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Sample records for accurate force production

  1. Motor equivalence during multi-finger accurate force production

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Daniela; Schöner, Gregor; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We explored stability of multi-finger cyclical accurate force production action by analysis of responses to small perturbations applied to one of the fingers and inter-cycle analysis of variance. Healthy subjects performed two versions of the cyclical task, with and without an explicit target. The “inverse piano” apparatus was used to lift/lower a finger by 1 cm over 0.5 s; the subjects were always instructed to perform the task as accurate as they could at all times. Deviations in the spaces of finger forces and modes (hypothetical commands to individual fingers) were quantified in directions that did not change total force (motor equivalent) and in directions that changed the total force (non-motor equivalent). Motor equivalent deviations started immediately with the perturbation and increased progressively with time. After a sequence of lifting-lowering perturbations leading to the initial conditions, motor equivalent deviations were dominating. These phenomena were less pronounced for analysis performed with respect to the total moment of force with respect to an axis parallel to the forearm/hand. Analysis of inter-cycle variance showed consistently higher variance in a subspace that did not change the total force as compared to the variance that affected total force. We interpret the results as reflections of task-specific stability of the redundant multi-finger system. Large motor equivalent deviations suggest that reactions of the neuromotor system to a perturbation involve large changes of neural commands that do not affect salient performance variables, even during actions with the purpose to correct those salient variables. Consistency of the analyses of motor equivalence and variance analysis provides additional support for the idea of task-specific stability ensured at a neural level. PMID:25344311

  2. Motor equivalence during multi-finger accurate force production.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Daniela; Schöner, Gregor; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2015-02-01

    We explored stability of multi-finger cyclical accurate force production action by analysis of responses to small perturbations applied to one of the fingers and inter-cycle analysis of variance. Healthy subjects performed two versions of the cyclical task, with and without an explicit target. The "inverse piano" apparatus was used to lift/lower a finger by 1 cm over 0.5 s; the subjects were always instructed to perform the task as accurate as they could at all times. Deviations in the spaces of finger forces and modes (hypothetical commands to individual fingers) were quantified in directions that did not change total force (motor equivalent) and in directions that changed the total force (non-motor equivalent). Motor equivalent deviations started immediately with the perturbation and increased progressively with time. After a sequence of lifting-lowering perturbations leading to the initial conditions, motor equivalent deviations were dominating. These phenomena were less pronounced for analysis performed with respect to the total moment of force with respect to an axis parallel to the forearm/hand. Analysis of inter-cycle variance showed consistently higher variance in a subspace that did not change the total force as compared to the variance that affected total force. We interpret the results as reflections of task-specific stability of the redundant multi-finger system. Large motor equivalent deviations suggest that reactions of the neuromotor system to a perturbation involve large changes in neural commands that do not affect salient performance variables, even during actions with the purpose to correct those salient variables. Consistency of the analyses of motor equivalence and variance analysis provides additional support for the idea of task-specific stability ensured at a neural level. PMID:25344311

  3. Equifinality and its violations in a redundant system: multifinger accurate force production

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Luke; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    We explored a hypothesis that transient perturbations applied to a redundant system result in equifinality in the space of task-related performance variables but not in the space of elemental variables. The subjects pressed with four fingers and produced an accurate constant total force level. The “inverse piano” device was used to lift and lower one of the fingers smoothly. The subjects were instructed “not to intervene voluntarily” with possible force changes. Analysis was performed in spaces of finger forces and finger modes (hypothetical neural commands to fingers) as elemental variables. Lifting a finger led to an increase in its force and a decrease in the forces of the other three fingers; the total force increased. Lowering the finger back led to a drop in the force of the perturbed finger. At the final state, the sum of the variances of finger forces/modes computed across repetitive trials was significantly higher than the variance of the total force/mode. Most variance of the individual finger force/mode changes between the preperturbation and postperturbation states was compatible with constant total force. We conclude that a transient perturbation applied to a redundant system leads to relatively small variance in the task-related performance variable (equifinality), whereas in the space of elemental variables much more variance occurs that does not lead to total force changes. We interpret the results within a general theoretical scheme that incorporates the ideas of hierarchically organized control, control with referent configurations, synergic control, and the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. PMID:23904497

  4. Equifinality and its violations in a redundant system: multifinger accurate force production.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Luke; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2013-10-01

    We explored a hypothesis that transient perturbations applied to a redundant system result in equifinality in the space of task-related performance variables but not in the space of elemental variables. The subjects pressed with four fingers and produced an accurate constant total force level. The "inverse piano" device was used to lift and lower one of the fingers smoothly. The subjects were instructed "not to intervene voluntarily" with possible force changes. Analysis was performed in spaces of finger forces and finger modes (hypothetical neural commands to fingers) as elemental variables. Lifting a finger led to an increase in its force and a decrease in the forces of the other three fingers; the total force increased. Lowering the finger back led to a drop in the force of the perturbed finger. At the final state, the sum of the variances of finger forces/modes computed across repetitive trials was significantly higher than the variance of the total force/mode. Most variance of the individual finger force/mode changes between the preperturbation and postperturbation states was compatible with constant total force. We conclude that a transient perturbation applied to a redundant system leads to relatively small variance in the task-related performance variable (equifinality), whereas in the space of elemental variables much more variance occurs that does not lead to total force changes. We interpret the results within a general theoretical scheme that incorporates the ideas of hierarchically organized control, control with referent configurations, synergic control, and the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. PMID:23904497

  5. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  6. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control.

  7. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control. PMID:27555365

  8. Practical Schemes for Accurate Forces in Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Moroni, S; Saccani, S; Filippi, C

    2014-11-11

    While the computation of interatomic forces has become a well-established practice within variational Monte Carlo (VMC), the use of the more accurate Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method is still largely limited to the computation of total energies on structures obtained at a lower level of theory. Algorithms to compute exact DMC forces have been proposed in the past, and one such scheme is also put forward in this work, but remain rather impractical due to their high computational cost. As a practical route to DMC forces, we therefore revisit here an approximate method, originally developed in the context of correlated sampling and named here the Variational Drift-Diffusion (VD) approach. We thoroughly investigate its accuracy by checking the consistency between the approximate VD force and the derivative of the DMC potential energy surface for the SiH and C2 molecules and employ a wide range of wave functions optimized in VMC to assess its robustness against the choice of trial function. We find that, for all but the poorest wave function, the discrepancy between force and energy is very small over all interatomic distances, affecting the equilibrium bond length obtained with the VD forces by less than 0.004 au. Furthermore, when the VMC forces are approximate due to the use of a partially optimized wave function, the DMC forces have smaller errors and always lead to an equilibrium distance in better agreement with the experimental value. We also show that the cost of computing the VD forces is only slightly larger than the cost of calculating the DMC energy. Therefore, the VD approximation represents a robust and efficient approach to compute accurate DMC forces, superior to the VMC counterparts.

  9. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  10. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  11. Attentional Focusing Instructions and Force Production

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Research progress assessing the role of attentional focusing instructions on skill acquisition and performance has lead researchers to apply this approach to force production tasks. Initial converging evidence indicates that force production tasks are sensitive to verbal instruction; externally focused instructions (onto movement outcomes, or onto the object force is being exerted against) are shown to be more beneficial than internally focused instructions (focusing attention onto the movements being executed). These benefits are observed for maximal and accurate force production, as well as the maintenance of force production in prolonged tasks. A range of mechanisms are identified supporting the proposal that an external focus promotes movement efficiency in line with energy and effort conservation. Future research is required to assess how this developing body of work interacts with the broader understanding of psychological and physiological factors implicated in the effective production, maintenance, and limitation of maximal or sub-maximal forces. PMID:21833266

  12. Variance Components in Discrete Force Production Tasks

    PubMed Central

    SKM, Varadhan; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The study addresses the relationships between task parameters and two components of variance, “good” and “bad”, during multi-finger accurate force production. The variance components are defined in the space of commands to the fingers (finger modes) and refer to variance that does (“bad”) and does not (“good”) affect total force. Based on an earlier study of cyclic force production, we hypothesized that speeding-up an accurate force production task would be accompanied by a drop in the regression coefficient linking the “bad” variance and force rate such that variance of the total force remains largely unaffected. We also explored changes in parameters of anticipatory synergy adjustments with speeding-up the task. The subjects produced accurate ramps of total force over different times and in different directions (force-up and force-down) while pressing with the four fingers of the right hand on individual force sensors. The two variance components were quantified, and their normalized difference was used as an index of a total force stabilizing synergy. “Good” variance scaled linearly with force magnitude and did not depend on force rate. “Bad” variance scaled linearly with force rate within each task, and the scaling coefficient did not change across tasks with different ramp times. As a result, a drop in force ramp time was associated with an increase in total force variance, unlike the results of the study of cyclic tasks. The synergy index dropped 100-200 ms prior to the first visible signs of force change. The timing and magnitude of these anticipatory synergy adjustments did not depend on the ramp time. Analysis of the data within an earlier model has shown adjustments in the variance of a timing parameter, although these adjustments were not as pronounced as in the earlier study of cyclic force production. Overall, we observed qualitative differences between the discrete and cyclic force production tasks: Speeding-up the cyclic

  13. Accurate force spectroscopy in tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Existing force spectroscopy methods in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as higher harmonic inversion [M. Stark, R. W. Stark, W. M. Heckl, and R. Guckenberger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8473 (2002)] or scanning probe acceleration microscopy [J. Legleiter, M. Park, B. Cusick, and T. Kowalewski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 4813 (2006)] or integral relations [M. Lee and W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 036104 (2006); S. Hu and A. Raman, Nanotechnology 19, 375704 (2008); H. Hölscher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 123109 (2006); A. J. Katan, Nanotechnology 20, 165703 (2009)] require and assume as an observable the tip dynamics in a single eigenmode of the oscillating microcantilever. We demonstrate that this assumption can distort significantly the extracted tip-sample interaction forces when applied to tapping mode AFM with soft cantilevers in liquid environments. This exception is due to the fact that under these conditions the second eigenmode is momentarily excited and the observed tip dynamics clearly contains contributions from the fundamental and second eigenmodes. To alleviate this problem, a simple experimental method is proposed to screen the second eigenmode contributions in the observed tip deflection signal to allow accurate tip-sample force reconstruction in liquids. The method is implemented experimentally to reconstruct interaction forces on polymer, bacteriorhodopsin membrane, and mica samples in buffer solutions.

  14. Developing accurate molecular mechanics force fields for conjugated molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-10-14

    A rapid method to parameterize the intramolecular component of classical force fields for complex conjugated molecules is proposed. The method is based on a procedure of force matching with a reference electronic structure calculation. It is particularly suitable for those applications where molecular dynamics simulations are used to generate structures that are therefore analysed by electronic structure methods, because it is possible to build force fields that are consistent with electronic structure calculations that follow classical simulations. Such applications are commonly encountered in organic electronics, spectroscopy of complex systems and photobiology (e.g. photosynthetic systems). We illustrate the method by parameterizing the force fields of a molecule used in molecular semiconductors (2,2-dicyanovinyl-capped S,N-heteropentacene or DCV-SN5), a polymeric semiconductor (thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole TT-DPP) and a chromophore embedded in a protein environment (15,16-dihydrobiliverdin or DBV) where several hundreds of parameters need to be optimized in parallel.

  15. An accurate ab initio quartic force field for ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The quartic force field of ammonia is computed using basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality and an augmented coupled cluster method. After correcting for Fermi resonance, the computed fundamentals and nu 4 overtones agree on average to better than 3/cm with the experimental ones except for nu 2. The discrepancy for nu 2 is principally due to higher-order anharmonicity effects. The computed omega 1, omega 3, and omega 4 confirm the recent experimental determination by Lehmann and Coy (1988) but are associated with smaller error bars. The discrepancy between the computed and experimental omega 2 is far outside the expected error range, which is also attributed to higher-order anharmonicity effects not accounted for in the experimental determination. Spectroscopic constants are predicted for a number of symmetric and asymmetric top isotopomers of NH3.

  16. Bilateral synergies in foot force production tasks.

    PubMed

    Sarabon, Nejc; Markovic, Goran; Mikulic, Pavle; Latash, Mark L

    2013-05-01

    We analysed the effects of task symmetry during bilateral accurate force production tasks performed by the two feet. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that bilateral deficit would lead to higher indices of synergies defined as co-varied adjustments in the two forces across trials that reduced total force variability. The subjects produced steady-state force followed by a quick force pulse into the target. The two feet could be acting both into plantar flexion and into dorsiflexion (symmetrical tasks), or in opposite directions (asymmetrical task). We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis to quantify two variance components, one of which did not change total force (V UCM), while the other did (V ORT). Synergy indices during the asymmetrical task were higher than in either symmetrical task. The difference was due to higher V UCM (compared to the symmetrical plantar flexion task) or lower V ORT (compared to the symmetrical dorsiflexion task). The synergy index showed a drop (anticipatory synergy adjustment, ASA) starting 100-150 ms prior to the force pulse initiation. The ASA tended to be shorter and of a smaller magnitude for the asymmetrical task. This is the first demonstration of bilateral synergies during accurate force production by the legs. We conclude that bilateral deficit has no or weak effects on two-leg synergies. The results fit the earlier introduced scheme with two groups of neural variables defining average performance of a redundant system and patterns of co-variation among its elemental variables, respectively. PMID:23568657

  17. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  18. Accurate noncontact calibration of colloidal probe sensitivities in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Shaw, Gordon A; Pratt, Jon R

    2009-06-01

    The absolute force sensitivities of colloidal probes comprised of atomic force microscope, or AFM, cantilevers with microspheres attached to their distal ends are measured. The force sensitivities are calibrated through reference to accurate electrostatic forces, the realizations of which are described in detail. Furthermore, the absolute accuracy of a common AFM force calibration scheme, known as the thermal noise method, is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the thermal noise method can be applied with great success to colloidal probe calibration in air and in liquid to yield force measurements with relative standard uncertainties below 5%. Techniques to combine the electrostatics-based determination of the AFM force sensitivity with measurements of the colloidal probe's thermal noise spectrum to compute noncontact estimates of the displacement sensitivity and spring constant are also developed.

  19. Accurate noncontact calibration of colloidal probe sensitivities in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Shaw, Gordon A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2009-06-15

    The absolute force sensitivities of colloidal probes comprised of atomic force microscope, or AFM, cantilevers with microspheres attached to their distal ends are measured. The force sensitivities are calibrated through reference to accurate electrostatic forces, the realizations of which are described in detail. Furthermore, the absolute accuracy of a common AFM force calibration scheme, known as the thermal noise method, is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the thermal noise method can be applied with great success to colloidal probe calibration in air and in liquid to yield force measurements with relative standard uncertainties below 5%. Techniques to combine the electrostatics-based determination of the AFM force sensitivity with measurements of the colloidal probe's thermal noise spectrum to compute noncontact estimates of the displacement sensitivity and spring constant are also developed.

  20. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  1. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  2. An Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for CH4 and Isotopomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    A very accurate ab initio quartic force field for CH4 and its isotopomers is presented. The quartic force field was determined with the singles and doubles coupled-cluster procedure that includes a quasiperturbative estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), using the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta, cc-pVTZ, basis set. Improved quadratic force constants were evaluated with the correlation consistent polarized valence quadruple zeta, cc-pVQZ, basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies are determined using second-order perturbation theory anharmonic analyses. All fundamentals of CH4 and isotopomers for which accurate experimental values exist and for which there is not a large Fermi resonance, are predicted to within +/- 6 cm(exp -1). It is thus concluded that our predictions for the harmonic frequencies and the anharmonic constants are the most accurate estimates available. It is also shown that using cubic and quartic force constants determined with the correlation consistent polarized double zeta, cc-pVDZ, basis set in conjunction with the cc-pVQZ quadratic force constants and equilibrium geometry leads to accurate predictions for the fundamental vibrational frequencies of methane, suggesting that this approach may be a viable alternative for larger molecules. Using CCSD(T), core correlation is found to reduce the CH4 r(e), by 0.0015 A. Our best estimate for r, is 1.0862 +/- 0.0005 A.

  3. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy.

  4. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Vlassak, J J

    2013-05-01

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious.

  5. Force production of a hovering hummingbird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Song, Jialei; Hedrick, Tyson

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional numerical study is performed for a hovering Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) based on an immersed-boundary method. To accurately model the unsteady aerodynamics, realistic 3D wing kinematics is reconstructed from high-speed images of the wing motion filmed at 1000 frames per second, resulting in 25 frames per flapping cycle. A high-resolution grid is employed to resolve the vortices shed from the wing. The results are validated by comparing the spanwise vorticity and circulation with the previous PIV data and also by calculating the average lift. The force production shows significant asymmetry with the downstroke producing lift 2.6 times as high as the upstroke, despite a nearly horizontal stroke plane. The total power consumption is around 55 W/kg, which is twice of previous estimate. In this presentation, we will discuss several mechanisms that lead to the force asymmetry, including the drag-based lift and the leading-edge vortex behavior. We will also address the role of wing-wake interaction, which appears to be different for the hummingbird than some of the insects such as fruit flies. Supported by NSF (No. CBET-0954381).

  6. HRD and Productivity: Allied Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    The author defines productivity and discusses ways to increase productivity in the workplace, with emphasis on human resource development (HRD). He discusses the use of quality circles, participative management, and layoffs to increase productivity. (CH)

  7. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  8. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  9. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kei; Labuda, Aleksander; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-12-01

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  10. An Accurate Quartic Force Field and Vibrational Frequencies for HNO and DNO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Lee, Timothy J.; Schwenke, David W.

    1994-01-01

    An accurate ab initio quartic force field for HNO has been determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), in conjunction with the correlation consistent polarized valence triple zeta (cc-pVTZ) basis set. Improved harmonic frequencies were determined with the cc-pVQZ basis set. Fundamental vibrational frequencies were determined using a second-order perturbation theory analysis and also using variational calculations. The N-0 stretch and bending fundamentals are determined well from both vibrational analyses. The H-N stretch, however, is shown to have an unusually large anharmonic correction, and is not well determined using second-order perturbation theory. The H-N fundamental is well determined from the variational calculations, demonstrating the quality of the ab initio quartic force field. The zero-point energy of HNO that should be used in isodesmic reactions is also discussed.

  11. Accurate formula for dissipative interaction in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei; Labuda, Aleksander

    2014-12-08

    Much interest has recently focused on the viscosity of nano-confined liquids. Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a powerful technique that can detect variations in the conservative and dissipative forces between a nanometer-scale tip and a sample surface. We now present an accurate formula to convert the dissipation power of the cantilever measured during the experiment to damping of the tip-sample system. We demonstrated the conversion of the dissipation power versus tip-sample separation curve measured using a colloidal probe cantilever on a mica surface in water to the damping curve, which showed a good agreement with the theoretical curve. Moreover, we obtained the damping curve from the dissipation power curve measured on the hydration layers on the mica surface using a nanometer-scale tip, demonstrating that the formula allows us to quantitatively measure the viscosity of a nano-confined liquid using FM-AFM.

  12. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  13. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goza, Andres; Liska, Sebastian; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is applied as a post-processing procedure, so that the convergence of the velocity field is unaffected. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by computing stresses and forces that converge to the physical stresses and forces for several test problems.

  14. High Fidelity Non-Gravitational Force Models for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination of TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, -Peter; Eineder, Michael; Gisinger, Christoph

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on sophisticated validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. Basically, the precise reconstruction of the satellite’s trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency receiver onboard the spacecraft. The Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for the gravitational and non-gravitational forces. Following a proper analysis of the orbit quality, systematics in the orbit products have been identified, which reflect deficits in the non-gravitational force models. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). Due to the dusk-dawn orbit configuration of TerraSAR-X, the satellite is almost constantly illuminated by the Sun. Therefore, the direct SRP has an effect on the lateral stability of the determined orbit. The indirect effect of the solar radiation principally contributes to the Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). The resulting force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface in the visible, and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed within the presentation. The presentation highlights the influence of non-gravitational force and satellite macro models on the orbit quality of TerraSAR-X.

  15. Perceived Submaximal Force Production in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen W.; Ludtke, Andrew W.; Martin, Scott B.; Koziris, L. (Perry); Dishman, Rod K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the force production patterns using perceived stimulus cues from 10% to 90% of maximal force. In Experiment 1, 54 men (age: 19-34 years) and 53 women (age: 18-37 years) performed leg extensions on a dynamometer at a speed of 60 degrees/s. Participants produced actual forces perceived to be 10-90% of…

  16. The variance needed to accurately describe jump height from vertical ground reaction force data.

    PubMed

    Richter, Chris; McGuinness, Kevin; O'Connor, Noel E; Moran, Kieran

    2014-12-01

    In functional principal component analysis (fPCA) a threshold is chosen to define the number of retained principal components, which corresponds to the amount of preserved information. A variety of thresholds have been used in previous studies and the chosen threshold is often not evaluated. The aim of this study is to identify the optimal threshold that preserves the information needed to describe a jump height accurately utilizing vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) curves. To find an optimal threshold, a neural network was used to predict jump height from vGRF curve measures generated using different fPCA thresholds. The findings indicate that a threshold from 99% to 99.9% (6-11 principal components) is optimal for describing jump height, as these thresholds generated significantly lower jump height prediction errors than other thresholds.

  17. Accurate ab initio quartic force fields for the ions HCO(+) and HOC(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCO(+) and HOC(+) have been computed using augmented coupled cluster methods and basis sets of spdf and spdfg quality. Calculations on HCN, CO, and N2 have been performed to assist in calibrating the computed results. Going from an spdf to an spdfg basis shortens triple bonds by about 0.004 A, and increases the corresponding harmonic frequency by 10-20/cm, leaving bond distances about 0.003 A too long and triple bond stretching frequencies about 5/cm too low. Accurate estimates for the bond distances, fundamental frequencies, and thermochemical quantities are given. HOC(+) lies 37.8 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol (0 K) above HCO(+); the classical barrier height for proton exchange is 76.7 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol.

  18. Accurate ab initio Quartic Force Fields of Cyclic and Bent HC2N Isomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inostroza, Natalia; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly correlated ab initio quartic force field (QFFs) are used to calculate the equilibrium structures and predict the spectroscopic parameters of three HC2N isomers. Specifically, the ground state quasilinear triplet and the lowest cyclic and bent singlet isomers are included in the present study. Extensive treatment of correlation effects were included using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T). Dunning s correlation-consistent basis sets cc-pVXZ, X=3,4,5, were used, and a three-point formula for extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was used. Core-correlation and scalar relativistic corrections were also included to yield highly accurate QFFs. The QFFs were used together with second-order perturbation theory (with proper treatment of Fermi resonances) and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schr dinger equation. The quasilinear nature of the triplet isomer is problematic, and it is concluded that a QFF is not adequate to describe properly all of the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants (though some constants not dependent on the bending motion are well reproduced by perturbation theory). On the other hand, this procedure (a QFF together with either perturbation theory or variational methods) leads to highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers of HC2N. All three isomers possess significant dipole moments, 3.05D, 3.06D, and 1.71D, for the quasilinear triplet, the cyclic singlet, and the bent singlet isomers, respectively. It is concluded that the spectroscopic constants determined for the cyclic and bent singlet isomers are the most accurate available, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the interpretation of high-resolution astronomical observations or laboratory experiments.

  19. Measuring laser power as a force: a new paradigm to accurately monitor optical power during laser-based machining operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Simonds, Brian; Sowards, Jeffrey; Hadler, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    In laser manufacturing operations, accurate measurement of laser power is important for product quality, operational repeatability, and process validation. Accurate real-time measurement of high-power lasers, however, is difficult. Typical thermal power meters must absorb all the laser power in order to measure it. This constrains power meters to be large, slow and exclusive (that is, the laser cannot be used for its intended purpose during the measurement). To address these limitations, we have developed a different paradigm in laser power measurement where the power is not measured according to its thermal equivalent but rather by measuring the laser beam's momentum (radiation pressure). Very simply, light reflecting from a mirror imparts a small force perpendicular to the mirror which is proportional to the optical power. By mounting a high-reflectivity mirror on a high-sensitivity force transducer (scale), we are able to measure laser power in the range of tens of watts up to ~ 100 kW. The critical parameters for such a device are mirror reflectivity, angle of incidence, and scale sensitivity and accuracy. We will describe our experimental characterization of a radiation-pressure-based optical power meter. We have tested it for modulated and CW laser powers up to 92 kW in the laboratory and up to 20 kW in an experimental laser welding booth. We will describe present accuracy, temporal response, sources of measurement uncertainty, and hurdles which must be overcome to have an accurate power meter capable of routine operation as a turning mirror within a laser delivery head.

