formation Flows of Dilute Collagen Solutions.

    PubMed

    Aguilar Gutierrez, O F; Rey, Alejandro D

    2016-11-15

    Dilute isotropic collagen solutions are usually flow processed into monodomain chiral nematic thin films for obtaining highly ordered materials by a multistep process that starts with complex inhomogeneous flow kinematics. Here we present rigorous theory and simulation of the initial precursors during flow steps in cholesteric collagen film formation. We first extract the molecular shape parameter and rotational diffusivity from previously reported simple shear data of dilute collagen solutions, where the former leads the reactive parameter (tumbling function) which determines the net effect of vorticity and strain rate on the average orientation and where the latter establishes the intensity of strain required for flow-birefringence, both crucial quantities for controlled film formation flow. We find that the tumbling function is similar to those of rod-like lyotropic liquid crystalline polymers and hence it is predicted that they would tumble in the ordered high concentration state leading to flow-induced texturing. The previously reported experimental data is well fitted with rotational diffusivities whose order of magnitude is consistent to those of other biomacromolecules. We then investigate the response of the tensor order parameter to complex flow kinematics, ranging from pure vorticity, through simple shear, to extensional flow, as may arise in typical flow casting and film flows. The chosen control variable to produce precursor cholesteric films is the director or average orientation, since the nematic order is set close to typical values found in concentrated cholesteric type I collagen solutions. Using the efficient four-roll mill kinematics, we summarize the para-nematic structure-flow process diagram in terms of the director orientation and flow type. Using analysis and computation, we provide a parametric envelope that is necessary to eventually produce well-aligned cholesteric films. We conclude that extensional flow is an essential ingredient of

  11. Upscaling of Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Media with Non-uniform Flow and Dispersion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2013-10-01

    An analytical and computational model for non-reactive solute transport in periodic heterogeneous media with arbitrary non-uniform flow and dispersion fields within the unit cell of length ε is described. The model lumps the effect of non-uniform flow and dispersion into an effective advection velocity Ve and an effective dispersion coefficient De. It is shown that both Ve and De are scale-dependent (dependent on the length scale of the microscopic heterogeneity, ε), dependent on the Péclet number Pe, and on a dimensionless parameter α that represents the effects of microscopic heterogeneity. The parameter α, confined to the range of [-0.5, 0.5] for the numerical example presented, depends on the flow direction and non-uniform flow and dispersion fields. Effective advection velocity Ve and dispersion coefficient De can be derived for any given flow and dispersion fields, and . Homogenized solutions describing the macroscopic variations can be obtained from the effective model. Solutions with sub-unit-cell accuracy can be constructed by homogenized solutions and its spatial derivatives. A numerical implementation of the model compared with direct numerical solutions using a fine grid, demonstrated that the new method was in good agreement with direct solutions, but with significant computational savings.

  12. Navier-Stokes solutions for two-dimensional subsonic base flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for determining the effects of mass injection from the trailing edge of a bluff body at low speeds and in transonic flow were numerically studied along with an unmodified blunt-based body to gain insight into the effects of vortex shedding on the base drag. The methodology used to obtain finite-difference solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations for subsonic compressible two-dimensional near-wake flows is presented. The effectiveness of an introduced outflow boundary condition which minimizes reflections back into the computational domain was demonstrated with the solution of a model vortex problem. Calculations of the near-wake flow past a circular cylinder were in excellent agreement with experimental data. Laminar-flow solutions for a blunt-based model with and without a base cavity and with mass injection into the wake agreed qualitatively with experimental observations. The drag reduction capability provided by such base modifications was demonstrated.

  13. Numerical solutions of thin-film equations for polymer flows.

    PubMed

    Salez, Thomas; McGraw, Joshua D; Cormier, Sara L; Bäumchen, Oliver; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie

    2012-11-01

    We report on the numerical implementation of thin-film equations that describe the capillary-driven evolution of viscous films, in two-dimensional configurations. After recalling the general forms and features of these equations, we focus on two particular cases inspired by experiments: the leveling of a step at the free surface of a polymer film, and the leveling of a polymer droplet over an identical film. In each case, we first discuss the long-term self-similar regime reached by the numerical solution before comparing it to the experimental profile. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent, thus providing a versatile probe for nanorheology of viscous liquids in thin-film geometries.

  14. Effects of the computational time step on numerical solutions for turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Moin, Parviz

    1994-01-01

    Effects of large computational time steps on the computed turbulence were investigated using a fully implicit method. In turbulent channel flow computations the largest computational time step in wall units which led to accurate prediction of turbulence statistics was determined. Turbulence fluctuations could not be sustained if the computational time step was near or larger than the Kolmogorov time scale.

  15. An accurate method for evaluating the kernel of the integral equation relating lift to downwash in unsteady potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The method is capable of generating approximations of arbitrary accuracy. It is based on approximating the algebraic part of the nonelementary integrals in the kernel by exponential functions and then integrating termwise. The exponent spacing in the approximation is a geometric sequence. The coefficients and exponent multiplier of the exponential approximation are computed by least squares so the method is completely automated. Exponential approximates generated in this manner are two orders of magnitude more accurate than the exponential approximation that is currently most often used for this purpose. The method can be used to generate approximations to attain any desired trade-off between accuracy and computing cost.

  16. Protein Crystal Growth Under Forced Solution Flow: Experimental Setup and General Response of Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, P. G.; Rosenberger, F.

    1998-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the effects of solution flow on the growth kinetics of the protein lysozyme. To this end, we have expanded our interferometry setup by a novel crystallization cell and solution recirculation system. This combination permits monitoring of interface morphology and kinetics with a depth resolution of 200 A at bulk flow rates of up to 2000 micron/s. Particular attention was paid to the prevention of protein denaturation that is often associated with the pumping of protein solutions. We found that at bulk flow rates it less than 250 microns/s the average growth rate and step velocity, R(sub avg) and upsilon(sub avg) increase with increasing it. This can be quantitatively understood in terms of the enhanced, convective solute supply to the interface. With high-purity solutions, it u greater than 250 microns/s lead to growth deceleration, and, at low supersaturations sigma, to growth cessation. When solutions containing approx. 1% of other protein impurities were used, growth deceleration occurred at any u greater than 0 and cessation in the low sigma experiments was reached at about half the it causing cessation with pure solution. The flow-induced changes in R(sub avg) and upsilon(sub avg) including growth cessation, were reversible and reproducible, independent of the direction of the u-changes and solution purity. Hence, we attribute the deceleration to the convection-enhanced supply of impurities to the interface, which at higher flow rates overpowers the effects of enhanced interfacial solute concentration. Most importantly, we found that convective transport leads to a significant reduction in kinetics fluctuations, in agreement with our earlier expectations for the lysozyme system. This supports our hypothesis that these long-term fluctuations represent an intrinsic response feature of the coupled bulk transport-interfacial kinetics system in the mixed growth control regime.

  17. Modeling preferential flow and its consequences on solute transfer in a strongly heterogeneous deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimene, Erij; Lassabatere, Laurent; Winiarski, Thierry; Gourdon, Remy

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the fate of pollutants in the vadose zone is a prerequisite to manage soil and groundwater quality. Water infiltrates into the soil and carries a large amount of pollutants (heavy metals, organic compounds, etc.). The quality of groundwater depends on the capability of soils to remove pollutants while water infiltrates. The capability of soils to remove pollutants depends not only on their geochemical properties and affinity with pollutants but also on the quality of the contact between the reactive particles of the soil and pollutants. In such a context, preferential flows are the worst scenario since they prevent pollutants from reaching large parts of the soil including reactive zones that could serve for pollutant removal. The negative effects of preferential flow have already been pointed out by several studies. In this paper, we investigate numerically the effect of the establishment of preferential flow in a numerical section (13.5m long and 2.5m deep) that mimics a strongly heterogeneous deposit. The modelled deposit is made of several lithofacies with contrasting hydraulic properties. The numerical study proves that this strong contrast in hydraulic properties triggers the establishment of preferential flow (capillary barriers and funneled flow). Preferential flow develops mainly for low initial water contents and low fluxes imposed at the soil surface. The impact of these flows on solute transfer is also investigated as a function of solute reactivity and affinity to soil sorption sites. Modeled results clearly show that solute transport is greatly impacted by flow heterogeneity. Funneled flows have the same impacts as water fractionation into mobile and immobile transfer with a fast transport of solutes by preferential flow and solute diffusion to zones where the flow is slower. Such a pattern greatly impacts retention and reduces the access of pollutants into large parts of the soil. Retention is thus greatly reduced at the section

  18. Code and Solution Verification of 3D Numerical Modeling of Flow in the Gust Erosion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Erosion microcosms are devices commonly used to investigate the erosion and transport characteristics of sediments at the bed of rivers, lakes, or estuaries. In order to understand the results these devices provide, the bed shear stress and flow field need to be accurately described. In this research, the UMCES Gust Erosion Microcosm System (U-GEMS) is numerically modeled using Finite Volume Method. The primary aims are to simulate the bed shear stress distribution at the surface of the sediment core/bottom of the microcosm, and to validate the U-GEMS produces uniform bed shear stress at the bottom of the microcosm. The mathematical model equations are solved by on a Cartesian non-uniform grid. Multiple numerical runs were developed with different input conditions and configurations. Prior to developing the U-GEMS model, the General Moving Objects (GMO) model and different momentum algorithms in the code were verified. Code verification of these solvers was done via simulating the flow inside the top wall driven square cavity on different mesh sizes to obtain order of convergence. The GMO model was used to simulate the top wall in the top wall driven square cavity as well as the rotating disk in the U-GEMS. Components simulated with the GMO model were rigid bodies that could have any type of motion. In addition cross-verification was conducted as results were compared with numerical results by Ghia et al. (1982), and good agreement was found. Next, CFD results were validated by simulating the flow within the conventional microcosm system without suction and injection. Good agreement was found when the experimental results by Khalili et al. (2008) were compared. After the ability of the CFD solver was proved through the above code verification steps. The model was utilized to simulate the U-GEMS. The solution was verified via classic mesh convergence study on four consecutive mesh sizes, in addition to that Grid Convergence Index (GCI) was calculated and based on

  19. Use of an Accurate DNS Particulate Flow Method to Supply and Validate Boundary Conditions for the MFIX Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Gang Feng

    2012-05-31

    The simulation of particulate flows for industrial applications often requires the use of two-fluid models, where the solid particles are considered as a separate continuous phase. One of the underlining uncertainties in the use of the two-fluid models in multiphase computations comes from the boundary condition of the solid phase. Typically, the gas or liquid fluid boundary condition at a solid wall is the so called no-slip condition, which has been widely accepted to be valid for single-phase fluid dynamics provided that the Knudsen number is low. However, the boundary condition for the solid phase is not well understood. The no-slip condition at a solid boundary is not a valid assumption for the solid phase. Instead, several researchers advocate a slip condition as a more appropriate boundary condition. However, the question on the selection of an exact slip length or a slip velocity coefficient is still unanswered. Experimental or numerical simulation data are needed in order to determinate the slip boundary condition that is applicable to a two-fluid model. The goal of this project is to improve the performance and accuracy of the boundary conditions used in two-fluid models such as the MFIX code, which is frequently used in multiphase flow simulations. The specific objectives of the project are to use first principles embedded in a validated Direct Numerical Simulation particulate flow numerical program, which uses the Immersed Boundary method (DNS-IB) and the Direct Forcing scheme in order to establish, modify and validate needed energy and momentum boundary conditions for the MFIX code. To achieve these objectives, we have developed a highly efficient DNS code and conducted numerical simulations to investigate the particle-wall and particle-particle interactions in particulate flows. Most of our research findings have been reported in major conferences and archived journals, which are listed in Section 7 of this report. In this report, we will present a

  20. Determination of bedform resolution necessary to accurately resolve the flow field by comparing numerical simulations with field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margelowsky, G.; Foster, D.; Traykovski, P.; Felzenberg, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of wave-current and tidal flow bottom boundary layers are evaluated with a quasi-three-dimensional non-hydrostatic phase-resolving wave-current bottom boundary layer model, Dune. In each case, the model is evaluated with field observations of velocity profiles and seabed geometry. For wave-current boundary layers, the observations were obtained over a 26-day period in 13 m of water at the Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO, Edgartown, MA) in 2002 - 2003. Bedforms were orbital-scale ripples with wavelengths of 50-125 cm and heights of 5-20 cm with peak root-mean-square orbital velocities and mean flows typically ranging from 50-70 cm/s and 10-20 cm/s, respectively. The observations for tidal flows were obtained over a 3-day period in 13-16 m of water in Portsmouth Harbor (Portsmouth, NH) in 2008. Bedforms were dunes with wavelengths on the order of 1 m and heights on the order of 10 cm with typical peak tidal currents of approximately 1 m/s. The flow field is simulated with a finite volume approach to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a k-ω 2nd order turbulence closure scheme. The model simulations are performed for a range of theoretical and observed bedforms to examine the boundary layer sensitivity to the resolution of the bottom roughness. The observed and predicted vertical velocity profiles are evaluated with correlations and Briar’s Skill scores over the range of data sets.

  1. Macropore system characteristics controls on non-reactive solute transport at different flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsbo, Mats; Koestel, John

    2014-05-01

    Preferential flow and transport in macroporous soils are important pathways for the leaching of agrochemicals through soils. Preferential solute transport in soil is to a large extent determined by the macropore system characteristics and the water flow conditions. The importance of different characteristics of the macropore system is likely to vary with the flow conditions. The objective of this study was to determine which properties of the macropore system that control the shape of non-reactive tracer solute breakthrough curves at different steady-state flow rates. We sampled five undisturbed columns (20 cm high, 20 cm diameter) from the soil surface of four soils with clay contents between 21 and 50 %. Solute transport experiments were carried out under unsaturated conditions at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mm h-1 flow rates. For each flow rate a pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the soil surface and the electrical conductivity was measured with high temporal resolution in the column effluent. We used the 5 % arrival time and the holdback factor to estimate the degree of preferential transport from the resulting breakthrough curves. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were measured at the soil surface of the columns using a tension disc infiltrometer. The macropore system was imaged by industrial X-ray computed tomography at a resolution of 125 μm in all directions. Measures of the macropore system characteristics including measures of pore continuity were calculated from these images using the ImageJ software. Results show that the degree of preferential transport is generally increasing with flow rate when larger pores become active in the transport. The degree of preferential flow was correlated to measures of macropore topology. This study show that conclusions drawn from experiments carried out at one flow rate should generally not be extrapolated to other flow rates.

  2. Flow characteristics of surfactant solutions in porous media and their role in permeability modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpakci, B.; Klaus, E.E.; Duda, J.L.; Nagarajan, R.

    1981-12-01

    This work presents a study on flow properties of surfactant solutions in porous media, using the Penn State porous media viscometer. The effects of permeability, shear rate, and surface characteristics of porous media on the flow of oil- and water-external microemulsions, as well as surfactant solutions with lamellar structures, are examined. Untreated Bradford and Berea sand-stones, oil- and water-wet treated sandstones, and filter papers are used as porous media. The study shows that the effective viscosity of the surfactant solution (as measured in porous media), on the basis of initial permeabilities, is greater than the bulk viscosity (as measured by conventional viscometers). This increase is small for Newtonian surfactant solutions but is quite substantial for non-Newtonian surfactant solutions. 31 refs.

  3. Darcian preferential water flow and solute transport through bimodal porous systems: experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Vincenzo; Basile, Angelo; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Severino, Gerardo

    2009-02-16

    Soils often exhibit a variety of small-scale heterogeneities such as inter-aggregate pores and voids which partition flow into separate regions. In this paper a methodological approach is discussed for characterizing the hydrological behaviour of a heterogeneous clayey-sandy soil in the presence of structural inter-aggregate pores. For the clay soil examined, it was demonstrated that, coupling the transfer function approach for analyzing BTCs and water retention data obtained with different methods from laboratory studies captures the bimodal geometry of the porous system along with the related existence of fast and slow flow paths. To be effectively and reliably applied this approach requires that the predominant effects of the soil hydrological behaviour near saturation be supported by accurate experimental data of both breakthrough curves (BTCs) and hydraulic functions for high water content values. This would allow the separation of flow phases and hence accurate identification of the processes and related parameters.

  4. A grid generation and flow solution method for the Euler equations on unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.K. )

    1994-01-01

    A grid generation and flow solution algorithm for the Euler equations on unstructured grids is presented. The grid generation scheme utilizes Delaunay triangulation and self-generates the field points for the mesh based on cell aspect ratios and allows for clustering near solid surfaces. The flow solution method is an implicit algorithm in which the linear set or equations arising at each time step is solved using a Gauss Seidel procedure which is completely vectorizable. In addition, a study is conducted to examine the number of subiterations required for good convergence of the overall algorithm. Grid generation results are shown in two dimensions for a NACA 0012 airfoil as well as two-element configuration. Flow solution results are shown for two-dimensional flow over the NACA 0012 airfoil and for a two-element configuration in which the solution has been obtained through an adaptation procedure and compared to an exact solution. Preliminary three-dimensional results are also shown in which subsonic flow over a business jet is computed. 31 refs. 30 figs.

  5. Grid generation and flow solution method for Euler equations on unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle

    1992-01-01

    A grid generation and flow solution algorithm for the Euler equations on unstructured grids is presented. The grid generation scheme, which uses Delaunay triangulation, generates the field points for the mesh based on cell aspect ratios and allows clustering of grid points near solid surfaces. The flow solution method is an implicit algorithm in which the linear set of equations arising at each time step is solved using a Gauss-Seidel procedure that is completely vectorizable. Also, a study is conducted to examine the number of subiterations required for good convergence of the overall algorithm. Grid generation results are shown in two dimensions for an NACA 0012 airfoil as well as a two element configuration. Flow solution results are shown for a two dimensional flow over the NACA 0012 airfoil and for a two element configuration in which the solution was obtained through an adaptation procedure and compared with an exact solution. Preliminary three dimensional results also are shown in which the subsonic flow over a business jet is computed.

  6. Numerical solution of potential flow about arbitrary 2-dimensional multiple bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. F.; Thames, F. C.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure for the finite-difference numerical solution of the lifting potential flow about any number of arbitrarily shaped bodies is given. The solution is based on a technique of automatic numerical generation of a curvilinear coordinate system having coordinate lines coincident with the contours of all bodies in the field, regardless of their shapes and number. The effects of all numerical parameters involved are analyzed and appropriate values are recommended. Comparisons with analytic solutions for single Karman-Trefftz airfoils and a circular cylinder pair show excellent agreement. The technique of application of the boundary-fitted coordinate systems to the numerical solution of partial differential equations is illustrated.

  7. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  8. Direct observation of DNA dynamics in semidilute solutions in extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Sasmal, Chandi; Ravi Prakash, J.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of semi-dilute polymer solutions is governed by an interplay between solvent quality, concentration, molecular weight, and flow type. Semi-dilute solutions are characterized by large fluctuations in concentration, wherein polymer coils interpenetrate but may not be topologically entangled at equilibrium. In non-equilibrium flows, it is generally thought that polymer chains can self-entangle in semi-dilute solutions, thereby leading to entanglements in solutions that are nominally unentangled at equilibrium. Despite recent progress, we still lack a complete molecular-level understanding of these dynamics. In this work, we use single molecule techniques to study the dynamics of semi-dilute solutions of DNA in planar extensional flow, including polymer relaxation from high stretch, transient stretching dynamics in step-strain experiments, and steady-state stretching in flow. Our results are consistent with a power-law scaling of the longest polymer relaxation time in semi-dilute solutions, revealing an effective excluded volume exponent $\

  9. A tale of two solutes: Dual-domain flow and the role of the mass transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, M. V.; Bishop, J. M.; Cey, E. E.; Bentley, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    ' histories were different because of the difference in their distribution at the beginning of the experiment. Dual-permeability water flow and solute transport has been modeled using the HYDRUS software package. The numerical model was calibrated to both the observed salt and tracer concentrations, and, consequently, the distinct behavior of the two solutes. The numerical modeling results indicate that salt and tracer transport are sensitive to the mass transfer coefficient between matrix and macropore domains and, consequently, proper selection of the coefficient value is key to the accurate prediction of transport in dual permeability media.

  10. A 3D-CFD code for accurate prediction of fluid flows and fluid forces in seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Current and future turbomachinery requires advanced seal configurations to control leakage, inhibit mixing of incompatible fluids and to control the rotodynamic response. In recognition of a deficiency in the existing predictive methodology for seals, a seven year effort was established in 1990 by NASA's Office of Aeronautics Exploration and Technology, under the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion program, to develop validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts, codes and analyses for seals. The effort will provide NASA and the U.S. Aerospace Industry with advanced CFD scientific codes and industrial codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals. An advanced 3D CFD cylindrical seal code has been developed, incorporating state-of-the-art computational methodology for flow analysis in straight, tapered and stepped seals. Relevant computational features of the code include: stationary/rotating coordinates, cylindrical and general Body Fitted Coordinates (BFC) systems, high order differencing schemes, colocated variable arrangement, advanced turbulence models, incompressible/compressible flows, and moving grids. This paper presents the current status of code development, code demonstration for predicting rotordynamic coefficients, numerical parametric study of entrance loss coefficients for generic annular seals, and plans for code extensions to labyrinth, damping, and other seal configurations.

  11. Flow Curve Determination at Large Plastic Strain Levels to Accurately Constitutive Equations of AHSS in Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, X.; Sriram, S.; Kergen, R.

    2011-05-01

    ArcelorMittal continuously develops new steel grades (AHSS) with high performance for the automotive industry to improve the weight reduction and the passive safety. The wide market introduction of AHSS raises a new challenge for manufacturers in terms of material models in the prediction of forming—especially formability and springback. The relatively low uniform elongation, the high UTS and the low forming limit curve of these AHSS may cause difficulties in forming simulations. One of these difficulties is the consequence of the relatively low uniform elongation on the parameters identification of isotropic hardening model. Different experimental tests allow to reach large plastic strain levels (hydraulic bulge test, stack compression test, shear test…). After a description on how to determine the flow curve in these experimental tests, a comparison of the different flow curves is made for different steel grades. The ArcelorMittal identification protocol for hardening models is only based on stress-strain curves determined in uniaxial tension. Experimental tests where large plastic strain levels are reached are used to validate our identification protocol and to recommend some hardening models. Finally, the influence of isotropic hardening models and yield loci in forming prediction for AHSS steels will be presented.

  12. Implicit solution of the material transport in Stokes flow simulation: Toward thermal convection simulation surrounded by free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Mikito; May, Dave A.