  20. Accurate halo-model matter power spectra with dark energy, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, A. J.; Heymans, C.; Lombriser, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Steele, O. I.; Winther, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate non-linear matter power spectrum prediction scheme for a variety of extensions to the standard cosmological paradigm, which uses the tuned halo model previously developed in Mead et al. We consider dark energy models that are both minimally and non-minimally coupled, massive neutrinos and modified gravitational forces with chameleon and Vainshtein screening mechanisms. In all cases, we compare halo-model power spectra to measurements from high-resolution simulations. We show that the tuned halo-model method can predict the non-linear matter power spectrum measured from simulations of parametrized w(a) dark energy models at the few per cent level for k < 10 h Mpc-1, and we present theoretically motivated extensions to cover non-minimally coupled scalar fields, massive neutrinos and Vainshtein screened modified gravity models that result in few per cent accurate power spectra for k < 10 h Mpc-1. For chameleon screened models, we achieve only 10 per cent accuracy for the same range of scales. Finally, we use our halo model to investigate degeneracies between different extensions to the standard cosmological model, finding that the impact of baryonic feedback on the non-linear matter power spectrum can be considered independently of modified gravity or massive neutrino extensions. In contrast, considering the impact of modified gravity and massive neutrinos independently results in biased estimates of power at the level of 5 per cent at scales k > 0.5 h Mpc-1. An updated version of our publicly available HMCODE can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode.

  1. The mechanical forces in katydid sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Chiu, Cheng-Wei; Zhou, Yan; He, Xingliang; Epstein, Ben; Liang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Katydids and crickets generate their characteristic calling sound by rubbing their wings together. The mechanisms of the rubbing force, however, have not been extensively studied. The change of mechanical force with external parameters (speed and applied load) in the stridulation process has not been reported. Our current study aims to investigate the mechanical forces of katydid stridulation. Four pairs of files and plectrums from a katydid, which are responsible for the katydid's sound production, were examined with a specially designed experimental configuration. Due to the asymmetric nature of the wing motion in their opening and closing, the contact between the plectrum and file resembles that of a ratchet. Multiple frequencies were generated during experimental wing rubbing so that a calling-like sound was produced. Results showed that the morphology of the plectrum/file contact has significant effects on mechanical forces induced on the wings and resulting sound production. The roles of the mechanical forces include sound generation, tone modification, and energy consumption. The findings in this work reveal the variation trend of mechanical force with sliding speed and applied load. The frequency and amplitude of the sound wave produced in tribo-test are close to those in natural condition. By mimicking the microstructure of the plectrum and file teeth, acoustic instruments with high mechanical energy conversion rate can be developed. Our results provide new approaches in the design and improvement of micro-machines for acoustic applications, as well as in hybrid robotic systems.

  2. 'Psyching-up' and muscular force production.

    PubMed

    Tod, David; Iredale, Fiona; Gill, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Psyching-up refers to self-directed cognitive strategies used immediately prior to or during skill execution that are designed to enhance performance. This review focuses on research that has investigated the effect of psyching-up on force production; specifically, strength, muscular endurance and power. Although firm conclusions are not possible, the research tentatively suggests that psyching-up may enhance performance during dynamic tasks requiring strength and/or muscular endurance. However, more research is required. Power has received scant empirical attention and there are not enough data to support any conclusions. Preparatory arousal appears to be the most effective strategy although other strategies like imagery, self-talk and attentional focus also have empirical support. The range of tasks that have been used to measure force production have been limited to movements such as handgrip, leg extension, bench press, sit-ups, press-ups, pull-ups, and the standing broad jump. Additionally, most studies have used undergraduate and/or untrained samples. Only a very small number of studies have examined well-trained individuals. Currently, no explanation for why psyching-up may influence force production has any substantive support. Although a small number of studies have examined moderating and mediating variables, few consistent patterns have emerged and knowledge in this area is somewhat restricted. Given the importance that many athletes place on their mental preparation just prior to performance this is an area that warrants further examination. Research needs to examine a range of complex sport-specific tasks and use well-trained samples. Additionally, research needs to further examine why psyching-up may enhance force production. PMID:12477377

  3. Accurate Quartic Force Fields and Vibrational Frequencies for HCN and HNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Gazdy, Bela; Bowman, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCN and HNC are determined using atomic natural orbital one-particle basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality in conjunction with the CCSD(T) electron correlation method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbation estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). The HCN force field is in good agreement with a recent experimentally derived force field and also with the force field recently computed by Wong and Bacskay. On the basis of the good agreement obtained for HCN, it is argued that the ab initio quartic force field for HNC is superior to a prior force field derived from experiment. The harmonic frequencies of HNC are predicted to be 3822 +/- 10, 472 +/- 5, and 2051 +/- 10 cm(exp -1) for omega(sub 1), omega(sub 2), and omega(sub 3), respectively; the experimentally derived values are above these values and fall outside the estimated uncertainties. Using the quartic force field, spectroscopic constants are predicted for HNC based on a vibrational second-order perturbation theory analysis. It is also asserted that the gas-phase fundamental nu(sub 3) for HNC is slightly lower than the matrix isolation value. The range of validity of the quartic force fields is investigated by comparison of variational vibrational energies computed with the quartic force fields to those obtained from our recently reported global HCN/HNC potential energy surface and also to experimental data.

  4. Accurate Quartic Force Fields and Vibrational Frequencies for HCN and HNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Gazdy, Bela; Bowman, Joel M.

    1993-01-01

    The quartic force fields of HCN and HNC are determined using atomic natural orbital one-particle basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality in conjunction with the CCSD(T) electron correlation method (singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory plus a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations). The HCN force field is in good agreement with a recent experimentally derived force field and also with the force field recently computed by Wong and Bacskay. On the basis of the good agreement obtained for HCN, it is argued that the ab initio quartic force field for HNC is superior to a prior force field derived from experiment. The harmonic frequencies of HNC are predicted to be 3822 +/- 10,472 +/- 5, and 2051 +/-10/cm for omega1, omega2, and omega3, respectively; the experimentally derived values are above these values and fall outside the estimated uncertainties. Using the quartic force field, spectroscopic constants are predicted for HNC based on a vibrational second-order perturbation theory analysis. It is also asserted that the gas-phase fundamental v(sub 3) for HNC is slightly lower than the matrix isolation value. The range of validity of the quartic force fields is investigated by comparison of variational vibrational energies computed with the quartic force fields to those obtained from our recently reported global HCN/HNC potential energy surface and also to experimental data.

  5. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Grutzik, Scott J; Gates, Richard S; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Smith, Douglas T; Cook, Robert F; Zehnder, Alan T

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  6. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  7. Accurate predictions for the production of vaporized water

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, E.; Montel, F.

    1995-12-31

    The production of water vaporized in the gas phase is controlled by the local conditions around the wellbore. The pressure gradient applied to the formation creates a sharp increase of the molar water content in the hydrocarbon phase approaching the well; this leads to a drop in the pore water saturation around the wellbore. The extent of the dehydrated zone which is formed is the key controlling the bottom-hole content of vaporized water. The maximum water content in the hydrocarbon phase at a given pressure, temperature and salinity is corrected by capillarity or adsorption phenomena depending on the actual water saturation. Describing the mass transfer of the water between the hydrocarbon phases and the aqueous phase into the tubing gives a clear idea of vaporization effects on the formation of scales. Field example are presented for gas fields with temperatures ranging between 140{degrees}C and 180{degrees}C, where water vaporization effects are significant. Conditions for salt plugging in the tubing are predicted.

  8. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  9. Are Current Atomistic Force Fields Accurate Enough to Study Proteins in Crowded Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  10. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2014-05-01

    The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded) and oxidatively damaged (unfolded) forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP) as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL), and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields may distort the

  11. Accurate ab initio quartic force fields for borane and BeH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    The quartic force fields of BH3 and BeH2 have been computed ab initio using an augmented coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) method and basis sets of spdf and spdfg quality. For BH3, the computed spectroscopic constants are in very good agreement with recent experimental data, and definitively confirm misassignments in some older work, in agreement with recent ab initio studies. Using the computed spectroscopic constants, the rovibrational partition function for both molecules has been constructed using a modified direct numerical summation algorithm, and JANAF-style thermochemical tables are presented.

  12. Accurate predictions of dielectrophoretic force and torque on particles with strong mutual field, particle, and wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2012-11-01

    The basis of dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the prediction of the force and torque on particles. The classical approach to the prediction is based on the effective moment method, which, however, is an approximate approach, assumes infinitesimal particles. Therefore, it is well-known that for finite-sized particles, the DEP approximation is inaccurate as the mutual field, particle, wall interactions become strong, a situation presently attracting extensive research for practical significant applications. In the present talk, we provide accurate calculations of the force and torque on the particles from first principles, by directly resolving the local geometry and properties and accurately accounting for the mutual interactions for finite-sized particles with both dielectric polarization and conduction in a sinusoidally steady-state electric field. Since the approach has a significant advantage, compared to other numerical methods, to efficiently simulate many closely packed particles, it provides an important, unique, and accurate technique to investigate complex DEP phenomena, for example heterogeneous mixtures containing particle chains, nanoparticle assembly, biological cells, non-spherical effects, etc. This study was supported by the Department of Energy under funding for an EFRC (the HeteroFoaM Center), grant no. DE-SC0001061.

  13. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Montmorillonite Using an Accurate and Flexible Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V N; Cygan, R T; Myshakin, E M

    2012-06-21

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, CO2. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating CO2 in the interlayer of layered clays, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 and H2O in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation. An accurate and fully flexible set of interatomic potentials for CO2 is developed and combined with Clayff potentials to help evaluate the intercalation mechanism and examine the effect of molecular flexibility onthe diffusion rate of CO2 in water.

  14. Accurate AB Initio Calculation of Anharmonic Force Fields and Spectroscopic Constants of Small Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jan M. L.

    The quartic force fields of a number of small polyatomic molecules (specifically, rm H _2O, NH_2, NH_3, CH_4, BH_3, BeH_2, H_2CO, N_2O, CO_2, CS_2, OCS, H_2S, FNO, ClNO, and H_2CS) have been computed ab initio using large basis sets and augmented coupled cluster methods. It has been established throughout that harmonic and fundamental frequencies can consistently be reproduced to within about 10 cm^{ -1} of experimental using spdf basis sets, except in such inherently problematic cases as the umbrella motion in NH_3; such problems are solved by recomputing the harmonic frequencies with an spdf g basis set. Coupled cluster frequencies using small basis sets of spd quality agree surprisingly well with experiment (mean absolute error of 26 cm^ {-1}), but bond distances are generally seriously overestimated. Using spdf basis sets, they are consistently overestimated by 0.002 and 0.006-7 A for single and multiple bonds, respectively; for spdf g basis sets this drops to 0.001 and 0.003-4 A, respectively. Geometries and harmonic frequencies for highly polar fluorine compounds such as HF and FNO are qualitatively wrong unless special anion functions are added to the fluorine basis set. Anharmonicity, rovibrational coupling, and centrifugal distortion constants are consistently predicted well; the anharmonic portions of the computed force fields are probably more reliable than their experimental counterparts in many cases. Remaining errors in the computed geometries and harmonic frequencies are shown to be almost entirely due to a combination of core correlation and residual deficiencies in the electron correlation treatment. A 3-term correction for remaining basis set incompleteness to computed total atomization energies is proposed by the author, and is shown to result in mean absolute errors of as little as 0.5 kcal/mol for spdf g basis sets. Example applications on rm HCO^+, HOC^+, B_2C, BCN, and BNC testify to the predictive power of the methods used in this work.

  15. Force production in the rugby union scrum.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, K L; Wilson, B D

    2000-04-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between anthropometric, strength and power characteristics of rugby forwards, their body position when scrummaging, and their ability to apply force when scrummaging. Force applied to an instrumented scrum machine was measured for 56 players, both individually and as scrum packs. Measurements of body position for individuals were made by digitizing videotape records of the trials. Forty players subsequently had their anthropometry assessed and completed several strength and power tests. Body mass, each component of somatotype, maximal anaerobic power developed on a cycle ergometer, and isokinetic knee extension strength correlated significantly with individual scrummaging force. A regression model (P < 0.001) including body mass, mesomorphy, maximal anaerobic power and hip angle while in the scrummaging position accounted for 45% of the variance in individual scrummaging force. The packs that produced the largest scrummaging forces were, in general, characterized by a greater pack force to sum of individual force ratio than the packs producing lower forces. Our results emphasize the need for a scrum pack to develop technique and coordination as a unit to maximize scrummaging force. PMID:10824640

  16. Force feedback coupling with dynamics for physical simulation of product assembly and operation performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Tan, Jianrong; Duan, Guifang; Fu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Most existing force feedback methods are still difficult to meet the requirements of real-time force calculation in virtual assembly and operation with complex objects. In addition, there is often an assumption that the controlled objects are completely free and the target object is only completely fixed or free, thus, the dynamics of the kinematic chain where the controlled objects are located are neglected during the physical simulation of the product manipulation with force feedback interaction. This paper proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation based on statistically learned contact force prediction model and the coupling of force feedback and dynamics. In the proposed method, based on hidden Markov model (HMM) and local weighting learning (LWL), contact force prediction model is constructed, which can estimate the contact force in real time during interaction. Based on computational load balance model, the computing resources are dynamically assigned and the dynamics integral step is optimized. In addition, smoothing process is performed to the force feedback on the synchronization points. Consequently, we can solve the coupling and synchronization problems of high-frequency feedback force servo, low-frequency dynamics solver servo and scene rendering servo, and realize highly stable and accurate force feedback in the physical simulation of product assembly and operation manipulation. This research proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation.

  17. Effects of Force Requirements on Pinch Force Production in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aisha; Gorniak, Stacey L

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies of fine motor control have focused on the ability of participants to match their grip force production to a visually provided template. We investigated differences exhibited in pinch force control during variable force production templates, including sine-, sawtooth-, and square-wave templates. Our results indicate that increased force requirements are associated with increased error rates and a noisier frequency spectrum, consistent with previous studies. Our results also indicate that visual feedback, in the form of template shape, directly affect pinch force production features and motor unit firing patterns, despite the use of consistent baseline force requirements, amplitude changes, and visual signal frequency. This suggests that CNS modulation of motor unit responses can be triggered by basic changes in visual feedback unrelated to force requirements. The potential implications of error compensation based on this study due to aging are also discussed.

  18. The nature of constant and cyclic force production: unintentional force-drift characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ambike, Satyajit; Mattos, Daniela; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    We explored unintentional changes in forces during performance of constant and cyclic force-production tasks (F-tasks) after visual feedback removal. Based on earlier studies, we expected all force parameters to drop exponentially with time. We also explored possible role of working memory in the force drop phenomena. Healthy subjects performed constant or cyclic isometric F-tasks with the index finger under visual feedback. The cyclic task was paced by a metronome. Removing visual feedback resulted in a consistent force drop in constant F-tasks and a qualitatively similar drift in the mean force in the cyclic F-task. Both were slow with characteristic times of about 10-20 s. In contrast, force amplitude in the cyclic F-task increased quickly (within 1-2 s). When the subjects were asked to stop producing force for 5 s after the visual feedback disappeared and then resume force production, no downward force drift was seen in constant F-tasks, while in cyclic F-tasks, the drift of the mean force was present and an exaggerated increase in force amplitude was also observed. We conclude that while working memory limitations may influence cyclic F-tasks, their role in determining the force drift in constant F-tasks is limited. The results of both experiments are interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis supplemented with an idea of unintentional drift of referent coordinates (RC-back-coupling) induced by differences between the referent and actual body configurations. PMID:26419663

  19. Women's employment and the production force.

    PubMed

    Li, S

    1990-01-01

    The economic problem of women in China is discussed in terms of the diversification of women's jobs, the growth in women's employment rate, and improvements in women's employment structure. Any change in women's employment status must be compatible with social production forces of labor organization patterns and the demand in professional fields. Fields of employment that are suitable for women need to be expanded. The division of labor is such that men are predominately in heavy industry and women in light industry. The physical makeup of women puts them at a disadvantage, as well as their role in child rearing. The service industry is open to women. The number of new jobs is rapidly increasing in occupations that require more mental work and hence open to women, such as, office maintenance, computer services' technician, computer programmer, and law associates or electrical engineer. The semiconductor industry statistics in southeast Asia reveal that 90% of unmarried women 16-23 years are employed in this industry. Improvement in women's educational levels also provide opportunities. The largest proportion of jobs are still in agriculture, while the country is changing from a natural economy to a market-oriented one. More women are engaged in employment in developed countries, and there is regional variation in female employment patterns. Comparisons are made for countries in southeast Asia in the % of working women. The increase in working women is attributed to increases in very young (16-23 years) and very old (65 years) women. Women's employment has grown on an annual average of 23.7% vs. 15% for the world. During times of economic recession, women's employment grew but in low level jobs. Women in state-owned enterprises rose from 7.5% in 1949 to 32.0% in 1984. Growth for women was fastest in the service industry (4.1%-39.8%), followed closely by scientific research institutions and health services (11.4%-38.2%). Women in agriculture and forestry rose from 2

  20. Accurate Evaluation of Ion Conductivity of the Gramicidin A Channel Using a Polarizable Force Field without Any Corrections.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dinglin; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui

    2016-06-14

    Classical molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of membrane proteins faces significant challenges in accurately reproducing and predicting experimental observables such as ion conductance and permeability due to its incapability of precisely describing the electronic interactions in heterogeneous systems. In this work, the free energy profiles of K(+) and Na(+) permeating through the gramicidin A channel are characterized by using the AMOEBA polarizable force field with a total sampling time of 1 μs. Our results indicated that by explicitly introducing the multipole terms and polarization into the electrostatic potentials, the permeation free energy barrier of K(+) through the gA channel is considerably reduced compared to the overestimated results obtained from the fixed-charge model. Moreover, the estimated maximum conductance, without any corrections, for both K(+) and Na(+) passing through the gA channel are much closer to the experimental results than any classical MD simulations, demonstrating the power of AMOEBA in investigating the membrane proteins. PMID:27171823

  1. Limited rotational and rovibrational line lists computed with highly accurate quartic force fields and ab initio dipole surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    In this work, computational procedures are employed to compute the rotational and rovibrational spectra and line lists for H2O, CO2, and SO2. Building on the established use of quartic force fields, MP2 and CCSD(T) Dipole Moment Surfaces (DMSs) are computed for each system of study in order to produce line intensities as well as the transition energies. The computed results exhibit a clear correlation to reference data available in the HITRAN database. Additionally, even though CCSD(T) DMSs produce more accurate intensities as compared to experiment, the use of MP2 DMSs results in reliable line lists that are still comparable to experiment. The use of the less computationally costly MP2 method is beneficial in the study of larger systems where use of CCSD(T) would be more costly. PMID:23692860

  2. Human capacity for explosive force production: neural and contractile determinants.

    PubMed

    Folland, J P; Buckthorpe, M W; Hannah, R

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the integrative neural and contractile determinants of human knee extension explosive force production. Forty untrained participants performed voluntary and involuntary (supramaximally evoked twitches and octets - eight pulses at 300 Hz that elicit the maximum possible rate of force development) explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors. Explosive force (F0-150 ms) and sequential rate of force development (RFD, 50-ms epochs) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude was recorded (superficial quadriceps and hamstrings, 50-ms epochs) and normalized (quadriceps to Mmax, hamstrings to EMGmax). Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was also assessed. Multiple linear regressions assessed the significant neural and contractile determinants of absolute and relative (%MVF) explosive force and sequential RFD. Explosive force production exhibited substantial interindividual variability, particularly during the early phase of contraction [F50, 13-fold (absolute); 7.5-fold (relative)]. Multiple regression explained 59-93% (absolute) and 35-60% (relative) of the variance in explosive force production. The primary determinants of explosive force changed during the contraction (F0-50, quadriceps EMG and Twitch F; RFD50-100, Octet RFD0-50; F100-150, MVF). In conclusion, explosive force production was largely explained by predictor neural and contractile variables, but the specific determinants changed during the phase of contraction.

  3. Towards an accurate representation of electrostatics in classical force fields: Efficient implementation of multipolar interactions in biomolecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagui, Celeste; Pedersen, Lee G.; Darden, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The accurate simulation of biologically active macromolecules faces serious limitations that originate in the treatment of electrostatics in the empirical force fields. The current use of "partial charges" is a significant source of errors, since these vary widely with different conformations. By contrast, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through the use of a distributed multipole moment description, has been shown to converge to the quantum MEP outside the van der Waals surface, when higher order multipoles are used. However, in spite of the considerable improvement to the representation of the electronic cloud, higher order multipoles are not part of current classical biomolecular force fields due to the excessive computational cost. In this paper we present an efficient formalism for the treatment of higher order multipoles in Cartesian tensor formalism. The Ewald "direct sum" is evaluated through a McMurchie-Davidson formalism [L. McMurchie and E. Davidson, J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)]. The "reciprocal sum" has been implemented in three different ways: using an Ewald scheme, a particle mesh Ewald (PME) method, and a multigrid-based approach. We find that even though the use of the McMurchie-Davidson formalism considerably reduces the cost of the calculation with respect to the standard matrix implementation of multipole interactions, the calculation in direct space remains expensive. When most of the calculation is moved to reciprocal space via the PME method, the cost of a calculation where all multipolar interactions (up to hexadecapole-hexadecapole) are included is only about 8.5 times more expensive than a regular AMBER 7 [D. A. Pearlman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 91, 1 (1995)] implementation with only charge-charge interactions. The multigrid implementation is slower but shows very promising results for parallelization. It provides a natural way to interface with continuous, Gaussian-based electrostatics in the future. It is

  4. Towards an accurate representation of electrostatics in classical force fields: efficient implementation of multipolar interactions in biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Sagui, Celeste; Pedersen, Lee G; Darden, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The accurate simulation of biologically active macromolecules faces serious limitations that originate in the treatment of electrostatics in the empirical force fields. The current use of "partial charges" is a significant source of errors, since these vary widely with different conformations. By contrast, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) obtained through the use of a distributed multipole moment description, has been shown to converge to the quantum MEP outside the van der Waals surface, when higher order multipoles are used. However, in spite of the considerable improvement to the representation of the electronic cloud, higher order multipoles are not part of current classical biomolecular force fields due to the excessive computational cost. In this paper we present an efficient formalism for the treatment of higher order multipoles in Cartesian tensor formalism. The Ewald "direct sum" is evaluated through a McMurchie-Davidson formalism [L. McMurchie and E. Davidson, J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)]. The "reciprocal sum" has been implemented in three different ways: using an Ewald scheme, a particle mesh Ewald (PME) method, and a multigrid-based approach. We find that even though the use of the McMurchie-Davidson formalism considerably reduces the cost of the calculation with respect to the standard matrix implementation of multipole interactions, the calculation in direct space remains expensive. When most of the calculation is moved to reciprocal space via the PME method, the cost of a calculation where all multipolar interactions (up to hexadecapole-hexadecapole) are included is only about 8.5 times more expensive than a regular AMBER 7 [D. A. Pearlman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 91, 1 (1995)] implementation with only charge-charge interactions. The multigrid implementation is slower but shows very promising results for parallelization. It provides a natural way to interface with continuous, Gaussian-based electrostatics in the future. It is

  5. A simplified hydroethidine method for fast and accurate detection of superoxide production in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Back, Patricia; Matthijssens, Filip; Vanfleteren, Jacques R; Braeckman, Bart P

    2012-04-01

    Because superoxide is involved in various physiological processes, many efforts have been made to improve its accurate quantification. We optimized and validated a superoxide-specific and -sensitive detection method. The protocol is based on fluorescence detection of the superoxide-specific hydroethidine (HE) oxidation product, 2-hydroxyethidium. We established a method for the quantification of superoxide production in isolated mitochondria without the need for acetone extraction and purification chromatography as described in previous studies.