    2015-07-01

    We present implicit time integration schemes suitable for modeling free surface Stokes flow dynamics with marker in cell (MIC) based spatial discretization. Our target is for example thermal convection surrounded by deformable surface boundaries to simulate the long term planetary formation process. The numerical system becomes stiff when the dynamical balancing time scale for the increasing/decreasing load by surface deformation is very short compared with the time scale associated with thermal convection. Any explicit time integration scheme will require very small time steps; otherwise, serious numerical oscillation (spurious solutions) will occur. The implicit time integration scheme possesses a wider stability region than the explicit method; therefore, it is suitable for stiff problems. To investigate an efficient solution method for the stiff Stokes flow system, we apply first (backward Euler (BE)) and second order (trapezoidal method (TR) and trapezoidal rule-backward difference formula (TR-BDF2)) accurate implicit methods for the MIC solution scheme. The introduction of implicit time integration schemes results in nonlinear systems of equations. We utilize a Jacobian free Newton Krylov (JFNK) based Newton framework to solve the resulting nonlinear equations. In this work we also investigate two efficient implicit solution strategies to reduce the computational cost when solving stiff nonlinear systems. The two methods differ in how the advective term in the material transport evolution equation is treated. We refer to the method that employs Lagrangian update as "fully implicit" (Imp), whilst the method that employs Eulerian update is referred to as "semi-implicit" (SImp). Using a finite difference (FD) method, we have performed a series of numerical experiments which clarify the accuracy of solutions and trade-off between the computational cost associated with the nonlinear solver and time step size. In comparison with the general explicit Euler method

  13. Slow rarefied gas flow past a cylinder: Analytical solution in comparison to the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerkamp, Armin; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    In the variety of approaches to tackle the challenges of rarefied gas flows, the regularized 13-moment equations (R13) have become a very promising contender. The equations are based on moment approximations in kinetic gas theory which can be interpreted as a non-linear discretization of the Boltzmann equation in the velocity space. In order to get a deeper insight into rarefaction effects, an analytic solution for the flow around a sphere has been constructed in [M. Torrilhon, Phys. Fluids. 22, 072001:1-16 (2010)]. In the present work, an analytic solution for the flow past a cylinder is derived, which is another very important text book problem. Again, the investigation is restricted to slow flows (Ma ≪ 1), which means a linearized system of the original R13 equations is analyzed. The results for the sphere and the cylinder are then compared and typical rarefaction effects are pointed out.

  14. Simulation of unsaturated flow and nonreactive solute transport in a heterogeneous soil at the field scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, M L

    1993-02-01

    A field-scale, unsaturated flow and solute transport experiment at the Las Cruces trench site in New Mexico was simulated as part of a blind'' modeling exercise to demonstrate the ability or inability of uncalibrated models to predict unsaturated flow and solute transport in spatially variable porous media. Simulations were conducted using a recently developed multiphase flow and transport simulator. Uniform and heterogeneous soil models were tested, and data from a previous experiment at the site were used with an inverse procedure to estimate water retention parameters. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean observed and simulated flow and transport behavior. The results of this study suggest that defensible predictions of waste migration and fate at low-level waste sites will ultimately require site-specific data for model calibration.

  15. New approach to the exact solution of viscous flow due to stretching (shrinking) and porous sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Azhar; Khan Marwat, Dil Nawaz; Asghar, S.

    Exact analytical solutions for the generalized stretching (shrinking) of a porous surface, for the variable suction (injection) velocity, is presented in this paper. The solution is generalized in the sense that the existing solutions that correspond to various stretching velocities are recovered as a special case of this study. A suitable similarity transformation is introduced to find self-similar solution of the non-linear governing equations. The flow is characterized by a few non-dimensional parameters signifying the problem completely. These parameters are such that the whole range of stretching (shrinking) problems discussed earlier can be recovered by assigning appropriate values to these parameters. A key point of the whole narrative is that a number of earlier works can be abridged into one generalized problem through the introduction of a new similarity transformation and finding its exact solution encompassing all the earlier solutions.

  16. Flow of polymer solutions in porous media: inadequacy of the capillary model

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, J.L.; Klaus, E.E.; Hong, S.A.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental measurements show that conventional capillary models are inadequate for the description of the flow of nonlinear purely viscous solutions in porous media. A theoretical analysis indicates that any model for the flow of purely viscous polymer solutions in porous media must meet 2 criteria. First, the model must include expansion and contraction regions where excess pressure drops occur. Secondly, the rheologic model for the fluid must include the characteristic transition from Newtonian behavior at low shear rates to shear-thinning behavior at high shear rates. 17 references.

  17. Solution of three-dimensional afterbody flow using reduced Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almahroos, H. M. H.; Khosla, P. K.; Rubin, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    The flow over afterbody geometries was investigated using the reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) approximation. Both pressure velocity flux-split and composites velocity primitive variable formulations were considered. Pressure or pseudopotential relaxation procedures are combined with sparse matrix or coupled strongly implicit algorithms to form a three-dimensional solver for general non-orthogonal coordinates. Three-dimensional subsonic and transonic viscous/inviscid interacting flows were evaluated. Solutions with and without regions of recirculation were obtained.

  18. Transonic small disturbances equation applied to the solution of two-dimensional nonsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couston, M.; Angelini, J. J.; Mulak, P.

    1980-01-01

    Transonic nonsteady flows are of large practical interest. Aeroelastic instability prediction, control figured vehicle techniques or rotary wings in forward flight are some examples justifying the effort undertaken to improve knowledge of these problems is described. The numerical solution of these problems under the potential flow hypothesis is described. The use of an alternating direction implicit scheme allows the efficient resolution of the two dimensional transonic small perturbations equation.

  19. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity were included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the sub-adjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the non-linear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The tradeoff between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models (DGRF's) is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition, a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  20. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Goerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity have been included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary and the subadjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the nonlinear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The trade-off between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and fluid flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  1. Solution of 3-dimensional time-dependent viscous flows. Part 3: Application to turbulent and unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical scheme is developed for solving the time dependent, three dimensional compressible viscous flow equations to be used as an aid in the design of helicopter rotors. In order to further investigate the numerical procedure, the computer code developed to solve an approximate form of the three dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations employing a linearized block implicit technique in conjunction with a QR operator scheme is tested. Results of calculations are presented for several two dimensional boundary layer flows including steady turbulent and unsteady laminar cases. A comparison of fourth order and second order solutions indicate that increased accuracy can be obtained without any significant increases in cost (run time). The results of the computations also indicate that the computer code can be applied to more complex flows such as those encountered on rotating airfoils. The geometry of a symmetric NACA four digit airfoil is considered and the appropriate geometrical properties are computed.

  2. Invariant solutions in a channel flow using a minimal restricted nonlinear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizard, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Simulations using a Restricted Nonlinear (RNL) system, where mean flow distortion resulting from Reynolds stress feedback regenerates rolls, is applied in a channel flow under subcritical conditions. This quasi-linear restriction of the dynamics is used to study invariant solutions located in the bulk of the flow found recently by Rawat et al. (2016) [14]. It is shown that the RNL system truncated to a single streamwise mode for the perturbation supports invariant solutions that are found to bifurcate from a relative periodic orbit into a travelling wave solution when the spanwise size is increasing. In particular, the travelling wave solution exhibits a spanwise localized structure that remains unchanged for large values of the spanwise extent as the invariant solution lying on the lower branch found by Rawat et al. (2016) [14]. In addition, travelling wave solutions provided by this minimal RNL system are self-similar with respect to the Reynolds number based on the centreline velocity, and the half-channel height varying from 2000 to 5000.

  3. The use of flow cytometry to accurately ascertain total and viable counts of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in chocolate.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Yves; Champagne, Claude P

    2015-04-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the precision and accuracy of flow cytometry (FC) methodologies in the evaluation of populations of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011) in two commercial dried forms, and ascertain the challenges in enumerating them in a chocolate matrix. FC analyses of total (FC(T)) and viable (FC(V)) counts in liquid or dried cultures were almost two times more precise (reproducible) than traditional direct microscopic counts (DCM) or colony forming units (CFU). With FC, it was possible to ascertain low levels of dead cells (FC(D)) in fresh cultures, which is not possible with traditional CFU and DMC methodologies. There was no interference of chocolate solids on FC counts of probiotics when inoculation was above 10(7) bacteria per g. Addition of probiotics in chocolate at 40 °C resulted in a 37% loss in viable cells. Blending of the probiotic powder into chocolate was not uniform which raised a concern that the precision of viable counts could suffer. FCT data can serve to identify the correct inoculation level of a sample, and viable counts (FCV or CFU) can subsequently be better interpreted.

  4. Solution of axisymmetric and two-dimensional inviscid flow over blunt bodies by the method of lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II

    1978-01-01

    Comparisons with experimental data and the results of other computational methods demonstrated that very accurate solutions can be obtained by using relatively few lines with the method of lines approach. This method is semidiscrete and has relatively low core storage requirements as compared with fully discrete methods since very little data were stored across the shock layer. This feature is very attractive for three dimensional problems because it enables computer storage requirements to be reduced by approximately an order of magnitude. In the present study it was found that nine lines was a practical upper limit for two dimensional and axisymmetric problems. This condition limits application of the method to smooth body geometries where relatively few lines would be adequate to describe changes in the flow variables around the body. Extension of the method to three dimensions was conceptually straightforward; however, three dimensional applications would also be limited to smooth body geometries although not necessarily to total of nine lines.

  5. Solutions of turbulent backward-facing step flow with heat transfer using the finite volume method

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, R.H.; Cochran, R.J.; Emergy, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    The heated turbulent flow over a backward-facing step is numerically solved using the commercial computational fluid dynamics program FLUENT. The methods used here consist of the default power-law upwinding scheme, default multigrid equation solution method and a standard k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model with wall functions. A total of four separate cases are reported. The four cases consist of combinations of partially and fully developed flow at the inlet with uniform or developed temperature profiles. Three mesh refinements are reported for each flow.

  6. Calculation procedures for potential and viscous flow solutions for engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Stockman, N. O.

    1973-01-01

    The method and basic elements of computer solutions for both potential flow and viscous flow calculations for engine inlets are described. The procedure is applicable to subsonic conventional (CTOL), short-haul (STOL), and vertical takeoff (VTOL) aircraft engine nacelles operating in a compressible viscous flow. The calculated results compare well with measured surface pressure distributions for a number of model inlets. The paper discusses the uses of the program in both the design and analysis of engine inlets, with several examples given for VTOL lift fans, acoustic splitters, and for STOL engine nacelles. Several test support applications are also given.

  7. Improved radiation dose efficiency in solution SAXS using a sheath flow sample environment

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Nigel; Cowieson, Nathan; Hawley, Adrian M.; Mudie, Stephen T.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Kusel, Michael; Samardzic-Boban, Vesna; Ryan, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation damage is a major limitation to synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of biomacromolecules. Flowing the sample during exposure helps to reduce the problem, but its effectiveness in the laminar-flow regime is limited by slow flow velocity at the walls of sample cells. To overcome this limitation, the coflow method was developed, where the sample flows through the centre of its cell surrounded by a flow of matched buffer. The method permits an order-of-magnitude increase of X-ray incident flux before sample damage, improves measurement statistics and maintains low sample concentration limits. The method also efficiently handles sample volumes of a few microlitres, can increase sample throughput, is intrinsically resistant to capillary fouling by sample and is suited to static samples and size-exclusion chromatography applications. The method unlocks further potential of third-generation synchrotron beamlines to facilitate new and challenging applications in solution scattering. PMID:27917826

  8. Testing and benchmarking of a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, P.N.; Andersen, P.F.; Faust, C.R.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1988-12-31

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The model is intended for application to a variety of groundwater resource and solute migration evaluations, including several complex sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Because the model, FTWORK, is relatively new, there is a need to provide confidence in the model results. Methodologies that test models include comparisons with analytical solutions, comparisons with empirical data, and checking that conservation properties hold. Another level of testing is the comparison of one code against another. This paper describes the testing and benchmarking procedure used to verify the validate FTWORK.

  9. A mean flow field solution to a moderately under/over-expanded turbulent supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Babak; Bussmann, Markus; Tran, Honghi N.

    2009-04-01

    The linearized solution for an inviscid imperfectly-expanded supersonic axisymmetric jet has been extended to the case of a turbulent flow, by taking into account the mean Reynolds stresses. The analytical results agree reasonably well with experimental data available in the literature, and so indicate that the solution is a good approximation to the near-field of an imperfectly-expanded jet. This analytical solution could be used to improve semi-empirical models of broadband shock-associated noise in aeronautics. To cite this article: B. Emami et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  10. Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Takahashi, Kayori; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF) using multi-angle light scattering (MALS) with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS.

  11. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  12. Uniformly Valid Asymptotic Solution of Steady Dendrite Growth in External Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun; Yu, Dong-Sheng

    1998-11-01

    The interaction of convection and dendritic growth has been a subject of great interest in the area of material science in recent years. Theoretical studies of the steady dendrite growth in an external flow have been conducted by a number of authors, such as Ananth and Gill (1984); Ben Amar (1988), Bouisson and Pelce (1989); Saville and Beaghton (1989), etc., numerically and analytically. Their solutions, however, are not asymptotic expansion solutions. Their approaches do not allow to generate the next order approximations, nor give an estimation of the error between their solutions and the exact solutions. The first asymptotic, uniformly valid expansion solution was obtained by Xu (1994) in the limit of the Prandtl number Pr → ∞. Xu's solution may be well applied to the case that the flow velocity, U_∞, has the same order of magnitude as the growth speed of dendrite tip, U. It, however, will not give a good approximation when U_∞ >> U . The case of U_∞ >> U is, practically, important. It was just for this case that some recent experiments were performed. In this paper, we consider steady growth with zero surface tension in the case, U_∞ >> U and obtain a uniformly valid asymptotic expansion for the steady state solution in the whole growth region as ɛ = U/U_∞ → 0.

  13. Integrating Vegetation, Soil and Topography to Assess the Impact of Lateral Flow on Plant Solute Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, K. T.; Riha, S. J.; Stedinger, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    Simulation of solute uptake by vegetation in complex terrain typically fails to account for subsurface lateral movement of solutes. This study uses a spatially explicit plant-soil-water simulation model to investigate whether subsurface lateral flow at the sand-clay interface impacts tritium uptake by mixed forest vegetation. Ten hectares of a mixed pine - laurel oak forest on Coastal Plain soils periodically received irrigation with tritium-enriched water (activity ranged from 5,000 to 20,000 pCi/ml) over a three year time period. To simulate water and tritium fluxes we developed a spatially explicit water balance model. Tritium was completely mixed daily with water in each soil layer. Vertical flow of water was simulated using a capacitance model with lateral flow dependent on head development and the local slope of the impeding clay layer. The model was evaluated by comparing biweekly measurements of tritium activity (measured to 3 meter depth) and soil water content (measured to 2 meter depth) in 18 measurement clusters distributed over the catchment. We evaluated the importance of including subsurface flow in model simulations. Lateral flow was locally important (mean distance tritium traveled laterally was 1.35 m). However, after three years of simulation, the maximum predicted lateral movement of tritium did not exceed 70 meters. On the catchment scale, the average simulated amount of tritium taken up by vegetation was not impacted by lateral flow, but smaller scale spatial variability in tritium uptake increased with the inclusion of lateral flow. Simulated tritium uptake was most sensitive to changes in vegetation cover, and was less sensitive to differences in soil properties (e.g. field capacity, hydraulic conductivity and root distribution). When integrated over the study area, the simulation of solute uptake by a mixed forest in Coastal Pain soils was not sensitive to inclusion of subsurface lateral flow of water.

  14. MAST solution of irrotational flow problems in 2D domains with strongly unstructured triangular meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucciarelli, T.

    2012-12-01

    A new methodology for the solution of irrotational 2D flow problems in domains with strongly unstructured meshes is presented. A fractional time step procedure is applied to the original governing equations, solving consecutively a convective prediction system and a diffusive corrective system. The non linear components of the problem are concentrated in the prediction step, while the correction step leads to the solution of a linear system, of the order of the number of computational cells. A MArching in Space and Time (MAST) approach is applied for the solution of the convective prediction step. The major advantages of the model, as well as its ability to maintain the solution monotonicity even in strongly irregular meshes, are briefly described. The algorithm is applied to the solution of diffusive shallow water equations in a simple domain.

  15. Series Solution for Rotating Flow of an Upper Convected Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, M.; Z., Iqbal; Hayat, T.; Obaidat, S.

    2011-10-01

    The equations for two-dimensional flow of an upper convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid in a rotating frame are modeled. The resulting equations are first simplified by a boundary layer approach and then solved by a homotopy analysis method (HAM). Convergence of series solution is discussed through residual error curves. The results of the influence of viscoelastic and rotation parameters are plotted and discussed.

  16. Direct estimation of mass flow and diffusion of nitrogen compounds in solution and soil.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Olusegun Ayodeji; Inselsbacher, Erich; Näsholm, Torgny

    2014-02-01

    Plant nutrient uptake from soil is mainly governed by diffusion and transpirationally induced mass flow, but the current methods for assessing the relative importance of these processes are indirect. We developed a microdialysis method using solutions of different osmotic potentials as perfusates to simulate diffusion and mass flow processes, and assessed how induced mass flow affected fluxes of nitrogen (N) compounds in solution and in boreal forest soil. Varying the osmotic potential of perfusates induced vertical fluxes in the direction of the dialysis membranes at rates of between 1 × 10(-8) and 3 × 10(-7)  m s(-1) , thus covering the estimated range of water velocities perpendicular to root surfaces and induced by transpiration. Mass flow increased N fluxes in solution but even more so in soil. This effect was explained by an indirect effect of mass flow on rates of diffusive fluxes, possibly caused by the formation of steeper gradients in concentrations of N compounds from membrane surfaces out in the soil. Our results suggest that transpiration may be an essential driver of plant N acquisition.

  17. Preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions for solution of the preconditioned Euler equations at low Mach number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Kamali-Moghadam, Ramin

    2012-06-01

    Preconditioned characteristic boundary conditions (BCs) are implemented at artificial boundaries for the solution of the two- and three-dimensional preconditioned Euler equations at low Mach number flows. The preconditioned compatibility equations and the corresponding characteristic variables (or the Riemann invariants) based on the characteristic forms of preconditioned Euler equations are mathematically derived for three preconditioners proposed by Eriksson, Choi and Merkle, and Turkel. A cell-centered finite volume Roe's method is used for the discretization of the preconditioned system of equations on unstructured meshes. The accuracy and performance of the preconditioned characteristic BCs applied at artificial boundaries are evaluated in comparison with the non-preconditioned characteristic BCs and the simplified BCs in computing steady low Mach number flows. The two-dimensional flow over the NACA0012 airfoil and three-dimensional flow over the hemispherical headform are computed and the results are obtained for different conditions and compared with the available numerical and experimental data. The sensitivity of the solution to the size of computational domain and the variation of the angle of attack for each type of BCs is also examined. Indications are that the preconditioned characteristic BCs implemented in the preconditioned system of Euler equations greatly enhance the convergence rate of the solution of low Mach number flows compared to the other two types of BCs.

  18. On the effects of preferential or barrier flow features on solute plumes in permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebben, Megan L.; Werner, Adrian D.

    2016-12-01

    Despite that discrete flow features (DFFs, e.g. fractures and faults) are common features in the subsurface, few studies have explored the influence of DFFs on solute plumes in otherwise permeable rocks (e.g. sandstone, limestone), compared to low-permeability rock settings (e.g. granite and basalt). DFFs can provide preferential flow pathways (i.e. 'preferential flow features'; PFFs), or can act to impede flow (i.e. 'barrier flow features'; BFFs). This research uses a simple analytical expression and numerical modelling to explore how a single DFF influences the steady-state distributions of solute plumes in permeable aquifers. The analysis quantifies the displacement and widening (or narrowing) of a steady-state solute plume as it crosses a DFF in idealised, 1 × 1 m moderately permeable rock aquifers. Previous research is extended by accounting for DFFs as 2D flow features, and including BFF situations. A range of matrix-DFF permeability ratios (0.01 to 100) and DFF apertures (0.25 mm to 2 cm), typical of sedimentary aquifers containing medium-to-large fractures, are considered. The results indicate that for the conceptual models considered here, PFFs typically have a more significant influence on plume distributions than BFFs, and the impact of DFFs on solute plumes generally increases with increasing aperture. For example, displacement of peak solute concentration caused by DFFs exceeds 20 cm in some PFF cases, compared to a maximum of 0.64 cm in BFF cases. PFFs widen plumes up to 9.7 times, compared to a maximum plume widening of 2.0 times in BFF cases. Plumes crossing a PFF are less symmetrical, and peak solute concentrations beneath PFFs are up to two orders of magnitude lower than plumes in BFF cases. This study extends current knowledge of the attenuating influence of DFFs in otherwise permeable rocks on solute plume characteristics, through evaluation of 2D flow effects in DFFs for a variety of DFF apertures, and by considering BFF situations.

  19. Brownian dynamics simulations of flowing isolated polymer molecules in solution near surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Manish

    Brownian dynamics simulations have been shown to give accurate predictions of the molecular conformations and rheology of polymers (DNA in particular) in extensional and shear flow. We extend these Brownian dynamics methods to include the interactions of polymers with non- adsorbing and irreversibly adsorbing solid surfaces during flow. We develop mathematical tools and statistical analyses and apply them to the case of a simple steady shear flow (plane Couette) inside a confined geometry and to the time-dependent axisymmetric flow created by the action of a drying droplet. Under shearing flow (plane Couette) there is a depletion layer near the wall whose thickness decreases with increasing shear rate, because of the compression of the chain in the shear gradient direction. Relative to the bulk, the molecular stretch in the direction of the flow is reduced near the wall, despite the increase in molecular alignment. We also demonstrate that the wall interferes with the molecular tumbling in shear flow. In the case of a perfectly adsorbing wall, in the process of adsorbing, the molecule becomes more stretched than in the bulk flow at the same shear rate. We also report a propensity for the polymer to affix to the surface sequentially starting at one end, due to the tendency in a random-walk polymer for a free end to lie at the periphery. The more highly stretched molecules tend to be those that adsorbed more perfectly in sequence. In the drying droplet flow field, the degree of stretch obtainable is substantially less than can be obtained by deposition from a simple uniform shearing flow. Statistical analysis reveals that the inefficiency of stretching in the drying droplet results from the presence of a velocity component normal to the surface, which reduces the time available for the chain to unravel sequentially as it adsorbs onto the surface.

  20. The effect of antidiuretic hormone on solute flows in mammalian collecting tubules

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, James A.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1972-01-01

    These experiments were intended to evaluate the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-dependent reflection coefficients of urea, sucrose, and NaCl in cortical and outer medullary collecting tubules isolated from mammalian kidney. In one group of experiments, the ADH-dependent osmotic water flows, when the perfusing solutions contained hypotonic NaCl solutions, were indistinguishable from control observations when either urea or sucrose replaced, in part, NaCl in isotonic bathing solutions (cortical collecting tubules). Similarly, both in cortical and outer medullary collecting tubules exposed to ADH, there was zero net osmotic volume flow when a portion of the NaCl in the bathing and/or perfusing solutions was replaced by either sucrose or urea, so long as the perfusing and bathing solutions were isosmolal. Taken together, these observations suggest that the ADH-dependent reflection coefficients of NaCl, urea, and sucrose, in these tubules, were identical. Since the effective hydrodynamic radii of urea and sucrose are, respectively, 1.8 and 5.2 A, it is likely that σi, for urea, sucrose, and NaCl, was unity. In support of this, the diffusion permeability coefficient (PDi cm sec-1) of urea was indistinguishable from zero. Since the limiting sites for urea penetration were the luminal interfaces of the tubules, these data are consistent with the view that ADH increases diffusional water flow across such interfaces. Images PMID:5057132

  1. Numerical solutions of turbulent models for flow over a flat plate with angle of attack

    SciTech Connect

    Truncellito, N.T.; Yeh, H.; Lior, N.