  6. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  7. Highly accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants for cyclic and linear C3H3(+).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-05-19

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C(3)H(3)(+) molecular cation, referred to as c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+). Specifically, the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit, and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants by use of both vibrational second-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C(3)H(3)(+), obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+) are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations. PMID:21510653

  8. Force production and mechanical accommodation during convergent extension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Pal, Siladitya; Maiti, Spandan; Davidson, Lance A.

    2015-01-01

    Forces generated within the embryo during convergent extension (CE) must overcome mechanical resistance to push the head away from the rear. As mechanical resistance increases more than eightfold during CE and can vary twofold from individual to individual, we have proposed that developmental programs must include mechanical accommodation in order to maintain robust morphogenesis. To test this idea and investigate the processes that generate forces within early embryos, we developed a novel gel-based sensor to report force production as a tissue changes shape; we find that the mean stress produced by CE is 5.0±1.6 Pascal (Pa). Experiments with the gel-based force sensor resulted in three findings. (1) Force production and mechanical resistance can be coupled through myosin contractility. The coupling of these processes can be hidden unless affected tissues are challenged by physical constraints. (2) CE is mechanically adaptive; dorsal tissues can increase force production up to threefold to overcome a stiffer microenvironment. These findings demonstrate that mechanical accommodation can ensure robust morphogenetic movements against environmental and genetic variation that might otherwise perturb development and growth. (3) Force production is distributed between neural and mesodermal tissues in the dorsal isolate, and the notochord, a central structure involved in patterning vertebrate morphogenesis, is not required for force production during late gastrulation and early neurulation. Our findings suggest that genetic factors that coordinately alter force production and mechanical resistance are common during morphogenesis, and that their cryptic roles can be revealed when tissues are challenged by controlled biophysical constraints. PMID:25670794

  9. PROCEDURES FOR ACCURATE PRODUCTION OF COLOR IMAGES FROM SATELLITE OR AIRCRAFT MULTISPECTRAL DIGITAL DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1985-01-01

    Because the display and interpretation of satellite and aircraft remote-sensing data make extensive use of color film products, accurate reproduction of the color images is important. To achieve accurate color reproduction, the exposure and chemical processing of the film must be monitored and controlled. By using a combination of sensitometry, densitometry, and transfer functions that control film response curves, all of the different steps in the making of film images can be monitored and controlled. Because a sensitometer produces a calibrated exposure, the resulting step wedge can be used to monitor the chemical processing of the film. Step wedges put on film by image recording machines provide a means of monitoring the film exposure and color balance of the machines.

  10. Algal productivity modeling: a step toward accurate assessments of full-scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Chambonnière, Paul; Shilton, Andy; Guizard, Guillaume; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    A new biomass productivity model was parameterized for Chlorella vulgaris using short-term (<30 min) oxygen productivities from algal microcosms exposed to 6 light intensities (20-420 W/m(2)) and 6 temperatures (5-42 °C). The model was then validated against experimental biomass productivities recorded in bench-scale photobioreactors operated under 4 light intensities (30.6-74.3 W/m(2)) and 4 temperatures (10-30 °C), yielding an accuracy of ± 15% over 163 days of cultivation. This modeling approach addresses major challenges associated with the accurate prediction of algal productivity at full-scale. Firstly, while most prior modeling approaches have only considered the impact of light intensity on algal productivity, the model herein validated also accounts for the critical impact of temperature. Secondly, this study validates a theoretical approach to convert short-term oxygen productivities into long-term biomass productivities. Thirdly, the experimental methodology used has the practical advantage of only requiring one day of experimental work for complete model parameterization. The validation of this new modeling approach is therefore an important step for refining feasibility assessments of algae biotechnologies.

  11. Algal productivity modeling: a step toward accurate assessments of full-scale algal cultivation.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Chambonnière, Paul; Shilton, Andy; Guizard, Guillaume; Guieysse, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    A new biomass productivity model was parameterized for Chlorella vulgaris using short-term (<30 min) oxygen productivities from algal microcosms exposed to 6 light intensities (20-420 W/m(2)) and 6 temperatures (5-42 °C). The model was then validated against experimental biomass productivities recorded in bench-scale photobioreactors operated under 4 light intensities (30.6-74.3 W/m(2)) and 4 temperatures (10-30 °C), yielding an accuracy of ± 15% over 163 days of cultivation. This modeling approach addresses major challenges associated with the accurate prediction of algal productivity at full-scale. Firstly, while most prior modeling approaches have only considered the impact of light intensity on algal productivity, the model herein validated also accounts for the critical impact of temperature. Secondly, this study validates a theoretical approach to convert short-term oxygen productivities into long-term biomass productivities. Thirdly, the experimental methodology used has the practical advantage of only requiring one day of experimental work for complete model parameterization. The validation of this new modeling approach is therefore an important step for refining feasibility assessments of algae biotechnologies. PMID:25502920

  12. Force production during maximal effort bend sprinting: Theory vs reality.

    PubMed

    Churchill, S M; Trewartha, G; Bezodis, I N; Salo, A I T

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated whether the "constant limb force" hypothesis can be applied to bend sprinting on an athletics track and to understand how force production influences performance on the bend compared with the straight. Force and three-dimensional video analyses were conducted on seven competitive athletes during maximal effort sprinting on the bend (radius 37.72 m) and straight. Left step mean peak vertical and resultant force decreased significantly by 0.37 body weight (BW) and 0.21 BW, respectively, on the bend compared with the straight. Right step force production was not compromised in the same way, and some athletes demonstrated substantial increases in these variables on the bend. More inward impulse during left (39.9 ± 6.5 Ns) than right foot contact (24.7 ± 5.8 Ns) resulted in 1.6° more turning during the left step on the bend. There was a 2.3% decrease in velocity from straight to bend for both steps. The constant limb force hypothesis is not entirely valid for maximal effort sprinting on the bend. Also, the force requirements of bend sprinting are considerably different to straight-line sprinting and are asymmetrical in nature. Overall, bend-specific strength and technique training may improve performance during this portion of 200- and 400-m races.

  13. Rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products based on DNA sequence homology.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Shibayama, H; Suzuki, Y; Karita, S; Takamatsu, S

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop rapid and accurate procedures to identify microorganisms contaminating cosmetic products, based on the identity of the nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA coding DNA (rDNA). Five types of microorganisms were isolated from the inner portion of lotion bottle caps, skin care lotions, and cleansing gels. The rDNA ITS region of microorganisms was amplified through the use of colony-direct PCR or ordinal PCR using DNA extracts as templates. The nucleotide sequences of the amplified DNA were determined and subjected to homology search of a publicly available DNA database. Thereby, we obtained DNA sequences possessing high similarity with the query sequences from the databases of all the five organisms analyzed. The traditional identification procedure requires expert skills, and a time period of approximately 1 month to identify the microorganisms. On the contrary, 3-7 days were sufficient to complete all the procedures employed in the current method, including isolation and cultivation of organisms, DNA sequencing, and the database homology search. Moreover, it was possible to develop the skills necessary to perform the molecular techniques required for the identification procedures within 1 week. Consequently, the current method is useful for rapid and accurate identification of microorganisms, contaminating cosmetics.

  14. The Utility of CBM Written Language Indices: An Investigation of Production-Dependent, Production-Independent, and Accurate-Production Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Jennifer; Malecki, Christine Kerres

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the utility of three categories of CBM written language indices including production-dependent indices (Total Words Written, Words Spelled Correctly, and Correct Writing Sequences), production-independent indices (Percentage of Words Spelled Correctly and Percentage of Correct Writing Sequences), and an accurate-production…

  15. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, Tigran M; Snyder, James A; Yancey, Jeremy A; Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG-X-GTGT host-guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard-Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid-liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  16. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  17. Growth cone behavior and production of traction force

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The growth cone must push its substrate rearward via some traction force in order to propel itself forward. To determine which growth cone behaviors produce traction force, we observed chick sensory growth cones under conditions in which force production was accommodated by movement of obstacles in the environment, namely, neurites of other sensory neurons or glass fibers. The movements of these obstacles occurred via three, different, stereotyped growth cone behaviors: (a) filopodial contractions, (b) smooth rearward movement on the dorsal surface of the growth cone, and (c) interactions with ruffling lamellipodia. More than 70% of the obstacle movements were caused by filopodial contractions in which the obstacle attached at the extreme distal end of a filopodium and moved only as the filopodium changed its extension. Filopodial contractions were characterized by frequent changes of obstacle velocity and direction. Contraction of a single filopodium is estimated to exert 50-90 microdyn of force, which can account for the pull exerted by chick sensory growth cones. Importantly, all five cases of growth cones growing over the top of obstacle neurites (i.e., geometry that mimics the usual growth cone/substrate interaction), were of the filopodial contraction type. Some 25% of obstacle movements occurred by a smooth backward movement along the top surface of growth cones. Both the appearance and rate of movements were similar to that reported for retrograde flow of cortical actin near the dorsal growth cone surface. Although these retrograde flow movements also exerted enough force to account for growth cone pulling, we did not observe such movements on ventral growth cone surfaces. Occasionally obstacles were moved by interaction with ruffling lamellipodia. However, we obtained no evidence for attachment of the obstacles to ruffling lamellipodia or for directed obstacle movements by this mechanism. These data suggest that chick sensory growth cones move forward by

  18. Towards accurate solvation dynamics of divalent cations in water using the polarizable amoeba force field: From energetics to structure.

    PubMed

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Perera, Lalith; Cisneros, G Andrés; Ren, Pengyu; Pedersen, Lee G; Darden, Thomas A

    2006-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed using a modified amoeba force field to determine hydration and dynamical properties of the divalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+. The extension of amoeba to divalent cations required the introduction of a cation specific parametrization. To accomplish this, the Thole polarization damping model parametrization was modified based on the ab initio polarization energy computed by a constrained space orbital variation energy decomposition scheme. Excellent agreement has been found with condensed phase experimental results using parameters derived from gas phase ab initio calculations. Additionally, we have observed that the coordination of the calcium cation is influenced by the size of the periodic water box, a recurrent issue in first principles molecular dynamics studies.

  19. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  20. Extension of the AMBER force field for nitroxide radicals and combined QM/MM/PCM approach to the accurate determination of EPR parameters of DMPOH in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hermosilla, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo; Calle, Paloma; García de la Vega, José Manuel; Brancato, Giuseppe; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A computational strategy that combines both time-dependent and time-independent approaches is exploited to accurately model molecular dynamics and solvent effects on the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the DMPO-H nitroxide. Our recent general force field for nitroxides derived from AMBER ff99SB is further extended to systems involving hydrogen atoms in β-positions with respect to NO. The resulting force-field has been employed in a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations, comparing the computed EPR parameters from selected molecular configurations to the corresponding experimental data in different solvents. The effect of vibrational averaging on the spectroscopic parameters is also taken into account, by second order vibrational perturbation theory involving semi-diagonal third energy derivatives together first and second property derivatives. PMID:26584116

  1. Embryo mechanics: balancing force production with elastic resistance during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lance A

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis requires the spatial and temporal control of embryo mechanics, including force production and mechanical resistance to those forces, to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. Thus, biomechanical processes play a key role in directly shaping the embryo. Additional roles for embryo mechanics during development may include the patterning of positional information and to provide feedback to ensure the success of morphogenetic movements in shaping the larval body and organs. To understand the multiple roles of mechanics during development requires familiarity with engineering principles of the mechanics of structures, the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials, and the integration of force and stress within embryonic structures as morphogenesis progresses. In this chapter, we review the basic engineering principles of biomechanics as they relate to morphogenesis, introduce methods for quantifying embryo mechanics and the limitations of these methods, and outline a formalism for investigating the role of embryo mechanics in birth defects. We encourage the nascent field of embryo mechanics to adopt standard engineering terms and test methods so that studies of diverse organisms can be compared and universal biomechanical principles can be revealed.

  2. Extended Adaptive Biasing Force Algorithm. An On-the-Fly Implementation for Accurate Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haohao; Shao, Xueguang; Chipot, Christophe; Cai, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Proper use of the adaptive biasing force (ABF) algorithm in free-energy calculations needs certain prerequisites to be met, namely, that the Jacobian for the metric transformation and its first derivative be available and the coarse variables be independent and fully decoupled from any holonomic constraint or geometric restraint, thereby limiting singularly the field of application of the approach. The extended ABF (eABF) algorithm circumvents these intrinsic limitations by applying the time-dependent bias onto a fictitious particle coupled to the coarse variable of interest by means of a stiff spring. However, with the current implementation of eABF in the popular molecular dynamics engine NAMD, a trajectory-based post-treatment is necessary to derive the underlying free-energy change. Usually, such a posthoc analysis leads to a decrease in the reliability of the free-energy estimates due to the inevitable loss of information, as well as to a drop in efficiency, which stems from substantial read-write accesses to file systems. We have developed a user-friendly, on-the-fly code for performing eABF simulations within NAMD. In the present contribution, this code is probed in eight illustrative examples. The performance of the algorithm is compared with traditional ABF, on the one hand, and the original eABF implementation combined with a posthoc analysis, on the other hand. Our results indicate that the on-the-fly eABF algorithm (i) supplies the correct free-energy landscape in those critical cases where the coarse variables at play are coupled to either each other or to geometric restraints or holonomic constraints, (ii) greatly improves the reliability of the free-energy change, compared to the outcome of a posthoc analysis, and (iii) represents a negligible additional computational effort compared to regular ABF. Moreover, in the proposed implementation, guidelines for choosing two parameters of the eABF algorithm, namely the stiffness of the spring and the mass

  3. The Anharmonic Force Field of Ethylene, C2H4, by Means of Accurate Ab Initio Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jan M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Taylor, Peter R.; Francois, Jean-Pierre; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The quartic force field of ethylene, C2H4, has been calculated ab initio using augmented coupled cluster, CCSD(T), methods and correlation consistent basis sets of spdf quality. For the C-12 isotopomers C2H4, C2H3D, H2CCD2, cis-C2H2D2, trans-C2H2D2, C2HD3, and C2D4, all fundamentals could be reproduced to better than 10 per centimeter, except for three cases of severe Fermi type 1 resonance. The problem with these three bands is identified as a systematic overestimate of the Kiij Fermi resonance constants by a factor of two or more; if this is corrected for, the predicted fundamentals come into excellent agreement with experiment. No such systematic overestimate is seen for Fermi type 2 resonances. Our computed harmonic frequencies suggest a thorough revision of the accepted experimentally derived values. Our computed and empirically corrected re geometry differs substantially from experimentally derived values: both the predicted rz geometry and the ground-state rotational constants are, however, in excellent agreement with experiment, suggesting revision of the older values. Anharmonicity constants agree well with experiment for stretches, but differ substantially for stretch-bend interaction constants, due to equality constraints in the experimental analysis that do not hold. Improved criteria for detecting Fermi and Coriolis resonances are proposed and found to work well, contrary to the established method based on harmonic frequency differences that fails to detect several important resonances for C2H4 and its isotopomers. Surprisingly good results are obtained with a small spd basis at the CCSD(T) level. The well-documented strong basis set effect on the v8 out-of-plane motion is present to a much lesser extent when correlation-optimized polarization functions are used. Complete sets of anharmonic, rovibrational coupling, and centrifugal distortion constants for the isotopomers are available as supplementary material to the paper.

  4. Extended Adaptive Biasing Force Algorithm. An On-the-Fly Implementation for Accurate Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haohao; Shao, Xueguang; Chipot, Christophe; Cai, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Proper use of the adaptive biasing force (ABF) algorithm in free-energy calculations needs certain prerequisites to be met, namely, that the Jacobian for the metric transformation and its first derivative be available and the coarse variables be independent and fully decoupled from any holonomic constraint or geometric restraint, thereby limiting singularly the field of application of the approach. The extended ABF (eABF) algorithm circumvents these intrinsic limitations by applying the time-dependent bias onto a fictitious particle coupled to the coarse variable of interest by means of a stiff spring. However, with the current implementation of eABF in the popular molecular dynamics engine NAMD, a trajectory-based post-treatment is necessary to derive the underlying free-energy change. Usually, such a posthoc analysis leads to a decrease in the reliability of the free-energy estimates due to the inevitable loss of information, as well as to a drop in efficiency, which stems from substantial read-write accesses to file systems. We have developed a user-friendly, on-the-fly code for performing eABF simulations within NAMD. In the present contribution, this code is probed in eight illustrative examples. The performance of the algorithm is compared with traditional ABF, on the one hand, and the original eABF implementation combined with a posthoc analysis, on the other hand. Our results indicate that the on-the-fly eABF algorithm (i) supplies the correct free-energy landscape in those critical cases where the coarse variables at play are coupled to either each other or to geometric restraints or holonomic constraints, (ii) greatly improves the reliability of the free-energy change, compared to the outcome of a posthoc analysis, and (iii) represents a negligible additional computational effort compared to regular ABF. Moreover, in the proposed implementation, guidelines for choosing two parameters of the eABF algorithm, namely the stiffness of the spring and the mass

  5. 76 FR 24025 - Information Collection; Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ...; Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured Child Labor AGENCY: Department of... acquisition of products produced by forced or indentured child labor. DATES: Submit comments on or before..., Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured Child Labor, signed by the...

  6. 76 FR 42709 - Submission for OMB Review; Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ...; Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured Child Labor AGENCY: Department of... acquisition of products produced by forced or indentured child labor. DATES: Submit comments on or before... on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured Child Labor, by any of the...

  7. 77 FR 9267 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in Foreign Countries and Efforts by Certain Countries To Eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labor AGENCY: The Bureau...

  8. 43 CFR 3275.15 - How accurately must I measure my production and utilization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... production and utilization? 3275.15 Section 3275.15 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000... production and utilization? It depends on whether you use a meter to calculate Federal production or...

  9. Few crop traits accurately predict variables important to productivity of processing sweet corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recovery, case production, and gross profit margin, hereafter called ‘processor variables’, are as important metrics to processing sweet corn as grain yield is to field corn production. However, crop traits such as ear number or ear mass alone are reported in sweet corn production research rather t...

  10. An Accurate Quartic Force Field, Fundamental Frequencies, and Binding Energy for the High Energy Density Material T(d)N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CCSD(T) method has been used to compute a highly accurate quartic force field and fundamental frequencies for all N-14 and N-15 isotopomers of the high energy density material T(sub d)N(sub 4). The computed fundamental frequencies show beyond doubt that the bands observed in a matrix isolation experiment by Radziszewski and coworkers are not due to different isotopomers of T(sub d)N(sub 4). The most sophisticated thermochemical calculations to date yield a N(sub 4) -> 2N(sub 2) heat of reaction of 182.22 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol at 0 K (180.64 +/- 0.5 at 298 K). It is hoped that the data reported herein will aid in the ultimate detection of T(sub d)N(sub 4).

  11. Entropy production for velocity-dependent macroscopic forces: The problem of dissipation without fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerino, L.; Puglisi, A.

    2015-08-01

    In macroscopic systems, velocity-dependent phenomenological forces F(v) are used to model friction, feedback devices or self-propulsion. Such forces usually include a dissipative component which conceals the fast energy exchanges with a thermostat at the environment temperature T, ruled by a microscopic Hamiltonian H. The mapping (H,T) \\to F(v) —even if effective for many purposes— may lead to applications of stochastic thermodynamics where an incomplete fluctuating entropy production (FEP) is derived. An enlighting example is offered by recent macroscopic experiments where dissipation is dominated by solid-on-solid friction, typically modelled through a deterministic Coulomb force F(v). Through an adaptation of the microscopic Prandtl-Tomlinson model for friction, we show how the FEP is dominated by the heat released to the T-thermostat, ignored by the macroscopic Coulomb model. This problem, which haunts several studies in the literature, cannot be cured by weighing the time-reversed trajectories with a different auxiliary dynamics: it is only solved by a more accurate stochastic modelling of the thermostat underlying dissipation.

  12. The Adaptive Range of 1/f Isometric Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Valantine, Andrew D.; Newell, Karl M.

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive range of 1/f dynamics in isometric force output was investigated. Participants produced isometric force to targets with predictable demands (constant and sinusoidal) and 1/f noise waveforms (white, pink, brown, and black) that also varied in the frequency bandwidth represented in the force signal (0-4 Hz, 0-8 Hz, and 0-12 Hz). The…

  13. Molecular model for force production and transmission during vertebrate gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Katherine; Shook, David R; Chang, Chenbei; Keller, Ray; Skoglund, Paul

    2016-02-15

    Vertebrate embryos undergo dramatic shape changes at gastrulation that require locally produced and anisotropically applied forces, yet how these forces are produced and transmitted across tissues remains unclear. We show that depletion of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) levels in the embryo blocks force generation at gastrulation through two distinct mechanisms: destabilizing the myosin II (MII) hexameric complex and inhibiting MII contractility. Molecular dissection of these two mechanisms demonstrates that normal convergence force generation requires MII contractility and we identify a set of molecular phenotypes correlated with both this failure of convergence force generation in explants and of blastopore closure in whole embryos. These include reduced rates of actin movement, alterations in C-cadherin dynamics and a reduction in the number of polarized lamellipodia on intercalating cells. By examining the spatial relationship between C-cadherin and actomyosin we also find evidence for formation of transcellular linear arrays incorporating these proteins that could transmit mediolaterally oriented tensional forces. These data combine to suggest a multistep model to explain how cell intercalation can occur against a force gradient to generate axial extension forces. First, polarized lamellipodia extend mediolaterally and make new C-cadherin-based contacts with neighboring mesodermal cell bodies. Second, lamellipodial flow of actin coalesces into a tension-bearing, MII-contractility-dependent node-and-cable actin network in the cell body cortex. And third, this actomyosin network contracts to generate mediolateral convergence forces in the context of these transcellular arrays.

  14. Foot force production and asymmetries in elite rowers.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica M; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2014-03-01

    The rowing stroke is a leg-driven action, in which forces developed by the lower limbs provide a large proportion of power delivered to the oars. In terms of both performance and injury, it is important to initiate each stroke with powerful and symmetrical loading of the foot stretchers. The aims of this study were to assess the reliability of foot force measured by footplates developed for the Concept2 indoor ergometer and to examine the magnitude and symmetry of bilateral foot forces in different groups of rowers. Five heavyweight female scullers, six heavyweight female sweep rowers, and six lightweight male (LWM) rowers performed an incremental step test on the Concept2 ergometer. Vertical, horizontal, and resultant forces were recorded bilaterally, and asymmetries were quantified using the absolute symmetry index. Foot force was measured with high consistency (coefficient of multiple determination > 0.976 +/- 0.010). Relative resultant, vertical, and horizontal forces were largest in LWM rowers, whilst average foot forces significantly increased across stroke rates for all three groups of rowers. Asymmetries ranged from 5.3% for average resultant force to 28.9% for timing of peak vertical force. Asymmetries were not sensitive to stroke rate or rowing group, however, large inter-subject variability in asymmetries was evident.

  15. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a wide range of biological and medical applications. Their identification by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenging task. A new open-source de novo peptide identification engine CycloBranch was developed and successfully applied in identification or detailed characterization of 11 linear, cyclic, branched, and branch-cyclic peptides. CycloBranch is based on annotated building block databases the size of which is defined by the user according to ribosomal or nonribosomal peptide origin. The current number of involved nonisobaric and isobaric building blocks is 287 and 521, respectively. Contrary to all other peptide sequencing tools utilizing either peptide libraries or peptide fragment libraries, CycloBranch represents a true de novo sequencing engine developed for accurate mass spectrometric data. It is a stand-alone and cross-platform application with a graphical and user-friendly interface; it supports mzML, mzXML, mgf, txt, and baf file formats and can be run in parallel on multiple threads. It can be downloaded for free from http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/cyclobranch/, where the User's manual and video tutorials can be found.