    1985-03-01

    Numerical solutions of the two-dimensional boundary layer equations were developed as applied to flow over a flat plate at various angles of attack. Three methods of approach were examined. An integral solution was constructed for laminar and turbulent flow, as well as finite difference solutions for zeroth- and first-order turbulence models. The models also account for buoyancy effects. A three part mixing length model was employed in the zeroth-order model, and an additional turbulent kinetic energy equation was utilized for the first-order model. The computational method utilized Patankar-Spalding coordinates and differs from other methods in that no matching procedure is required for the inner and outer flow regions. The Falkner-Skan velocity profile is applied as an edge boundary condition while variable wall temperature conditions can be imposed. The effects of freestream velocity and angle of attack on skin friction and heat transfer were established, and the velocity and temperature fields were determined. Results of the zeroth-order solution are in excellent agreement with the Colburn equation and several other data sources. These solutions provide correlations in terms of Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient versus local Reynolds number which can be used for estimating heat transfer and wind loadings on a flat plate. Results generated are especially useful in predicting the performance of solar system designs.

  2. Dual-Code Solution Strategy for Chemically-Reacting Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Eberhardt, Scott

    1995-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flow fields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three-dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a non-catalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the non-catalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated in both the radial and streamwise directions. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three-dimensional case in comparison to an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  3. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Shaw, Leo; Wang, Cheng; Park, Steve; Guo, Yikun; Reinspach, Julia A.; Gu, Kevin; Gu, Xiaodan; Tee, Benjamin C. K.; Pang, Changhyun; Yan, Hongping; Zhao, Dahui; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-08-12

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a similar to 90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhanced all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. However, we expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility.

  4. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Shaw, Leo; Wang, Cheng; Park, Steve; Guo, Yikun; Reinspach, Julia A; Gu, Kevin; Gu, Xiaodan; Tee, Benjamin C K; Pang, Changhyun; Yan, Hongping; Zhao, Dahui; Toney, Michael F; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-08-12

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a ∼90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhanced all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. We expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility.

  5. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Shaw, Leo; Wang, Cheng; Park, Steve; Guo, Yikun; Reinspach, Julia A.; Gu, Kevin; Gu, Xiaodan; Tee, Benjamin C. K.; Pang, Changhyun; Yan, Hongping; Zhao, Dahui; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a ∼90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhanced all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. We expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility. PMID:26264528

  6. An Exact Dual Adjoint Solution Method for Turbulent Flows on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lu, James; Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for solving the discrete adjoint system based on an unstructured-grid discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method is constructed such that an adjoint solution exactly dual to a direct differentiation approach is recovered at each time step, yielding a convergence rate which is asymptotically equivalent to that of the primal system. The new approach is implemented within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid framework and results are presented for inviscid, laminar, and turbulent flows. Improvements to the baseline solution algorithm, such as line-implicit relaxation and a tight coupling of the turbulence model, are also presented. By storing nearest-neighbor terms in the residual computation, the dual scheme is computationally efficient, while requiring twice the memory of the flow solution. The scheme is expected to have a broad impact on computational problems related to design optimization as well as error estimation and grid adaptation efforts.

  7. Modeling expected solute concentration in randomly heterogeneous flow systems with multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Maria E; Destouni, Georgia; Martinet, Philippe

    2004-05-01

    Many environmental problems require assessment of extensive reaction systems within natural subsurface flow systems exhibiting large physical and biogeochemical heterogeneity. We present an approach to couple stochastic advective-reactive modeling of physical solute transport (LaSAR) with the geochemical model PHREEQC for modeling solute concentrations in systems with variable flow velocity and multicomponent reactions. PHREEQC allows for general and flexible quantification of a multitude of linear and nonlinear geochemical processes, while LaSAR efficiently handles field-scale solute spreading in stochastic heterogeneous flow fields. The combined LaSAR-PHREEQC approach requires very modest computational efforts, thereby allowing a large number of reactive transport problems to be readily assessed and facilitating handling of quantifiable uncertainty in environmental model applications. Computational efficiency and explicit handling of field-scale dispersion without introduction of excessive fluid mixing that may impair model results are general advantages of the LaSAR compared with alternative solute transport modeling approaches. The LaSAR-PHREEQC approach is restricted to steady or unidirectional flow fields, and our specific application examples are limited to homogeneous reaction systems without local or transverse dispersion-diffusion, although these are not general methodological limitations. As a comprehensive application example, we simulate the spreading of acid mine drainage in a groundwater focusing on Zn2+ and including relevant, major-component geochemistry. Model results show that Zn2+ may be substantially attenuated by both sorption and precipitation, with flow heterogeneity greatly affecting expected solute concentrations downstream of the mine waste deposit in both cases.

  8. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  9. Flow Data for Solute Transport Modeling from Tracer Experiments in a Stream Not Continuously Gaining Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2007-12-01

    In-stream tracer experiments are a well-established method for determining flow data to be incorporated in solute transport modeling. For a gaining stream, this method is implemented to provide spatial flow data at scales of minutes and tens of meters without physical disturbance to the flow of water, the streambed, or biota. Of importance for solute transport modeling, solute inflow loading along the stream can be estimated with this spatial data. The tracer information can also be interpreted to characterize hyporheic exchange time-scales for a stream with hyporheic exchange flowpaths (HEFs) that are short relative to the distance over which the stream gains water. The interpretation of tracer data becomes uncertain for a stream that is not gaining water continuously over intended study reach. We demonstrate, with straight-forward mass-balances, uncertainties for solute loading which arise in the analysis of streams locally losing water while predominantly gaining water (and solutes) over a larger scale. With field data from Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado) we illustrate the further uncertainty distinguishing HEFs from (locally) losing segments of the stream. Comparison of bromide tracer with ambient sulfate concentrations suggests that subsurface inflows and outflows, concurrent with likely HEFs, occur in a hydrogeochemical setting of multiple, dispersed and mixed, sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the predominately gaining, but locally losing, stream. To compute stream-reach mass-balances (the simplest of water quality models) there is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Identification of inflow solute mass requires quantifying water gain, loss, and hyporheic exchange in addition to concentration.

  10. An investigation of parallel implicit solution algorithms for incompressible flows on unstructured topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyams, Daniel Gaiennie

    The primary objective of this study is to develop an efficient, scalable, parallel incompressible flow solver capable of performing viscous, high Reynolds number flow simulations for complex geometries using multielement unstructured grids. The present parallel unstructured viscous flow solver is based on domain decomposition for concurrent solution within subdomains assigned to multiple processors. The solution algorithm employs iterative solution of the implicit approximation, and its software implementation uses MPI message passing for interprocessor communication. Key parallelization issues addressed in this work are (1) definition of the iteration hierarchy, (2) treatment of connectivity between subdomain interfaces, and (3) methods for coupling of subdomains. A heuristic, semiempirical performance estimate is developed and evaluated. With this performance estimate, scalability characteristics of the solution algorithm may be calculated for a particular architecture and/or predicted for a given problem a priori. Validation and verification of the solution procedure are carried out on several small steady and unsteady model problems with excellent agreement to experimental, theoretical, and numerical results. The present parallel flow solver is demonstrated for large-scale meshes with viscous sublayer resolution (y+ ˜ 1) and approximately 106 points or more. Complex geometry 3D applications include (1) a full-scale ship hull, (2) a SUBOFF model hull with stern appendages, (3) a fully-configured high-lift transport, and (4) a maneuvering tiltrotor aircraft. The first three computations are shown to agree well with available experimental data. The maneuvering tiltrotor aircraft simulation is a demonstration of capability for the parallel solution algorithm in the context of an extremely complex geometry and unsteady flowfield.

  11. Can a numerically stable subgrid-scale model for turbulent flow computation be ideally accurate?: a preliminary theoretical study for the Gaussian filtered Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2003-09-01

    This paper introduces a candidate for the origin of the numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation repeatedly observed in academic and practical industrial flow computations. Without resorting to any subgrid-scale modeling, but based on a simple assumption regarding the streamwise component of flow velocity, it is shown theoretically that in a channel-flow computation, the application of the Gaussian filtering to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations yields a numerically unstable term, a cross-derivative term, which is similar to one appearing in the Gaussian filtered Vlasov equation derived by Klimas [J. Comput. Phys. 68, 202 (1987)] and also to one derived recently by Kobayashi and Shimomura [Phys. Fluids 15, L29 (2003)] from the tensor-diffusivity subgrid-scale term in a dynamic mixed model. The present result predicts that not only the numerical methods and the subgrid-scale models employed but also only the applied filtering process can be a seed of this numerical instability. An investigation concerning the relationship between the turbulent energy scattering and the unstable term shows that the instability of the term does not necessarily represent the backscatter of kinetic energy which has been considered a possible origin of numerical instabilities in large eddy simulation. The present findings raise the question whether a numerically stable subgrid-scale model can be ideally accurate.

  12. A nonlinear self-similar solution to barotropic flow over rapidly varying topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Ruy; Kuehl, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Beginning from the Shallow Water Equations (SWE), a nonlinear self-similar analytic solution is derived for barotropic flow over rapidly varying topography. We study conditions relevant to the ocean slope where the flow is dominated by Earth's rotation and topography. Attention is paid to the northern Gulf of Mexico slope with application to pollutant dispersion and the Norwegian Coastal Current which sheds eddies into the Lofoten Basin that are believe to influence deep water formation. The solution is found to extend the topographic β-plume solution (Kuehl 2014, GRL) in two ways: 1) The solution is valid for intensifying jets. 2) The influence of nonlinear advection is included. The SWE are scaled to the case of a topographically controlled jet, then solved by introducing a similarity variable η = Cxy . The nonlinear solution, valid for topographies h =h0 - αxy3 , takes the form of the Lambert W Function for velocity. The linear solution, valid for topographies h =h0 - αxyγ , takes the form of the Error Function for transport. Kuehl's results considered the case - 1 <= γ < 1 which admits expanding jets, while the new result consider the case γ < - 1 which admits intensifying jets.

  13. Combined LAURA-UPS solution procedure for chemically-reacting flows. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flowfields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a noncatalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the noncatalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated and the nonequilibrium results are compared with a perfect gas solution, showing that while the surface pressure is relatively unchanged by the inclusion of reacting chemistry the nonequilibrium heating is 25 percent higher. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three dimensional case over an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  14. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaji, Masao; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    To improve the thermal performance of high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater, heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling of lithium bromide aqueous solution in the subcooled region were experimentally investigated. Experiments were made for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel (5 mm × 20 mm cross section) with one side wall heated. Boiling onset quality of lithium bromide aqueous solution is greater than that of water. The heat transfer coefficient of lithium bromide aqueous solution is about a half of that of water under the same experimental conditions of inlet velocity and heat flux. The experimental data of heat transfer coefficient for water are compared with the empirical correlation of Thom et al.11) and a fairly good agreement is obtained. The predictive calculations by the method of Sekoguchi et al.12) are compared with the data for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution. Agreement between them is good for water, while the results for lithium bromide aqueous solution are not satisfactory.

  15. Accurate and absolute diffusion measurements of Rhodamine 6G in low-concentration aqueous solutions by the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G.; Zick, K.

    2015-04-28

    A pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sequence with solvent suppression (PGSE-WATERGATE) was applied to accurately measure the diffusion coefficients of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in low-concentration aqueous solutions. Three samples with Rh6G concentrations of C{sub Rh6G} = 1, 4.5, and 25 μM were investigated. The precise determination of the diffusion coefficients in this low-concentration range was made possible by using a cryogenically cooled NMR probe and by the effective solvent suppression of the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence. The present results bridge the gap between diffusion data measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in the single molecule limit and diffusivities obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) without solvent suppression at higher concentrations. To further extend the concentration range, the diffusion coefficient of Rh6G was also measured on a sample with C{sub Rh6G} = 410 μM by PFG-NMR. The overall concentration dependence of the Rh6G diffusion at 25 °C is discussed in terms of dimerization of the Rh6G molecules. The concentration-dependent monomer/dimer proportion is deduced from the diffusion data.

  16. The role of chemistry and pH of solid surfaces for specific adsorption of biomolecules in solution--accurate computational models and experiment.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Hendrik

    2014-06-18

    Adsorption of biomolecules and polymers to inorganic nanostructures plays a major role in the design of novel materials and therapeutics. The behavior of flexible molecules on solid surfaces at a scale of 1-1000 nm remains difficult and expensive to monitor using current laboratory techniques, while playing a critical role in energy conversion and composite materials as well as in understanding the origin of diseases. Approaches to implement key surface features and pH in molecular models of solids are explained, and distinct mechanisms of peptide recognition on metal nanostructures, silica and apatite surfaces in solution are described as illustrative examples. The influence of surface energies, specific surface features and protonation states on the structure of aqueous interfaces and selective biomolecular adsorption is found to be critical, comparable to the well-known influence of the charge state and pH of proteins and surfactants on their conformations and assembly. The representation of such details in molecular models according to experimental data and available chemical knowledge enables accurate simulations of unknown complex interfaces in atomic resolution in quantitative agreement with independent experimental measurements. In this context, the benefits of a uniform force field for all material classes and of a mineral surface structure database are discussed.

  17. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  18. Can the Dupuit-Thiem equation accurately describe the flow pattern induced by injection in a laboratory scale aquifer-well system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Jose; Kalwa, Fritz; Händel, Falk; Binder, Martin; Stefan, Catalin

    2016-04-01

    The Dupuit-Thiem equation is normally used to assess flow towards a pumping well in unconfined aquifers under steady-state conditions. For the formulation of the equation it is assumed that flow is laminar, radial and horizontal towards the well. It is well known that these assumptions are not met in the vicinity of the well; some authors restrict the application of the equation only to a radius larger than 1.5-fold the aquifer thickness. In this study, the equation accuracy to predict the pressure head is evaluated as a simple and quick analytical method to describe the flow pattern for different injection rates in the LSAW. A laboratory scale aquifer-well system (LSAW) was implemented to study the aquifer recharge through wells. The LSAW consists of a 1.0 m-diameter tank with a height of 1.1 meters, filled with sand and a screened well in the center with a diameter of 0.025 m. A regulated outflow system establishes a controlled water level at the tank wall to simulate various aquifer thicknesses. The pressure head at the bottom of the tank along one axis can be measured to assess the flow profile every 0.1 m between the well and the tank wall. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the Dupuit-Thiem equation, a combination of different injection rates and aquifer thicknesses were simulated in the LSAW. Contrary to what was expected (significant differences between the measured and calculated pressure heads in the well), the absolute difference between the calculated and measured pressure head is less than 10%. Beside this, the highest differences are not observed in the well itself, but in the near proximity of it, at a radius of 0.1 m. The results further show that the difference between the calculated and measured pressure heads tends to decrease with higher flow rates. Despite its limitations (assumption of laminar and horizontal flow throughout the whole aquifer), the Dupuit-Thiem equation is considered to accurately represent the flow system in the LSAW.

  19. Nature of fluid flows in differentially heated cylindrical container filled with a stratified solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jai-Ching

    1992-01-01

    Semiconductor crystals such as Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te grown by unidirectional solidification Bridgmann method have shown compositional segregations in both the axial and radial directions. Due to the wide separation between the liquidus and the solidus of its pseudobinary phase diagram, there is a diffusion layer of higher HgTe content built up in the melt near the melt-solid interface which gives a solute concentration gradient in the axial direction. Because of the higher thermal conductivity in the melt than that in the crystal there is a thermal leakage through the fused silica crucible wall near the melt-solid interface. This gives a thermal gradient in the radial direction. Hart (1971), Thorpe, Hutt and Soulsby (1969) have shown that under such condition a fluid will become convectively unstable as a result of different diffusivities of temperature and solute. It is quite important to understand the effects of this thermosolute convection on the compositional segregation in the unidirectionally solidified crystals. To reach this goal, we start with a simplified problem. We study the nature of fluid flows of a stratified solution in a cylindrical container with a radial temperature gradient. The cylindrical container wall is considered to be maintained at a higher temperature than that at the center of the solution and the solution in the lower gravitational direction has higher solute concentration which decrease linearly to a lower concentration and then remain constant to the top of the solution. The sample solution is taken to be salt water.

  20. Effect of solution flow produced by rotary shaker on protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Ryota; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Kawahara, Hisato; Maki, Syou; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kitatani, Tomoya; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between the flow produced by a rotary shaker and protein crystallization. Lysozyme was crystallized in a solution stirred by a rotary shaker at 50 rpm. The number of crystals grown in the stirring environment was less than that of the quiescent environment. We confirmed the improvement of resolution and mosaicity of crystals grown in the stirring by X-ray diffraction measurement. We estimated that mean speed of the flow by a rotary shaker at 50 rpm was about 2×10 -6 m/s, and the Reynolds number of this flow was 4×10 -4. The magnitude of the Reynolds number was only twice as large as that of the quiescent environment. These results indicate that such a slight flow can influence protein crystallization.

  1. Multigrid solution of compressible turbulent flow on unstructured meshes using a two-equation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Matinelli, L.

    1994-01-01

    The steady state solution of the system of equations consisting of the full Navier-Stokes equations and two turbulence equations has been obtained using a multigrid strategy of unstructured meshes. The flow equations and turbulence equations are solved in a loosely coupled manner. The flow equations are advanced in time using a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme with a stability-bound local time step, while turbulence equations are advanced in a point-implicit scheme with a time step which guarantees stability and positivity. Low-Reynolds-number modifications to the original two-equation model are incorporated in a manner which results in well-behaved equations for arbitrarily small wall distances. A variety of aerodynamic flows are solved, initializing all quantities with uniform freestream values. Rapid and uniform convergence rates for the flow and turbulence equations are observed.

  2. Implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme for steady state solutions in all flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhong, Chengwen; Xu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) for non-equilibrium steady state flow computation. The UGKS is a direct modeling method for flow simulation in all regimes with the updates of both macroscopic flow variables and microscopic gas distribution function. By solving the macroscopic equations implicitly, a predicted equilibrium state can be obtained first through iterations. With the newly predicted equilibrium state, the evolution equation of the gas distribution function and the corresponding collision term can be discretized in a fully implicit way for fast convergence through iterations as well. The lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) factorization method is implemented to solve both macroscopic and microscopic equations, which improves the efficiency of the scheme. Since the UGKS is a direct modeling method and its physical solution depends on the mesh resolution and the local time step, a physical time step needs to be fixed before using an implicit iterative technique with a pseudo-time marching step. Therefore, the physical time step in the current implicit scheme is determined by the same way as that in the explicit UGKS for capturing the physical solution in all flow regimes, but the convergence to a steady state speeds up through the adoption of a numerical time step with large CFL number. Many numerical test cases in different flow regimes from low speed to hypersonic ones, such as the Couette flow, cavity flow, and the flow passing over a cylinder, are computed to validate the current implicit method. The overall efficiency of the implicit UGKS can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude in comparison with the explicit one.

  3. Second-order small-disturbance solutions for hypersonic flow over power-law bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Similarity solutions were found which give the adiabatic flow of an ideal gas about two-dimensional and axisymmetric power-law bodies at infinite Mach number to second order in the body slenderness parameter. The flow variables were expressed as a sum of zero-order and perturbation similarity functions for which the axial variations in the flow equations separated out. The resulting similarity equations were integrated numerically. The solutions, which are universal functions, are presented in graphic and tabular form. To avoid a singularity in the calculations, the results are limited to body power-law exponents greater than about 0.85 for the two-dimensional case and 0.75 for the axisymmetric case. Because of the entropy layer induced by the nose bluntness (for power-law bodies other than cones and wedges), only the pressure function is valid at the body surface. The similarity results give excellent agreement with the exact solutions for inviscid flow over wedges and cones having half-angles up to about 20 deg. They give good agreement with experimental shock-wave shapes and surface-pressure distributions for 3/4-power axisymmetric bodies, considering that Mach number and boundary-layer displacement effects are not included in the theory.

  4. Analytical Solution to the Riemann Problem of Three-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Juanes, Ruben; Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    2002-09-26

    In this paper we study one-dimensional three-phase flow through porous media of immiscible, incompressible fluids. The model uses the common multiphase flow extension of Darcy's equation, and does not include gravity and capillarity effects. Under these conditions, the mathematical problem reduces to a 2 x 2 system of conservation laws whose essential features are: (1) the system is strictly hyperbolic; (2) both characteristic fields are nongenuinely nonlinear, with single, connected inflection loci. These properties, which are natural extensions of the two-phase flow model, ensure that the solution is physically sensible. We present the complete analytical solution to the Riemann problem (constant initial and injected states) in detail, and describe the characteristic waves that may arise, concluding that only nine combinations of rarefactions, shocks and rarefaction-shocks are possible. We demonstrate that assuming the saturation paths of the solution are straightlines may result in inaccurate predictions for some realistic systems. Efficient algorithms for computing the exact solution are also given, making the analytical developments presented here readily applicable to interpretation of lab displacement experiments, and implementation of streamline simulators.

  5. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.

    1996-12-31

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  6. Similarity solution for unsteady gravity-driven dry patch in a non-Newtonian fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, Siti Sabariah; Mohd Yatim, Yazariah

    2013-04-01

    We consider an unsteady thin-film flow of a non-Newtonian fluid around a dry patch subject to gravitational acceleration on an inclined plane. The general governing partial differential equation is transformed into the second-order ordinary differential equation using a unique travelling-wave similarity transformation. The analysis shows that the dry patch has a parabolic shape and the film thickness was found to increase monotonically away from the dry patch. Numerical solutions of the similarity equation are obtained for the velocity of the dry patch. These numerical solutions are also compared with the asymptotic solutions in the certain limits. The effects of power-law index on the behavior and patterns of the solutions are also discussed.

  7. A numerical method for the solution of three dimensional, incompressible, viscous flows over slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Moshe; Israeli, Moshe; Wolfshtein, Micha

    1987-01-01

    A marching iterative method for the solution of the three dimensional, incompressibhle, steady and parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is described. The equations are written in primitive variables and discretized in general axisymmetric orthogonal coordinate systems. The coupled set of finite-difference equations are solved without any splitting or factorization errors. Moreover, the continuity equation and the two crossflow momentum equations are exactly satisfied at every step of the iterative process. The solution scheme is equivalent to the solution of one Poisson equation by the Successive Plane Over Relaxation method and has good convergence properties. Other existing solution methods resemble a Jacobi-type iterative scheme and therefore are less efficient. Numerical experiments include the laminar, incompressible flow over prolate spheroids at incidence.

  8. Investigation of flow and solute transport at the field scale through heterogeneous deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This work describes an investigation of the spatial statistical structure of specific discharge field and solute transport process of a nonreactive solute at the field scale through a heterogeneous deformable porous medium. The flow field is driven by a vertical gradient in the excess pore water pressure induced by a step increase in load applied on the upper part of a finite-thickness aquifer. The non-stationary spectral representation is adopted to characterize the spatial covariance of the specific discharge field necessary for the development of the solute particle trajectory statistics using the Lagrangian formalism. We show that the statistics of the specific discharge and particle trajectory derived herein are non-stationary and functions of the coefficient of soil compressibility, μ. The effect of μ on the relative variation of specific discharge and the solute particle trajectory statistics are analyzed upon evaluating our expressions.

  9. An inverse problem solution to the flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth Ramirez S.; Fernando Samaniego V.; Fernando Rodriguez; Jesus Rivera R.