  16. Particle Production by Tidal Forces, and the Energy - Tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacand, Christophe Maurice Jean-Baptiste

    The quantum production of spinless particles, < n_{k}(t)>, and of energy-momentum-stress, < T^{{a}{b}}(P) >, by the tidal forces of classical curved space-time are investigated in this thesis. In a first part we consider the test case of 1+1 dimensions. Our computations are finite step by step, the predicted evolution of the energy-momentum tensor < T^{ a b} > and of the spectral energy density e_{k}< n_{k }> are consistent with each other throughout curved space-time, < T^ { a b}> is covariantly conserved and has the standard trace anomaly R/24 pi for massless particles. The two chiralities, right-goers versus left-goers, are decoupled, the total < T^{{a} {b}}> is the sum of the chiral parts. We apply our methods to four problems: (1) The Rindler problem. (2) An inhomogeneous patch of curvature produces a burst of energy-momentum and of particles. (3) We compute the quantum production of energy density and pressure for a quantum field in external Friedmann-Robertson -Walker space-times in 1+1 dimensions. (4) We consider the gravitational field of a collapsing shell of classical matter in 3+1 dimensions, and we compute the production of Hawking radiation everywhere inside a linear wave guide in the radial direction. In a second part, we compute the energy density and pressures from a quantum scalar field propagating in the external field of a (3+1)-dimensional, spherically symmetric, static geometry with flat spatial sections. We consider only the (l = 0)-sector of the scalar field. The initial state of the quantum field is the gauge invariant vacuum on one of these hypersurface. Our computations are finite step by step. For the pressures we use the covariant conservation of T^{mu nu} and its four-dimensional trace. We apply our results to the case of the gravitational potential due to an homogeneous spherical body. At late times, i.e. when all switch-on effects are far away from the body, the results are that a static cloud of energy and pressure is formed inside

  17. Velocity associated characteristics of force production in college weight lifters

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, H.; Fukunaga, T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine velocity specific isokinetic forces and cross sectional areas of reciprocal muscle groups in Olympic weight lifters. METHODS: The cross sectional area of the flexor or extensor muscles of the elbow or knee joint was determined by a B-mode ultrasonic apparatus in 34 college weight lifters and 31 untrained male subjects matched for age. Maximum voluntary force produced in the flexion and extension of the elbow and knee joints was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60, 180, and 300 degrees/s. RESULTS: The average cross sectional area was 31-65% higher, and the force was 19-62% higher in weight lifters than in the untrained subjects. The ratio of force to cross sectional area was the same in both groups. The weight lifters showed a lower velocity associated decline in force than untrained subjects in the elbow and knee flexors but not in the extensors. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that for muscle contractions with velocities between 60 degrees/s and 300 degrees/s the difference in isokinetic force between weight lifters and untrained subjects can be primarily attributed to the difference in the muscle cross sectional area. However, the lower velocity associated decline in force implies that weight lifters may have a higher force per cross sectional area than untrained subjects at velocities above 300 degrees/s. 




 PMID:10205693

  18. Functional muscle synergies constrain force production during postural tasks

    PubMed Central

    McKay, J. Lucas; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a set of five functional muscle synergies were sufficient to characterize both hindlimb muscle activity and active forces during automatic postural responses in cats standing at multiple postural configurations. This characterization depended critically upon the assumption that the endpoint force vector (synergy force vector) produced by the activation of each muscle synergy rotated with the limb axis as the hindlimb posture varied in the sagittal plane. Here, we used a detailed, 3D static model of the hindlimb to confirm that this assumption is biomechanically plausible: as we varied the model posture, simulated synergy force vectors rotated monotonically with the limb axis in the parasagittal plane (r2 = 0.94 ± 0.08). We then tested whether a neural strategy of using these five functional muscle synergies provides the same force-generating capability as controlling each of the 31 muscles individually. We compared feasible force sets (FFS) from the model with and without a muscle synergy organization. FFS volumes were significantly reduced with the muscle synergy organization (F = 1556.01, p ≪ 0.01), and as posture varied, the synergy-limited FFSs changed in shape, consistent with changes in experimentally-measured active forces. In contrast, nominal FFS shapes were invariant with posture, reinforcing prior findings that postural forces cannot be predicted by hindlimb biomechanics alone. We propose that an internal model for postural force generation may coordinate functional muscle synergies that are invariant in intrinsic limb coordinates, and this reduced-dimension control scheme reduces the set of forces available for postural control. PMID:17980370

  19. The assessment of the impact of aviation NOx on ozone and other radiative forcing responses - The importance of representing cruise altitudes accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, A.; Lee, D. S.; De León, R. R.

    2013-08-01

    Aviation emissions of NOx result in the formation of tropospheric ozone (warming) and destruction of a small amount of methane (cooling), positive and negative radiative forcing effects. In addition, the reduction of methane results in a small long-term reduction in tropospheric ozone (cooling) and, in addition, a long-term reduction in water vapour in the stratosphere (cooling) from reduced oxidation of methane, both negative radiative forcing impacts. Taking all these radiative effects together, aircraft NOx is still thought to result in a positive (warming) radiative effect under constant emissions assumptions. Previously, comparative modelling studies have focussed on the variability between models, using the same emissions database. In this study, we rather quantify the variability and uncertainty arising from different estimations of present-day aircraft NOx emissions. Six different aircraft NOx emissions inventories were used in the global chemical transport model, MOZART v3. The inventories were normalized to give the same global emission of NOx in order to remove one element of uncertainty. Emissions differed in the normalized cases by 23% at cruise altitudes (283-200 hPa, where the bulk of emission occurs, globally). However, the resultant short-term ozone chemical perturbation varied by 15% between the different inventories. Once all the effects that give rise to positive and negative radiative impacts were accounted for, the variability of net radiative forcing impacts was 94%. Using these radiative effects to formulate a net aviation NOx Global Warming Potential (GWP) for a 100-year time horizon resulted in GWPs ranging from 60 to 4, over an order of magnitude. It is concluded that the detailed placement of emissions at chemically sensitive cruise altitudes strongly affects the assessment of the total radiative impact, introducing a hitherto previously unidentified large fraction of the uncertainty of impacts between different modelling assessments. It

  20. Influence of Emotion on the Control of Low-Level Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naugle, Kelly M.; Coombes, Stephen A.; Cauraugh, James H.; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy and variability of a sustained low-level force contraction (2% of maximum voluntary contraction) was measured while participants viewed unpleasant, pleasant, and neutral images during a feedback occluded force control task. Exposure to pleasant and unpleasant images led to a relative increase in force production but did not alter the…

  1. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action. PMID:25904710

  2. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection of a Nanofluid in an Inclined Heated Enclosure Using Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Method: Accurate Effects of Thermophoresis and Brownian Forces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud; Eslamian, Morteza

    2015-12-01

    Laminar natural convection in differentially heated (β = 0°, where β is the inclination angle), inclined (β = 30° and 60°), and bottom-heated (β = 90°) square enclosures filled with a nanofluid is investigated, using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann simulation approach. The effects of the inclination angle on Nu number and convection heat transfer coefficient are studied. The effects of thermophoresis and Brownian forces which create a relative drift or slip velocity between the particles and the base fluid are included in the simulation. The effect of thermophoresis is considered using an accurate and quantitative formula proposed by the authors. Some of the existing results on natural convection are erroneous due to using wrong thermophoresis models or simply ignoring the effect. Here we show that thermophoresis has a considerable effect on heat transfer augmentation in laminar natural convection. Our non-homogenous modeling approach shows that heat transfer in nanofluids is a function of the inclination angle and Ra number. It also reveals some details of flow behavior which cannot be captured by single-phase models. The minimum heat transfer rate is associated with β = 90° (bottom-heated) and the maximum heat transfer rate occurs in an inclination angle which varies with the Ra number. PMID:26183389

  4. Correlation of Force Production with Apoptosis in Tissue Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Yusuke; Peralta, Xomalin; Venakides, Stephanos; Kiehart, Daniel; Edwards, Glenn

    2007-03-01

    To understand embryo morphogenesis, it is necessary to know the force distribution in the various tissues. Since cells are largely inaccessible to mechanical probes in vivo, measurements of the net forces exerted by cells are challenging. The combination of experimental and theoretical approaches has proven to improve our understanding of these forces. A steerable UV-laser microbeam was used to probe the forces and the resulting kinematics were monitored with confocal microscopy. Dorsal closure is a developmental stage in Drosophila embryogenesis, where the dynamics are a consequence of four biological processes [1]. During this stage, cells that have outlived their usefulness undergo apoptosis, a biological process also known as programmed cell death for cells. Apoptotic events were decreased with genetic techniques or increased by irradiation with a UV-C lamp. We present experimental evidence for force generation correlating with apoptosis. This research has been supported by the NIH (GM33830 and GM61240). [1] M. S. Hutson, et al. Science, 300, 145 (2003).

  5. Radial force distribution changes associated with tangential force production in cylindrical grasping, and the importance of anatomical registration

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Slota, Gregory P.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    Radial force (Fr) distributions describe grip force coordination about a cylindrical object. Recent studies have employed only explicit Fr tasks, and have not normalized for anatomical variance when considering Fr distributions. The goals of the present study were (i) to explore Fr during tangential force production tasks, and (ii) to examine the extent to which anatomical registration (i.e. spatial normalization of anatomically analogous structures) could improve signal detectability in Fr data. Twelve subjects grasped a vertically-oriented cylindrical handle (diameter = 6 cm) and matched target upward tangential forces of 10, 20, and 30 N. Fr data were measured using a flexible pressure mat with an angular resolution 4.8 deg, and were registered using piecewise-linear interpolation between five manually identified points-of-interest. Results indicate that Fr was primarily limited to three contact regions: the distal thumb, the distal fingers, and the fingers’ metatacarpal heads, and that, while increases in tangential force caused significant increases in Fr for these regions, they did not significantly affect the Fr distribution across the hand. Registration was found to substantially reduce between-subject variability, as indicated by both accentuated Fr trends, and amplification of the test statistic. These results imply that, while subjects focus Fr primarily on three anatomical regions during cylindrical grasp, inter-subject anatomical differences introduce a variability that, if not corrected for via registration, may compromise one’s ability to draw anatomically relevant conclusions from grasping force data. PMID:22134182

  6. Explosive force production during isometric squats correlates with athletic performance in rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Tillin, Neale Anthony; Pain, Matthew Thomas Gerard; Folland, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between explosive force production during isometric squats and athletic performance (sprint time and countermovement jump height). Sprint time (5 and 20 m) and jump height were recorded in 18 male elite-standard varsity rugby union players. Participants also completed a series of maximal- and explosive-isometric squats to measure maximal force and explosive force at 50-ms intervals up to 250 ms from force onset. Sprint performance was related to early phase (≤100 ms) explosive force normalised to maximal force (5 m, r = -0.63, P = 0.005; and 20 m, r = -0.54, P = 0.020), but jump height was related to later phase (>100 ms) absolute explosive force (0.51 < r < 0.61; 0.006 < P < 0.035). When participants were separated for 5-m sprint time (< or ≥ 1s), the faster group had greater normalised explosive force in the first 150 ms of explosive-isometric squats (33-67%; 0.001 < P < 0.017). The results suggest that explosive force production during isometric squats was associated with athletic performance. Specifically, sprint performance was most strongly related to the proportion of maximal force achieved in the initial phase of explosive-isometric squats, whilst jump height was most strongly related to absolute force in the later phase of the explosive-isometric squats.

  7. Force Production and Reactive Strength Capabilities After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Eamonn P; Galvin, Lorcan; Harrison, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Context: Ambiguity exists in the literature regarding whether individuals can restore function to 100% after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The response of force production and reactive strength in stretch-shortening cycle activities after surgery has not been established. Objective: To compare reactive strength and force production capabilities between the involved and uninvolved legs of participants who had undergone ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation with the reactive strength and force production capabilities of a control group. Design: Repeated measures, cross-sectional. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten participants with ACL reconstructions who had returned to their chosen sports and 10 age-matched and activity-matched control subjects. Intervention(s): We screened the ACL group with the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form and functional performance tests to measure a basic level of function. We assessed force production capabilities and reactive strength using squat, countermovement, drop, and rebound jump protocols on a force sledge apparatus. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were flight time, peak vertical ground reaction force, leg spring stiffness, and reactive strength index. Results: No participant in the ACL group exhibited functional deficits in comparison with normative values or the control group. Using the force sledge apparatus, we found no notable differences in force production capabilities and reactive strength in the ACL group when comparing the involved with uninvolved legs or the degree of difference between legs with the control group. Conclusions: After ACL reconstruction, rehabilitated participants did not exhibit deficits in force production or reactive strength capabilities. Our results suggest that force production and reactive strength capabilities can be restored to levels comparable with the uninjured control limb and may not

  8. Synoptic events force biological productivity in Patagonian fjord ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneri, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The annual cycle of primary productivity of the Patagonian fjords has, to date, been described as a two phase system consisting of a short non productive winter phase (during June and July) and a productive phase extending from late winter (August) to autumn (May). Low levels of primary production, phytoplankton biomass and high concentrations of surface nutrients have been described as characterizing winter conditions while pulsed productivity events typifies the productivity pattern during the extended productive season. Pulsed productivity events characterize coastal waters where inorganic nutrients in surface layers are replenished following periods of intensive utilization by autotrophs. Freshwater input in Patagonian fjords in southern Chile (41-55°S) results in one of the largest estuarine regions worldwide. Here strong haline water column stratification prevents nutrient mixing to the surface layers thus potentially shutting off algal production. Our working hypothesis considered that in order to reconcile the observed pulsed productivity pattern, periodic breaking (associated to surface nutrient replenishment) and re-establishment of estuarine conditions (associated to water column stratification) would be required. Up to now however our understanding of the physical processes that control water column conditions in the Patagonian fjord area has been extremely limited. Here we present evidence linking the passage of synoptic low pressure fronts to pulsed productivity events in the Patagonian fjord area. These front controls and influence local processes of interaction between the fjord and the atmosphere generating a rapid water column response. In the specific case of the Puyuhuapi fjord we have been able to show that such synoptic fronts induce surface flow reversal and water column mixing. Phytoplankton blooming occurs after the passage of the synoptic front once calmer conditions prevail and estuarine conditions are re established. The occurrence of

  9. Radial force distribution changes associated with tangential force production in cylindrical grasping, and the importance of anatomical registration.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd C; Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-01-10

    Radial force (F(r)) distributions describe grip force coordination about a cylindrical object. Recent studies have employed only explicit F(r) tasks, and have not normalized for anatomical variance when considering F(r) distributions. The goals of the present study were (i) to explore F(r) during tangential force production tasks, and (ii) to examine the extent to which anatomical registration (i.e. spatial normalization of anatomically analogous structures) could improve signal detectability in F(r) data. Twelve subjects grasped a vertically oriented cylindrical handle (diameter=6 cm) and matched target upward tangential forces of 10, 20, and 30 N. F(r) data were measured using a flexible pressure mat with an angular resolution of 4.8°, and were registered using piecewise-linear interpolation between five manually identified points-of-interest. Results indicate that F(r) was primarily limited to three contact regions: the distal thumb, the distal fingers, and the fingers' metatacarpal heads, and that, while increases in tangential force caused significant increases in F(r) for these regions, they did not significantly affect the F(r) distribution across the hand. Registration was found to substantially reduce between-subject variability, as indicated by both accentuated F(r) trends, and amplification of the test statistic. These results imply that, while subjects focus F(r) primarily on three anatomical regions during cylindrical grasp, inter-subject anatomical differences introduce a variability that, if not corrected for via registration, may compromise one's ability to draw anatomically relevant conclusions from grasping force data. PMID:22134182

  10. Production of pure quasi-monochromatic 11C beams for accurate radiation therapy and dose delivery verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, Marta; Brahme, Anders

    2015-09-01

    In the present study we develop a new technique for the production of clean quasi-monochromatic 11C positron emitter beams for accurate radiation therapy and PET-CT dose delivery imaging and treatment verification. The 11C ion beam is produced by projectile fragmentation using a primary 12C ion beam. The practical elimination of the energy spread of the secondary 11C fragments and other beam contaminating fragments is described. Monte Carlo calculation with the SHIELD-HIT10+ code and analytical methods for the transport of the ions in matter are used in the analysis. Production yields, as well as energy, velocity and magnetic rigidity distributions of the fragments generated in a cylindrical target are scored as a function of the depth within 1 cm thick slices for an optimal target consisting of a fixed 20 cm section of liquid hydrogen followed by a variable thickness section of polyethylene. The wide energy and magnetic rigidity spread of the 11C ion beam can be reduced to values around 1% by using a variable monochromatizing wedge-shaped degrader in the beam line. Finally, magnetic rigidity and particle species selection, as well as discrimination of the particle velocity through a combined Time of Flight and Radio Frequency-driven Velocity filter purify the beam from similar magnetic rigidity contaminating fragments (mainly 7Be and 3He fragments). A beam purity of about 99% is expected by the combined method.

  11. Responsiveness of muscle tone characteristics to progressive force production.

    PubMed

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Häkkinen, Arja; Kautiainen, Hannu; Weir, Adam; Ylinen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    It is possible to measure muscle tone reliably, quickly and objectively using tonometers although they are not yet widely used. In clinical practice, it may be helpful if clinicians could assess the degree of contraction in different parts of a muscle without having to perform time-consuming electromyography measurements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of different muscle tone characteristics to progressively increased contraction force of quadriceps muscle. Twenty healthy subjects (mean age 39.9 years, 50% women) volunteered. Using 2 different tonometers various muscle viscoelastic properties were measured. The frequency (hertz), logarithmic decrement, and stiffness (newtons per meter) of damped mechanical oscillation of the muscle tissue and tissue compliance (millijoules) were registered from rectus femoris muscle at rest and 20, 40, 60, 80% of maximal voluntary contraction determined using dynamometry. All the values changed linearly with increasing force level. Compliance, oscillation stiffness, and frequency parameters showed large effect sizes (ESs ≥ 0.8). The standardized respoknse mean for compliance was 5.3 (4.8-5.7) mJ, for oscillation stiffness 1.8 (1.3-2.2) N·m(-1), frequency 1.1 (0.6-1.5) Hz, and decrement -0.6 (-1.0 to -0.2). The results indicate that the compliance and oscillation stiffness parameters showed the highest responsiveness and can thus best detect changes in muscle contraction state. The additional value of using tonometers to measure these properties in clinical practice should be investigated further.

  12. Forced degradation studies of rapamycin: identification of autoxidation products.

    PubMed

    Oyler, Alan R; Segmuller, Brigitte E; Sun, Yanqiu; Polshyna, Ann; Dunphy, Richard; Armstrong, Barbara L; Achord, Patrick; Maryanoff, Cynthia A; Alquier, Lori; Il'ichev, Yuri V

    2012-02-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, also known as Sirolimus, underwent autoxidation under mild conditions to give numerous monomeric and oligomeric compounds, which were generally characterized by size-exclusion chromatography and NP-HPLC with UV and MS detection. Some of the more predominant products, epoxides and ketones, were isolated and identified. Two epoxides and 10S-epimer of rapamycin were described for the first time. Observed rapamycin isomers were also addressed. Computational chemistry was used to provide mechanistic insights. Formation of the majority of the rapamycin products could be rationalized with free radical-mediated autoxidation reactions involving alkene and alcohol sites. Methodological aspects of oxidative stress testing are discussed. PMID:22088479

  13. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  14. Stochastic order parameter equation of isometric force production revealed by drift-diffusion estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; Friedrich, R.; Beek, P. J.

    2006-11-01

    We address two questions that are central to understanding human motor control variability: what kind of dynamical components contribute to motor control variability (i.e., deterministic and/or random ones), and how are those components structured? To this end, we derive a stochastic order parameter equation for isometric force production from experimental data using drift-diffusion estimates. We show that the force variability increases with the required force output because of a decrease of deterministic stability and an accompanying increase of noise intensity. A structural analysis reveals that the deterministic component consists of a linear control loop, while the random component involves a noise source that scales with force output. In addition, we present evidence for the existence of a subject-independent overall noise level of human isometric force production.

  15. Forces Shaping Future U.S. Coal Production and Use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Pierce, Brenda S.

    2001-01-01

    More than half of the electricity in the United States is generated by coal-fired powerplants. U.S. coal producers sell almost 90 percent of their product for electricity generation, and so, the future of the U.S. coal industry will be determined by the future of coal-fired electricity-generation plants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) of five major coal-producing regions of the United States (fig. 1): (1) the Appalachian Basin, (2) the Illinois Basin, (3) the Gulf Coast, (4) the Colorado Plateau, and (5) the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. The Powder River and Williston Basins are the principal producing areas of the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region.

  16. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Coombes, Stephen A; Planetta, Peggy J; Vaillancourt, David E

    2013-03-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

  17. Accurate ab Initio Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Heats of Formation for FCN, FNC, ClCN, and ClNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The XCN and XNC (X = F, Cl) isomers have been investigated using the CCSD(T) method in conjunction with correlation consistent basis sets. Equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies, anharmonic constants, fundamental frequencies, and heats of formation have been evaluated. Agreement with experiment for the fundamental frequencies is very good, even for nu(sub 2), for CICN, which is subject to a strong Fermi resonance with 2nu(sub 3). It is also shown that a second-order perturbation theory approach to solving the nuclear Schroedinger equation gives results in excellent agreement with essentially exact variational calculations. This is true even for nu(sub 2) of ClCN, provided that near-singular terms are eliminated from the perturbation theory formulas and the appropriate Fermi interaction energy matrix is then diagonalized. A band at 615/cm, tentatively assigned as the Cl-N stretch in ClNC in matrix isolation experiments, is shown not to be due to ClNC. Accurate atomization energies are determined and are used to evaluate accurate heats of formation (3.1 +/- 1.5, 33.2 +/- 1.5, 72.6 +/- 1.5, and 75.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/mol for FCN, ClCN, FNC, and ClNC, respectively). It is expected that the theoretical heats of formation for FCN, FNC, and ClNC are the most accurate available.

  18. Nanotribological effects of hair care products and environment on human hair using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Carmen; Bhushan, Bharat

    2005-07-01

    Tribological properties are useful in the study of human hair and other biological materials. Major sources of investigation for conditioner treated hair includes localization of conditioner, mechanisms related to changes in surface roughness, friction, and adhesion on the nanoscale due to conditioner agents, and how the products change the microstructure of the cuticle. The paper presents nanotribological studies investigating surface roughness, friction, and adhesion using atomic force/friction force microscopy (AFM/FFM). Test samples include virgin and chemically damaged hair, both with and without commercial conditioner treatment, as well as chemically damaged hair with experimental conditioner treatments. Friction force mapping provides insight into the localized change in friction caused by the application of hair care materials. Adhesive force maps to study adhesion on the cuticle surface provide information about localization and distribution of conditioner as well. A discussion is presented on these properties of hair as a function of relative humidity, temperature, durability, and conditioning treatments.

  19. Sensitivity of Simulated Global Ocean Carbon Flux Estimates to Forcing by Reanalysis Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    Reanalysis products from MERRA, NCEP2, NCEP1, and ECMWF were used to force an established ocean biogeochemical model to estimate air-sea carbon fluxes (FCO2) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the global oceans. Global air-sea carbon fluxes and pCO2 were relatively insensitive to the choice of forcing reanalysis. All global FCO2 estimates from the model forced by the four different reanalyses were within 20% of in situ estimates (MERRA and NCEP1 were within 7%), and all models exhibited statistically significant positive correlations with in situ estimates across the 12 major oceanographic basins. Global pCO2 estimates were within 1% of in situ estimates with ECMWF being the outlier at 0.6%. Basin correlations were similar to FCO2. There were, however, substantial departures among basin estimates from the different reanalysis forcings. The high latitudes and tropics had the largest ranges in estimated fluxes among the reanalyses. Regional pCO2 differences among the reanalysis forcings were muted relative to the FCO2 results. No individual reanalysis was uniformly better or worse in the major oceanographic basins. The results provide information on the characterization of uncertainty in ocean carbon models due to choice of reanalysis forcing.