    1994-01-20

    This paper presents a solution for the inverse problem to the flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. The models considered include linear flow in vertical fractures, radial flow in horizontal fractures, and cubic block matrix-fracture geometry. The Rosenbrock method for nonlinear regression used in this study, allowed the estimation of up to six parameters for the cubic block matrix fracture geometry. The nonlinear regression for the three cases was carefully tested against syntetical tracer concentration responses affected by random noise, with the objective of simulating as close as possible step injection field data. Results were obtained within 95 percent confidence limits. The sensitivity of the inverse problem solution on the main parameters that describe this flow problem was investigated. The main features of the nonlinear regression program used in this study are also discussed. The procedure of this study can be applied to interpret tracer tests in naturally fractured reservoirs, allowing the estimation of fracture and matrix parameters of practical interest (longitudinal fracture dispersivity alpha, matrix porosity phi2, fracture half-width w, matrix block size d, matrix diffusion coefficient D2 and the adsorption constant kd). The methodology of this work offers a practical alternative for tracer flow tests interpretation to other techniques.

  10. Field-scale experiments of unsaturated flow and solute transport in a heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Craig; Smith, Leslie; Beckie, Roger

    2005-05-01

    A multiyear flow and conservative tracer test has been carried out in unsaturated mine waste rock to examine the physical mechanisms by which water moves through this coarse, heterogeneous, granular material. The experimental system has a footprint of 8 m × 8 m, is 5 m high, and is built on a contiguous grid of 16 zero-tension lysimeters. A chloride tracer was applied during a single rainfall event. Subsequently, the system has been subject to both natural and applied rainfall events in which no further tracer was added. Water flow and tracer transport is monitored using in situ measurements of moisture content, matric suction, and soil water solution samplers. Results demonstrate for transient infiltration conditions the influence and interaction of matrix flow in a heterogeneous granular matrix, preferential flow in macropores, and noncapillary pathways. Tracer migration through preferential flow paths dominates the initial and peak breakthrough concentrations. Point measurements of tracer concentration from in situ solution samplers yield a relatively poor indication of the flux-averaged transport of mass that is recorded at the base of the experiment, in addition to overestimating the stored mass and underestimating residence time.

  11. A boundary-layer solution for flow at the soil-root interface.

    PubMed

    Severino, Gerardo; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2015-06-01

    Transpiration, a process by which plants extract water from soil and transmit it to the atmosphere, is a vital (yet least quantified) component of the hydrological cycle. We propose a root-scale model of water uptake, which is based on first principles, i.e. employs the generally accepted Richards equation to describe water flow in partially saturated porous media (both in a root and the ambient soil) and makes no assumptions about the kinematic structure of flow in a root-soil continuum. Using the Gardner (exponential) constitutive relation to represent the relative hydraulic conductivities in the Richards equations and treating the root as a cylinder, we use a matched asymptotic expansion technique to derive approximate solutions for transpiration rate and the size of a plant capture zone. These solutions are valid for roots whose size is larger than the macroscopic capillary length of a host soil. For given hydraulic properties, the perturbation parameter used in our analysis relates a root's size to the macroscopic capillary length of the ambient soil. This parameter determines the width of a boundary layer surrounding the soil-root interface, within which flow is strictly horizontal (perpendicular to the root). Our analysis provides a theoretical justification for the standard root-scale cylindrical flow model of plant transpiration that imposes a number of kinematic constraints on water flow in a root-soil continuum.

  12. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  13. Lateral Flow Rapid Test for Accurate and Early Diagnosis of Scrub Typhus: A Febrile Illness of Historically Military Importance in the Pacific Rim.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chien-Chung; Zhangm, Zhiwen; Weissenberger, Giulia; Chen, Hua-Wei; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2017-03-01

    Scrub typhus (ST) is an infection caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Historically, ST was ranked as the second most important arthropod-borne medical problem only behind malaria during World War II and the Vietnam War. The disease occurs mainly in Southeast Asia and has been shown to emerge and reemerge in new areas, implying the increased risk for U.S. military and civilian personnel deployed to these regions. ST can effectively be treated by doxycycline provided the diagnosis is made early, before the development of severe complications. Scrub Typhus Detect is a lateral flow rapid test based on a mixture of recombinant 56-kDa antigens with broad reactivity. The performance of this prototype product was evaluated against indirect immunofluorescence assay, the serological gold standard. Using 249 prospectively collected samples from Thailand, the sensitivity and specificity for IgM was found to be 100% and 92%, respectively, suggesting a high potential of this product for clinical use. This product will provide a user friendly, rapid, and accurate diagnosis of ST for clinicians to provide timely and accurate treatments of deployed personnel.

  14. Laminar supersonic flow over a backstep - A numerical solution at higher Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronzon, Y.; Rom, J.; Seginer, A.

    1976-01-01

    The Allen-Cheng solution of the flow over a backward facing step is extended to Reynolds numbers up to 16,000 and to inflow boundary-layer height ratios as low as 0.1 by moving the downstream boundary into the recompression region and by smoothing the resulting errors. The boundary conditions in the supersonic outer flow and the downstream boundary conditions in the wake are determined by an extrapolation procedure. Computational results are compared with relevant experimental data. Fair agreement is found between the calculated base pressures and the experimental values, whereas agreement between heat transfer rates appears to be qualitative only.

  15. Critical Phenomenon Analysis of Shear-Banding Flow in Polymer-Like Micellar Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, F.; Pérez-López, J. H.; Puig, J. E.; Manero, O.

    2008-07-01

    We examined the shear-banding flow phenomenon in polymer-like micellar solutions with the Bautista-Manero-Puig (BMP) model, which predicts that upon decreasing the shear banding intensity parameter of this model, which correspond to increasing temperature, concentration or varying salt-to-surfactant concentration, a non-equilibrium critical line is reached. By using non-equilibrium critical theory, which we obtain a set of symmetrical curves which are the normalized stress versus normalized shear rate flow curves, similar to gas-liquid transitions around the critical point. In addition, we derived the non-equilibrium critical exponents and found that them are no classic values.

  16. Stratified flow over a backward-facing step: hybrid solution by integral transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, R.; Perez Guerrero, J. S.; Cotta, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    The generalized integral transform technique (GITT) is employed in the hybrid numerical-analytical solution of the stratified backward-facing step flow problem, with automatic global accuracy control towards a user-prescribed accuracy target. The present paper is aimed at extending the available database on benchmark results in heat and fluid flow, which were progressively obtained through integral transforms, for the co-validation of more flexible fully discrete approaches. Numerical results are presented for the situations more frequently encountered in the literature Copyright

  17. Parallel Finite Element Solution of 3D Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, G. F.; McLay, R.; Bicken, G.; Barth, B.; Pehlivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    A domain decomposition strategy and parallel gradient-type iterative solution scheme have been developed and implemented for computation of complex 3D viscous flow problems involving heat transfer and surface tension effects. Details of the implementation issues are described together with associated performance and scalability studies. Representative Rayleigh-Benard and microgravity Marangoni flow calculations and performance results on the Cray T3D and T3E are presented. The work is currently being extended to tightly-coupled parallel "Beowulf-type" PC clusters and we present some preliminary performance results on this platform. We also describe progress on related work on hierarchic data extraction for visualization.

  18. Effects of flow on solute exchange between fluids and supported biosurfaces.

    PubMed

    Hermens, Wim Th; Benes, Martin; Richter, Ralf; Speijer, Han

    2004-06-01

    Uptake of nutrients by cultured cells on solid supports, conversion of substrates by surface-bound catalysts and binding of antibodies to microtitre plates are examples of transport processes that are strongly influenced by the flow conditions in the surrounding fluid. The literature on this subject is scattered over widely different research fields and is often found in dated, and not generally available, treatises. Also, the subject is inherently complicated from a mathematical viewpoint, because even the simplest experimental configurations will usually not allow analytical solutions for the diffusion-convection equations describing the solute mass transport in the system. Fortunately, however, relatively simple expressions for the rates of mass transport can often be obtained in physically realistic limiting cases. The present study attempts to give a short overview of the main experimental models used in this field and presents simple equations for the estimation of solute exchange rates between surfaces and fluids. The models considered are: (1) uptake from an unstirred solution; (2) reversible binding from a perfectly stirred solution; (3) reversible binding through an unstirred fluid layer; (4) catalytic conversion at the internal surface of a tube or a slit with laminar flow; (5) adsorption by a surface opposite a rotating stirrer; (6) adsorption from an impinging fluid jet; and (7) uptake by the surface of a rotating disc. In practical situations the property of uniform accessibility proves to be of crucial importance. Stirring by ultrasound, more specifically the use of acoustic streaming in nano-devices, is also discussed.

  19. Low-flow transport models for conservative and sorbed solutes; Uvas Creek, near Morgan Hill, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Walters, R.A.; Kennedy, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Models describing low-flow transport of conservative (nonreactive) and reactive solutes, which adsorb on the streambed, are developed and tested. Temporary storage within the bed plays an important role in solute movement. Three different models of bed-storage processes are developed for conservative solutes. One model assumes the bed is a well-mixed, nondiffusing, nonreacting zone. Solute flux into the bed is then proportional to the difference between stream and bed-solute concentrations. A second model assumes that solute is transported within the bed by a vertical diffusion process. The bed-solute concentration, which matches the stream concentration at the interface, varies with depth in the bed according to Fick 's law. A third model assumes convection in the downstream direction occurs in certain parts of the bed, while the mechanism of the first model functions elsewhere. Storage of absorbing species is assumed to occur by equilibrium adsorption within streambed particles. Uptake rate is described by an intraparticle diffusion process. Model equations were solved using finite element numerical methods. Models were calibrated using data from a 24-hour injection of conservative chloride and adsorptive Sr ions at Uvas Creek near Morgan Hill, California. All models predict well except for some overestimation by the adsorption model during dieaway. (USGS)

  20. Numerical Solutions for Supersonic Flow of an Ideal Gas Around Blunt Two-Dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Franklyn B.

    1961-01-01

    The method described is an inverse one; the shock shape is chosen and the solution proceeds downstream to a body. Bodies blunter than circular cylinders are readily accessible, and any adiabatic index can be chosen. The lower limit to the free-stream Mach number available in any case is determined by the extent of the subsonic field, which in turn depends upon the body shape. Some discussion of the stability of the numerical processes is given. A set of solutions for flows about circular cylinders at several Mach numbers and several values of the adiabatic index is included.

  1. Full potential solution of transonic quasi-3-D flow through a cascade using artificial compressability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C.; Adamczyk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow in a turbomachinery blade row was approximated by correcting for streamtube convergence and radius change in the throughflow direction. The method is a fully conservative solution of the full potential equation incorporating the finite volume technique on body fitted periodic mesh, with an artificial density imposed in the transonic region to insure stability and the capture of shock waves. Comparison of results for several supercritical blades shows good agreement with their hodograph solutions. Other calculations for these profiles as well as standard NACA blade sections indicate that this is a useful scheme analyzing both the design and off-design performance of turbomachinery blading.

  2. On the flow of a compressible fluid by the hodograph method II : fundamental set of particular flow solutions of the Chaplygin differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E; Kaplan, Carl

    1944-01-01

    The differential equation of Chaplygin's jet problem is utilized to give a systematic development of particular solutions of the hodograph flow equations, which extends the treatment of Chaplygin into the supersonic range and completes the set of particular solutions. The particular solutions serve to place on a reasonable basis the use of velocity correction formulas for the comparison of incompressible and compressible flows. It is shown that the geometric-mean type of velocity correction formula introduced in part I has significance as an over-all type of approximation in the subsonic range. A brief review of general conditions limiting the potential flow of an adiabatic compressible fluid is given and application is made to the particular solutions, yielding conditions for the existence of singular loci in the supersonic range. The combining of particular solutions in accordance with prescribed boundary flow conditions is not treated in the present paper.

  3. On the Flow of a Compressible Fluid by the Hodograph Method. II - Fundamental Set of Particular Flow Solutions of the Chaplygin Differential Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I. E.; Kaplan, Carl

    1944-01-01

    The differential equation of Chaplygin's jet problem is utilized to give a systematic development of particular solutions of the hodograph flow equations, which extends the treatment of Chaplygin into the supersonic range and completes the set of particular solutions. The particular solutions serve to place on a reasonable basis the use of velocity correction formulas for the comparison of incompressible and compressible flows. It is shown that the geometric-mean type of velocity correction formula introduced in part I has significance as an over-all type of approximation in the subsonic range. A brief review of general conditions limiting the potential flow of an adiabatic compressible fluid is given and application is made to the particular solutions, yielding conditions for the existence of singular loci in the supersonic range. The combining of particular solutions in accordance with prescribed boundary flow conditions is not treated in the present paper.

  4. STUDIES ON THE ANOMALOUS VISCOSITY AND FLOW-BIREFRINGENCE OF PROTEIN SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, A. S. C.; Miall, Margaret; Needham, Joseph; Shen, Shih-Chang

    1944-01-01

    1. An extensive investigation has been made of protein particle shape using the methods of flow-birefringence and anomalous viscosity measurement in the coaxial cell. 2. As a result of investigations on a number of proteins, it is concluded that they may be divided into four groups. Group A consists of those which show flow-anomaly both in the bulk phase and in the surface film. These also show flow-birefringence in the bulk phase. Examples: tobacco mosaic disease virus nucleoprotein; myosin. Though corpuscular proteins, they have elongated particles before denaturation. Group B consists of those which show flow-anomaly only (in the first instance) in the surface film, and no flow-birefringence in the bulk phase. They are probably close to spherical in shape in solution, but form elongated particles as they denature in the surface film. After this process has been completed, they may show flow-anomaly also in the bulk phase. Some proteins show flow-anomaly in the surface film immediately it forms, others only show it after a certain time has elapsed for the building up of the film. We designate the former as group B1 and the latter as group B2. Group B1, immediate surface film flow-anomaly. Examples: serum euglobulin, amphibian embryo euglobulin b. Group B2, slowly appearing surface film flow-anomaly. After the film has once been fully formed and then dispersed by shaking, the solution may have the properties of that of a protein in group B1; i.e., anomalous flow in the film may occur immediately on testing in the viscosimeter. Examples: avian ovalbumin, amphibian embryo pseudoglobulin. Group C consists of those proteins which show flow-anomaly neither in the bulk phase nor in the surface film, under the conditions used by us. They are probably close to spherical in shape. Examples: insulin, methaemoglobin, amphibian embryo euglobulin c, mucoproteins. 3. The theoretical significance of protein fibre molecules, whether native or formed by denaturation in the living

  5. An accurate, flexible and small optical fiber sensor: a novel technological breakthrough for real-time analysis of dynamic blood flow data in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiao-ying; Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Dan; Zhao, Kun; Lin, Chun; Si, Liang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8), and the blood pressure and other detection data were determined directly through the veins. The fiber detection results were compared with test results obtained using color Doppler ultrasound and a physiological pressure sensor recorder. Pairwise comparisons among the blood pressure results obtained using the three methods indicated that real-time blood pressure information obtained through the fiber sensor technique exhibited better correlation than the data obtained with the other techniques. The highest correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.86) was obtained between the fiber sensor and pressure sensor. The blood pressure values were positively related to the total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein level, number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin level, with correlation coefficients of 0.033, 0.129, 0.358, and 0.373, respectively. The blood pressure values had no obvious relationship with the number of white blood cells and high-density lipoprotein and had a negative relationship with triglyceride levels, with a correlation coefficient of -0.031. The average ambulatory blood pressure measured by the fiber sensor exhibited a negative correlation with the quantity of blood platelets (correlation coefficient of -0.839, P<0.05). The novel fiber sensor can thus obtain in vivo blood pressure data accurately, stably, and in real time; the sensor can also determine the content and status of the blood flow to some extent. Therefore, the fiber sensor can obtain partially real

  6. An Accurate, Flexible and Small Optical Fiber Sensor: A Novel Technological Breakthrough for Real-Time Analysis of Dynamic Blood Flow Data In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiao-ying; Zhang, Ling; Xiao, Dan; Zhao, Kun; Lin, Chun; Si, Liang-yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the limitations of existing methods and techniques for directly obtaining real-time blood data, no accurate microflow in vivo real-time analysis method exists. To establish a novel technical platform for real-time in vivo detection and to analyze average blood pressure and other blood flow parameters, a small, accurate, flexible, and nontoxic Fabry-Perot fiber sensor was designed. The carotid sheath was implanted through intubation of the rabbit carotid artery (n = 8), and the blood pressure and other detection data were determined directly through the veins. The fiber detection results were compared with test results obtained using color Doppler ultrasound and a physiological pressure sensor recorder. Pairwise comparisons among the blood pressure results obtained using the three methods indicated that real-time blood pressure information obtained through the fiber sensor technique exhibited better correlation than the data obtained with the other techniques. The highest correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.86) was obtained between the fiber sensor and pressure sensor. The blood pressure values were positively related to the total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein level, number of red blood cells, and hemoglobin level, with correlation coefficients of 0.033, 0.129, 0.358, and 0.373, respectively. The blood pressure values had no obvious relationship with the number of white blood cells and high-density lipoprotein and had a negative relationship with triglyceride levels, with a correlation coefficient of –0.031. The average ambulatory blood pressure measured by the fiber sensor exhibited a negative correlation with the quantity of blood platelets (correlation coefficient of −0.839, P<0.05). The novel fiber sensor can thus obtain in vivo blood pressure data accurately, stably, and in real time; the sensor can also determine the content and status of the blood flow to some extent. Therefore, the fiber sensor can obtain partially real

  7. An efficient solution technique for shockwave-boundary layer interactions with flow separation and slot suction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1991-01-01

    An efficient method for computing two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes flow fields is presented. The solution algorithm is a fully-implicit approximate factorization technique based on an unsymmetric line Gauss-Seidel splitting of the equation system Jacobian matrix. Convergence characteristics are improved by the addition of acceleration techniques based on Shamanskii's method for nonlinear equations and Broyden's quasi-Newton update. Characteristic-based differencing of the equations is provided by means of Van Leer's flux vector splitting. In this investigation, emphasis is placed on the fast and accurate computation of shock-wave-boundary layer interactions with and without slot suction effects. In the latter context, a set of numerical boundary conditions for simulating the transpiration flow in an open slot is devised. Both laminar and turbulent cases are considered, with turbulent closure provided by a modified Cebeci-Smith algebraic model. Comparisons with computational and experimental data sets are presented for a variety of interactions, and a fully-coupled simulation of a plenum chamber/inlet flowfield with shock interaction and suction is also shown and discussed.

  8. A rapid and accurate method for determining protein content in dairy products based on asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qin-Qin; Li, Yong-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid method and a system to determine protein content using asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry based on reaction between coomassie brilliant blue G250 (CBBG) and protein was established. Main merit of our approach is that it can avoid interferences of other nitric-compounds in samples, such as melamine and urea. Optimized conditions are as follows: Concentrations of CBBG, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), NaCl and HCl are 150 mg/l, 30 mg/l, 0.1 mol/l and 1.0% (v/v), respectively; volumes of the sample and reagent are 150 μl and 30 μl, respectively; length of a reaction coil is 200 cm; total flow rate is 2.65 ml/min. The linear range of the method is 0.5-15 mg/l (BSA), its detection limit is 0.05 mg/l, relative standard deviation is less than 1.87% (n=11), and analytical speed is 60 samples per hour.

  9. Accurate Descriptions of Hot Flow Behaviors Across β Transus of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy by Intelligence Algorithm GA-SVR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-yong; Li, Le; Zhang, Zhi-hua

    2016-09-01

    Hot compression tests of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in a wide temperature range of 1023-1323 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were conducted by a servo-hydraulic and computer-controlled Gleeble-3500 machine. In order to accurately and effectively characterize the highly nonlinear flow behaviors, support vector regression (SVR) which is a machine learning method was combined with genetic algorithm (GA) for characterizing the flow behaviors, namely, the GA-SVR. The prominent character of GA-SVR is that it with identical training parameters will keep training accuracy and prediction accuracy at a stable level in different attempts for a certain dataset. The learning abilities, generalization abilities, and modeling efficiencies of the mathematical regression model, ANN, and GA-SVR for Ti-6Al-4V alloy were detailedly compared. Comparison results show that the learning ability of the GA-SVR is stronger than the mathematical regression model. The generalization abilities and modeling efficiencies of these models were shown as follows in ascending order: the mathematical regression model < ANN < GA-SVR. The stress-strain data outside experimental conditions were predicted by the well-trained GA-SVR, which improved simulation accuracy of the load-stroke curve and can further improve the related research fields where stress-strain data play important roles, such as speculating work hardening and dynamic recovery, characterizing dynamic recrystallization evolution, and improving processing maps.

  10. Applications of polarizable continuum models to determine accurate solution-phase thermochemical values across a broad range of cation charge - the case of U(III-VI).

    PubMed

    Parmar, Payal; Samuels, Alex; Clark, Aurora E

    2015-01-13

    Contributing factors to the solution-phase correction to the free energy of the molecular clusters U(H2O)n(3+/4+) and UO2(H2O)m(1+/2+) (n = 8, 9, 30, 41, 77; m = 4, 5, 30, 41, 77) have been examined as a function of cavity type in the integrated-equation-formalism-protocol (IEF) and SMD polarizable continuum models (PCMs). It is observed that the free energy correction, Gcorr, does not smoothly converge to zero as the number of explicitly solvating water molecules approaches the bulk limit, and the convergence behavior varies significantly with cavity and model. The rates of convergence of the gas-phase hydration energy, ΔGhyd, wherein the bare metal ion is inserted into a molecular water cluster and ΔGcorr for the reaction exhibit wide variations as a function of ion charge, cavity, and model. This is the likely source of previously reported discrepancies in predicted free energies of solvation for metal ions when using different PCM cavities and/or models. The cancellation of errors in ΔGhyd and ΔGcorr is optimal for clusters consisting of only a second solvation shell of explicit water molecules (n = m = 30). The UFF cavity within IEF, in particular, exhibits the most consistent cancellation of errors when using a molecular cluster consisting of a second shell of solvating water for all oxidation states of uranium, leading to accurate free energies of solvation ΔGsolv for these species.

  11. Investigation of ALEGRA shock hydrocode algorithms using an exact free surface jet flow solution.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, Bradley Wright.; Robinson, Allen C

    2014-01-01

    Computational testing of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian shock physics code, ALEGRA, is presented using an exact solution that is very similar to a shaped charge jet flow. The solution is a steady, isentropic, subsonic free surface flow with significant compression and release and is provided as a steady state initial condition. There should be no shocks and no entropy production throughout the problem. The purpose of this test problem is to present a detailed and challenging computation in order to provide evidence for algorithmic strengths and weaknesses in ALEGRA which should be examined further. The results of this work are intended to be used to guide future algorithmic improvements in the spirit of test-driven development processes.

  12. Flow Boiling Heat Transfer to Lithium Bromide Aqueous Solution in Subcooled Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Masao; Furukawa, Masahiro; Nishizumi, Takeharu; Ozaki, Shinji; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko

    A theoretical prediction model of the boiling heat transfer coefficient in the subcooled region for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution flowing in a rectangular channel is proposed. In the present heat transfer model, a heat flux is assumed to consist of both the forced convective and the boiling effect components. The forced convective component is evaluated from the empirical correlation of convective heat transfer coefficient for single-phase flow considering the effect of increase of liquid velocity due to net vapor generation. Empirical correlations for determining the heat flux due to the boiling effect and the quality at the onset point of net vapor generation are obtained from the data presented in the first report1). Agreement between the present theoretical prediction and the experimental data is satisfactorily good both for water and lithium bromide aqueous solution.

  13. A method for analyzing the vibrational energy flow in biomolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Soler, Miguel Angel; Bastida, Adolfo; Farag, Marwa H; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto

    2011-11-28

    A method is proposed to analyze the intra- and intermolecular vibrational energy flow occurring in biomolecules in solution during relaxation processes. It is based on the assumption that the total energy exchanged between the vibrational modes is minimal and the global process is essentially statistical. This statistical minimum flow method is shown to provide very useful information about the amount and the rate at which energy is transferred between the individual vibrations of the molecule. To demonstrate the performance of the method, an application is made to the relaxation of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide-d in aqueous D(2)O solution which yields a detailed quantitative description of the process.

  14. Simulation of unsteady flow and solute transport in a tidal river network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhan, X.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical method for water flow and solute transport in a tidal river network is presented. The tidal river network is defined as a system of open channels of rivers with junctions and cross sections. As an example, the Pearl River in China is represented by a network of 104 channels, 62 nodes, and a total of 330 cross sections with 11 boundary section for one of the applications. The simulations are performed with a supercomputer for seven scenarios of water flow and/or solute transport in the Pearl River, China, with different hydrological and weather conditions. Comparisons with available data are shown. The intention of this study is to summarize previous works and to provide a useful tool for water environmental management in a tidal river network, particularly for the Pearl River, China.

  15. Approximate analytical solution for MHD stagnation-point flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awang Kechil, S.; Hashim, I.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the steady two-dimensional laminar forced MHD Hiemenz flow against a flat plate with variable wall temperature in a porous medium which was solved numerically using the implicit finite-difference of Keller-box method [Yih KA. The effect of uniform suction/blowing on heat transfer of magnetohydrodynamic Hiemenz flow through porous media. Acta Mech 1998;130:147-58] is revisited. A simple analytic approach of the Adomian decomposition method (ADM) is employed to obtain an approximate analytical solution of the problem. The skin friction coefficient and the rate of heat transfer given by the ADM are in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the Keller-box method.

  16. Development of an Efficient Solution Scheme for Incompressible Steady- State Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Investigation," Technical Report REMR-HY-4, US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Bernard, R. S., and Thompson , J . F . 1984. "Mass...0208, AIAA 24th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV. Mastin, C. W., and Thompson , J . F . 1978. "Three-Dimensional Body-Fitted Coordinate Systems for... Thompson , J . F . 1984. "A Vectorized Solution for Incompressible Flow," AIAA Paper 84-1534, AIAA 17th Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics, and Lasers Conference

  17. Solute transport processes in flow-event-driven stream-aquifer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between streams and groundwater controls key features of the stream hydrograph and chemograph. Since surface runoff is usually less saline than groundwater, flow events are usually accompanied by declines in stream salinity. In this paper, we use numerical modelling to show that, at any particular monitoring location: (i) the increase in stream stage associated with a flow event will precede the decrease in solute concentration (arrival time lag for solutes); and (ii) the decrease in stream stage following the flow peak will usually precede the subsequent return (increase) in solute concentration (return time lag). Both arrival time lag and return time lag increase with increasing wave duration. However, arrival time lag decreases with increasing wave amplitude, whereas return time lag increases. Furthermore, while arrival time lag is most sensitive to parameters that control river velocity (channel roughness and stream slope), return time lag is most sensitive to groundwater parameters (aquifer hydraulic conductivity, recharge rate, and dispersitivity). Additionally, the absolute magnitude of the decrease in river concentration is sensitive to both river and groundwater parameters. Our simulations also show that in-stream mixing is dominated by wave propagation and bank storage processes, and in-stream dispersion has a relatively minor effect on solute concentrations. This has important implications for spreading of contaminants released to streams. Our work also demonstrates that a high contribution of pre-event water (or groundwater) within the flow hydrograph can be caused by the combination of in-stream and bank storage exchange processes, and does not require transport of pre-event water through the catchment.

  18. Global solution to a hyperbolic problem arising in the modeling of blood flow in circulatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Weihua; Clark, M. E.; Zhao, Meide; Curcio, Anthony

    2007-07-01

    This paper considers a system of first-order, hyperbolic, partial differential equations in the domain of a one-dimensional network. The system models the blood flow in human circulatory systems as an initial-boundary-value problem with boundary conditions of either algebraic or differential type. The differential equations are nonhomogeneous with frictional damping terms and the state variables are coupled at internal junctions. The existence and uniqueness of the local classical solution have been established in our earlier work [W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, A hyperbolic system of equations of blood flow in an arterial network, J. Appl. Math. 64 (2) (2003) 637-667; W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, Blood flow in a network, Nonlinear Anal. Real World Appl. 5 (2004) 463-485; W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, A quasilinear hyperbolic system that models blood flow in a network, in: Charles V. Benton (Ed.), Focus on Mathematical Physics Research, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, 2004, pp. 203-230]. This paper continues the analysis and gives sufficient conditions for the global existence of the classical solution. We prove that the solution exists globally if the boundary data satisfy the dissipative condition (2.3) or (3.2), and the norms of the initial and forcing functions in a certain Sobolev space are sufficiently small. This is only the first step toward establishing the global existence of the solution to physiologically realistic models, because, in general, the chosen dissipative conditions (2.3) and (3.2) do not appear to hold for the originally proposed boundary conditions (1.3)-(1.12).

  19. Explicit solutions of a gravity-induced film flow along a convectively heated vertical wall.

    PubMed

    Raees, Ammarah; Xu, Hang

    2013-01-01

    The gravity-driven film flow has been analyzed along a vertical wall subjected to a convective boundary condition. The Boussinesq approximation is applied to simplify the buoyancy term, and similarity transformations are used on the mathematical model of the problem under consideration, to obtain a set of coupled ordinary differential equations. Then the reduced equations are solved explicitly by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). The resulting solutions are investigated for heat transfer effects on velocity and temperature profiles.

  20. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. An analytic solution for periodic thermally-driven flows over an infinite slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardi, Dino; Serafin, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The flow generated along an infinite slope in an unperturbed stably stratified atmosphere at rest by a time periodic surface temperature forcing is examined. Following Defant (1949), a set of equations is derived which extends Prandtl's (1942) theory to allow for nonstationary conditions. Uniform boundary conditions are conducive to an along-slope parallel flow, governed by a periodically reversing local imbalance between along-slope advection and slope-normal fluxes of momentum and heat. Solutions include both a transient part and a subsequent periodic regime. The former can only be expressed in an integral form, whereas the latter is a combination of exponential and sine or cosine functions of time and height normal to the slope. Key parameters are the quantity Nα = N sinα (where α is the slope angle, and N is the Brunt-Väisälä frequency of the unperturbed atmosphere) and the angular frequency of the driving surface temperature cycle, ?. Three different flow regimes may occur, namely subcritical (Nα < ?), critical (Nα = ?) and supercritical (Nα > ?). The properties of the solutions in each regime are examined and discussed. The relationship between the present solutions and the earlier time-dependent slope flow model by Defant (1949) is also discussed. References Defant, F., 1949: Zur Theorie der Hangwinde, nebst Bemerkungen zur Theorie der Berg- und Talwinde. [A theory of slope winds, along with remarks on the theory of mountain winds and valley winds]. Arch. Meteor. Geophys. Bioclimatol., Ser. A, 1, 421-450 (Theoretical and Applied Climatology). [English translation: Whiteman, C.D., and E. Dreiseitl, 1984: Alpine meteorology: Translations of classic contributions by A. Wagner, E. Ekhart and F. Defant. PNL-5141 / ASCOT-84-3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington, 121 pp]. Prandtl, L., 1942: Strömungslehre [Flow Studies]. Vieweg und Sohn, Braunschweig, 382 pp.

  2. Solution of the equations for one-dimensional, two-phase, immiscible flow by geometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, Boronin; Andrey, Shevlyakov

    2016-12-01

    Buckley-Leverett equations describe non viscous, immiscible, two-phase filtration, which is often of interest in modelling of oil production. For many parameters and initial conditions, the solutions of these equations exhibit non-smooth behaviour, namely discontinuities in form of shock waves. In this paper we obtain a novel method for the solution of Buckley-Leverett equations, which is based on geometry of differential equations. This method is fast, accurate, stable, and describes non-smooth phenomena. The main idea of the method is that classic discontinuous solutions correspond to the continuous surfaces in the space of jets - the so-called multi-valued solutions (Bocharov et al., Symmetries and conservation laws for differential equations of mathematical physics. American Mathematical Society, Providence, 1998). A mapping of multi-valued solutions from the jet space onto the plane of the independent variables is constructed. This mapping is not one-to-one, and its singular points form a curve on the plane of the independent variables, which is called the caustic. The real shock occurs at the points close to the caustic and is determined by the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions.

  3. Travel time and trajectory moments of conservative solutes in two-dimensional convergent flows.

    PubMed

    Riva, M; Sánchez-Vila, X; Guadagnini, A; De Simoni, M; Willmann, M

    2006-01-05

    We address advective transport of a solute traveling toward a single pumping well in a two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous aquifer. The two random variables of interest are the trajectory followed by an individual particle from the injection point to the well location and the particle travel time under steady-state conditions. Our main objective is to derive the predictors of trajectory and travel time and the associated uncertainty, in terms of their first two statistical moments (mean and variance). We consider a solute that undergoes mass transfer between a mobile and an immobile zone. Based on Lawrence et al. [Lawrence, A.E., Sánchez-Vila, X., Rubin, Y., 2002. Conditional moments of the breakthrough curves of kinetically sorbing solute in heterogeneous porous media using multirate mass transfer models for sorption and desorption. Water Resour. Res. 38 (11), 1248, doi:10.1029/2001WR001006.], travel time moments can be written in terms of those of a conservative solute times a deterministic quantity. Moreover, the moments of solute particles trajectory do not depend on mass transfer processes. The resulting mean and variance of travel time and trajectory for a conservative species can be written as functions of the first, second moments and cross-moments of trajectory and velocity components. The equations are developed from a consistent second order expansion in sigmaY (standard deviation of the natural logarithm of hydraulic conductivity). Our solution can be completely integrated with the moment equations of groundwater flow of Guadagnini and Neuman [Guadagnini, A., Neuman, S.P., 1999a. Nonlocal and localized analyses of conditional mean steady state flow in bounded, randomly non uniform domains 1. Theory and computational approach. Water Resour. Res. 35(10), 2999-3018.,Guadagnini, A., Neuman, S.P., 1999b. Nonlocal and localized analyses of conditional mean steady state flow in bounded, randomly non uniform domains 2. Computational examples. Water Resour

  4. A compressible solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow about an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Gibeling, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    A compressible time dependent solution of the Navier-Stokes equations including a transition turbulence model is obtained for the isolated airfoil flow field problem. The equations are solved by a consistently split linearized block implicit scheme. A nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate system is used which has maximum resolution near the airfoil surface and in the region of the airfoil leading edge. The transition turbulence model is based upon the turbulence kinetic energy equation and predicts regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Mean flow field and turbulence field results are presented for an NACA 0012 airfoil at zero and nonzero incidence angles of Reynolds number up to one million and low subsonic Mach numbers.

  5. A combined Galerkin/collocation spectral method for transient solution of flow past a spherical droplet

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S. ); Chung, J.N. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    A spectral model, based on the stream function and vorticity, is developed in order to calculate the time-dependent solution of flow past a spherical droplet. Both Chebyshev and Legendre polynomials are used to expand the stream fiinction and vorticity in the radial and angular directions, respectively, along with the backward Euler approximation to advance in time. Consistent treatment of boundary conditions is made to resolve the lack of vorticity boundary conditions by means of the influence matrix technique. The computed flow field, the drag coefficient, and the interfacial velocity are presented for Reynolds numbers in the range from 0.5 to 50 for both continuous and dispersed phases with viscosity ratios of 1 and 3. Comparison of the present results to those found in the literature indicate that the model is capable of predicting the correct nature of the flow associated with a droplet.

  6. Polymer retention and adsorption in the flow of polymer solutions through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Y.; Christ, F.R.

    1986-03-01

    A new experimental technique based on a surface treatment process was developed for determining mobility reduction as a result of polymer adsorption in flow of polymer solutions through porous media. The experimental method also allowed the direct determination of adsorptive and nonadsorptive polymer retention from flow experiments. The adsorptive mobility reduction for the flow of polyacrylamide (J333) mobility control polymer through silica sand was found to be as high as 14% at the lowest experimental stress level of 3.75 dynes/cm/sup 2/ (0.375 Pa). This corresponded to an effective hydrodynamic thickness (EHT) of the adsorbed polymer layer of 0.57 ..mu..m. Both the mobility reduction and the EHT decreased with an increase in shear stress. The amount of adsorptive retention accounted for about 35.2% of the total retained polymer.

  7. Impact of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2006-10-01

    A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in porous media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a 7-day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant impact on the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it concurrent with the expansion of the colonized zone between days 3 and 6. The location of horizontal dispersion corresponded with the cell densities of 1-3 × 109 cells g-1 dry sand. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with population densities that would occupy approximately 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.

  8. Impact of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, John S.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2006-10-05

    A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in porous media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a seven day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant impact on the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min 1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min 1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with maximum population densities that would occupy about 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.

  9. Semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow in multi-zone (patchy) wedge-shaped aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Nozar; Sedghi, Mohammad M.

    2015-03-01

    Alluvial fans are potential sites of potable groundwater in many parts of the world. Characteristics of alluvial fans sediments are changed radially from high energy coarse-grained deposition near the apex to low energy fine-grained deposition downstream so that patchy wedge-shaped aquifers with radial heterogeneity are formed. The hydraulic parameters of the aquifers (e.g. hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) change in the same fashion. Analytical or semi-analytical solutions of the flow in wedge-shaped aquifers are available for homogeneous cases. In this paper we derive semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a well in multi-zone wedge-shaped aquifers. Solutions are provided for three wedge boundary configurations namely: constant head-constant head wedge, constant head-barrier wedge and barrier-barrier wedge. Derivation involves the use of integral transforms methods. The effect of heterogeneity ratios of zones on the response of the aquifer is examined. The results are presented in form of drawdown and drawdown derivative type curves. Heterogeneity has a significant effect on over all response of the pumped aquifer. Solutions help understanding the behavior of heterogeneous multi-zone aquifers for sustainable development of the groundwater resources in alluvial fans.

  10. One-dimensional model and solutions for creeping gas flows in the approximation of uniform pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, A.; Balapanov, D.

    2016-11-01

    A model, along with analytical and numerical solutions, is presented to describe a wide variety of one-dimensional slow flows of compressible heat-conductive fluids. The model is based on the approximation of uniform pressure valid for the flows, in which the sound propagation time is much shorter than the duration of any meaningful density variation in the system. The energy balance is described by the heat equation that is solved independently. This approach enables the explicit solution for the fluid velocity to be obtained. Interfacial and volumetric heat and mass sources as well as boundary motion are considered as possible sources of density variation in the fluid. A set of particular tasks is analyzed for different motion sources in planar, axial, and central symmetries in the quasistationary limit of heat conduction (i.e., for large Fourier number). The analytical solutions are in excellent agreement with corresponding numerical solutions of the whole system of the Navier-Stokes equations. This work deals with the ideal gas. The approach is also valid for other equations of state.

  11. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  12. PHAST--a program for simulating ground-water flow, solute transport, and multicomponent geochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Engesgaard, Peter; Charlton, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The computer program PHAST simulates multi-component, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated ground-water flow systems. PHAST is a versatile ground-water flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated ground-water systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock-water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, density-dependent flow, or waters with high ionic strengths. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux, and leaky conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, gases, surface complexation sites, ion exchange sites, and solid solutions; and (3) kinetic reactions with rates that are a function of solution composition. The aqueous model (elements, chemical reactions, and equilibrium constants), minerals, gases, exchangers, surfaces, and rate expressions may be defined or modified by the user. A number of options are available to save results of simulations to output files. The data may be saved in three formats: a format suitable for viewing with a text editor; a

  13. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  14. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  15. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  16. Colloid release and clogging in porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Vanderzalm, Joanne L; Patterson, Bradley M; Harris, Brett; Prommer, Henning

    2015-10-01

    The release and retention of in-situ colloids in aquifers play an important role in the sustainable operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes. The processes of colloid release, retention, and associated permeability changes in consolidated aquifer sediments were studied by displacing native groundwater with reverse osmosis-treated (RO) water at various flow velocities. Significant amounts of colloid release occurred when: (i) the native groundwater was displaced by RO-water with a low ionic strength (IS), and (ii) the flow velocity was increased in a stepwise manner. The amount of colloid release and associated permeability reduction upon RO-water injection depended on the initial clay content of the core. The concentration of released colloids was relatively low and the permeability reduction was negligible for the core sample with a low clay content of about 1.3%. In contrast, core samples with about 6 and 7.5% clay content exhibited: (i) close to two orders of magnitude increase in effluent colloid concentration and (ii) more than 65% permeability reduction. Incremental improvement in the core permeability was achieved when the flow velocity increased, whereas a short flow interruption provided a considerable increase in the core permeability. This dependence of colloid release and permeability changes on flow velocity and colloid concentration was consistent with colloid retention and release at pore constrictions due to the mechanism of hydrodynamic bridging. A mathematical model was formulated to describe the processes of colloid release, transport, retention at pore constrictions, and subsequent permeability changes. Our experimental and modeling results indicated that only a small fraction of the in-situ colloids was released for any given change in the IS or flow velocity. Comparison of the fitted and experimentally measured effluent colloid concentrations and associated changes in the core permeability showed good agreement, indicating that the

  17. SU-D-18C-05: Variable Bolus Arterial Spin Labeling MRI for Accurate Cerebral Blood Flow and Arterial Transit Time Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M; Jung, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI perfusion imaging method from which quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps can be calculated. Acquisition with variable post-labeling delays (PLD) and variable TRs allows for arterial transit time (ATT) mapping and leads to more accurate CBF quantification with a scan time saving of 48%. In addition, T1 and M0 maps can be obtained without a separate scan. In order to accurately estimate ATT and T1 of brain tissue from the ASL data, variable labeling durations were invented, entitled variable-bolus ASL. Methods: All images were collected on a healthy subject with a 3T Siemens Skyra scanner. Variable-bolus Psuedo-continuous ASL (PCASL) images were collected with 7 TI times ranging 100-4300ms in increments of 700ms with TR ranging 1000-5200ms. All boluses were 1600ms when the TI allowed, otherwise the bolus duration was 100ms shorter than the TI. All TI times were interleaved to reduce sensitivity to motion. Voxel-wise T1 and M0 maps were estimated using a linear least squares fitting routine from the average singal from each TI time. Then pairwise subtraction of each label/control pair and averaging for each TI time was performed. CBF and ATT maps were created using the standard model by Buxton et al. with a nonlinear fitting routine using the T1 tissue map. Results: CBF maps insensitive to ATT were produced along with ATT maps. Both maps show patterns and averages consistent with literature. The T1 map also shows typical T1 contrast. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that variablebolus ASL produces CBF maps free from the errors due to ATT and tissue T1 variations and provides M0, T1, and ATT maps which have potential utility. This is accomplished with a single scan in a feasible scan time (under 6 minutes) with low sensivity to motion.

  18. Energetics of slope flows: linear and weakly nonlinear solutions of the extended Prandtl model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, Ivan; Marinović, Ivana; Večenaj, Željko; Grisogono, Branko

    2016-07-01

    The Prandtl model succinctly combines the 1D stationary boundary-layer dynamics and thermodynamics of simple anabatic and katabatic flows over uniformly inclined surfaces. It assumes a balance between the along-the-slope buoyancy component and adiabatic warming/cooling, and the turbulent mixing of momentum and heat. In this study, energetics of the Prandtl model is addressed in terms of the total energy (TE) concept. Furthermore, since the authors recently developed a weakly nonlinear version of the Prandtl model, the TE approach is also exercised on this extended model version, which includes an additional nonlinear term in the thermodynamic equation. Hence, interplay among diffusion, dissipation and temperature-wind interaction of the mean slope flow is further explored. The TE of the nonlinear Prandtl model is assessed in an ensemble of solutions where the Prandtl number, the slope angle and the nonlinearity parameter are perturbed. It is shown that nonlinear effects have the lowest impact on variability in the ensemble of solutions of the weakly nonlinear Prandtl model when compared to the other two governing parameters. The general behavior of the nonlinear solution is similar to the linear solution, except that the maximum of the along-the-slope wind speed in the nonlinear solution reduces for larger slopes. Also, the dominance of PE near the sloped surface, and the elevated maximum of KE in the linear and nonlinear energetics of the extended Prandtl model are found in the PASTEX-94 measurements. The corresponding level where KE>PE most likely marks the bottom of the sublayer subject to shear-driven instabilities. Finally, possible limitations of the weakly nonlinear solutions of the extended Prandtl model are raised. In linear solutions, the local storage of TE term is zero, reflecting the stationarity of solutions by definition. However, in nonlinear solutions, the diffusion, dissipation and interaction terms (where the height of the maximum interaction is

  19. Two-lane traffic-flow model with an exact steady-state solution.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masahiro

    2010-12-01

    We propose a stochastic cellular-automaton model for two-lane traffic flow based on the misanthrope process in one dimension. The misanthrope process is a stochastic process allowing for an exact steady-state solution; hence, we have an exact flow-density diagram for two-lane traffic. In addition, we introduce two parameters that indicate, respectively, driver's driving-lane preference and passing-lane priority. Due to the additional parameters, the model shows a deviation of the density ratio for driving-lane use and a biased lane efficiency in flow. Then, a mean-field approach explicitly describes the asymmetric flow by the hop rates, the driving-lane preference, and the passing-lane priority. Meanwhile, the simulation results are in good agreement with an observational data, and we thus estimate these parameters. We conclude that the proposed model successfully produces two-lane traffic flow particularly with the driving-lane preference and the passing-lane priority.

  20. On the Solution of the Three-Dimensional Flowfield About a Flow-Through Nacelle. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William Bernard

    1985-01-01

    The solution of the three dimensional flow field for a flow through nacelle was studied. Both inviscid and viscous inviscid interacting solutions were examined. Inviscid solutions were obtained with two different computational procedures for solving the three dimensional Euler equations. The first procedure employs an alternating direction implicit numerical algorithm, and required the development of a complete computational model for the nacelle problem. The second computational technique employs a fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical algorithm which was modified to fit the nacelle problem. Viscous effects on the flow field were evaluated with a viscous inviscid interacting computational model. This model was constructed by coupling the explicit Euler solution procedure with a flag entrainment boundary layer solution procedure in a global iteration scheme. The computational techniques were used to compute the flow field for a long duct turbofan engine nacelle at free stream Mach numbers of 0.80 and 0.94 and angles of attack of 0 and 4 deg.