  20. Isometric force production parameters during normal and experimental low back pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Descarreaux, Martin; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Teasdale, Normand

    2005-01-01

    Background The control of force and its between-trial variability are often taken as critical determinants of motor performance. Subjects performed isometric trunk flexion and extension forces without and with experiment pain to examine if pain yields changes in the control of trunk forces. The objective of this study is to determine if experimental low back pain modifies trunk isometric force production. Methods Ten control subjects participated in this study. They were required to exert 50 and 75% of their isometric maximal trunk flexion and extension torque. In a learning phase preceding the non painful and painful trials, visual and verbal feedbacks were provided. Then, subjects were asked to perform 10 trials without any feedback. Time to peak torque, time to peak torque variability, peak torque variability as well as constant and absolute error in peak torque were calculated. Time to peak and peak dF/dt were computed to determine if the first peak of dF/dt could predict the peak torque achieved. Results Absolute and constant errors were higher in the presence of a painful electrical stimulation. Furthermore, peak torque variability for the higher level of force was increased with in the presence of experimental pain. The linear regressions between peak dF/dt, time to peak dF/dt and peak torque were similar for both conditions. Experimental low back pain yielded increased absolute and constant errors as well as a greater peak torque variability for the higher levels of force. The control strategy, however, remained the same between the non painful and painful condition. Cutaneous pain affects some isometric force production parameters but modifications of motor control strategies are not implemented spontaneously. Conclusions It is hypothesized that adaptation of motor strategies to low back pain is implemented gradually over time. This would enable LBP patients to perform their daily tasks with presumably less pain and more accuracy. PMID:15703067

  1. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing.

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics.

  2. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing.

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics. PMID:24851830

  3. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Christopher M.; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5–9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1–5 or 6–15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough

  4. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor.

    PubMed

    Laine, Christopher M; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5-9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1-5 or 6-15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough exploration

  5. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Christopher M.; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5–9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1–5 or 6–15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough

  6. Control of cytoplasmic dynein force production and processivity by its C-terminal domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Höök, Peter; Brenner, Sibylle; Wynne, Caitlin L.; Vallee, Richard B.; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in cargo transport, nuclear migration and cell division. Despite structural conservation of the dynein motor domain from yeast to higher eukaryotes, the extensively studied S. cerevisiae dynein behaves distinctly from mammalian dyneins, which produce far less force and travel over shorter distances. However, isolated reports of yeast-like force production by mammalian dynein have called interspecies differences into question. We report that functional differences between yeast and mammalian dynein are real and attributable to a C-terminal motor element absent in yeast, which resembles a ‘cap’ over the central pore of the mammalian dynein motor domain. Removal of this cap increases the force generation of rat dynein from 1 pN to a yeast-like 6 pN and greatly increases its travel distance. Our findings identify the CT-cap as a novel regulator of dynein function.

  7. Control of cytoplasmic dynein force production and processivity by its C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Matthew P; Höök, Peter; Brenner, Sibylle; Wynne, Caitlin L; Vallee, Richard B; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-02-11

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in cargo transport, nuclear migration and cell division. Despite structural conservation of the dynein motor domain from yeast to higher eukaryotes, the extensively studied S. cerevisiae dynein behaves distinctly from mammalian dyneins, which produce far less force and travel over shorter distances. However, isolated reports of yeast-like force production by mammalian dynein have called interspecies differences into question. We report that functional differences between yeast and mammalian dynein are real and attributable to a C-terminal motor element absent in yeast, which resembles a 'cap' over the central pore of the mammalian dynein motor domain. Removal of this cap increases the force generation of rat dynein from 1 pN to a yeast-like 6 pN and greatly increases its travel distance. Our findings identify the CT-cap as a novel regulator of dynein function.

  8. Carry-Over of Force Production Symmetry in Athletes of Differing Strength Levels.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Christopher A; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus; Stone, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to determine the level of association between bilateral force production symmetry assessment methods (standing weight distribution [WtD], unloaded and lightly loaded jumps, and isometric strength) and to determine whether the amount of symmetry carry-over between these tasks differs for strong and weak athletes. Subjects for this study included male (n = 31) and female (n = 32) athletes from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I sports. Athletes performed WtD, unloaded and lightly loaded (20 kg) static and countermovement jumps, and isometric midthigh pull (IMTP) assessments on 2 adjacent force plates. Ground reaction force data were used to calculate symmetry variables and performance-related variables. Using Pearson zero order correlations, evaluations of the amount of symmetry carry-over were made. Weight distribution correlated strongly with jump peak force (PF) (r = 0.628-0.664). Strong relationships were also observed between loading conditions for jump variables (r = 0.568-0.957) as were the relationships between jump types for PF, peak power, and net impulse (r = 0.506-0.834). Based on the pooled sample, there was a lack of association between IMTP and WtD for jump symmetry variables. However, when examining strong and weak groups, rate of force development showed moderate to strong symmetry carry-over in the strongest athletes (r = 0.416-0.589). Stronger athletes appear to display similar explosive strength symmetry characteristics in dynamic and isometric assessments, unlike weaker athletes. Strength seems to influence the amount of force production symmetry carry-over between bilateral assessments. There may be optimal loads and variables for symmetry assessment, but these may differ based on population characteristics.

  9. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products. PMID:26243938

  10. DNA extraction techniques compared for accurate detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products.

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Kazan, Hande; Karacanli, Burçin; Lucas, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, DNA extraction methods have been evaluated to detect the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in maize food and feed products commercialised in Turkey. All the extraction methods tested performed well for the majority of maize foods and feed products analysed. However, the highest DNA content was achieved by the Wizard, Genespin or the CTAB method, all of which produced optimal DNA yield and purity for different maize food and feed products. The samples were then screened for the presence of GM elements, along with certified reference materials. Of the food and feed samples, 8 % tested positive for the presence of one GM element (NOS terminator), of which half (4 % of the total) also contained a second element (the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter). The results obtained herein clearly demonstrate the presence of GM maize in the Turkish market, and that the Foodproof GMO Screening Kit provides reliable screening of maize food and feed products.

  11. Ion drag force on an absorbing grain in highly collisional plasma in the presence of plasma production and loss processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Manis; Khrapak, Sergei A.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2008-09-07

    The ion drag force acting on a small absorbing spherical grain has been calculated analytically in highly collisional plasma with slowly drifting ions taking into account plasma production and loss mechanisms in the vicinity of the grain. It is shown that both the magnitude and direction of the ion drag force are strongly influenced by the plasma production and loss mechanisms. The parameter regimes for the 'positive' and 'negative' ion drag forces acting on an absorbing grain have been identified.

  12. Investigating the Force Production of Functionally-Graded Flexible Wings in Flapping Wing Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudbhari, Durlav; Erdogan, Malcolm; He, Kai; Bateman, Daniel; Lipkis, Rory; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and bats oscillate their wings to propel themselves over long distances and to maneuver with unprecedented agility. A key element to achieve their impressive aerodynamic performance is the flexibility of their wings. Numerous studies have shown that homogeneously flexible wings can enhance force production, propulsive efficiency and lift efficiency. Yet, animal wings are not homogenously flexible, but instead have varying material properties. The aim of this study is to characterize the force production and energetics of functionally-graded flexible wings. A partially-flexible wing composed of a rigid section and a flexible section is used as a first-order model of functionally-graded materials. The flexion occurs in the spanwise direction and it is affected by the spanwise flexion ratio, that is, the ratio of the length of the rigid section compared to the total span length. By varying the flexion ratio as well as the material properties of the flexible section, the study aims to examine the force production and energetics of flapping flight with functionally-graded flexible wings. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  13. Separation and characterization of forced degradation products of abacavir sulphate by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Vali, R Mastan; Ramachandra, Bondigalla; Raju, S Satyanarayana

    2011-01-25

    Abacavir sulphate was subjected to forced degradation under the conditions of hydrolysis (acid, alkali and neutral), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress as prescribed by ICH. Eight degradation products were formed and their separation was accomplished on Waters XTerra C₁₈ (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column using 20 mM ammonium acetate:acetonitrile as a mobile phase in gradient elution mode by LC. The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS/MS and its fragmentation pathways were proposed. No previous reports were found in the literature regarding the degradation behavior of abacavir sulphate.

  14. Characterization of forced degradation products of pazopanib hydrochloride by UHPLC-Q-TOF/MS and in silico toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prinesh N; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Sharma, Mahesh; Garg, Prabha; Talluri, M V N Kumar; Gananadhamu, S; Srinivas, R

    2015-07-01

    Pazopanib (PZ), an anti-cancer drug, was subjected to forced degradation under hydrolytic (acid, base and neutral), oxidative, photolytic and thermal stress conditions as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. A selective stability indicating validated method was developed using a Waters Acquity UPLC HSS T3 (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) column in gradient mode with ammonium acetate buffer (10 mM, pH 5.0) and acetonitrile. PZ was found to degrade only in photolytic conditions to produce six transformation products (TPs). All the TPs were identified and characterized by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry experiments in combination with accurate mass measurements. Plausible mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of TPs. In silico toxicity was predicted using TOPKAT and DEREK softwares for all the TPs. The TP, N4-(2,3-dimethyl-2H-indazol-6-yl)-N4-methylpyrimidine-2,4-diamine, was found to be genotoxic, whereas all other TPs with sulfonamide moiety were hepatotoxic. The data reported here are expected to be of significance as this study foresees the formation of one potential genotoxic and five hepatotoxic degradation/transformation products.

  15. The sources of two components of variance: An example of multifinger cyclic force production tasks at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jason; Skm, Varadhan; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    In a multifinger cyclic force production task, the finger force variance measured across trials can be decomposed into two components, one that affects the combined force output (“bad variance”), and one that does not (“good variance”). Previous studies have found similar time patterns of “bad variance” and force rate leading to an approximately linear relationship between them. Based on this finding and a recently developed model of multifinger force production, we expected the “bad variance” during cyclic force production to increase monotonically with the rate of force change, both within-a-cycle, and across trials at different frequencies. Alternatively, “bad variance” could show a dependence on task frequency, not on actual force derivative values. Healthy subjects were required to produce cyclic force patterns to prescribed targets by pressing on unidimensional force sensors, at a frequency set by a metronome. The task was performed with only the index finger, and with all four fingers. In the task with all four fingers, the “good variance” increased approximately linearly with an increase in the force magnitude. The “bad variance” showed within-a-cycle modulation similar to that of the force rate. However, an increase in the frequency did not lead to an increase in the “bad variance” that could be expected based on the natural relationships between action frequency and the rate of force change modulation. The results have been interpreted in the framework of an earlier model of multifinger force production where “bad variance” is a result of variance of the timing parameter. The unexpected lack of modulation of the “bad variance” with frequency suggests a drop in variance of the timing parameter with increased frequency. This mechanism may serve to maintain a constant acceptable level of variance under different conditions. PMID:19468721

  16. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R E; Tamm, A; Béland, L K; Samolyuk, G D; Stocks, G M; Caro, A; Slipchenko, L V; Osetsky, Yu N; Aabloo, A; Klintenberg, M; Wang, Y

    2016-06-14

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. During these collisions, the distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. However, there is no accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure. PMID:27110927

  17. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Caro, A.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.; et al

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is nomore » accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.« less

  18. TMS reveals a direct influence of spinal projections from human SMAp on precise force production.

    PubMed

    Entakli, Jonathan; Bonnard, Mireille; Chen, Sophie; Berton, Eric; De Graaf, Jozina B

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal (CS) system plays an important role in fine motor control, especially in precision grip tasks. Although the primary motor cortex (M1) is the main source of the CS projections, other projections have been found, especially from the supplementary motor area proper (SMAp). To study the characteristics of these CS projections from SMAp, we compared muscle responses of an intrinsic hand muscle (FDI) evoked by stimulation of human M1 and SMAp during an isometric static low-force control task. Subjects were instructed to maintain a small cursor on a target force curve by applying a pressure with their right precision grip on a force sensor. Neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to stimulate either left M1 or left SMAp with equal induced electric field values at the defined cortical targets. The results show that the SMAp stimulation evokes reproducible muscle responses with similar latencies and amplitudes as M1 stimulation, and with a clear and significant shorter silent period. These results suggest that (i) CS projections from human SMAp are as rapid and efficient as those from M1, (ii) CS projections from SMAp are directly involved in control of the excitability of spinal motoneurons and (iii) SMAp has a different intracortical inhibitory circuitry. We conclude that human SMAp and M1 both have direct influence on force production during fine manual motor tasks. PMID:24164635

  19. Unconventional entropy production in the presence of momentum-dependent forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chulan; Yeo, Joonhyun; Lee, Hyun Keun; Park, Hyunggyu

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the unconventional nature of entropy production (EP) in nonequilibrium systems with odd-parity variables that change signs under time reversal. We consider the Brownian motion of a particle in contact with a heat reservoir, where the particle's momentum is an odd-parity variable. In the presence of an external momentum-dependent force, the EP transferred to the environment is found to be not equivalent to the usual reservoir entropy change due to heat transfer. An additional unconventional contribution to the EP, which is crucial for maintaining the non-negativity of the (average) total EP enforced by the second law of thermodynamics, appears. A few examples are considered to elucidate the novel nature of the EP. We also discuss detailed balance conditions with a momentum-dependent force.

  20. Effects of resistance training on tendon mechanical properties and rapid force production in prepubertal children

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, C. M.; Korff, T.; Fath, F.

    2014-01-01

    Children develop lower levels of muscle force, and at slower rates, than adults. Although strength training in children is expected to reduce this differential, a synchronous adaptation in the tendon must be achieved to ensure forces continue to be transmitted to the skeleton with efficiency while minimizing the risk of strain-related tendon injury. We hypothesized that resistance training (RT) would alter tendon mechanical properties in children concomitantly with changes in force production characteristics. Twenty prepubertal children (age 8.9 ± 0.3 yr) were equally divided into control (nontraining) and experimental (training) groups. The training group completed a 10-wk RT intervention consisting of 2–3 sets of 8–15 plantar flexion contractions performed twice weekly on a recumbent calf-raise machine. Achilles tendon properties (cross-sectional area, elongation, stress, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus), electromechanical delay (EMD; time between the onset of muscle activity and force), rate of force development (RFD; slope of the force-time curve), and rate of electromyographic (EMG) increase (REI; slope of the EMG time curve) were measured before and after RT. Tendon stiffness and Young's modulus increased significantly after RT in the experimental group only (∼29% and ∼25%, respectively); all other tendon properties were not significantly altered, although there were mean decreases in both peak tendon strain and strain at a given force level (14% and 24%, respectively; not significant) which may have implications for tendon injury risk and muscle fiber mechanics. A decrease of ∼13% in EMD was found after RT for the experimental group, which paralleled the increase in tendon stiffness (r = −0.59); however, RFD and REI were unchanged. The present data show that the Achilles tendon adapts to RT in prepubertal children and is paralleled by a change in EMD, although the magnitude of this change did not appear to be sufficient to influence RFD

  1. 77 FR 70473 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) at the email or physical address below by 5 p.m... that ILAB follows in developing the TVPRA List (72 FR 73374). The guidelines set forth the criteria by.... List''), identified by country of origin, that the Department, in consultation and cooperation with...

  2. 75 FR 8402 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... goods (72 FR 73374). The guidelines set forth the criteria by which information is evaluated... believe might have been mined, produced or manufactured with forced or indentured child labor (66 FR 5353... appropriate, revising the List (66 FR 5351). Based on DOL research and information submitted by the...

  3. Simple reaction time as a function of number and similarity of sequenced elements in rapid force production.

    PubMed

    Ito, M

    1997-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the effects of number and similarity of sequenced elements on simple reaction time (RT). In Exp. 1, subjects were required to initiate and execute sequences of one to three homogeneous or heterogeneous force elements by squeezing the handle as quickly and accurately as possible. Simple RTs and premotor times increased from one to two elements, with no further increases thereafter, regardless of whether the sequences were comprised of homogeneous or heterogeneous elements. The number of elements did not affect the production of interelement interval. In Exps. 1 and 2, however, simple RTs and premotor times to initiate the sequences were longer for the heterogeneous conditions than for the homogeneous conditions. These findings did not support the assumption of the 1978 subprogram retrieval model of Sternberg, Monsell, Knoll, and Wright that only the first element in the sequence is retrieved and programmed during a simple-RT interval. These findings also suggest that similarity of sequenced elements is one factor which affects the complexity of the motor-programming process. PMID:9293593

  4. Vortexlet models of flapping flexible wings show tuning for force production and control.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, A M; Daniel, T L

    2010-12-01

    Insect wings are compliant structures that experience deformations during flight. Such deformations have recently been shown to substantially affect induced flows, with appreciable consequences to flight forces. However, there are open questions related to the aerodynamic mechanisms underlying the performance benefits of wing deformation, as well as the extent to which such deformations are determined by the boundary conditions governing wing actuation together with mechanical properties of the wing itself. Here we explore aerodynamic performance parameters of compliant wings under periodic oscillations, subject to changes in phase between wing elevation and pitch, and magnitude and spatial pattern of wing flexural stiffness. We use a combination of computational structural mechanics models and a 2D computational fluid dynamics approach to ask how aerodynamic force production and control potential are affected by pitch/elevation phase and variations in wing flexural stiffness. Our results show that lift and thrust forces are highly sensitive to flexural stiffness distributions, with performance optima that lie in different phase regions. These results suggest a control strategy for both flying animals and engineering applications of micro-air vehicles.

  5. Vortexlet models of flapping flexible wings show tuning for force production and control.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, A M; Daniel, T L

    2010-12-01

    Insect wings are compliant structures that experience deformations during flight. Such deformations have recently been shown to substantially affect induced flows, with appreciable consequences to flight forces. However, there are open questions related to the aerodynamic mechanisms underlying the performance benefits of wing deformation, as well as the extent to which such deformations are determined by the boundary conditions governing wing actuation together with mechanical properties of the wing itself. Here we explore aerodynamic performance parameters of compliant wings under periodic oscillations, subject to changes in phase between wing elevation and pitch, and magnitude and spatial pattern of wing flexural stiffness. We use a combination of computational structural mechanics models and a 2D computational fluid dynamics approach to ask how aerodynamic force production and control potential are affected by pitch/elevation phase and variations in wing flexural stiffness. Our results show that lift and thrust forces are highly sensitive to flexural stiffness distributions, with performance optima that lie in different phase regions. These results suggest a control strategy for both flying animals and engineering applications of micro-air vehicles. PMID:21098955

  6. Muscle force production during bent-knee, bent-hip walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Adam D; Raichlen, David A; Pontzer, Herman

    2013-09-01

    Researchers have long debated the locomotor posture used by the earliest bipeds. While many agree that by 3-4 Ma (millions of years ago), hominins walked with an extended-limb human style of bipedalism, researchers are still divided over whether the earliest bipeds walked like modern humans, or walked with a more bent-knee, bent-hip (BKBH) ape-like form of locomotion. Since more flexed postures are associated with higher energy costs, reconstructing early bipedal mechanics has implications for the selection pressures that led to upright walking. The purpose of this study is to determine how modern human anatomy functions in BKBH walking to clarify the links between morphology and energy costs in different mechanical regimes. Using inverse dynamics, we calculated muscle force production at the major limb joints in humans walking in two modes, both with extended limbs and BKBH. We found that in BKBH walking, humans must produce large muscle forces at the knee to support body weight, leading to higher estimated energy costs. However, muscle forces at the hip remained similar in BKBH and extended limb walking, suggesting that anatomical adaptations for hip extension in humans do not necessarily diminish the effective mechanical advantage at the hip in more flexed postures. We conclude that the key adaptations for economical walking, regardless of joint posture, seem to center on maintaining low muscle forces at the hip, primarily by keeping low external moments at the hip. We explore the implications of these results for interpreting locomotor energetics in early hominins, including australopithecines and Ardipithecus ramidus. PMID:23928351

  7. Force-production asymmetry in male and female athletes of differing strength levels.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Christopher A; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus; Stone, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the existence of bilateral strength and force-production asymmetry and evaluate possible differences based on sex, as well as strength level. Asymmetry was assessed during weight-distribution (WtD) testing, unloaded and lightly loaded static- (SJ) and countermovement-jump (CMJ) testing, and isometric midthigh-pull (IMTP) strength testing. Subjects included 63 athletes (31 male, 32 female) for WtD, SJ, and CMJ tests, while 129 athletes (64 male, 65 female) participated in IMTP testing. Independent-samples t tests were used to determine possible differences in asymmetry magnitude between males and females, as well as between strong and weak athletes. Cohen d effect-size (ES) estimates were also used to estimate difference magnitudes. Statistically different asymmetry levels with moderate to strong ESs were seen between males and females in WtD, 0-kg SJ (peak force [PF]), 20-kg SJ (peak power [PP]), 0-kg CMJ (PF, PP, net impulse), and 20-kg CMJ (PF), but no statistical differences were observed in IMTP variables. Dividing the sample into strong and weak groups produced statistically significant differences with strong ES estimates in IMTP PF and rate of force development, and many ESs in jump symmetry variables increased. The results of this investigation indicate that females may be more prone to producing forces asymmetrically than males during WtD and jumping tasks. Similarly, weaker athletes displayed more asymmetry than stronger athletes. This may indicate that absolute strength may play a larger role in influencing asymmetry magnitude than sex. PMID:25394294

  8. Muscle force production during bent-knee, bent-hip walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Adam D; Raichlen, David A; Pontzer, Herman

    2013-09-01

    Researchers have long debated the locomotor posture used by the earliest bipeds. While many agree that by 3-4 Ma (millions of years ago), hominins walked with an extended-limb human style of bipedalism, researchers are still divided over whether the earliest bipeds walked like modern humans, or walked with a more bent-knee, bent-hip (BKBH) ape-like form of locomotion. Since more flexed postures are associated with higher energy costs, reconstructing early bipedal mechanics has implications for the selection pressures that led to upright walking. The purpose of this study is to determine how modern human anatomy functions in BKBH walking to clarify the links between morphology and energy costs in different mechanical regimes. Using inverse dynamics, we calculated muscle force production at the major limb joints in humans walking in two modes, both with extended limbs and BKBH. We found that in BKBH walking, humans must produce large muscle forces at the knee to support body weight, leading to higher estimated energy costs. However, muscle forces at the hip remained similar in BKBH and extended limb walking, suggesting that anatomical adaptations for hip extension in humans do not necessarily diminish the effective mechanical advantage at the hip in more flexed postures. We conclude that the key adaptations for economical walking, regardless of joint posture, seem to center on maintaining low muscle forces at the hip, primarily by keeping low external moments at the hip. We explore the implications of these results for interpreting locomotor energetics in early hominins, including australopithecines and Ardipithecus ramidus.