  1. A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow using the Lambert-W function.

    PubMed

    Hall, A J; Minchin, P E H

    2013-12-01

    A closed-form solution for steady-state coupled phloem/xylem flow is presented. This incorporates the basic Münch flow model of phloem transport, the cohesion model of xylem flow, and local variation in the xylem water potential and lateral water flow along the transport pathway. Use of the Lambert-W function allows this solution to be obtained under much more general and realistic conditions than has previously been possible. Variation in phloem resistance (i.e. viscosity) with solute concentration, and deviations from the Van't Hoff expression for osmotic potential are included. It is shown that the model predictions match those of the equilibrium solution of a numerical time-dependent model based upon the same mechanistic assumptions. The effect of xylem flow upon phloem flow can readily be calculated, which has not been possible in any previous analytical model. It is also shown how this new analytical solution can handle multiple sources and sinks within a complex architecture, and can describe competition between sinks. The model provides new insights into Münch flow by explicitly including interactions with xylem flow and water potential in the closed-form solution, and is expected to be useful as a component part of larger numerical models of entire plants.

  2. On the propagation of diel signals in river networks using analytic solutions of flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonley, Morgan; Mantilla, Ricardo; Small, Scott J.; Curtu, Rodica

    2016-07-01

    Several authors have reported diel oscillations in streamflow records and have hypothesized that these oscillations are linked to evapotranspiration cycles in the watershed. The timing of oscillations in rivers, however, lags behind those of temperature and evapotranspiration in hillslopes. Two hypotheses have been put forth to explain the magnitude and timing of diel streamflow oscillations during low-flow conditions. The first suggests that delays between the peaks and troughs of streamflow and daily evapotranspiration are due to processes occurring in the soil as water moves toward the channels in the river network. The second posits that they are due to the propagation of the signal through the channels as water makes its way to the outlet of the basin. In this paper, we design and implement a theoretical model to test these hypotheses. We impose a baseflow signal entering the river network and use a linear transport equation to represent flow along the network. We develop analytic streamflow solutions for the case of uniform velocities in space over all river links. We then use our analytic solution to simulate streamflows along a self-similar river network for different flow velocities. Our results show that the amplitude and time delay of the streamflow solution are heavily influenced by transport in the river network. Moreover, our equations show that the geomorphology and topology of the river network play important roles in determining how amplitude and signal delay are reflected in streamflow signals. Finally, we have tested our theoretical formulation in the Dry Creek Experimental Watershed, where oscillations are clearly observed in streamflow records. We find that our solution produces streamflow values and fluctuations that are similar to those observed in the summer of 2011.

  3. CFD modeling of fluid flow and solute transport in a µXCT scanned natural fracture: Impact of fracture geometry on solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, F. M.; Enzmann, F.; Wenka, A.; Dentz, M.; Schaefer, T.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid flow and solute transport through fractures are a key process in both industrial and scientific issues ranging from e.g. geothermal energy production to the disposal of nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the various interdependent processes governing fluid flow and solute transport in fractures over a broad range of length and time scales is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have shown the importance of fracture geometry on flow and solute transport. More recently, significance of so called recirculation zones which are accessible for solutes and colloids through hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion have been identified [1,2] which can be responsible for pronounced late time solute breakthrough (tailing). Unfortunately, these studies are mostly focused on 2D. Thus, the intention of the prevailing study is to investigate the influence of fracture geometry on solute transport under a broad range of flow conditions (Pe number from 0.1 up to 1000) and as a function of flow direction (that is, reversed flow direction) both in 2D and 3D. We present µXCT measurements with a spatial resolution of 80 µm of a natural single fracture in a diorite drill core from Äspö, Sweden, which serves as direct input for computational mesh generation in order to obtain a realistic 3D model. Besides, a 2D model was produced by projecting the 3D mesh into the x-y-plane to completely exclude the fracture aperture information. Computational fluid dynamic simulations in 2D and 3D have been conducted to study fluid flow and conservative tracer (HTO) transport by means of the finite volume code FLUENT. The natural fracture exhibits a very complex geometry with asperities, rough side walls and a heterogenous aperture distribution. Furthermore, the µXCT data clearly shows that the fracture is not filled with fault gauge material. Simulation results confirm the impact of fracture geometry/roughness on fluid flow causing

  4. Pareto-optimal solutions for environmental flow schemes incorporating the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2007-06-01

    The temporal variations of natural flows are essential elements for preserving the ecological health of a river which are addressed in this paper by the environmental flow schemes that incorporate the intra-annual and interannual variability of the natural flow regime. We present an optimization framework to find the Pareto-optimal solutions for various flow schemes. The proposed framework integrates (1) the range of variability approach for evaluating the hydrologic alterations; (2) the standardized precipitation index approach for establishing the variation criteria for the wet, normal, and dry years; (3) a weir operation model for simulating the system of flows; and (4) a multiobjective optimization genetic algorithm for search of the Pareto-optimal solutions. The proposed framework is applied to the Kaoping diversion weir in Taiwan. The results reveal that the time-varying schemes incorporating the intra-annual variability in the environmental flow prescriptions promote the ecosystem and human needs fitness. Incorporation of the interannual flow variability using different criteria established for three types of water year further promotes both fitnesses. The merit of incorporating the interannual variability may be superimposed on that of incorporating only the intra-annual flow variability. The Pareto-optimal solutions searched with a limited range of flows replicate satisfactorily those obtained with a full search range. The limited-range Pareto front may be used as a surrogate of the full-range one if feasible prescriptions are to be found among the regular flows.

  5. Exact solutions for the flow of non-Newtonian fluid with fractional derivative in an annular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Dengke; Wang, Ruihe; Yang, Heshan

    2005-08-01

    This paper deals with some unsteady unidirectional transient flows of Oldroyd-B fluid in an annular pipe. The fractional calculus approach in the constitutive relationship model Oldroyd-B fluid is introduced and a generalized Jeffreys model with the fractional calculus has been built. Exact solutions of some unsteady flows of Oldroyd-B fluid in an annular pipe are obtained by using Hankel transform and Laplace transform for fractional calculus. The following four problems have been studied: (1) Poiseuille flow due to a constant pressure gradient; (2) axial Couette flow in an annulus; (3) axial Couette flow in an annulus due to a longitudinal constant shear; (4) Poiseuille flow due to a constant pressure gradient and a longitudinal constant shear. The well-known solutions for Navier-Stokes fluid, as well as those corresponding to a Maxwell fluid and a second grade one, appear as limited cases of our solutions.

  6. A Dual Model-Reduction Approach to Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical-model reduction using singular value decomposition (SVD) has been shown to be an effective method for reducing the computer runtime of linear and nonlinear groundwater-flow models without sacrificing accuracy. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is an alternate method of model reduction better suited for nonlinear systems. In this research, both methods are applied simultaneously to reduce the dimensionality of a 3-D unconfined groundwater-flow model: SVD to reduce the column space and DEIM to reduce the row space. The results of the dimensional reduction can approach several orders of magnitude, resulting in significantly faster simulation runtimes. The implementation and benefit of SVD/DEIM model reduction is demonstrated through its application to a synthetic, groundwater-flow and solute-transport model with groundwater extraction wells that influence of seawater intrusion. The developed methodology identifies the dominant locations (i.e. the discrete points) of the model that have the most influence on the water levels and saltwater concentrations. The result is a reduced model constructed from fewer equations (row dimension) and is projected into a reduced subspace (column dimension). The methodology first independently constructs the reduced flow and transport models such that their errors are minimized for a flow-only model and transport-only model, respectively. Once the two reduced models have been established, a density-dependent flow simulation is preformed by iterating between the flow and transport models for each time step. Further analysis of the SVD/DEIM method illustrates the tradeoff between magnitude of the reduced dimension and corresponding errors in model output, with respect to the unreduced and independently reduced models. The application of this method shows that runtime can be significantly decreased for models of this type while still maintaining control of desired model accuracy.

  7. Extensional flow of hyaluronic acid solutions in an optimized microfluidic cross-slot device.

    PubMed

    Haward, S J; Jaishankar, A; Oliveira, M S N; Alves, M A; McKinley, G H

    2013-07-01

    We utilize a recently developed microfluidic device, the Optimized Shape Cross-slot Extensional Rheometer (OSCER), to study the elongational flow behavior and rheological properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) solutions representative of the synovial fluid (SF) found in the knee joint. The OSCER geometry is a stagnation point device that imposes a planar extensional flow with a homogenous extension rate over a significant length of the inlet and outlet channel axes. Due to the compressive nature of the flow generated along the inlet channels, and the planar elongational flow along the outlet channels, the flow field in the OSCER device can also be considered as representative of the flow field that arises between compressing articular cartilage layers of the knee joints during running or jumping movements. Full-field birefringence microscopy measurements demonstrate a high degree of localized macromolecular orientation along streamlines passing close to the stagnation point of the OSCER device, while micro-particle image velocimetry is used to quantify the flow kinematics. The stress-optical rule is used to assess the local extensional viscosity in the elongating fluid elements as a function of the measured deformation rate. The large limiting values of the dimensionless Trouton ratio, Tr ∼ O(50), demonstrate that these fluids are highly extensional-thickening, providing a clear mechanism for the load-dampening properties of SF. The results also indicate the potential for utilizing the OSCER in screening of physiological SF samples, which will lead to improved understanding of, and therapies for, disease progression in arthritis sufferers.

  8. Efficient Steady-State Solution Techniques for Variably Saturated Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farthing, M. W.; Kees, C. E.; Coffey, T. S.; Kelley, C. T.; Miller, C. T.

    2002-12-01

    We consider the simulation of steady-state variably saturated groundwater flow using Richards' equation. The difficulties associated with solving Richards' equation numerically are well known. Most discretization approaches for Richards' equation lead to nonlinear systems that are large and difficult to solve. The solution of nonlinear systems for steady-state problems can be particularly challenging, since a good initial guess for the steady-state solution is often hard to obtain, and the resulting linear systems may be poorly scaled. Common approaches like modified Picard iteration or variations of Newton's method have their advantages but perform poorly with standard globalization techniques under certain conditions. Pseudo-transient continuation has been used in computational fluid dynamics for some time to obtain steady-state solutions for problems in which Newton's method with standard line-search strategies fails. It combines aspects of backward Euler time integration and Newton's method to select intermediate estimates of the steady-state solution. In this work, we examine the use of pseudo-transient continuation methods for Richards' equation. We evaluate their performance for steady-state problems in heterogeneous domains by comparing them with Newton's method using standard globalization techniques. We investigate the methods' performance with both direct and preconditioned Krylov iterative linear solvers. We then make recommendations for robust and efficient approaches to obtain steady-state solutions for Richards' equation under a variety of conditions.

  9. Exact solutions for unsteady unidirectional flows of a generalized second-order fluid through a rectangular conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jianhong; Xu, Mingyu

    2009-04-01

    The exact solutions are obtained for unsteady unidirectional flows of a generalized second-order fluid through a rectangular conduit. The fractional calculus in the constitutive relationship of a non-Newtonian fluid is introduced. We construct the solutions by means of Fourier transform and the discrete Laplace transform of the sequential derivatives and the double finite Fourier transform. The solutions for Newtonian fluid between two infinite parallel plates appear as limiting cases of our solutions.

  10. Finite element solution of unsteady mixed convection flow of micropolar fluid over a porous shrinking sheet.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Diksha; Kumar, Lokendra; Singh, Bani

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to analyze the effect of unsteadiness on the mixed convection boundary layer flow of micropolar fluid over a permeable shrinking sheet in the presence of viscous dissipation. At the sheet a variable distribution of suction is assumed. The unsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by the time dependence of the shrinking velocity and surface temperature. With the aid of similarity transformations, the governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically, using variational finite element method. The influence of important physical parameters, namely, suction parameter, unsteadiness parameter, buoyancy parameter and Eckert number on the velocity, microrotation, and temperature functions is investigated and analyzed with the help of their graphical representations. Additionally skin friction and the rate of heat transfer have also been computed. Under special conditions, an exact solution for the flow velocity is compared with the numerical results obtained by finite element method. An excellent agreement is observed for the two sets of solutions. Furthermore, to verify the convergence of numerical results, calculations are conducted with increasing number of elements.

  11. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; ...

    2015-08-12

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a similar to 90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhancedmore » all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. However, we expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility.« less

  12. An algebraic factorisation scheme for spectral element solution of incompressible flow and scalar transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho J.; Beskok, Ali

    2010-03-01

    A spectral element algorithm for solution of the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes and scalar (species/heat) transport equations is developed using the algebraic factorisation scheme. The new algorithm utilises Nth order Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre points for velocity and the scalar, while (N-2)th order Gauss-Legendre points are used for pressure. As a result, the algorithm does not require inter-element continuity for pressure and pressure boundary conditions on solid surfaces. Implementations of the algorithm are performed for conforming and non-conforming grids. The latter is accomplished using both the point-wise matching and integral projection methods, and applied for grids with both polynomial and geometric non-conformities. Code validation cases include the unsteady scalar convection equation, and Kovasznay flow in two- and three-dimensional domains. Using cases with analytical solutions, the algorithm is shown to achieve spectral accuracy in space and second-order accuracy in time. The results for the Boussinesq approximation for buoyancy-driven flows, and the species mixing in a continuous flow micro-mixer are also included as examples of applications that require long-time integration of the scalar transport equations.

  13. Some exact solutions to the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards-Payne traffic flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, G.; Infeld, E.; Skorupski, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    We find a class of exact solutions to the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards-Payne (LWRP) traffic flow equations. Using two consecutive Lagrangian transformations, a linearization is achieved. Next, depending on the initial density, we either apply (again two) Lambert functions and obtain exact formulae for the dependence of the car density and velocity on x, t, or else, failing that, the same result in a parametric representation. The calculation always involves two possible factorizations of a consistency condition. Both must be considered. In physical terms, the lineup usually separates into two offshoots at different velocities. Each velocity soon becomes uniform. This outcome in many ways resembles the two soliton solution to the Korteweg-de Vries equation. We check general conservation requirements. Although traffic flow research has developed tremendously since LWRP, this calculation, being exact, may open the door to solving similar problems, such as gas dynamics or water flow in rivers. With this possibility in mind, we outline the procedure in some detail at the end.

  14. A master dynamic flow diagram for the shear thickening transition in micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Bautista, F; Tepale, N; Fernández, V V A; Landázuri, G; Hernández, E; Macías, E R; Soltero, J F A; Escalante, J I; Manero, O; Puig, J E

    2016-01-07

    The shear thickening behavior of dilute micellar solutions of hexadecyltrimethylammonium-type surfactants with different counterions (tosylate, 3- and 4-fluorobenzoate, vinylbenzoate and salicylate) and of n-alkyltetradecylammonium bromide (CnTAB), with n = 14, 16 and 18, is examined here. These solutions undergo a shear thickening transition due to the formation of shear-induced structures (SISs) in the shear range studied. Here we report a relationship between the shear thickening intensity and the differences in the hydrophobicity of counterions according to the Hofmeister-like anion series, which leads to a master flow diagram. This master flow diagram is produced by plotting a normalized shear thickening intensity (Iη - 1)/(Imax - 1) versus CD/CD,max, where Iη is the shear-thickening intensity, defined as the largest viscosity obtained in the shear-thickening transition (STT) at a given surfactant concentration CD divided by the Newtonian viscosity η0, and Imax is the largest intensity value obtained in the STT at a surfactant concentration CD,max. The master flow diagram is built using several cetyltrimethylammonium-type surfactants with different counterions, according to a Hofmeister-like series, and by n-alkyltetradecylammonium bromide surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths.

  15. Solution-Adaptive Cartesian Cell Approach for Viscous and Inviscid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A Cartesian cell-based approach for adaptively refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is presented. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by the recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, polygonal cut cells are created using modified polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary tree data structure that provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The results of a study comparing the accuracy and positivity of two classes of cell-centered, viscous gradient reconstruction procedures is briefly summarized. Adaptively refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are shown using the more robust of these gradient reconstruction procedures, where the results computed by the Cartesian approach are compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  16. Design of Distributed Controllers Seeking Optimal Power Flow Solutions Under Communication Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Simonetto, Andrea; Dhople, Sairaj

    2016-12-29

    This paper focuses on power distribution networks featuring inverter-interfaced distributed energy resources (DERs), and develops feedback controllers that drive the DER output powers to solutions of time-varying AC optimal power flow (OPF) problems. Control synthesis is grounded on primal-dual-type methods for regularized Lagrangian functions, as well as linear approximations of the AC power-flow equations. Convergence and OPF-solution-tracking capabilities are established while acknowledging: i) communication-packet losses, and ii) partial updates of control signals. The latter case is particularly relevant since it enables asynchronous operation of the controllers where DER setpoints are updated at a fast time scale based on local voltage measurements, and information on the network state is utilized if and when available, based on communication constraints. As an application, the paper considers distribution systems with high photovoltaic integration, and demonstrates that the proposed framework provides fast voltage-regulation capabilities, while enabling the near real-time pursuit of solutions of AC OPF problems.

  17. Hydrodynamic dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in electroosmotic flow

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-06-01

    Analytical methods are employed to determine the axial dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in an incompressible electroosmotic flow. In contrast to previous approaches, the dispersion is obtained here by solving the time-dependent diffusion-advection equation in transformed spatial and temporal coordinates to obtain the two-dimensional late-time concentration field. The coefficient of dispersion arises as a separation eigenvalue, and its value is obtained as a necessary condition for satisfying all of the required boundary conditions. Solutions based on the Debye-Huckel approximation are presented for both a circular tube and a channel of infinite width. These results recover the well-known solutions for dispersion in pressure-driven flows when the Debye length is very large. In this limit, the axial dispersion is proportional to the square of the Peclet number based on the characteristic transverse dimension of the tube or channel. In the tilt of very small Debye lengths, the authors find that the dispersion varies as the square of the Peclet number based on the Debye length. Simple approximations to the coefficient of dispersion as a function of the Debye length and Peclet number are also presented.

  18. Water flow and multicomponent solute transport in drip-irrigated lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raij, Iael; Šimûnek, Jiří; Ben-Gal, Alon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2016-08-01

    Controlled experiments and modeling are crucial components in the evaluation of the fate of water and solutes in environmental and agricultural research. Lysimeters are commonly used to determine water and solute balances and assist in making sustainable decisions with respect to soil reclamation, fertilization, or irrigation with low-quality water. While models are cost-effective tools for estimating and preventing environmental damage by agricultural activities, their value is highly dependent on the accuracy of their parameterization, often determined by calibration. The main objective of this study was to use measured major ion concentrations collected from drip-irrigated lysimeters to calibrate the variably saturated water flow model HYDRUS (2D/3D) coupled with the reactive transport model UNSATCHEM. Irrigation alternated between desalinated and brackish waters. Lysimeter drainage and soil solution samples were collected for chemical analysis and used to calibrate the model. A second objective was to demonstrate the potential use of the calibrated model to evaluate lower boundary design options of lysimeters with respect to leaching fractions determined using drainage water fluxes, chloride concentrations, and overall salinity of drainage water, and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) in the profile. The model showed that, in the long term, leaching fractions calculated with electrical conductivity values would be affected by the lower boundary condition pressure head, while those calculated with chloride concentrations and water fluxes would not be affected. In addition, clear dissimilarities in ESP profiles were found between lysimeters with different lower boundary conditions, suggesting a potential influence on hydraulic conductivities and flow patterns.

  19. Some exact solutions to the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards-Payne traffic flow equations: II. Moderate congestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infeld, E.; Rowlands, G.; Skorupski, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    We find a further class of exact solutions to the Lighthill-Whitham- Richards-Payne (LWRP) traffic flow equations. As before, using two consecutive Lagrangian transformations, a linearization is achieved. Next, depending on the initial density, we either obtain exact formulae for the dependence of the car density and velocity on x,t, or else, failing that, the same result in a parametric representation. The calculation always involves two possible factorizations of a consistency condition. Both must be considered. In physical terms, the lineup usually separates into two offshoots at different velocities. Each velocity soon becomes uniform. This outcome in many ways resembles not only that of Rowlands et al (2013 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46 365202 (part I)) but also the two-soliton solution to the Korteweg-de Vries equation. This paper can be read independently of part I. This explains unavoidable repetitions. Possible uses of both papers in checking numerical codes are indicated. Since LWRP, numerous more elaborate models, including multiple lanes, traffic jams, tollgates, etc, abound in the literature. However, we present an exact solution. These are few and far between, other than found by inverse scattering. The literature for various models, including ours, is given. The methods used here and in part I may be useful in solving other problems, such as shallow water flow.

  20. A finite difference solution for the propagation of sound in near sonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Lester, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    An explicit time/space finite difference procedure is used to model the propagation of sound in a quasi one-dimensional duct containing high Mach number subsonic flow. Nonlinear acoustic equations are derived by perturbing the time-dependent Euler equations about a steady, compressible mean flow. The governing difference relations are based on a fourth-order, two-step (predictor-corrector) MacCormack scheme. The solution algorithm functions by switching on a time harmonic source and allowing the difference equations to iterate to a steady state. The principal effect of the non-linearities was to shift acoustical energy to higher harmonics. With increased source strengths, wave steepening was observed. This phenomenon suggests that the acoustical response may approach a shock behavior at at higher sound pressure level as the throat Mach number aproaches unity. On a peak level basis, good agreement between the nonlinear finite difference and linear finite element solutions was observed, even through a peak sound pressure level of about 150 dB occurred in the throat region. Nonlinear steady state waveform solutions are shown to be in excellent agreement with a nonlinear asymptotic theory.

  1. Balancing Osmotic Pressure of Electrolytes for Nanoporous Membrane Vanadium Redox Flow Battery with a Draw Solute.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ligen; Li, Dan; Li, Shuaiqiang; Xu, Zhi; Dong, Junhang; Jing, Wenheng; Xing, Weihong

    2016-12-28

    Vanadium redox flow batteries with nanoporous membranes (VRFBNM) have been demonstrated to be good energy storage devices. Yet the capacity decay due to permeation of vanadium and water makes their commercialization very difficult. Inspired by the forward osmosis (FO) mechanism, the VRFBNM battery capacity decrease was alleviated by adding a soluble draw solute (e.g., 2-methylimidazole) into the catholyte, which can counterbalance the osmotic pressure between the positive and negative half-cell. No change of the electrolyte volume has been observed after VRFBNM being operated for 55 h, revealing that the permeation of water and vanadium ions was effectively limited. Consequently, the Coulombic efficiency (CE) of nanoporous TiO2 vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) was enhanced from 93.5% to 95.3%, meanwhile, its capacity decay was significantly suppressed from 60.7% to 27.5% upon the addition of soluble draw solute. Moreover, the energy capacity of the VRFBNM was noticeably improved from 297.0 to 406.4 mAh remarkably. These results indicate balancing the osmotic pressure via the addition of draw solute can restrict pressure-dependent vanadium permeation and it can be established as a promising method for up-scaling VRFBNM application.

  2. Design of Distributed Controllers Seeking Optimal Power Flow Solutions under Communication Constraints: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Anese, Emiliano; Simonetto, Andrea; Dhople, Sairaj

    2016-12-01

    This paper focuses on power distribution networks featuring inverter-interfaced distributed energy resources (DERs), and develops feedback controllers that drive the DER output powers to solutions of time-varying AC optimal power flow (OPF) problems. Control synthesis is grounded on primal-dual-type methods for regularized Lagrangian functions, as well as linear approximations of the AC power-flow equations. Convergence and OPF-solution-tracking capabilities are established while acknowledging: i) communication-packet losses, and ii) partial updates of control signals. The latter case is particularly relevant since it enables asynchronous operation of the controllers where DER setpoints are updated at a fast time scale based on local voltage measurements, and information on the network state is utilized if and when available, based on communication constraints. As an application, the paper considers distribution systems with high photovoltaic integration, and demonstrates that the proposed framework provides fast voltage-regulation capabilities, while enabling the near real-time pursuit of solutions of AC OPF problems.

  3. Comparison of Nonequilibrium Solution Algorithms Applied to Chemically Stiff Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1995-01-01

    Three solution algorithms, explicit under-relaxation, point implicit, and lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel, are used to compute nonequilibrium flow around the Apollo 4 return capsule at the 62-km altitude point in its descent trajectory. By varying the Mach number, the efficiency and robustness of the solution algorithms were tested for different levels of chemical stiffness.The performance of the solution algorithms degraded as the Mach number and stiffness of the flow increased. At Mach 15 and 30, the lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel method produces an eight order of magnitude drop in the energy residual in one-third to one-half the Cray C-90 computer time as compared to the point implicit and explicit under-relaxation methods. The explicit under-relaxation algorithm experienced convergence difficulties at Mach 30 and above. At Mach 40 the performance of the lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel algorithm deteriorates to the point that it is out performed by the point implicit method. The effects of the viscous terms are investigated. Grid dependency questions are explored.

  4. Interface evolution of a particle in a supersaturated solution affected by a far-field uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wen; Wang, Zi-Dong

    2013-09-01

    The effect of far-field uniform flow on the morphological evolution of a spherical particle in a supersaturated solution affected by a far-field uniform flow is studied by using the matched asymptotic expansion method. The analytical solution for the interface shape, concentration field, and interface velocity of the particle growth shows that the convection induced by the far-field uniform flow facilitates the growth of the spherical particle, the upstream flow imposed on the particle enhances the growth velocity of the interface when the flow comes in, the downstream flow lowers the growth velocity of the surface when the flow goes out, and the interface morphology evolves into a peach-like shape.

  5. New classes of exact solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation with arbitrary flow using Lie-point symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap.; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    Extending previous work [R. L. White and R. D. Hazeltine, Phys. Plasmas 16, 123101 (2009)] to the case of a generalized Grad-Shafranov equation (GGSE) with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction, we obtain new classes of exact solutions on the basis of Lie-point symmetries. This is done by using a previously found exact generalized Solovév solution to the GGSE. The new solutions containing five free parameters describe D-shaped toroidal configurations with plasma flow non-parallel to the magnetic field. In addition, the full symmetry group is obtained and new group-invariant solutions to the GGSE are presented.

  6. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gilca, Alex; Cole, Charles R.; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2006-07-20

    The CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator described in this User’s Guide is a three-dimensional finite-element model used to evaluate groundwater flow and solute mass transport. Confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows can be represented with CFEST. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentra¬tion of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Although several thermal parameters described in this User’s Guide are required inputs, thermal transport has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. The CFEST simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Execution of the CFEST simulator is controlled through three required text input files. These input file use a structured format of associated groups of input data. Example input data lines are presented for each file type, as well as a description of the structured FORTRAN data format. Detailed descriptions of all input requirements, output options, and program structure and execution are provided in this User’s Guide. Required inputs for auxillary CFEST utilities that aide in post-processing data are also described. Global variables are defined for those with access to the source code. Although CFEST is a proprietary code (CFEST, Inc., Irvine, CA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory retains permission to maintain its own source, and to distribute executables to Hanford subcontractors.

  7. Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for transonic afterbody flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The time dependent Navier-Stokes equations in mass averaged variables are solved for transonic flow over axisymmetric boattail plume simulator configurations. Numerical solution of these equations is accomplished with the unsplit explict finite difference algorithm of MacCormack. A grid subcycling procedure and computer code vectorization are used to improve computational efficiency. The two layer algebraic turbulence models of Cebeci-Smith and Baldwin-Lomax are employed for investigating turbulence closure. Two relaxation models based on these baseline models are also considered. Results in the form of surface pressure distribution for three different circular arc boattails at two free stream Mach numbers are compared with experimental data. The pressures in the recirculating flow region for all separated cases are poorly predicted with the baseline turbulence models. Significant improvements in the predictions are usually obtained by using the relaxation models.

  8. Numerical solution of flow problems using body-fitted coordinate systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with numerically generated boundary-fitted coordinate systems. This procedure eliminates the shape of the boundaries as a complicating factor and allows the flow about arbitrary boundaries to be treated essentially as easily as that about simple boundaries. The technique of boundary-fitted coordinate systems is based on a method of automatic numerical generation of a general curvilinear coordinate system having a coordinate line coincident with each boundary of a general multiconnected region involving any number of arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Once the curvilinear coordinate system is generated, any partial differential system of interest may be solved on the coordinate system by transforming the equations and solving the resulting system in finite-difference approximation on the rectangular transformed plane. Attention is given to the types of boundary-fitted coordinate systems, coordinate system control, operation of the coordinate codes, solution of partial differential equations, application to free-surface flow, and other applications of interest.

  9. Exact Solutions for Stokes' Flow of a Non-Newtonian Nanofluid Model: A Lie Similarity Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Taha; Aziz, A.; Khalique, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The fully developed time-dependent flow of an incompressible, thermodynamically compatible non-Newtonian third-grade nanofluid is investigated. The classical Stokes model is considered in which the flow is generated due to the motion of the plate in its own plane with an impulsive velocity. The Lie symmetry approach is utilised to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equation into different linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The reduced ordinary differential equations are then solved by using the compatibility and generalised group method. Exact solutions for the model equation are deduced in the form of closed-form exponential functions which are not available in the literature before. In addition, we also derived the conservation laws associated with the governing model. Finally, the physical features of the pertinent parameters are discussed in detail through several graphs.

  10. Conforming Chebyshev spectral collocation methods for the solution of laminar flow in a constricted channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karageorghis, Andreas; Phillips, Timothy N.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical simulation of steady planar two-dimensional, laminar flow of an incompressible fluid through an abruptly contracting channel using spectral domain decomposition methods is described. The key features of the method are the decomposition of the flow region into a number of rectangular subregions and spectral approximations which are pointwise C(1) continuous across subregion interfaces. Spectral approximations to the solution are obtained for Reynolds numbers in the range 0 to 500. The size of the salient corner vortex decreases as the Reynolds number increases from 0 to around 45. As the Reynolds number is increased further the vortex grows slowly. A vortex is detected downstream of the contraction at a Reynolds number of around 175 that continues to grow as the Reynolds number is increased further.

  11. Parallel solution of high-order numerical schemes for solving incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, Edward J.; Lin, Avi; Liou, May-Fun; Blech, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel numerical scheme for solving incompressible steady-state flows is presented. The algorithm uses a finite-difference approach to solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The algorithms are scalable and expandable. They may be used with only two processors or with as many processors as are available. The code is general and expandable. Any size grid may be used. Four processors of the NASA LeRC Hypercluster were used to solve for steady-state flow in a driven square cavity. The Hypercluster was configured in a distributed-memory, hypercube-like architecture. By using a 50-by-50 finite-difference solution grid, an efficiency of 74 percent (a speedup of 2.96) was obtained.

  12. Coupled turbulent flow, heat, and solute transport in continuous casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutalebi, M. Reza; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1995-08-01

    A fully coupled fluid flow, heat, and solute transport model was developed to analyze turbulent flow, solidification, and evolution of macrosegregation in a continuous billet caster. Transport equations of total mass, momentum, energy, and species for a binary iron-carbon alloy system were solved using a continuum model, wherein the equations are valid for the solid, liquid, and mushy zones in the casting. A modified version of the low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model was adopted to incorporate turbulence effects on transport processes in the system. A control-volume-based finite-difference procedure was employed to solve the conservation equations associated with appropriate boundary conditions. Because of high nonlinearity in the system of equations, a number of techniques were used to accelerate the convergence process. The effects of the parameters such as casting speed, steel grade, nozzle configuration on flow pattern, solidification profile, and carbon segregation were investigated. From the computed flow pattern, the trajectory of inclusion particles, as well as the density distribution of the particles, was calculated. Some of the computed results were compared with available experimental measurements, and reasonable agreements were obtained.

  13. Analytical solution of two-fluid electro-osmotic flows of viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Pinho, F T

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an analytical model that describes a two-fluid electro-osmotic flow of stratified fluids with Newtonian or viscoelastic rheological behavior. This is the principle of operation of an electro-osmotic two-fluid pump as proposed by Brask et al. [Tech. Proc. Nanotech., 1, 190-193, 2003], in which an electrically non-conducting fluid is transported by the interfacial dragging viscous force of a conducting fluid that is driven by electro-osmosis. The electric potential in the conducting fluid and the analytical steady flow solution of the two-fluid electro-osmotic stratified flow in a planar microchannel are presented by assuming a planar interface between the two immiscible fluids with Newtonian or viscoelastic rheological behavior. The effects of fluid rheology, shear viscosity ratio, holdup and interfacial zeta potential are analyzed to show the viability of this technique, where an enhancement of the flow rate is observed as the shear-thinning effects are increased.

  14. Michaelis-Menten kinetics in shear flow: Similarity solutions for multi-step reactions.

    PubMed

    Ristenpart, W D; Stone, H A

    2012-03-01

    Models for chemical reaction kinetics typically assume well-mixed conditions, in which chemical compositions change in time but are uniform in space. In contrast, many biological and microfluidic systems of interest involve non-uniform flows where gradients in flow velocity dynamically alter the effective reaction volume. Here, we present a theoretical framework for characterizing multi-step reactions that occur when an enzyme or enzymatic substrate is released from a flat solid surface into a linear shear flow. Similarity solutions are developed for situations where the reactions are sufficiently slow compared to a convective time scale, allowing a regular perturbation approach to be employed. For the specific case of Michaelis-Menten reactions, we establish that the transversally averaged concentration of product scales with the distance x downstream as x(5/3). We generalize the analysis to n-step reactions, and we discuss the implications for designing new microfluidic kinetic assays to probe the effect of flow on biochemical processes.

  15. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for arbitrary blunt bodies in supersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warsi, Z. U. A.; Devarayalu, K.; Thompson, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code employing the body-fitted coordinate technique has been developed for supersonic flows past blunt bodies of arbitrary shape. The computer program is based on the finite-difference approximation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations transformed to nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates with the contravariant components of the velocity vector as dependent variables. The bow shock ahead of the body is obtained as part of the solution, by 'shock capturing'. Numerical solutions of the complete equations are presented in detail for free-stream Mach number 4.6, Reynolds number 10,000, and an isothermal wall temperature of 556 K for a circular cylinder with the free-stream outer boundaries forming a hyperbola in the front and a circular arc in the back.

  16. Similar solutions for viscous hypersonic flow over a slender three-fourths-power body of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1987-01-01

    For hypersonic flow with a shock wave, there is a similar solution consistent throughout the viscous and inviscid layers along a very slender three-fourths-power body of revolution The strong pressure interaction problem can then be treated by the method of similarity. Numerical calculations are performed in the viscous region with the edge pressure distribution known from the inviscid similar solutions. The compressible laminar boundary-layer equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The resulting two-point boundary value problem is then solved by the Runge-Kutta method with a modified Newton's method for the corresponding boundary conditions. The effects of wall temperature, mass bleeding, and body transverse curvature are investigated. The induced pressure, displacement thickness, skin friction, and heat transfer due to the previously mentioned parameters are estimated and analyzed.

  17. Solutions with special functions for time fractional free convection flow of Brinkman-type fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Farhad; Aftab Alam Jan, Syed; Khan, Ilyas; Gohar, Madeha; Ahmad Sheikh, Nadeem

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to report the combined effect of heat and mass diffusion on time fractional free convectional incompressible flow of Brinkman-type fluid over an oscillating plate in the presence of first-order chemical reaction. The Laplace transform has been used to obtain the exact solutions for the fractional-order distributions. Exact expressions for temperature, concentration and velocity have been presented in terms of special functions. For instance, we presented temperature in terms of Wright function, concentration in the form of Fox- H function and velocity in terms of Mittag-Leffler and general Wright functions. The effects of various physical parameters on the fluid motion are sketched and discussed graphically. The present solutions have been reduced by taking one or more parameters approaching to zero and an excellent agreement is observed with the published work. The numerical results for skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers have been shown in tabular form.

  18. Analytical solutions for flow of horizontal well in compressible, three-dimensional unconsolidated formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Chen, Jun; Li, Long-Xin; Zhou, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    A novel mathematical model for single-phase fluid flow from unconsolidated formations to a horizontal well with the consideration of stress-sensitive permeability is presented. The model assumes the formation permeability is an exponential function of the pore pressure. Using a perturbation technique, the model is solved for either constant pressure or constant flux or infinite lateral boundary conditions with closed top and bottom boundaries. Through Laplace transformation, finite Fourier transformation and numerical inversion methods, the solutions are obtained and the pressure response curves are analyzed. The agreement between the analytical solutions in this paper and the numerical results from commercial software (Saphir) is excellent, which manifests the accuracy of the results derived in this paper.

  19. Transonic Navier-Stokes solutions of three-dimensional afterbody flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B., III; Thomas, James L.; Abeyounis, William K.; Mason, Mary L.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solution technique in predicting the transonic flow past a nonaxisymmetric nozzle was investigated. The investigation was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.60 to 0.94 and an angle of attack of 0 degrees. The numerical solution procedure employs the three-dimensional, unsteady, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations written in strong conservation form, a thin layer assumption, and the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The equations are solved by using the finite-volume principle in conjunction with an approximately factored upwind-biased numerical algorithm. In the numerical procedure, the jet exhaust is represented by a solid sting. Wind-tunnel data with the jet exhaust simulated by high pressure air were also obtained to compare with the numerical calculations.

  20. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  1. Numerical and series solutions for stagnation-point flow of nanofluid over an exponentially stretching sheet.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Meraj; Farooq, Muhammad A; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with the stagnation-point flow of nanofluid past an exponentially stretching sheet. The presence of Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects yields a coupled nonlinear boundary-value problem (BVP). Similarity transformations are invoked to reduce the partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Local similarity solutions are obtained by homotopy analysis method (HAM), which enables us to investigate the effects of parameters at a fixed location above the sheet. The numerical solutions are also derived using the built-in solver bvp4c of the software MATLAB. The results indicate that temperature and the thermal boundary layer thickness appreciably increase when the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects are strengthened. Moreover the nanoparticles volume fraction is found to increase when the thermophoretic effect intensifies.

  2. Full potential solution of a transonic quasi-3-D flow through a cascade using artificial compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C.; Adamczyk, J.

    1981-01-01

    A reliable method is presented for calculating the flowfield about a cascade of arbitrary 2-D airfoils. The method approximates the three-dimensional flow in a turbomachinery blade row by correcting for streamtube convergence and radius change in the throughflow direction. The method is a fully conservative solution of the full potential equation incorporating the finite volume technique on a body-fitted periodic mesh, with an artificial density imposed in the transonic region to ensure stability and the capture of shock waves. Comparison of results for several supercritical blades shows good agreement with their hodograph solutions. Other calculations for these profiles as well as standard NACA blade sections indicate that this is a useful scheme for analyzing both the design and off-design performance of turbomachinery blading.

  3. Finite volume numerical solution to a blood flow problem in human artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijayanti Budiawan, Inge; Mungkasi, Sudi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we solve a one dimensional blood flow model in human artery. This model is of a non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equation system which can generate either continuous or discontinuous solution. We use the Lax–Friedrichs finite volume method to solve this model. Particularly, we investigate how a pulse propagates in human artery. For this simulation, we give a single sine wave with a small time period as an impluse input on the left boundary. The finite volume method is successful in simulating how the pulse propagates in the artery. It detects the positions of the pulse for the whole time period.

  4. On the numerical solution of two-dimensional, laminar compressible flows with imbedded shock waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Lamb, J. P.; Bertin, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The complete, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are expressed in conservation form and solved by employing an explicit finite difference numerical technique which incorporates artificial viscosity terms of the form first suggested by Rusanov for numerical stability in the vicinity of shock waves. Surface boundary conditions are developed in a consistent and unique manner through the use of a physically oriented extrapolation procedure. From numerical experimentation an extended range for the explicit stability parameter is established. Also employed is an additional convergence parameter which relates incremental spatial steps. Convergence of the transient solution to a steady state flow was obtained after 400 to 500 time steps.

  5. Hybrid solution of the averaged Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A.; Perez-Guerrero, J. S.; Cotta, R. M.

    The Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) is utilized in the hybrid numerical-analytical solution of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations, for developing turbulent flow inside a parallel-plates channel. An algebraic turbulence model is employed in modelling the turbulent diffusivity. The automatic global error control feature inherent to this approach, permits the determination of fully converged reference results for the validation of purely numerical methods. Therefore, numerical results for different values of Reynolds number are obtained, both for illustrating the convergence characteristics of the integral transform approach, and for critical comparisons with previously reported results through different models and numerical schemes.

  6. Least-squares finite element solutions for three-dimensional backward-facing step flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Hou, Lin-Jun; Lin, Tsung-Liang

    1993-01-01

    Comprehensive numerical solutions of the steady state incompressible viscous flow over a three-dimensional backward-facing step up to Re equals 800 are presented. The results are obtained by the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) which is based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. The computed model is of the same size as that of Armaly's experiment. Three-dimensional phenomena are observed even at low Reynolds number. The calculated values of the primary reattachment length are in good agreement with experimental results.

  7. Squeeze flow rheometry as a novel tool for the characterization of highly concentrated protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Schermeyer, Marie-Therese; Sigloch, Heike; Bauer, Katharina C; Oelschlaeger, Claude; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    This study aims at defining rheological parameters for the characterization of highly concentrated protein solutions. As a basis for comparing rheological behavior with protein solution characteristics the protein phase behavior of Lysozyme from chicken egg white with concentrations up to 225 mg/mL, changing pH values and additive concentrations was studied in a microbatch scale format. The prepared phase diagrams, scored after 40 days (t40) give insights into the kind and kinetics of the phase transitions that occur. Oscillatory frequency sweep measurements of samples with exactly the same conditions were conducted immediately after preparation (t0). The protein solutions behave viscoelastic and show a characteristic curve shape of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″). The graphs provide information about the cross-linking degree of the respective sample. The measured rheological parameters were sensitive concerning solution composition, protein concentration and solution inner structure. The rheological moduli G' and G″ and especially the ratio of these parameters over a frequency range from 100 to 40000 rad/sec give information about the aggregation tendency of the protein under tested conditions. We succeeded to correlate protein phase behavior with the defined rheological key parameter ωCO. This point represents the frequency value of the intersection point from G' and G″. In our study Lysozyme expressed a ωCO threshold value of 20000 rad/sec as a lower limit for stable protein solutions. The predictability of lysozyme aggregation tendency and crystallization by means of squeeze flow rheometry is shown.

  8. Generic Procedure for Coupling the PHREEQC Geochemical Modeling Framework with Flow and Solute Transport Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmeier, L. C.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Computer simulations of water availability and quality play an important role in state-of-the-art water resources management. However, many of the most utilized software programs focus either on physical flow and transport phenomena (e.g., MODFLOW, MT3DMS, FEFLOW, HYDRUS) or on geochemical reactions (e.g., MINTEQ, PHREEQC, CHESS, ORCHESTRA). In recent years, several couplings between both genres of programs evolved in order to consider interactions between flow and biogeochemical reactivity (e.g., HP1, PHWAT). Software coupling procedures can be categorized as ‘close couplings’, where programs pass information via the memory stack at runtime, and ‘remote couplings’, where the information is exchanged at each time step via input/output files. The former generally involves modifications of software codes and therefore expert programming skills are required. We present a generic recipe for remotely coupling the PHREEQC geochemical modeling framework and flow and solute transport (FST) simulators. The iterative scheme relies on operator splitting with continuous re-initialization of PHREEQC and the FST of choice at each time step. Since PHREEQC calculates the geochemistry of aqueous solutions in contact with soil minerals, the procedure is primarily designed for couplings to FST’s for liquid phase flow in natural environments. It requires the accessibility of initial conditions and numerical parameters such as time and space discretization in the input text file for the FST and control of the FST via commands to the operating system (batch on Windows; bash/shell on Unix/Linux). The coupling procedure is based on PHREEQC’s capability to save the state of a simulation with all solid, liquid and gaseous species as a PHREEQC input file by making use of the dump file option in the TRANSPORT keyword. The output from one reaction calculation step is therefore reused as input for the following reaction step where changes in element amounts due to advection

  9. New exact solutions for Hele-Shaw flow in doubly connected regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallaston, Michael C.; McCue, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    Radial Hele-Shaw flows are treated analytically using conformal mapping techniques. The geometry of interest has a doubly connected annular region of viscous fluid surrounding an inviscid bubble that is either expanding or contracting due to a pressure difference caused by injection or suction of the inviscid fluid. The zero-surface-tension problem is ill-posed for both bubble expansion and contraction, as both scenarios involve viscous fluid displacing inviscid fluid. Exact solutions are derived by tracking the location of singularities and critical points in the analytic continuation of the mapping function. We show that by treating the critical points, it is easy to observe finite-time blow-up, and the evolution equations may be written in exact form using complex residues. We present solutions that start with cusps on one interface and end with cusps on the other, as well as solutions that have the bubble contracting to a point. For the latter solutions, the bubble approaches an ellipse in shape at extinction.

  10. Efficient steady-state solution techniques for variably saturated groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farthing, Matthew W.; Kees, Christopher E.; Coffey, Todd S.; Kelley, C. T.; Miller, Cass T.

    We consider the simulation of steady-state variably saturated groundwater flow using Richards' equation (RE). The difficulties associated with solving RE numerically are well known. Most discretization approaches for RE lead to nonlinear systems that are large and difficult to solve. The solution of nonlinear systems for steady-state problems can be particularly challenging, since a good initial guess for the steady-state solution is often hard to obtain, and the resulting linear systems may be poorly scaled. Common approaches like Picard iteration or variations of Newton's method have their advantages but perform poorly with standard globalization techniques under certain conditions. Pseudo-transient continuation has been used in computational fluid dynamics for some time to obtain steady-state solutions for problems in which Newton's method with standard line-search strategies fails. Here, we examine the use of pseudo-transient continuation as well as Newton's method combined with standard globalization techniques for steady-state problems in heterogeneous domains. We investigate the methods' performance with direct and preconditioned Krylov iterative linear solvers. We then make recommendations for robust and efficient approaches to obtain steady-state solutions for RE under a range of conditions.