  9. Force-dependent and force-independent heat production in single slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Buschman, H P; van der Laarse, W J; Stienen, G J; Elzinga, G

    1996-01-01

    1. The origin of labile heat production, i.e. a heat component which rapidly decays after the onset of stimulation, and of stable (maintenance) heat production was investigated in intact single fast-twitch (type 1) and slow-twitch (type 3) iliofibularis muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis, at 20 degrees C, by varying stimulation frequency and by varying sarcomere length and the concentration of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM) added. 2. The labile heat produced consisted of a force-independent and a force-dependent part. The average parvalbumin (PA) content found in type 1 fibre bundles (0.84 +/- 0.08 mM; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 5) and in type 3 fibre bundles (0.12 +/- 0.02 mM; n = 5) indicates that the force-independent labile heat is explained by Ca(2+)-Mg2+ exchange on PA, and amounts to a molar enthalpy change of -78 kJ (molPA)-1. 3. Force-dependent labile heat during fused contractions was similar to the calculated heat production resulting from the formation of force-generating cross-bridges, assuming an enthalpy change associated with cross-bridge formation of -30 kJ mol-1. 4. Activation heat, i.e. the part of the total stable heat that is not related to the contractile apparatus, and of which the calcium sequestration by the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the most important contributor, determined by varying sarcomere length or BDM concentration, was identical. For fused contractions the fraction activation heat of the stable maintenance rate of heat production was 34 +/- 4% (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 13) in type 1 fibres, and 52 +/- 4% (n = 15) in type 3 fibres. In unfused contractions this was 48 +/- 5% (n = 13) in type 1 fibres, and 35 +/- 2% (n = 11) in type 3 fibres. 5. From the force-dependent stable rate of heat production the economy of cross-bridge cycling, expressed as the force-time integral for a single myosin head per ATP molecule hydrolysed, was calculated. It followed that cross-bridge interaction in type 3 fibres is more economical than in type 1 fibres

  10. Sprint Acceleration Mechanics: The Major Role of Hamstrings in Horizontal Force Production

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Jean-Benoît; Gimenez, Philippe; Edouard, Pascal; Arnal, Pierrick; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Mendiguchia, Jurdan

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature supports the importance of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF) production for sprint acceleration performance. Modeling and clinical studies have shown that the hip extensors are very likely contributors to sprint acceleration performance. We experimentally tested the role of the hip extensors in horizontal GRF production during short, maximal, treadmill sprint accelerations. Torque capabilities of the knee and hip extensors and flexors were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 14 males familiar with sprint running. Then, during 6-s sprints on an instrumented motorized treadmill, horizontal and vertical GRF were synchronized with electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus maximus averaged over the first half of support, entire support, entire swing and end-of-swing phases. No significant correlations were found between isokinetic or EMG variables and horizontal GRF. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship (P = 0.024) between horizontal GRF and the combination of biceps femoris EMG activity during the end of the swing and the knee flexors eccentric peak torque. In conclusion, subjects who produced the greatest amount of horizontal force were both able to highly activate their hamstring muscles just before ground contact and present high eccentric hamstring peak torque capability. PMID:26733889

  11. Sprint Acceleration Mechanics: The Major Role of Hamstrings in Horizontal Force Production.

    PubMed

    Morin, Jean-Benoît; Gimenez, Philippe; Edouard, Pascal; Arnal, Pierrick; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Mendiguchia, Jurdan

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature supports the importance of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF) production for sprint acceleration performance. Modeling and clinical studies have shown that the hip extensors are very likely contributors to sprint acceleration performance. We experimentally tested the role of the hip extensors in horizontal GRF production during short, maximal, treadmill sprint accelerations. Torque capabilities of the knee and hip extensors and flexors were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 14 males familiar with sprint running. Then, during 6-s sprints on an instrumented motorized treadmill, horizontal and vertical GRF were synchronized with electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus maximus averaged over the first half of support, entire support, entire swing and end-of-swing phases. No significant correlations were found between isokinetic or EMG variables and horizontal GRF. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship (P = 0.024) between horizontal GRF and the combination of biceps femoris EMG activity during the end of the swing and the knee flexors eccentric peak torque. In conclusion, subjects who produced the greatest amount of horizontal force were both able to highly activate their hamstring muscles just before ground contact and present high eccentric hamstring peak torque capability.

  12. An optimized method for the accurate determination of patulin in apple products by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Miyeong; Kim, Byungjoo; Baek, Song-Yee

    2015-07-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several molds in fruits, has been frequently detected in apple products. Therefore, regulatory bodies have established recommended maximum permitted patulin concentrations for each type of apple product. Although several analytical methods have been adopted to determine patulin in food, quality control of patulin analysis is not easy, as reliable certified reference materials (CRMs) are not available. In this study, as a part of a project for developing CRMs for patulin analysis, we developed isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) as a higher-order reference method for the accurate value-assignment of CRMs. (13)C7-patulin was used as internal standard. Samples were extracted with ethyl acetate to improve recovery. For further sample cleanup with solid-phase extraction (SPE), the HLB SPE cartridge was chosen after comparing with several other types of SPE cartridges. High-performance liquid chromatography was performed on a multimode column for proper retention and separation of highly polar and water-soluble patulin from sample interferences. Sample extracts were analyzed by LC/MS/MS with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode with selected reaction monitoring of patulin and (13)C7-patulin at m/z 153→m/z 109 and m/z 160→m/z 115, respectively. The validity of the method was tested by measuring gravimetrically fortified samples of various apple products. In addition, the repeatability and the reproducibility of the method were tested to evaluate the performance of the method. The method was shown to provide accurate measurements in the 3-40 μg/kg range with a relative expanded uncertainty of around 1%.

  13. Enslaving in a serial chain: interactions between grip force and hand force in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Paclet, Florent; Ambike, Satyajit; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2014-03-01

    This study was motivated by the double action of extrinsic hand muscles that produce grip force and also contribute to wrist torque. We explored interactions between grip force and wrist torque in isometric force production tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that an intentional change in one of the two kinetic variables would produce an unintentional change in the other (enslaving). When young healthy subjects produced accurate changes in the grip force, only minor effects on the force produced by the hand (by wrist flexion/extension action) were observed. In contrast, a change in the hand force produced consistent changes in grip force in the same direction. The magnitude of such unintentional grip force change was stronger for intentional hand force decrease as compared to hand force increase. These effects increased with the magnitude of the initial grip force. When the subjects were asked to produce accurate total force computed as the sum of the hand and grip forces, strong negative covariation between the two forces was seen across trials interpreted as a synergy stabilizing the total force. An index of this synergy was higher in the space of "modes," hypothetical signals to the two effectors that could be changed by the controller one at a time. We interpret the complex enslaving effects (positive force covariation) as conditioned by typical everyday tasks. The presence of synergic effects (negative, task-specific force covariation) can be naturally interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:24309747

  14. Enslaving in a serial chain: Interactions between grip force and hand force in isometric tasks

    PubMed Central

    Paclet, Florent; Ambike, Satyajit; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    This study was motivated by the double action of extrinsic hand muscles that produce grip force and also contribute to wrist torque. We explored interactions between grip force and wrist torque in isometric force production tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that an intentional change in one of the two kinetic variables would produce an unintentional change in the other (enslaving). When young healthy subjects produced accurate changes in the grip force, only minor effects on the force produced by the hand (by wrist flexion/extension action) were observed. In contrast, a change in the hand force produced consistent changes in grip force in the same direction. The magnitude of such unintentional grip force change was stronger for intentional hand force decrease as compared to hand force increase. These effects increased with the magnitude of the initial grip force. When the subjects were asked to produce accurate total force computed as the sum of the hand and grip forces, strong negative co-variation between the two forces was seen across trials interpreted as a synergy stabilizing the total force. An index of this synergy was higher in the space of “modes”, hypothetical signals to the two effectors that could be changed by the controller one at a time. We interpret the complex enslaving effects (positive force co-variation) as conditioned by typical everyday tasks. The presence of synergic effects (negative, task-specific force co-variation) can be naturally interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:24309747

  15. Comparison of one-particle basis set extrapolation to explicitly correlated methods for the calculation of accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants: application to H2O, N2H+, NO2+, and C2H2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Valeev, Edward F; Lee, Timothy J

    2010-12-28

    One-particle basis set extrapolation is compared with one of the new R12 methods for computing highly accurate quartic force fields (QFFs) and spectroscopic data, including molecular structures, rotational constants, and vibrational frequencies for the H(2)O, N(2)H(+), NO(2)(+), and C(2)H(2) molecules. In general, agreement between the spectroscopic data computed from the best R12 and basis set extrapolation methods is very good with the exception of a few parameters for N(2)H(+) where it is concluded that basis set extrapolation is still preferred. The differences for H(2)O and NO(2)(+) are small and it is concluded that the QFFs from both approaches are more or less equivalent in accuracy. For C(2)H(2), however, a known one-particle basis set deficiency for C-C multiple bonds significantly degrades the quality of results obtained from basis set extrapolation and in this case the R12 approach is clearly preferred over one-particle basis set extrapolation. The R12 approach used in the present study was modified in order to obtain high precision electronic energies, which are needed when computing a QFF. We also investigated including core-correlation explicitly in the R12 calculations, but conclude that current approaches are lacking. Hence core-correlation is computed as a correction using conventional methods. Considering the results for all four molecules, it is concluded that R12 methods will soon replace basis set extrapolation approaches for high accuracy electronic structure applications such as computing QFFs and spectroscopic data for comparison to high-resolution laboratory or astronomical observations, provided one uses a robust R12 method as we have done here. The specific R12 method used in the present study, CCSD(T)(R12), incorporated a reformulation of one intermediate matrix in order to attain machine precision in the electronic energies. Final QFFs for N(2)H(+) and NO(2)(+) were computed, including basis set extrapolation, core-correlation, scalar

  16. Ergonomics strategies and actions for achieving productive use of an ageing work-force.

    PubMed

    Kumashiro, M

    2000-07-01

    In this report, a basic ERGOMA (Ergonomics in Industrial Management) strategy is proposed as a policy for corporate production and employment in countries where ageing populations and reduced birth rates are imminent, and a strategy related to this is proposed. Specifically, as a strategy at the company level, the results of survey studies aimed at the development of methods for determining job capacity, to enable effective use of the labour of ageing workers, were summarized. A number of the insights gained here are steps in the development of a foundational methodology for practical use, and in actual practice a number of these insights must be subjected to measurements. However, the theory and newly developed methodology described here are thought to represent significant changes from the approaches to job capacity diagnosis and assessment published in the past and from the stance towards utilization of an ageing work-force. The author is confident that this represents new progress in one of the ergonomics approach to dealing with the working environment of ageing workers and an ageing work-force in general. PMID:10929834

  17. Muscle-tendon unit stiffness does not independently affect voluntary explosive force production or muscle intrinsic contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Ricci; Folland, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of muscle-tendon unit (MTU) stiffness and explosive force production during voluntary and evoked contractions of the knee extensors. Thirty-four untrained participants performed a series of explosive voluntary and electrically evoked (octets (8 pulses, 300 Hz) via femoral nerve stimulation) isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was assessed during maximum voluntary contractions. Explosive force production was assessed as the time taken, from force onset (0 N), to achieve specific levels of absolute (25-300 N) and relative force (5%-75% MVF) during the explosive contractions. Ultrasonic images of the vastus lateralis were recorded during 10-s ramp contractions to assess MTU stiffness, which was expressed in absolute (N · mm(-1)) and relative (to MVF and resting tendon-aponeurosis length) terms. Bivariate correlations suggested that absolute MTU stiffness was associated with voluntary explosive force (time to achieve 150-300 N: r = -0.35 to -0.54, P < 0.05). However, no relationships between stiffness and voluntary explosive force were observed when the influence of MVF was removed, either via partial correlations of absolute values (P ≥ 0.49) or considering relative values (P ≥ 0.14). Similarly, absolute MTU stiffness was related to explosive force during evoked octet contractions (r = -0.41 to -0.64, P < 0.05), but these correlations were no longer present when accounting for the influence of MVF (P ≥ 0.15). Therefore, once maximum strength was considered, MTU stiffness had no independent relationship with voluntary explosive force production or the evoked capacity for explosive force.

  18. A leader-follower relationship in joint action on a discrete force production task.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The present study examined the development of a leader-follower relationship in joint action performed by participants with different skill levels. Two participants were instructed to produce discrete isometric forces such that the sum of the forces was the target force. The task did not prescribe the onset time or share of force each participant contributed to the target force. Although novices with low force variability did not produce an earlier force than those with high force variability in the novice-novice group, experienced participants produced an earlier force than novices in the novice-experienced group. While participants with low force variability always produced a stronger force than those with high force variability in both the groups, there was no significant difference in force distributions between participants with low and high force variabilities. Although a novice-experienced pair produced force more complementarily than a novice-novice pair in the first practice block, the difference between pairs vanished after the first practice block, suggesting that leader-follower relations were not always beneficial to task performance. In addition, practice of the joint action did not transfer to individual action.

  19. Dynamical degrees of freedom and correlations in isometric finger force production.

    PubMed

    James, Eric G

    2012-12-01

    Prior research has concluded that the correlations of isometric finger forces represent the extent to which the fingers are controlled as a single unit. If this is the case, finger force correlations should be consistent with estimates of the controlled (dynamical) degrees of freedom in finger forces. The present study examined the finger force correlations and the dynamical degrees of freedom in four isometric force tasks. The tasks were to produce a preferred level of force with the (a) Index, (b) Ring, (c) Both fingers and also to (d) Rest the fingers on the load cells. Dynamical degrees of freedom in finger forces were lowest in the Both finger force task and progressively higher in the Ring, Index and Resting finger force tasks. The finger force correlations were highest in the Resting and lowest in the Index and Ring finger tasks. The results for the dynamical degrees of freedom in finger forces were consistent with a reduction in degrees of freedom in response to the degrees of freedom problem and the task constraints. The results for the finger force correlations were inconsistent with a reduction in the dynamical degrees of freedom. These findings indicate that finger force correlations do not necessarily reflect the coupling of finger forces. The findings also highlight the value of time-domain analyses to reveal the organization of control in isometric finger forces.

  20. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress: Cellular Mechanisms and Impact on Muscle Force Production

    PubMed Central

    POWERS, SCOTT K.; JACKSON, MALCOLM J.

    2010-01-01

    The first suggestion that physical exercise results in free radical-mediated damage to tissues appeared in 1978, and the past three decades have resulted in a large growth of knowledge regarding exercise and oxidative stress. Although the sources of oxidant production during exercise continue to be debated, it is now well established that both resting and contracting skeletal muscles produce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. Importantly, intense and prolonged exercise can result in oxidative damage to both proteins and lipids in the contracting myocytes. Furthermore, oxidants can modulate a number of cell signaling pathways and regulate the expression of multiple genes in eukaryotic cells. This oxidant-mediated change in gene expression involves changes at transcriptional, mRNA stability, and signal transduction levels. Furthermore, numerous products associated with oxidant-modulated genes have been identified and include antioxidant enzymes, stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and mitochondrial electron transport proteins. Interestingly, low and physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required for normal force production in skeletal muscle, but high levels of reactive oxygen species promote contractile dysfunction resulting in muscle weakness and fatigue. Ongoing research continues to probe the mechanisms by which oxidants influence skeletal muscle contractile properties and to explore interventions capable of protecting muscle from oxidant-mediated dysfunction. PMID:18923182

  1. Forcings of nutrient, oxygen, and primary production interannual variability in the southeast Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachèlery, M.-L.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2016-08-01

    The recurrent occurrences of interannual warm and cold events along the coast of Africa have been intensively studied because of their striking effects on climate and fisheries. Using sensitivity experimentation based on a coupled physical/biogeochemical model, we show that the oceanic remote equatorial forcing explains more than 85% of coastal interannual nitrate and oxygen fluctuations along the Angolan and Namibian coasts up to the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). These events, associated with poleward propagations of upwelling and downwelling Coastal Trapped Waves (CTW), are maximum in subsurface and controlled by physical advection processes. Surprisingly, an abrupt change in the CTW biogeochemical signature is observed in the BUS, associated with mixed vertical gradients due to the strong local upwelling dynamics. Coastal modifications of biogeochemical features result in significant primary production variations that may affect fisheries habitats and coastal biodiversity along the southwestern African coasts and in the BUS.

  2. 76 FR 22921 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) at the e-mail or physical address below by 5 p.m., May 20, 2011. To... goods (72 FR 73374). The guidelines set forth the criteria by which information is evaluated... of products (the ``List''), identified by country of origin, that the Department, in consultation...

  3. Climatic and oceanic forcing of new, net, and diatom production in the North Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Jean-Eric; Gratton, Yves; Fauchot, Juliette; Price, Neil M.

    New, net, and diatom production in the North Water were estimated during May to July 1998 from in vitro measurements of nitrate uptake and mesoscale temporal changes in the inventories of nitrate, silicate, oxygen, and inorganic carbon (DIC). Sampling stations were divided into two domains according to the position of the dominant water types: the silicate-rich Arctic water (SRAW) and Baffin Bay Water (BBW). BBW dominated in the southeast and was associated with relatively shallow upper mixed layers (UMLs) and weak horizontal advection. A phytoplankton bloom started in late April in BBW and grew slowly over 7 weeks, during which time the build-up of particulate organic nitrogen and carbon accounted for ca. 80% of the nitrate and DIC deficit, respectively. Over half of the new production (1.37 g C m -2 d -1) during this period was attributed to wind-driven replenishment of nitrate in the euphotic zone. The bloom culminated when seasonally declining winds and rising temperatures severed the UML from the deep nutrient reservoir. The same change in weather induced ice melt, stratification, and bloom development in northern SRAW, which had previously been characterized by deep UMLs. Collectively, the results imply that the timing and magnitude of blooms in the North Water are controlled by a succession of oceanic and climatic forcings. New C production in the North Water during April to July (1.11 g C m -2 d -1) was an order of magnitude higher than in adjacent waters and up to 8 times higher than in the Northeast Water polynya. As much as 80% of this production was mediated by diatoms >5 μm, suggesting potentially high and efficient C transfer to the herbivorous food web and deep waters.

  4. Combining DSMC Simulations and ROSINA/COPS Data of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to Develop a Realistic Empirical Coma Model and to Determine Accurate Production Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. C.; Fougere, N.; Bieler, A. M.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Huang, Z.; Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; Tzou, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We have previously published results from the AMPS DSMC (Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) model and its characterization of the neutral coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko through detailed comparison with data collected by the ROSINA/COPS (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/COmet Pressure Sensor) instrument aboard the Rosetta spacecraft [Bieler, 2015]. Results from these DSMC models have been used to create an empirical model of the near comet coma (<200 km) of comet 67P. The empirical model characterizes the neutral coma in a comet centered, sun fixed reference frame as a function of heliocentric distance, radial distance from the comet, local time and declination. The model is a significant improvement over more simple empirical models, such as the Haser model. While the DSMC results are a more accurate representation of the coma at any given time, the advantage of a mean state, empirical model is the ease and speed of use. One use of such an empirical model is in the calculation of a total cometary coma production rate from the ROSINA/COPS data. The COPS data are in situ measurements of gas density and velocity along the ROSETTA spacecraft track. Converting the measured neutral density into a production rate requires knowledge of the neutral gas distribution in the coma. Our empirical model provides this information and therefore allows us to correct for the spacecraft location to calculate a production rate as a function of heliocentric distance. We will present the full empirical model as well as the calculated neutral production rate for the period of August 2014 - August 2015 (perihelion).

  5. Effect of forced aeration on citric acid production by Aspergillus sp. mutants in SSF.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cristine; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sturm, Wilerson; Dergint, Dario E A; Spier, Michele Rigon; de Carvalho, Júlio Cesar; Soccol, Carlos R

    2013-12-01

    Citric acid (CA) is one of the most important products of fermentation in the world. A great variety of agro-industrial residues can be used in solid state fermentation. Aspergillus niger parental strain (CCT 7716) and two strains obtained by mutagenesis (CCT 7717 and CCT 7718) were evaluated in Erlenmeyer flasks and glass columns using citric pulp (CP) as substrate/support, sugarcane molasses and methanol. Best results using glass columns (forced aeration) were found in the fourth day of fermentation: 278.4, 294.9 and 261.1 g CA/kg of dry CP with CCT 7716, CCT 7718 and CCT 7717, respectively. In Erlenmeyer flasks (aeration by diffusion) CA reached 410.7, 446.8 and 492.7 g CA/kg of dry CP with CCT 7716, CCT 7718 and CCT 7717, respectively. The aeration by diffusion improved CA production by the three strains. A data acquisition system specially developed for biotechnological processes analysis was used to perform the respirometric parameters measurement.

  6. Attenuated rapid onset vasodilation with greater force production in skeletal muscle of caveolin-2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Charmain A; Liu, Yajun; Sowa, Grzegorz; Segal, Steven S

    2016-08-01

    Caveolin-2 (Cav2) is a major protein component of caveolae in membranes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, yet its absence alters the ultrastructure of skeletal muscle fibers. To gain insight into Cav2 function in skeletal muscle, we tested the hypothesis that genetic deletion of Cav2 would alter microvascular reactivity and depress contractile function of skeletal muscle in vivo. In the left gluteus maximus muscle (GM) of anesthetized Cav2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) male mice (age, 6 mo), microvascular responses to physiological agonists and to GM contractions were studied at 34°C. For feed arteries (FA), first- (1A), second- (2A) and third-order (3A) arterioles, respective mean diameters at rest (45, 35, 25, 12 μm) and during maximal dilation (65, 55, 45, 30 μm) were similar between groups. Cumulative dilations to ACh (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) and constrictions to norepinephrine (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) were also similar between groups, as were steady-state dilations during rhythmic twitch contractions (2 and 4 Hz; 30 s). For single tetanic contractions (100 Hz; 100, 250, and 500 ms), rapid onset vasodilation (ROV) increased with contraction duration throughout networks in GM of both groups but was reduced by nearly half in Cav2(-/-) mice compared with WT mice (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, maximal force during tetanic contraction was ∼40% greater in GM of Cav2(-/-) vs. WT mice (152 ± 14 vs. 110 ± 3 mN per square millimeter, respectively; P < 0.05). Thus, while structural and functional properties of resistance networks are well maintained in the GM of Cav2(-/-) mice, diminished ROV with greater force production reveals novel physiological roles for Cav2 in skeletal muscle. PMID:27317631

  7. Interaction of finger enslaving and error compensation in multiple finger force production

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented two patterns of finger interaction during multi-finger pressing tasks, enslaving and error compensation, which do not agree with each other. Enslaving is characterized by positive correlation between instructed (master) and non-instructed (slave) finger(s) while error compensation can be described as a pattern of negative correlation between master and slave fingers. We hypothesize that pattern of finger interaction, enslaving or compensation, depends on the initial force level and the magnitude of the targeted force change. Subjects were instructed to press with four fingers (I - index, M - middle, R - ring, and L - little) from a specified initial force to a target forces following a ramp target line. Force-force relations between master and each of three slave fingers were analyzed during the ramp phase of trials by calculating correlation coefficients within each master-slave pair and then 2-factor ANOVA was performed to determine effect of initial force and force increase on the correlation coefficients. It was found that, as initial force increased, the value of the correlation coefficient decreased and in some cases became negative, i.e. the enslaving transformed into error compensation. Force increase magnitude had a smaller effect on the correlation coefficients. The observations support the hypothesis that the pattern of inter-finger interaction—enslaving or compensation—depends on the initial force level and, to a smaller degree, on the targeted magnitude of the force increase. They suggest that the controller views tasks with higher steady-state forces and smaller force changes as implying a requirement to avoid large changes in the total force. PMID:18985331

  8. A computational model of cerebrospinal fluid production and reabsorption driven by Starling forces.

    PubMed

    Buishas, Joel; Gould, Ian G; Linninger, Andreas A

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence has cast doubt on the classical model of river-like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow from the choroid plexus to the arachnoid granulations. We propose a novel model of water transport through the parenchyma from the microcirculation as driven by Starling forces. This model investigates the effect of osmotic pressure on water transport between the cerebral vasculature, the extracellular space (ECS), the perivascular space (PVS), and the CSF. A rigorous literature search was conducted focusing on experiments which alter the osmolarity of blood or ventricles and measure the rate of CSF production. Investigations into the effect of osmotic pressure on the volume of ventricles and the flux of ions in the blood, choroid plexus epithelium, and CSF are reviewed. Increasing the osmolarity of the serum via a bolus injection completely inhibits nascent fluid flow production in the ventricles. A continuous injection of a hyperosmolar solution into the ventricles can increase the volume of the ventricle by up to 125%. CSF production is altered by 0.231 μL per mOsm in the ventricle and by 0.835 μL per mOsm in the serum. Water flux from the ECS to the CSF is identified as a key feature of intracranial dynamics. A complete mathematical model with all equations and scenarios is fully described, as well as a guide to constructing a computational model of intracranial water balance dynamics. The model proposed in this article predicts the effects the osmolarity of ECS, blood, and CSF on water flux in the brain, establishing a link between osmotic imbalances and pathological conditions such as hydrocephalus and edema. PMID:25358881

  9. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates from South Asian Clay Brick Production Based on Direct Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Athalye, V.; Ragavan, S.; Rajarathnam, U.; Kr, B.; Lalchandani, D.; Maithel, S.; Malhotra, G.; Bhanware, P.; Thoa, V.; Phuong, N.; Baum, E.; Bond, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    About 150-200 billion clay bricks are produced in India every year. Most of these bricks are fired in small-scale traditional kilns that burn coal or biomass without pollution controls. Reddy and Venkataraman (2001) estimated that 8% of fossil fuel related PM2.5 emissions and 23% of black carbon emissions in India are released from brick production. Few direct emissions measurements have been done in this industry and black carbon emissions, in particular, have not been previously measured. In this study, 9 kilns representing five common brick kiln technologies were tested for aerosol properties and gaseous pollutant emissions, including optical scattering and absorption and thermal-optical OC/EC. Simple relationships are then used to estimate the radiative-forcing impact. Kiln design and fuel quality greatly affect the overall emission profiles and relative climate warming. Batch production kilns, such as the Downdraft kiln, produce the most PM2.5 (0.97 gPM2.5/fired brick) with an OC/EC fraction of 0.3. Vertical Shaft Brick kilns using internally mixed fuels produce the least PM (0.09 gPM2.5/kg fired brick) with the least EC (OC/EC = 16.5), but these kilns are expensive to implement and their use throughout Southern Asia is minimal. The most popular kiln in India, the Bull's Trench kiln, had fewer emissions per brick than the Downdraft kiln, but an even higher EC fraction (OC/EC = 0.05). The Zig-zag kiln is similar in structure to the Bull's Trench kiln, but the emission factors are significantly lower: 50% reduction for CO, 17% for PM2.5 and 60% for black carbon. This difference in emissions suggests that converting traditional Bull's Trench kilns into less polluting Zig-zag kilns would result in reduced atmospheric warming from brick production.

  10. Does lowering evening rectal temperature to morning levels offset the diurnal variation in muscle force production?

    PubMed

    Robinson, William R; Pullinger, Samuel A; Kerry, Jonathan W; Giacomoni, Magali; Robertson, Colin M; Burniston, Jatin G; Waterhouse, James M; Edwards, Ben J

    2013-10-01

    Muscle force production and power output in active males, regardless of the site of measurement (hand, leg, or back), are higher in the evening than the morning. This diurnal variation is attributed to motivational, peripheral, and central factors and higher core and, possibly, muscle temperatures in the evening. This study investigated whether decreasing evening resting rectal temperatures to morning values, by immersion in a water tank, leads to muscle force production and power output becoming equal to morning values in motivated subjects. Ten healthy active males (mean ± SD: age, 22.5 ± 1.3 yrs; body mass, 80.1 ± 7.8 kg; height, 1.72 ± 0.05 m) completed the study, which was approved by the local ethics committee of the university. The subjects were familiarized with the techniques and protocol and then completed three sessions (separated by at least 48 h): control morning (07:30 h) and evening (17:30 h) sessions (with an active 5-min warm-up on a cycle ergometer at 150 W) and then a further session at 17:30 h but preceded by an immersion in cold water (~16.5 °C) to lower rectal temperature (Trec) to morning values. During each trial, three measures of grip strength, isokinetic leg strength measurements (of knee flexion and extension at 1.05 and 4.19 rad s(-1) through a 90° range of motion), and three measures of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) on an isometric dynamometer (utilizing the twitch-interpolation technique) were performed. Trec, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and thermal comfort (TC) were also measured after the subjects had reclined for 30 min at the start of the protocol and prior to the measures for grip, isokinetic, and isometric dynamometry. Muscle temperature was taken after the warm-up or water immersion and immediately before the isokinetic and MVC measurements. Data were analyzed using general linear models with repeated measures. Trec values were higher at rest in the evening (by 0.37 °C; p < 0.05) than the morning, but

  11. Importance of anisotropy in detachment rates for force production and cargo transport by a team of motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Takshak, Anjneya; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-05-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by collective forces generated by a team consisting of multiple molecular motor proteins. One aspect that has received less attention is the detachment rate of molecular motors under mechanical force/load. While detachment rate of kinesin motors measured under backward force increases rapidly for forces beyond stall-force; this scenario is just reversed for non-yeast dynein motors where detachment rate from microtubule decreases, exhibiting a catch-bond type behavior. It has been shown recently that yeast dynein responds anisotropically to applied load, i.e. detachment rates are different under forward and backward pulling. Here, we use computational modeling to show that these anisotropic detachment rates might help yeast dynein motors to improve their collective force generation in the absence of catch-bond behavior. We further show that the travel distance of cargos would be longer if detachment rates are anisotropic. Our results suggest that anisotropic detachment rates could be an alternative strategy for motors to improve the transport properties and force production by the team. PMID:26890030

  12. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  13. Force production during squats performed with a rotational resistance device under stable versus unstable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moras, Gerard; Vázquez-Guerrero, Jairo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Force production during a squat action on a rotational resistance device (RRD) under stable and unstable conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one healthy males were asked to perform six sets of six repetitions of squats on an RRD on either stable or unstable surfaces. The stable and unstable sets were performed on different days. Muscular outputs were obtained from a linear encoder and a strain gauge fixed to a vest. [Results] Overall, the results showed no significant differences for any of the dependent variables across exercise modes. Forcemean outputs were higher in the concentric phase than in the eccentric phase for each condition, but there were no differences in velocity, time or displacement. The forcepeak was similar in the eccentric and concentric phases of movement under both stable and unstable conditions. There were no significant differences in forcemean between sets per condition or between conditions. [Conclusion] These results suggest that performing squats with a RRD achieves similar forcemean and forcepeak under stable and unstable conditions. The forcepeak produced is also similar in concentric and eccentric phases. PMID:26696707

  14. Effects of vibration training on force production in female basketball players.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rio, Javier; Terrados, Nicolas; Fernandez-Garcia, Benjamin; Suman, Oscar E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this research project was to investigate the long-term effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on force production. Thirty-one female basketball players were randomly distributed in an experimental group: VG (vibration) and a control group: CG (no vibration). Both groups participated in the same training program; however, the experimental group (VG) performed a set of exercises on a vibration platform (Power Plate) at 30- to 35-Hz frequency and 4 mm amplitude, whereas the CG performed the same exercises at 0 Hz. Muscle performance of the legs was tested on a contact-time platform (Ergojump, Finland) through several tests: squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and 15-second maximal performance jump; squat leg power (knee extension) was also evaluated using an Ergopower machine (Bosco, Italy). After 14 weeks, there was a significant increase (p < 0.001) from initial to final tests in both groups (CG and VG) in SJ, CMJ, 15 seconds, and squat leg power. However, there were no significant differences between the VG and the CG for any of the parameters evaluated. The findings of this study indicate that WBV training has no additive or discernible effect on the strength development of female basketball players after several weeks of use, suggesting that the application of this technology has no advantages over traditional strength training methods.

  15. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Otter, Don E; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-17

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching. PMID:27428379

  16. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Otter, Don E; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-17

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching.

  17. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation.

  18. Comparison of TOPEX/Poseidon Sea Level and Linear Model Results forced by Various Wind Products for the Tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackert, Eric C.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to compare TOPEX/Posaidon (T/P) sea level with sea level results from linear ocean model experiments forced by several different wind products for the tropical Pacific. During the period of this study (October 1992 - October 1995), available wind products include satellite winds from the ERS-1 scatterometer product of [HALP 97] and the passive microwave analysis of SSMI winds produced using the variational analysis method (VAM) of [ATLA 91]. In addition, atmospheric GCM winds from the NCEP reanalysis [KALN 96], ECMWF analysis [ECMW94], and the Goddard EOS-1 (GEOS-1) reanalysis experiment [SCHU 93] are available for comparison. The observed ship wind analysis of FSU [STRI 92] is also included in this study. The linear model of [CANE 84] is used as a transfer function to test the quality of each of these wind products for the tropical Pacific. The various wind products are judged by comparing the wind-forced model sea level results against the T/P sea level anomalies. Correlation and RMS difference maps show how well each wind product does in reproducing the T/P sea level signal. These results are summarized in a table showing area average correlations and RMS differences. The large-scale low-frequency temporal signal is reproduced by all of the wind products, However, significant differences exist in both amplitude and phase on regional scales. In general, the model results forced by satellite winds do a better job reproducing the T/P signal (i.e. have a higher average correlation and lower RMS difference) than the results forced by atmospheric model winds.

  19. Does raising morning rectal temperature to evening levels offset the diurnal variation in muscle force production?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ben J; Pullinger, Samuel A; Kerry, Jonathan W; Robinson, William R; Reilly, Tom P; Robertson, Colin M; Waterhouse, James M

    2013-05-01

    Muscle force production and power output in active males, regardless of the site of measurement (hand, leg, or back), are higher in the evening than in the morning. This diurnal variation is attributed to motivational, peripheral and central factors, and higher core and, possibly, muscle temperatures in the evening. This study investigated whether increasing morning rectal temperatures to evening resting values, by active or passive warm-ups, leads to muscle force production and power output becoming equal to evening values in motivated subjects. Ten healthy active males (mean ± SD: age, 21.2 ± 1.9 yrs; body mass, 75.4 ± 8 kg; height, 1.76 ± .06 m) completed the study, which was approved by the University Ethics Committee. The subjects were familiarized with the techniques and protocol and then completed four sessions (separated by at least 48 h): control morning (07:30 h) and evening (17:30 h) sessions (with an active 5-min warm-up) and then two further sessions at 07:30 h but proceeded by an extended active or passive warm-up to raise rectal temperature to evening values. These last two sessions were counterbalanced in order of administration. During each trial, three measures of handgrip strength, isokinetic leg strength measurements (of knee flexion and extension at 1.05 and 4.19 rad.s(-1) through a 90° range of motion), and four measures of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) on an isometric ergometer (utilizing the twitch-interpolation technique) were performed. Rectal and intra-aural temperatures, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and thermal comfort (TC) were measured. Measurements were made after the subjects had reclined for 30 min and after the warm-ups and prior to the measurement of handgrip and isokinetic and isometric ergometry. Muscle temperature was taken after the warm-up and immediately before the isokinetic and MVC measurements. Warm-ups were either active (cycle ergometer at 150 W) or passive (resting in a room at 35 °C, relative

  20. Structural forces and the production of TB-related stigma among Haitians in two contexts.

    PubMed

    Coreil, Jeannine; Mayard, Gladys; Simpson, Kelly M; Lauzardo, Michael; Zhu, Yiliang; Weiss, Mitchell

    2010-10-01

    In recent years renewed interest in health-related stigma has underscored the importance of better understanding the structural underpinnings of stigma processes. This study investigated the influence of sociocultural context on perceived components of tuberculosis-related stigma in non-affected persons by comparing Haitians living in South Florida, USA, with Haitians residing in Léogane Commune, Haiti. Using the methods of cultural epidemiology, a two-phase study based on fieldwork between 2004 and 2007 collected ethnographic data on the cultural context and components of tuberculosis (TB) stigma, and administered a stigma scale developed specifically for these populations. Thematic analysis of stigma components expressed in interviews, focus groups and observation revealed commonalities as well as distinctive emphases of TB stigma in the two comparison groups. Factor analyses of stigma scale scores confirmed the thematic differences revealed in ethnographic findings and highlight the influence of political and economic factors in shaping the meaning and experience of illness. Perceived components of TB stigma among Haitians in South Florida incorporated aspects of Haitian identity as a negatively stereotyped minority community within the larger society, while in Haiti, stigma was associated primarily with poverty, malnutrition, and HIV co-infection. Discussion of findings focuses on the social production of perceived and anticipated stigma as it is influenced by structural forces including the influences of politics, economics, institutional policies, and health service delivery structures. The findings also demonstrate the value of a transnational framework encompassing both sending and receiving countries for understanding TB-related stigma in immigrant communities.

  1. What Geological, Economic, or Policy Forces Might Limit Fossil Fuel Production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to ensure a 50% chance of keeping global temperatures from exceeding 2°C above pre-industrial levels, it has been estimated that total carbon dioxide emissions between 2011-2050 must be capped at roughly 1,100 gigatons.[1] However, some estimates calculate that global fossil fuel reserves—including unconventional oil and gas—hold at least three times this amount of potential greenhouse gas emissions.[2]What socio-political, technological, or economic forces are most likely to keep these energy resources from being burned? While it is difficult to predict with specificity what combination of technological, geological, or human factors will significantly minimize global fossil fuel production, there are at least four key potential drivers: 1. Under-investment and the economics of unconventional oil and natural gas; 2. International policy, driven by citizen demand and leadership from key nations; 3. Massive deployment of renewable energy sources and other technological solutions; and 4. Large-scale energy curtailment resulting from global economic contraction. We will explore the implications, viability, and consequences of each of these potential factors. [1] [1]United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) Report of the Conference of the Parties on its Fifteenth Session, held in Copenhagen from 7 to 19 December 2009. Part Two: Action taken by the Conference of the Parties at its Fifteenth Session. United Nations Climate Change Conf. Report 43 http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2009/cop15/eng/11a01.pdf (UNFCC, 2009) [2] Raupach, M. R. et al. Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions. Nature Clim. Chang. 4, 873-879 (2014)

  2. Structural Forces and the Production of TB-related Stigma among Haitians in Two Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Coreil, Jeannine; Mayard, Gladys; Simpson, Kelly M; Lauzardo, Michael; Zhu, Yiliang; Weiss, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    In recent years renewed interest in health-related stigma has underscored the importance of better understanding the structural underpinnings of stigma processes. This study investigated the influence of sociocultural context on perceived components of tuberculosis-related stigma in non-affected persons by comparing Haitians living in South Florida, USA, with Haitians residing in Léogane Commune, Haiti. Using the methods of cultural epidemiology, a two-phase study based on fieldwork between 2004–07 collected ethnographic data on the cultural context and components of tuberculosis (TB) stigma, and administered a stigma scale developed specifically for these populations. Thematic analysis of stigma components expressed in interviews, focus groups and observation revealed commonalities as well as distinctive emphases of TB stigma in the two comparison groups. Factor analyses of stigma scale scores confirmed the thematic differences revealed in ethnographic findings and highlight the influence of political and economic factors in shaping the meaning and experience of illness. Perceived components of TB stigma among Haitians in South Florida incorporated aspects of Haitian identity as a negatively stereotyped minority community within the larger society, while in Haiti, stigma was associated primarily with poverty, malnutrition, and HIV co-infection. Discussion of findings focuses on the social production of perceived and anticipated stigma as it is influenced by structural forces including the influences of politics, economics, institutional policies, and health service delivery structures. The findings also demonstrate the value of a transnational framework encompassing both sending and receiving countries for understanding TB related stigma in immigrant communities. PMID:20724052

  3. Force production characteristics of leg extensor, trunk flexor and extensor muscles in male and female basketball players.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, K

    1991-09-01

    Eleven male and nine female basketball players from two teams at the same relative competitive level were studied for the force production characteristics of their leg extensor, trunk flexor and extensor muscles. As expected, the male players demonstrated greater (p less than 0.001) absolute maximal strength in the three muscle groups than the females. When the force values were related to body weight, the differences became smaller but the male group could still produce higher values especially for the trunk flexor (p less than 0.01) and extensor muscles (p less than 0.05). The males demonstrated higher (p less than 0.001) values than the females for maximal vertical jumping height both in the squat jump (41.5 +/- 3.0 and 21.5 +/- 2.4 cm) and in the counter movement jump (43.9 +/- 4.0 and 24.8 +/- 2.5 cm). As expected, the times required to produce the same absolute force levels in the isometric force-time curves were significantly (p less than 0.001) shorter in the male team than in the female. However, the times needed to produce the same relative force levels were also shorter (p less than 0.05) in the male group. In the whole subject sample the individual values in maximal leg extension force correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the vertical jumping height. The present results suggest that the differences observed in force production characteristics between the male and female groups may not be explained only by the sexual difference but also by the differences in the overall volume and/or the type of strength and power training during the preparatory training season(s).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The influence of the breathing action on net drag force production in front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Formosa, D; Sayers, M G L; Burkett, B

    2014-12-01

    20 elite swimmers completed a total of 6 randomized net drag force trials in 2 conditions (i) 3 breathing and (ii) 3 non-breathing. Net drag force was measured using an assisted motorized dynamometer device mounted upon a Kistler force-platform. The male participants demonstrated no statistical differences in stroke rates between breathing and non-breathing trials. Female participants, however, demonstrated a statistical difference stroke rate. The male participants demonstrated that the breathing action caused a greater (26%) net drag force compared to the females (16%). To further understand the influence of breathing on swimming technique, each stroke was analyzed and comparisons were made between the breathing and non-breathing conditions. The male participants demonstrated a similar minimum net drag force when comparing the breathing and non-breathing conditions. Analysis showed that minimum net drag force and maximum net drag force for the males changed when integrating the breathing action, while female participants demonstrated similar swimming technique, regardless of condition or stroke.

  5. Concurrent endurance and explosive type strength training increases activation and fast force production of leg extensor muscles in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Jussi S; Rusko, Heikki K; Nummela, Ari T; Paavolainen, Leena M; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of concurrent endurance and explosive strength training on electromyography (EMG) and force production of leg extensors, sport-specific rapid force production, aerobic capacity, and work economy in cross-country skiers. Nineteen male cross-country skiers were assigned to an experimental group (E, n = 8) or a control group (C, n = 11). The E group trained for 8 weeks with the same total training volume as C, but 27% of endurance training in E was replaced by explosive strength training. The skiers were measured at pre- and post training for concentric and isometric force-time parameters of leg extensors and EMG activity from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) muscles. Sport-specific rapid force production was measured by performing a 30-m double poling test with the maximal velocity (V(30DP)) and sport-specific endurance economy by constant velocity 2-km double poling test (CVDP) and performance (V(2K)) by 2-km maximal double poling test with roller skis on an indoor track. Maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) was determined during the maximal treadmill walking test with the poles. The early absolute forces (0-100 ms) in the force-time curve in isometric action increased in E by 18 +/- 22% (p < 0.05), with concomitant increases in the average integrated EMG (IEMG) (0-100 ms) of VL by 21 +/- 21% (p < 0.05). These individual changes in the average IEMG of VL correlated with the changes in early force (r = 0.86, p < 0.01) in E. V(30DP) increased in E (1.4 +/- 1.6%) (p < 0.05) but not in C. The V(2K) increased in C by 2.9 +/- 2.8% (p < 0.01) but not significantly in E (5.5 +/- 5.8%, p < 0.1). However, the steady-state oxygen consumption in CVDP decreased in E by 7 +/- 6% (p < 0.05). No significant changes occurred in Vo(2)max either in E or in C. The present concurrent explosive strength and endurance training in endurance athletes produced improvements in explosive force associated with increased rapid

  6. Characterization of forced degradation products of ketorolac tromethamine using LC/ESI/Q/TOF/MS/MS and in silico toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Raju, B; Borkar, Roshan M; Namdev, Deepak; Gananadhamu, S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Srinivas, R

    2014-05-01

    Ketorolac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was subjected to forced degradation studies as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. A simple, rapid, precise, and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/Q/TOF/MS/MS) method has been developed for the identification and structural characterization of stressed degradation products of ketorolac. The drug was found to degrade in hydrolytic (acidic, basic, and neutral), photolytic (acidic, basic, and neutral solution), and thermal conditions, whereas the solid form of the drug was found to be stable under photolytic conditions. The method has shown adequate separation of ketorolac tromethamine and its degradation products on a Grace Smart C-18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm) column using 20 mM ammonium formate (pH = 3.2): acetonitrile as a mobile phase in gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. A total of nine degradation products were identified and characterized by LC/ESI/MS/MS. The most probable mechanisms for the formation of degradation products have been proposed on the basis of a comparison of the fragmentation of the [M + H](+) ions of ketorolac and its degradation products. In silico toxicity of the drug and degradation products was investigated by using topkat and derek softwares. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, and robustness as per International Conference on Harmonization guidelines.

  7. The Contribution of the C-Terminal Tails of Microtubules in Altering the Force Production Specifications of Multiple Kinesin-1.

    PubMed

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania

    2016-09-01

    The extent to which beta tubulin isotypes contribute to the function of microtubules and the microtubule-driven transport of molecular motors is poorly understood. The major differences in these isotypes are associated with the structure of their C-terminal tails. Recent studies have revealed a few aspects of the C-terminal tails' regulatory role on the activities of some of the motor proteins on a single-molecule level. However, little attention is given to the degree to which the function of a team of motor proteins can be altered by the microtubule's tail. In a set of parallel experiments, we investigated this open question by studying the force production of several kinesin-1 (kinesin) molecular motors along two groups of microtubules: regular ones and those microtubules whose C-terminals are cleaved by subtilisin digestion. The results indicate that the difference between the average of the force production of motors along two types of microtubules is statistically significant. The underlying mechanism of such production is substantially different as well. As compared to untreated microtubules, the magnitude of the binding time of several kinesin-1 is almost three times greater along subtilisin-treated microtubules. Also, the velocity of the group of kinesin molecules shows a higher sensitivity to external loads and reduces significantly under higher loads along subtilisin-treated microtubules. Together, this work shows the capacity of the tails in fine-tuning the force production characteristics of several kinesin molecules.

  8. The Contribution of the C-Terminal Tails of Microtubules in Altering the Force Production Specifications of Multiple Kinesin-1.

    PubMed

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania

    2016-09-01

    The extent to which beta tubulin isotypes contribute to the function of microtubules and the microtubule-driven transport of molecular motors is poorly understood. The major differences in these isotypes are associated with the structure of their C-terminal tails. Recent studies have revealed a few aspects of the C-terminal tails' regulatory role on the activities of some of the motor proteins on a single-molecule level. However, little attention is given to the degree to which the function of a team of motor proteins can be altered by the microtubule's tail. In a set of parallel experiments, we investigated this open question by studying the force production of several kinesin-1 (kinesin) molecular motors along two groups of microtubules: regular ones and those microtubules whose C-terminals are cleaved by subtilisin digestion. The results indicate that the difference between the average of the force production of motors along two types of microtubules is statistically significant. The underlying mechanism of such production is substantially different as well. As compared to untreated microtubules, the magnitude of the binding time of several kinesin-1 is almost three times greater along subtilisin-treated microtubules. Also, the velocity of the group of kinesin molecules shows a higher sensitivity to external loads and reduces significantly under higher loads along subtilisin-treated microtubules. Together, this work shows the capacity of the tails in fine-tuning the force production characteristics of several kinesin molecules. PMID:27503105

  9. Population studies should reflect the criterion of productive forces and the viewpoint of a market-oriented economy.

    PubMed

    Peng, X

    1989-01-01

    This commentary is on the role of population studies in a market oriented economy which reflects Marxist theories on productive forces. Population development must not be viewed unidimensionally. Prior thinking focused on the mode of social production determining population development and vice versa. The assumption prevalent prior to 1978 was that there was no common pattern among different societies. This view was openly challenged in the 2nd national population science symposium in Chengdu, Sichuan Province. It was stated that population development is affected by production techniques in either capitalist or socialist countries. Further understanding of this relationship based on quantitative and qualitative research was required. Public ownership is the basis of a socialist economy. Marxist views were that populations in market or nonmarket economies are different, and population scholars need to study these relationships. There was a mistaken belief that a socialist economy was nonmarket oriented. Correcting the mistake meant taking into consideration migration, urbanization, employment, expenditure, and the relationship to reproduction, as well as rethinking the development patterns. When the price of the labor force differs from its value, the investment in population and population quality will be affected. This has led to rampant commercialization and higher school dropout rates. Short term interests predominate. The trend does not benefit the quality of the population or the promotion of social productive forces. Further examination is needed of the effects of urbanization on a planned market oriented economy with socialist public ownership. PMID:12316994

  10. β-Alanine supplementation enhances human skeletal muscle relaxation speed but not force production capacity.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Ricci; Stannard, Rebecca Louise; Minshull, Claire; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Harris, Roger Charles; Sale, Craig

    2015-03-01

    β-Alanine (BA) supplementation improves human exercise performance. One possible explanation for this is an enhancement of muscle contractile properties, occurring via elevated intramuscular carnosine resulting in improved calcium sensitivity and handling. This study investigated the effect of BA supplementation on in vivo contractile properties and voluntary neuromuscular performance. Twenty-three men completed two experimental sessions, pre- and post-28 days supplementation with 6.4 g/day of BA (n = 12) or placebo (PLA; n = 11). During each session, force was recorded during a series of knee extensor contractions: resting and potentiated twitches and octet (8 pulses, 300 Hz) contractions elicited via femoral nerve stimulation; tetanic contractions (1 s, 1-100 Hz) via superficial muscle stimulation; and maximum and explosive voluntary contractions. BA supplementation had no effect on the force-frequency relationship, or the force responses (force at 25 and 50 ms from onset, peak force) of resting or potentiated twitches, and octet contractions (P > 0.05). Resting and potentiated twitch electromechanical delay and time-to-peak tension were unaffected by BA supplementation (P > 0.05), although half-relaxation time declined by 7-12% (P < 0.05). Maximum and explosive voluntary forces were unchanged after BA supplementation. BA supplementation had no effect on evoked force responses, implying that altered calcium sensitivity and/or release are not the mechanisms by which BA supplementation influences exercise performance. The reduced half-relaxation time with BA supplementation might, however, be explained by enhanced reuptake of calcium, which has implications for the efficiency of muscle contraction following BA supplementation.