  11. Finite Reynolds number properties of a turbulent channel flow similarity solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klewicki, Joseph; Oberlack, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Finite Reynolds number behaviors of the asymptotically logarithmic mean velocity profile in fully developed turbulent channel flow are investigated. This is accomplished by exploiting invariance properties admitted by the appropriately simplified form of the mean momentum equation. These properties underlie the existence of a similarity solution over an interior inertial domain. This similarity solution, which was originally demonstrated by numerically integrating the relevant nonlinear equation, is consistent with the emergence of a logarithmic mean velocity profile as the Reynolds number becomes large. It is now shown that the governing nonlinear equation has an analytical solution that contains both linear and logarithmic terms, but with the coefficient on the linear term decaying to zero with Reynolds number. Existing DNS are used to elucidate Reynolds number dependent properties of this finite Reynolds number form of the similarity solution. Correspondences between these properties and those indicated by finite Reynolds number corrections to the classical overlap layer formulation for the mean velocity profile are described and discussed. Support of the 2014 Mathematics of Turbulence program at the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA, is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  13. An Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme for Particulate Flows with a New Treatment of Boundary Conditions Based on Stokes Flow Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Andrew

    2005-11-01

    We have developed an explicit finite-difference scheme for direct simulation of the motion of solid particles in a fluid. It is challenging to enforce the no-slip condition on the surface of circular particles in a uniform grid. In this study, we have implemented a treatment of the boundary condition similar to that in the PHYSALIS method of Takagi et. al. (2003), which matches Stokes flow solutions next to the particle surface with a numerical solution away from it. The original PHYSALIS method was developed for implicit flow solvers, and required an iterative process to match the Stokes flow solutions with the numerical solution. However, it was easily adapted to work with the present explicit scheme, and found to be more efficient since no iterative process is required in the matching. The method proceeds by approximating the flow next to the particle surface as a Stokes flow in the particle's local coordinates, which is then matched to the numerically computed external flow on a ``cage'' of grid points near the particle surface. Advantages of the method include superior accuracy of the scheme on a relatively coarse grid for intermediate Reynolds numbers, ease of implementation, and elimination of the need to track the particle surface. A disadvantage is that fine grids are required for Reynolds numbers greater than 200. Several examples are presented, including flow over a stationary cylinder, dropping, kissing, and tumbling of two particles, and a dense particulate sedimentation problem.

  14. Laminar and turbulent flow solutions with radiation and ablation injection for Jovian entry. [radiative heating rates for the Galileo probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent flow-field solutions with coupled carbon-phenolic mass injection are presented for the forebody of a probe entering a nominal Jupiter atmosphere. Solutions are obtained for a 35-degree hyperboloid and for a 45-degree spherically blunted cone using a time-dependent, finite-difference method. The radiative heating rates for the coupled laminar flow are significantly reduced as compared to the corresponding no-blowing case; however, for the coupled turbulent flow, it is found that the surface radiative heating rates are substantially increased and often exceed the corresponding no-blowing values. Turbulence is found to have no effect on the surface radiative heating rates for the no-blowing solutions. The present results are compared with the other available solutions, and some additional solutions are presented.

  15. Supersonic flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical solution for chemically reacting supersonic gas-particle flows in rocket nozzles and exhaust plumes was described. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled in that the effects of particle drag and heat transfer between the gas and particle phases are treated. Gas and particles exchange momentum via the drag exerted on the gas by the particles. Energy is exchanged between the phases via heat transfer (convection and/or radiation). Thermochemistry calculations (chemical equilibrium, frozen or chemical kinetics) were shown to be uncoupled from the flow solution and, as such, can be solved separately. The solution to the set of governing equations is obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form are shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The particle distribution is represented in the numerical solution by a finite distribution of particle sizes.

  16. Symmetry-plane model of 3D Euler flows: Mapping to regular systems and numerical solutions of blowup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulungye, Rachel M.; Lucas, Dan; Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a family of 2D models describing the dynamics on the so-called symmetry plane of the full 3D Euler fluid equations. These models depend on a free real parameter and can be solved analytically. For selected representative values of the free parameter, we apply the method introduced in [M.D. Bustamante, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenom. 240, 1092 (2011)] to map the fluid equations bijectively to globally regular systems. By comparing the analytical solutions with the results of numerical simulations, we establish that the numerical simulations of the mapped regular systems are far more accurate than the numerical simulations of the original systems, at the same spatial resolution and CPU time. In particular, the numerical integrations of the mapped regular systems produce robust estimates for the growth exponent and singularity time of the main blowup quantity (vorticity stretching rate), converging well to the analytically-predicted values even beyond the time at which the flow becomes under-resolved (i.e. the reliability time). In contrast, direct numerical integrations of the original systems develop unstable oscillations near the reliability time. We discuss the reasons for this improvement in accuracy, and explain how to extend the analysis to the full 3D case. Supported under the programme for Research in Third Level Institutions (PRTLI) Cycle 5 and co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund.

  17. On a solution of the nonlinear differential equation for transonic flow past a wave-shaped wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Carl

    1952-01-01

    The Prandtl-Busemann small-perturbation method is utilized to obtain the flow of a compressible fluid past an infinitely long wave-shaped wall. When the essential assumption for transonic flow (that all Mach numbers in the region of flow are nearly unity) is introduced, the expression for the velocity potential takes the form of a power series in the transonic similarity parameter. On the basis of this form of the solution, an attempt is made to solve the nonlinear differential equation for transonic flow past the wavy wall. The analysis utilized exhibits clearly the difficulties inherent in nonlinear-flow problems.

  18. More accurate determination of the quantity of ice crystallized at low cooling rates in the glycerol and 1,2-propanediol aqueous solutions: comparison with equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Boutron, P

    1984-04-01

    It is generally assumed that when cells are cooled at rates close to those corresponding to the maximum of survival, once supercooling has ceased, above the eutectic melting temperature the extracellular ice is in equilibrium with the residual solution. This did not seem evident to us due to the difficulty of ice crystallization in cryoprotective solutions. The maximum quantities of ice crystallized in glycerol and 1,2-propanediol solutions have been calculated from the area of the solidification and fusion peaks obtained with a Perkin-Elmer DSC-2 differential scanning calorimeter. The accuracy has been improved by several corrections: better defined baseline, thermal variation of the heat of fusion of the ice, heat of solution of the water from its melting with the residual solution. More ice crystallizes in the glycerol than in the 1,2-propanediol solutions, of which the amorphous residue contains about 40 to 55% 1,2-propanediol. The equilibrium values are unknown in the presence of 1,2-propanediol. With glycerol, in our experiments, the maximum is first lower than the equilibrium but approaches it as the concentration increases. It is not completely determined by the colligative properties of the solutes.

  19. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  20. Flow injection combined with ICP-MS for accurate high throughput analysis of elemental impurities in pharmaceutical products according to USP <232>/<233>.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lisa; Zipfel, Barbara; Koellensperger, Gunda; Kovac, Jessica; Bilz, Susanne; Kunkel, Andrea; Venzago, Cornel; Hann, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    New guidelines of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), European Pharmacopeia (EP) and international organization (ICH, International Conference on Harmonization) regulating elemental impurity limits in pharmaceuticals seal the end of unspecific analysis of metal(oid)s as outlined in USP <231> and EP 2.4.8. Chapter USP <232> and EP 5.20 as well as drafts from ICH Q3D specify both daily doses and concentration limits of metallic impurities in pharmaceutical final products and in active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and excipients. In chapters USP <233> and EP 2.4.20 method implementation, validation and quality control during the analytical process are described. By contrast with the--by now--applied methods, substance specific quantitative analysis features new basic requirements, further, significantly lower detection limits ask for the necessity of a general changeover of the methodology toward sensitive multi element analysis by ICP-AES and ICP-MS, respectively. A novel methodological approach based on flow injection analysis and ICP-SFMS/ICP-QMS for the quick and accurate analysis of Cd, Pb, As, Hg, Ir, Os, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Cr, Mo, Ni, V, Cu, Mn, Fe and Zn in drug products by prior dilution, dissolution or microwave assisted closed vessel digestion according to the regulations is presented. In comparison to the acquisition of continuous signals, this method is advantageous with respect to the unprecedented high sample throughput due to a total analysis time of approximately 30s and the low sample consumption of below 50 μL, while meeting the strict USP demands on detection/quantification limits, precision and accuracy.

  1. Solutions to Kuessner's integral equation in unsteady flow using local basis functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromme, J. A.; Halstead, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    The computational procedure and numerical results are presented for a new method to solve Kuessner's integral equation in the case of subsonic compressible flow about harmonically oscillating planar surfaces with controls. Kuessner's equation is a linear transformation from pressure to normalwash. The unknown pressure is expanded in terms of prescribed basis functions and the unknown basis function coefficients are determined in the usual manner by satisfying the given normalwash distribution either collocationally or in the complex least squares sense. The present method of solution differs from previous ones in that the basis functions are defined in a continuous fashion over a relatively small portion of the aerodynamic surface and are zero elsewhere. This method, termed the local basis function method, combines the smoothness and accuracy of distribution methods with the simplicity and versatility of panel methods. Predictions by the local basis function method for unsteady flow are shown to be in excellent agreement with other methods. Also, potential improvements to the present method and extensions to more general classes of solutions are discussed.

  2. Investigation of capillary free-flow electrophoresis for separation of Co, Cr, and As species in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterer, M.E.; Kozerski, G.E.; Ritacco, R.; Painuly, P.

    1997-01-01

    Application of a prototype capillary free-flow electrophoresis (CFFE) device for separation of different solution species of Co, Cr, and As is explored. A unique free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) design is employed, which makes use of internal capillary cooling tubes to minimize thermal convection due to Joule heating.

  3. Temporal evolution of pore geometry, fluid flow, and solute transport resulting from colloid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cheng; Lau, Boris L.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Packman, A.I.

    2010-01-22

    Deposition of colloidal particles is one of many processes that lead to the evolution of the structure of natural porous media in groundwater aquifers, oil reservoirs, and sediment beds. Understanding of the mechanisms and effects of this type of structural evolution has been limited by a lack of direct observations of pore structure. Here, synchrotron X-ray difference microtomography (XDMT) was used to resolve the temporal evolution of pore structure and the distribution of colloidal deposits within a granular porous medium. Column filtration experiments were performed to observe the deposition of relatively high concentrations of colloidal zirconia (200 mg/l of particles having diameter {approx}1 {micro}m) in a packed bed of glass beads (diameters 210-300 {micro}m). Noninvasive XDMT imaging of the pore structure was performed three separate times during each column experiment. The structural information observed at each time was used to define internal boundary conditions for three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations that show how the evolving pore structure affects pore fluid flow and solute transport. While the total deposit mass increased continuously over time, colloid deposition was observed to be highly heterogeneous and local colloid detachment was observed at some locations in a low ionic strength medium. LB simulations indicated that particle accumulation greatly reduced the permeability of the porous medium while increasing the tortuosity. The colloidal deposits also increased the spatial variability in pore water velocities, leading to higher dispersion coefficients. Anomalous dispersion behavior was investigated by simulation at the scale of the experimental system: weak tailing was found in the clean bed case, and the extent of tailing greatly increased following colloid deposition because of the development of extensive no-flow regions. As a result of this coupling between pore fluid flow, colloid accumulation, and the pore geometry

  4. The stability of unbounded two- and three-dimensional flows subject to body forces - Some exact solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craik, A. D. D.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of those flows influenced by body forces that admit exact solutions similar to those identified by Craik and Criminale (1986) when body forces are absent. Bayly's (1986) inviscid Floquet stability analysis of elliptical flows is extended to incorporate a Coriolis force. With the exception of a narrow band of rotation speeds, it is found that elliptical-vortex flows are inviscidly unstable to three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances.

  5. Navier-Stokes and Euler solutions for lee-side flows over supersonic delta wings. A correlation with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, S. Naomi; Thomas, James L.; Murman, Earll M.

    1990-01-01

    An Euler flow solver and a thin layer Navier-Stokes flow solver were used to numerically simulate the supersonic leeside flow fields over delta wings which were observed experimentally. Three delta wings with 75, 67.5, and 60 deg leading edge sweeps were computed over an angle-of-attack range of 4 to 20 deg at a Mach number 2.8. The Euler code and Navier-Stokes code predict equally well the primary flow structure where the flow is expected to be separated or attached at the leading edge based on the Stanbrook-Squire boundary. The Navier-Stokes code is capable of predicting both the primary and the secondary flow features for the parameter range investigated. For those flow conditions where the Euler code did not predict the correct type of primary flow structure, the Navier-Stokes code illustrated that the flow structure is sensitive to boundary layer model. In general, the laminar Navier-Stokes solutions agreed better with the experimental data, especially for the lower sweep delta wings. The computational results and a detailed re-examination of the experimental data resulted in a refinement of the flow classifications. This refinement in the flow classification results in the separation bubble with the shock flow type as the intermediate flow pattern between separated and attached flows.

  6. Coupled thermohaline groundwater flow and single-species reactive solute transport in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Thomas; Therrien, René

    2007-04-01

    SummaryA 3D numerical model has been developed to solve coupled fluid flow, heat and single-species reactive mass transport with variable fluid density and viscosity. We focus on a single reaction between quartz and its aqueous form silica. The fluid density and viscosity and the dissolution rate constant, equilibrium constant and activity coefficient are calculated as a function of the concentrations of major ions and temperature. Reaction and flow parameters, such as mineral surface area and permeability, are updated at the end of each time step with explicitly calculated reaction rates. Adaptive time stepping is used to increase or decrease the time step size according to the rate of temporal variation of the solution to prevent physically unrealistic results. The time step size depends on maximum changes in matrix porosity and/or fracture aperture. The model is verified against existing analytical solutions of heat transfer and reactive transport in fractured porous media. The complexity of the model formulation allows studying chemical reactions and variable-density flow in a more realistic way than done previously. The newly developed model has been used to simulate illustrative examples of coupled thermohaline flow and reactive transport in fractured porous media. Simulations indicate that thermohaline (double-diffusive) transport impacts both buoyancy-driven flow and chemical reactions. Hot zones correspond to upwelling and to quartz dissolution while in cooler zones, the plume sinks and silica precipitates. The silica concentration is inversely proportional to salinity in high-salinity regions and proportional to temperature in low-salinity regions. Density contrasts are generally small and fractures do not act like preferential pathways but contribute to transverse dispersion of the plume. Results of a long-term (100 years) simulation indicate that the coexistence of dissolution and precipitation leads to self-sealing of fractures. Salt mass fluxes

  7. Microstructure and Rheology of a Flow-Induced Structured Phase in Wormlike Micellar Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardiel Rivera, Joshua J.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Dubash, Neville; Zhao, Ya; Cheung, Perry; Shen, Amy

    2013-04-30

    Surfactant molecules found in soaps and detergents can self-assemble into a great variety of morphologies (e.g., spherical micelles, cylindrical micelles, and lamellar phases). The resulting morphology is highly affected by ionic strength, temperature, and flow conditions. In particular, cylindrical micelles in the presence of inorganic or organic salts can self-assemble into large flexible and elongated wormlike micelles. In equilibrium, the wormlike micelles transition from slightly entangled to branched and, finally, to multi-connected structures with increasing salt concentration. In our work, by introducing external flow conditions via microfluidics, these micellar structures can follow very different trajectories on the phase map and new nanoporous structures can be created. This flow induced approach offers great potential to create novel materials and nanoporous scaffolds from wormlike micelles under ambient temperature and pressure, without any chemical and thermal means (1). As a result, this work provides attractive solutions for synthesizing new biocompatible materials under ambient conditions with biosensing, encapsulation, catalysis, photonics, and self-healing applications.

  8. Numerical steady flow solutions of the lower leg venous circulation: effects of external compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullana, J.-M.; Flaud, P.

    2007-06-01

    We present a numerical model used to compute steady flow solutions of the venous circulation of the leg. The network topology is based on clinical data and the flow is assumed to be steady, incompressible, and one-dimensional. We develop a non Newtonian approach to a one-dimensional flow because the blood viscosity depends on the velocity profile, and we demonstrate theoretically the pertinence of a phenomenological law of equivalent viscosity. Clinical experiments observe hemodynamical variables (i.e. venous pressure, venous area, blood velocity) only at the accessible places. In contrast the numerical model results are not limited to particular locations but can be evaluated on every point of the network. It provides important help to the definition of a clinical protocol. The model was designed to quantify a compression level of elastic compression stockings and to plan clinical studies. We validate the numerical approach using a published clinical trial, where the diameter of superficial and deep veins were measured at different compression pressures. We show also that the viscosity variations in a bed-rest position as a consequence of the application of a European Class II compression stockings. These variations could prevent the hyper-coagulability and the stasis of the blood.

  9. Analysis of an anisotropic coastal aquifer system using variable-density flow and solute transport simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Souza, W.R.; Voss, C.I.

    1987-01-01

    The groundwater system in southern Oahu, Hawaii consists of a thick, areally extensive freshwater lens overlying a zone of transition to a thick saltwater body. This system is analyzed in cross section with a variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport model on a regional scale. The simulation is difficult, because the coastal aquifer system has a saltwater transition zone that is broadly dispersed near the discharge area, but is very sharply defined inland. Steady-state simulation analysis of the transition zone in the layered basalt aquifer of southern Oahu indicates that a small transverse dispersivity is characteristic of horizontal regional flow. Further, in this system flow is generally parallel to isochlors and steady-state behavior is insensitive to the longitudinal dispersivity. Parameter analysis identifies that only six parameters control the complex hydraulics of the system: horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity of the basalt aquifer; hydraulic conductivity of the confining "caprock" layer; leakance below the caprock; specific yield; and aquifer matrix compressibility. The best-fitting models indicate the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is significantly greater than the vertical hydraulic conductivity. These models give values for specific yield and aquifer compressibility which imply a considerable degree of compressive storage in the water table aquifer. ?? 1987.

  10. Viscous shock-layer solutions for the low-density hypersonic flow past long slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Moss, J. N.; Zoby, E. V.; Tiwari, S. N.; Lee, K. P.

    1988-01-01

    Results are obtained for the surface pressure, drag, heat-transfer, and skin-friction coefficients for hyperboloids and sphere cones. Body half angles from 5 to 22.5 degrees are considered for various low-density flow conditions. Recently obtained surface-slip and shock-slip equations are employed to account for the low-density effects. The method of solution employed for the viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations is a partially coupled spatial-marching implicit finite-difference technique. The flow cases analyzed include highly cooled long slender bodies in high Mach number flows. The present perfect-gas VSL calculations compare quite well with available experimental data. Results have also been obtained from the steady-state Navier-Stokes (NS) equations by successive approximations. Comparison between the NS and VSL results indicates that VSL equations even with body and shock-slip boundary conditions may not be adequate in the stagnation region at altitudes greater than about 75 km for the cases analyzed here.

  11. Optimization of buffer solutions to analyze inflammatory cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid by multiplex flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Ríos-Lugo, María-Judith; Martin, Conchita; Alarcón, José-Antonio; Esquifino, Ana; Solano, Patricia; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Objective: the aim of this study was to test two buffer solutions in order to attain a reliable and reproducible analysis of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, OPG, OPN and OC), in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) by flow cytometry. Material and Methods: GCF samples from healthy volunteers were collected with perio-paper strips and diluted either in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or Tris-HCl buffer, with and without protease inhibitors (PI). Cytokine immunoassays were carried out by flow cytometry (Luminex Xmap 200) generating standard curves. Results: standards curves generated with the use of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) demonstrated best adjustment for cytokines IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF- α levels, when using Tris-HCl (p<0.05). Conclusions: The use of PBS buffer with the addition of PI provided reliable measurements of inflammatory biomarkers in GCF samples of healthy volunteers. Key words:Curve fitting, flow cytometer, immunoassay buffer, crevicular fluid, cytokines. PMID:24880451

  12. RBC aggregation in dextran solutions can be measured by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian; Kaewprayoon, Waraporn; Zhou, Hong; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans

    2017-01-01

    The impact of macromolecules on RBC aggregation continues to be of interest, nevertheless present measurements still have limitations and need improvement. We applied flow cytometry to measure RBC aggregation in dextran T500 (Dx500) solution. The samples were fixed in the aggregated state by glutaraldehyde. Fixed RBC exhibit auto fluorescence, which can be detected by flow cytometry. Single cells, doublets, triplets and larger aggregates can be distinguished quantitatively and quickly due to the correlation between auto fluorescence intensity and number of RBC per measured event. With the increase in concentration of Dx500, percentages of all aggregates and bigger aggregates increased significantly at concentration of 2%, 4% and 6%, while decreased when the concentration reached 8% and 10%. The percentage of bigger aggregates in concentration of 4% was higher than that in 2% and 6%. The data of flow cytometry was confirmed by microscopic observation and are in good agreement with the literature. The method provide additional advantages to the conventional measurement of RBC aggregation. It gets the distribution of single cells and aggregates as derived from the microscopic observation with hematocrit of physiological level. It uses sample volume as 1/5∼1/10 as needed in sendimentation and photometricmethods.

  13. The inhibition of the spongy electrocrystallization of zinc from doped flowing alkaline zincate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yue-hua; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Li; Yan, Xu; Yang, Yu-sheng

    The effects of the presence of additives like lead and tungstate ions in flowing alkaline zincate solutions on suppressing spongy zinc electrogrowth are examined. The results show that the two additives with optimal concentrations in flowing electrolytes can suppress spongy zinc initiation and propagation. And, the two additives can bring about more uniform and compact deposits and, thereby, reduce spongy zinc growth. The influence of lead and tungstate ions on the zinc deposition/dissolution is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. It also shows that the addition of the two additives is largely a blocking action, and the co-deposition of lead and zinc ions may occur. The performance of the zinc-air flow battery with zinc regeneration electrolysis is determined. It shows that by the addition of 0.6 M Na 2WO 4 or 10 -4 M to 10 -3 M lead, compact or mixed compact-spongy zinc deposits are created and the favorable charge/discharge performance of the battery is achieved with an energy efficiency of approximately 60%.

  14. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  15. Study on Durability and Stability of an Aqueous Electrolyte Solution for Zinc Bromide Hybrid Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-bromine flow battery using aqueous electrolyte has advantages of cost effective and high energy density, but there still remains a problem improving stability and durability of electrolyte materials during long-time cell operation. This paper focuses on providing a homogeneous aqueous solution for durability and stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. For performance experiments of conventional and proposed electrolyte solutions, detailed cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements (at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 in the range of -1.5 V~1.5 V) are carried out for 40 cycles and five kinds of electrolytes containing which has one of additives, such as (conventionally) zinc chloride, potassium chloride, (newly) lithium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate and zeolite-Y are compared with the 2.0 M ZnBr2 electrolyte, respectively. Experimental results show that using the proposed three additives provides higher anodic and cathodic peak current density of electrolytes than using other two conventional additives, and can lead to improved chemical reversibility of zinc bromide electrolyte. Especially, the solution of which the zeolite-Y added, shows enhanced electrochemical stability of zinc bromide electrolyte. Consequently, proposed electrolytes have a significant advantage in comparison with conventional electrolytes on higher stability and durability.

  16. On a difficulty in eigenfunction expansion solutions for the start-up of fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.

    2015-11-01

    Most mathematics and engineering textbooks describe the process of ``subtracting off'' the steady state of a linear parabolic partial differential equation as a technique for obtaining a boundary-value problem with homogeneous boundary conditions that can be solved by separation of variables (i.e., eigenfunction expansions). While this method produces the correct solution for the start-up of the flow of, e.g., a Newtonian fluid between parallel plates, it can lead to erroneous solutions to the corresponding problem for a class of non-Newtonian fluids. We show that the reason for this is the non-rigorous enforcement of the start-up condition in the textbook approach, which leads to a violation of the principle of causality. Nevertheless, these boundary-value problems can be solved correctly using eigenfunction expansions, and we present the fo