  11. Bilateral deficit in explosive force production is not caused by changes in agonist neural drive.

    PubMed

    Buckthorpe, Matthew W; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral deficit (BLD) describes the phenomenon of a reduction in performance during synchronous bilateral (BL) movements when compared to the sum of identical unilateral (UL) movements. Despite a large body of research investigating BLD of maximal voluntary force (MVF) there exist a paucity of research examining the BLD for explosive strength. Therefore, this study investigated the BLD in voluntary and electrically-evoked explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors and assessed agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation and measurement artefacts as potential mechanisms. Thirteen healthy untrained males performed a series of maximum and explosive voluntary contractions bilaterally (BL) and unilaterally (UL). UL and BL evoked twitch and octet contractions were also elicited. Two separate load cells were used to measure MVF and explosive force at 50, 100 and 150 ms after force onset. Surface EMG amplitude was measured from three superficial agonists and an antagonist. Rate of force development (RFD) and EMG were reported over consecutive 50 ms periods (0-50, 50-100 and 100-150 ms). Performance during UL contractions was compared to combined BL performance to measure BLD. Single limb performance during the BL contractions was assessed and potential measurement artefacts, including synchronisation of force onset from the two limbs, controlled for. MVF showed no BLD (P = 0.551), but there was a BLD for explosive force at 100 ms (11.2%, P = 0.007). There was a BLD in RFD 50-100 ms (14.9%, P = 0.004), but not for the other periods. Interestingly, there was a BLD in evoked force measures (6.3-9.0%, P<0.001). There was no difference in agonist or antagonist EMG for any condition (P≥0.233). Measurement artefacts contributed minimally to the observed BLD. The BLD in volitional explosive force found here could not be explained by measurement issues, or agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation. The BLD in voluntary and evoked explosive force might

  12. The effects of height and distance on the force production and acceleration in martial arts strikes.

    PubMed

    Bolander, Richard P; Neto, Osmar Pinto; Bir, Cynthia A

    2009-11-01

    Almost all cultures have roots in some sort of self defence system and yet there is relatively little research in this area, outside of a sports related environment. This project investigated different applications of strikes from Kung Fu practitioners that have not been addressed before in the literature. Punch and palm strikes were directly compared from different heights and distances, with the use of a load cell, accelerometers, and high speed video. The data indicated that the arm accelerations of both strikes were similar, although the force and resulting acceleration of the target were significantly greater for the palm strikes. Additionally, the relative height at which the strike was delivered was also investigated. The overall conclusion is that the palm strike is a more effective strike for transferring force to an object. It can also be concluded that an attack to the chest would be ideal for maximizing impact force and moving an opponent off balance. Key PointsIt has been determined that the palm strike is more effective than the punch for developing force and for transferring momentum, most likely the result of a reduced number of rigid links and joints.A strike at head level is less effective than a strike at chest level for developing force and transferring momentum.Distance plays an effect on the overall force and momentum changes, and most likely is dependent on the velocity of the limb and alignment of the bones prior to impact.The teaching of self defence for novices and law enforcement would benefit from including the palm strike as a high priority technique.

  13. The Effects of Height and Distance on the Force Production and Acceleration in Martial Arts Strikes

    PubMed Central

    Bolander, Richard P.; Neto, Osmar Pinto; Bir, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all cultures have roots in some sort of self defence system and yet there is relatively little research in this area, outside of a sports related environment. This project investigated different applications of strikes from Kung Fu practitioners that have not been addressed before in the literature. Punch and palm strikes were directly compared from different heights and distances, with the use of a load cell, accelerometers, and high speed video. The data indicated that the arm accelerations of both strikes were similar, although the force and resulting acceleration of the target were significantly greater for the palm strikes. Additionally, the relative height at which the strike was delivered was also investigated. The overall conclusion is that the palm strike is a more effective strike for transferring force to an object. It can also be concluded that an attack to the chest would be ideal for maximizing impact force and moving an opponent off balance. Key Points It has been determined that the palm strike is more effective than the punch for developing force and for transferring momentum, most likely the result of a reduced number of rigid links and joints. A strike at head level is less effective than a strike at chest level for developing force and transferring momentum. Distance plays an effect on the overall force and momentum changes, and most likely is dependent on the velocity of the limb and alignment of the bones prior to impact. The teaching of self defence for novices and law enforcement would benefit from including the palm strike as a high priority technique. PMID:24474886

  14. The effects of height and distance on the force production and acceleration in martial arts strikes.

    PubMed

    Bolander, Richard P; Neto, Osmar Pinto; Bir, Cynthia A

    2009-11-01

    Almost all cultures have roots in some sort of self defence system and yet there is relatively little research in this area, outside of a sports related environment. This project investigated different applications of strikes from Kung Fu practitioners that have not been addressed before in the literature. Punch and palm strikes were directly compared from different heights and distances, with the use of a load cell, accelerometers, and high speed video. The data indicated that the arm accelerations of both strikes were similar, although the force and resulting acceleration of the target were significantly greater for the palm strikes. Additionally, the relative height at which the strike was delivered was also investigated. The overall conclusion is that the palm strike is a more effective strike for transferring force to an object. It can also be concluded that an attack to the chest would be ideal for maximizing impact force and moving an opponent off balance. Key PointsIt has been determined that the palm strike is more effective than the punch for developing force and for transferring momentum, most likely the result of a reduced number of rigid links and joints.A strike at head level is less effective than a strike at chest level for developing force and transferring momentum.Distance plays an effect on the overall force and momentum changes, and most likely is dependent on the velocity of the limb and alignment of the bones prior to impact.The teaching of self defence for novices and law enforcement would benefit from including the palm strike as a high priority technique. PMID:24474886

  15. Validity of the Myotest® in measuring force and power production in the squat and bench press.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Brett A; Solomon-Hill, Glenn; Flanagan, Shawn D; Earp, Jacob E; Luk, Hui-Ying; Dobbins, Kathryn A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Fragala, Maren S; Ho, Jen-Yu; Hatfield, Disa L; Vingren, Jakob L; Denegar, Craig R; Volek, Jeff S; Kupchak, Brian R; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the concurrent validity of a bar-mounted Myotest® instrument in measuring the force and power production in the squat and bench press exercises when compared to the gold standard of a computerized linear transducer and force platform system. Fifty-four men (bench press: 39-171 kg; squat: 75-221 kg) and 43 women (bench press: 18-80 kg; squat: 30-115 kg) (age range 18-30 years) performed a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength test in bench press and squat exercises. Power testing consisted of the jump squat and the bench throw at 30% of each subject's 1RM. During each measurement, both the Myotest® instrument and the Celesco linear transducer of the directly interfaced BMS system (Ballistic Measurement System [BMS] Innervations Inc, Fitness Technology force plate, Skye, South Australia, Australia) were mounted to the weight bar. A strong, positive correlation (r) between the Myotest and BMS systems and a high correlation of determination (R2) was demonstrated for bench throw force (r = 0.95, p < 0.05) (R2 = 0.92); bench throw power (r = 0.96, p < 0.05) (R2 = 0.93); squat jump force (r = 0.98, p < 0.05) (R2 = 0.97); and squat jump power (r = 0.91, p < 0.05) (R2 = 0.82). In conclusion, when fixed on the bar in the vertical axis, the Myotest is a valid field instrument for measuring force and power in commonly used exercise movements.

  16. LC-MS-MS Characterization of Forced Degradation Products of Fidarestat, a Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitor: Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Talluri, M V N Kumar; Khatoon, Lubna; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Chavan, Balasaheb B; Ragampeta, Srinivas

    2015-10-01

    An accurate, precise, robust and selective stability-indicating liquid chromatographic (LC) method has been developed for the monitoring of fidarestat in the presence of its forced degradants. The drug was subjected to hydrolysis (acid, alkali and neutral degradation), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress conditions. The drug degraded significantly under hydrolytic (basic, acidic and neutral) and oxidative stress conditions, whereas it was found to be stable in photolytic and thermal conditions. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Grace C18, (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5 μm) column using gradient mobile phase system consisting of 10 mM of ammonium acetate buffer at pH 4 and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 283 nm. The developed method was extended to liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS-MS) for characterization of all the degradation products. A total of five new degradation products were identified and characterized by LC-QTOF-MS-MS. The developed LC method was validated as per ICH guideline Q2 (R1). The proposed method was found to be successively applied for the quality control of fidarestat in bulk drug analysis.

  17. Cosmogenic Beryllium Production from Ocean Sediment Sequences Help to Construct Accurate Records of the Geodynamo Variation at the Millennial to Million Year Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouveny, N.; Ménabréaz, L.; Bourles, D. L.; Demory, F.; Guillou, V.; Arnold, M.; Vidal, L.

    2013-12-01

    The possible contribution of the axial precession to the energy of the geodynamo was recently reintroduced by theoretical and experimental studies. It is supported by relative paleointensity stacks and deep sea floor magnetization records documenting series of geomagnetic dipole lows (GDL) with recurrence at periods ranging from 30 to 120 kyr, and intriguing phase relationships with obliquity variations and δ18O records (e.g. Fuller, 2006; Thouveny et al. 2008). Yet, these time-series are presently not precise and complete enough to validate this fundamental and debated relationship. The MAG-ORB project funded by the French "Agence nationale de la Recherche" aims at reconstructing the series of GDL over the last Ma, by coupling -on the very same sedimentary sequences- the reconstructions of paleomagnetic variations, cosmogenic10Be production variations and δ18O isotope variations. Recent results (e.g. Ménabréaz et al., 2012, 2013) demonstrate that 10Be overproduction events are systematically induced by the GDL linked with excursions and reversals -as awaited from the theoretical and empirical non linear inverse relationship established between the magnetic moment value and the penetration rate of cosmic rays and particles. The calibration of the authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio signals using absolute Virtual (axial) Dipole Moment values allowed us to construct 10Be-derived Geomagnetic Dipole Moment records over the last millennium, the last 60 ka and the last Ma, allowing to assess the robustness of the GDL series by a method completely independent from rock and paleo-magnetic methods. These records are comparable with individuals RPI records obtained from the same cores, and with global RPI stacks (e.g. GLOPIS, SINT 800 and PISO-1500). Since the Beryllium atoms are adsorbed on the settling silicate particles, the measured 10Be/9Be ratio signatures of cosmogenic isotope overproductions accurately indicate the exact stratigraphic position of the GDL in the sedimentary

  18. Chronic clenbuterol treatment compromises force production without directly altering skeletal muscle contractile machinery

    PubMed Central

    Py, G; Ramonatxo, C; Sirvent, P; Sanchez, A M J; Philippe, A G; Douillard, A; Galbès, O; Lionne, C; Bonnieu, A; Chopard, A; Cazorla, O; Lacampagne, A; Candau, R B

    2015-01-01

    Clenbuterol is a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist known to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotypic shift. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on contractile efficiency and explore the underlying mechanisms, i.e. the muscle contractile machinery and calcium-handling ability. Forty-three 6-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups that were treated with either subcutaneous equimolar doses of clenbuterol (4 mg kg−1 day−1) or saline solution for 9, 14 or 21 days. In addition to the muscle hypertrophy, although an 89% increase in absolute maximal tetanic force (Po) was noted, specific maximal tetanic force (sPo) was unchanged or even depressed in the slow twitch muscle of the clenbuterol-treated rats (P < 0.05). The fit of muscle contraction and relaxation force kinetics indicated that clenbuterol treatment significantly reduced the rate constant of force development and the slow and fast rate constants of relaxation in extensor digitorum longus muscle (P < 0.05), and only the fast rate constant of relaxation in soleus muscle (P < 0.05). Myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in both relaxed and activated conditions in soleus (P < 0.001), suggesting that the depressed specific tension was not due to the myosin head alteration itself. Moreover, action potential-elicited Ca2+ transients in flexor digitorum brevis fibres (fast twitch fibres) from clenbuterol-treated animals demonstrated decreased amplitude after 14 days (−19%, P < 0.01) and 21 days (−25%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that chronic clenbuterol treatment reduces contractile efficiency, with altered contraction and relaxation kinetics, but without directly altering the contractile machinery. Lower Ca2+ release during contraction could partially explain these deleterious effects. PMID:25656230

  19. Chronic clenbuterol treatment compromises force production without directly altering skeletal muscle contractile machinery.

    PubMed

    Py, G; Ramonatxo, C; Sirvent, P; Sanchez, A M J; Philippe, A G; Douillard, A; Galbès, O; Lionne, C; Bonnieu, A; Chopard, A; Cazorla, O; Lacampagne, A; Candau, R B

    2015-04-15

    Clenbuterol is a β2 -adrenergic receptor agonist known to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotypic shift. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on contractile efficiency and explore the underlying mechanisms, i.e. the muscle contractile machinery and calcium-handling ability. Forty-three 6-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups that were treated with either subcutaneous equimolar doses of clenbuterol (4 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) or saline solution for 9, 14 or 21 days. In addition to the muscle hypertrophy, although an 89% increase in absolute maximal tetanic force (Po ) was noted, specific maximal tetanic force (sPo) was unchanged or even depressed in the slow twitch muscle of the clenbuterol-treated rats (P < 0.05). The fit of muscle contraction and relaxation force kinetics indicated that clenbuterol treatment significantly reduced the rate constant of force development and the slow and fast rate constants of relaxation in extensor digitorum longus muscle (P < 0.05), and only the fast rate constant of relaxation in soleus muscle (P < 0.05). Myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in both relaxed and activated conditions in soleus (P < 0.001), suggesting that the depressed specific tension was not due to the myosin head alteration itself. Moreover, action potential-elicited Ca(2+) transients in flexor digitorum brevis fibres (fast twitch fibres) from clenbuterol-treated animals demonstrated decreased amplitude after 14 days (-19%, P < 0.01) and 21 days (-25%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that chronic clenbuterol treatment reduces contractile efficiency, with altered contraction and relaxation kinetics, but without directly altering the contractile machinery. Lower Ca(2+) release during contraction could partially explain these deleterious effects. PMID:25656230

  20. Lift vs. drag based mechanisms for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects.

    PubMed

    Jones, S K; Laurenza, R; Hedrick, T L; Griffith, B E; Miller, L A

    2015-11-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to determine whether lift- or drag-based mechanisms generate the most vertical force in the flight of the smallest insects. These insects fly at Re on the order of 4-60 where viscous effects are significant. Detailed quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available, and as a result both drag- and lift-based strategies have been suggested as the mechanisms by which these insects stay aloft. We used the immersed boundary method to solve the fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problem of a flexible wing immersed in a two-dimensional viscous fluid to compare three idealized hovering kinematics: a drag-based stroke in the vertical plane, a lift-based stroke in the horizontal plane, and a hybrid stroke on a tilted plane. Our results suggest that at higher Re, a lift-based strategy produces more vertical force than a drag-based strategy. At the Re pertinent to small insect hovering, however, there is little difference in performance between the two strategies. A drag-based mechanism of flight could produce more vertical force than a lift-based mechanism for insects at Re<5; however, we are unaware of active fliers at this scale.

  1. Load-induced enhancement of Dynein force production by LIS1-NudE in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Babu J N; Mattson, Michelle; Wynne, Caitlin L; Vadpey, Omid; Durra, Abdo; Chapman, Dail; Vallee, Richard B; Gross, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Most sub-cellular cargos are transported along microtubules by kinesin and dynein molecular motors, but how transport is regulated is not well understood. It is unknown whether local control is possible, for example, by changes in specific cargo-associated motor behaviour to react to impediments. Here we discover that microtubule-associated lipid droplets (LDs) in COS1 cells respond to an optical trap with a remarkable enhancement in sustained force production. This effect is observed only for microtubule minus-end-moving LDs. It is specifically blocked by RNAi for the cytoplasmic dynein regulators LIS1 and NudE/L (Nde1/Ndel1), but not for the dynactin p150(Glued) subunit. It can be completely replicated using cell-free preparations of purified LDs, where duration of LD force production is more than doubled. These results identify a novel, intrinsic, cargo-associated mechanism for dynein-mediated force adaptation, which should markedly improve the ability of motor-driven cargoes to overcome subcellular obstacles. PMID:27489054

  2. Load-induced enhancement of Dynein force production by LIS1–NudE in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Babu J. N.; Mattson, Michelle; Wynne, Caitlin L.; Vadpey, Omid; Durra, Abdo; Chapman, Dail; Vallee, Richard B.; Gross, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Most sub-cellular cargos are transported along microtubules by kinesin and dynein molecular motors, but how transport is regulated is not well understood. It is unknown whether local control is possible, for example, by changes in specific cargo-associated motor behaviour to react to impediments. Here we discover that microtubule-associated lipid droplets (LDs) in COS1 cells respond to an optical trap with a remarkable enhancement in sustained force production. This effect is observed only for microtubule minus-end-moving LDs. It is specifically blocked by RNAi for the cytoplasmic dynein regulators LIS1 and NudE/L (Nde1/Ndel1), but not for the dynactin p150Glued subunit. It can be completely replicated using cell-free preparations of purified LDs, where duration of LD force production is more than doubled. These results identify a novel, intrinsic, cargo-associated mechanism for dynein-mediated force adaptation, which should markedly improve the ability of motor-driven cargoes to overcome subcellular obstacles. PMID:27489054

  3. Climate Forcing Datasets for Agricultural Modeling: Merged Products for Gap-Filling and Historical Climate Series Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruane, Alex C.; Goldberg, Richard; Chryssanthacopoulos, James

    2014-01-01

    The AgMERRA and AgCFSR climate forcing datasets provide daily, high-resolution, continuous, meteorological series over the 1980-2010 period designed for applications examining the agricultural impacts of climate variability and climate change. These datasets combine daily resolution data from retrospective analyses (the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, MERRA, and the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis, CFSR) with in situ and remotely-sensed observational datasets for temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation, leading to substantial reductions in bias in comparison to a network of 2324 agricultural-region stations from the Hadley Integrated Surface Dataset (HadISD). Results compare favorably against the original reanalyses as well as the leading climate forcing datasets (Princeton, WFD, WFD-EI, and GRASP), and AgMERRA distinguishes itself with substantially improved representation of daily precipitation distributions and extreme events owing to its use of the MERRA-Land dataset. These datasets also peg relative humidity to the maximum temperature time of day, allowing for more accurate representation of the diurnal cycle of near-surface moisture in agricultural models. AgMERRA and AgCFSR enable a number of ongoing investigations in the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) and related research networks, and may be used to fill gaps in historical observations as well as a basis for the generation of future climate scenarios.

  4. Recovery patterns in electroencephalographic global field power during maximal isometric force production.

    PubMed

    Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S; Denegar, Craig R; Kupchak, Brian R; Kraemer, William J

    2011-10-01

    In previous work, cortical activity decreased with fatigue following novel movements or small muscle group actions. These muscle actions, however, do not appear related to the cortical activity seen with biologically relevant and highly trained movement patterns (i.e., ingrained patterns). The cortical recovery response to ingrained patterns-and how it differs with altered load, speed, or volume - is unknown. The purpose of this balanced, within-group study was to investigate differences in cortical activity 24 hours after physically distinct variations of a highly trained squat exercise (n = 7, minimum 4 years resistance training experience). Four resistance protocols were chosen: rate of force development (PWR, 6 × 3 squat jumps at 30% of 1 repetition maximum [1RM]); magnitude of force development (FOR, 6 × 3 squat at 95% of 1RM); volume of force development (VOL, 6 × 10 squat at 80% of their 1RM); and control (CTRL, 6 sets unracking an empty bar). Twenty-four hours later, subjects performed a peak isometric squat while electroencephalographic and biochemical markers of exertion and fatigue were obtained. Global field power detected the quantity of activity superficial to motor regions. Waveforms of activity throughout the isometric squats were obtained and grand averages calculated to produce quantitative depictions of cortical activity. Significance was P ≤ 0.05. Peak isometric squat force was not statistically different 24 hours postexercise (Force [N]: PWR: 2828.79 ± 461.17; FOR: 2887.64 ± 453.09; VOL: 2910.17 ± 625.81; CTRL 2768.53 ± 374.85). Subjects produced similar and characteristic cortical activity patterns during isometric squats despite varying indices of fatigue. Differences were observed based upon the use or nonuse of aerobic endurance exercise in their training program. Patterns of activity in data seem to have emerged based on differences in training preference. Global Field Power (uV) during the isometric squat for PWR was 26.98 ± 14

  5. Characterization of forced degradation products and in silico toxicity prediction of Sofosbuvir: A novel HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Swain, Debasish; Samanthula, Gananadhamu; Bhagat, Shweta; Bharatam, P V; Akula, Venkatakrishna; Sinha, Barij N

    2016-02-20

    Sofosbuvir is a direct acting antiviral medication used to treat Hepatitis C viral infection. The present study focuses on the degradation behavior of the drug under various stress conditions (hydrolysis, oxidative, thermal and photolytic) as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH Q1A (R2)) guidelines. A high performance liquid chromatographic system (HPLC) was used to develop a selective, precise and accurate method for separating all the degradation products. The separation was achieved on a Sunfire™ C18 (150mm×4.6mm×5μm) stationary phase with a mobile phase of 10mM ammonium acetate (pH 5.0) buffer and acetonitrile in gradient elution mode. A quadrupole-time of flight mass analyzer equipped with an electrospray ionization technique was used to propose the structural information based on the MS/MS and accurate mass measurements. Seven degradation products were identified and characterised by LC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS. In silico toxicity of the drug and its degradation products was determined using TOPKAT and DEREK toxicity prediction softwares. The proposed method was validated as per the ICH Q2 guidelines. PMID:26771133

  6. Effects of contraction path and velocity on the coordination of hand muscles during a three-digit force production task.

    PubMed

    Jiayuan He; Xinjun Sheng; Dingguo Zhang; Xiangyang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Though many studies indicated that the behavior of single muscle was different between contraction and relaxation, the effect of contraction history profile on multiple muscles has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the influence of contraction history on the coordination patterns of hand muscles during a three-digit force production task. The effects of the contraction and relaxation paths with two contraction velocities (5% and 10% maximum voluntary contraction per second) were investigated. The results showed that the force-independent characteristic of muscle coordination patterns still held regardless of the contraction history profiles. In addition, the effect of contraction path was more significant than that of velocity. The study provides a potential way to overcome the impact of contraction disturbance for improving the robustness of the human-machine interface (HMI) based on electromyographic (EMG) pattern recognition.

  7. Study of Falling Roof Vibrations in a Production Face at Roof Support Resistance in the Form of Concentrated Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyalich, G. D.; Buyalich, K. G.; Umrikhina, V. Yu

    2016-08-01

    One of the main reasons of roof support failures in production faces is mismatch of their parameters and parameters of dynamic impact on the metal structure from the falling roof during its secondary convergences. To assess the parameters of vibrational interaction of roof support with the roof, it was suggested to use computational models of forces application and a partial differential equation of fourth order describing this process, its numerical solution allowed to assess frequency, amplitude and speed of roof strata movement depending on physical and mechanical properties of the roof strata as well as on load bearing and geometry parameters of the roof support. To simplify solving of the differential equation, roof support response was taken as the concentrated force.

  8. Phosphorylation of a twitchin-related protein controls catch and calcium sensitivity of force production in invertebrate smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Siegman, Marion J.; Funabara, Daisuke; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Watabe, Shugo; Hartshorne, David J.; Butler, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    “Catch” is a condition of prolonged, high-force maintenance at resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) and very low energy usage, occurring in invertebrate smooth muscles, including the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis. Relaxation from catch is rapid on serotonergic nerve stimulation in intact muscles and application of cAMP in permeabilized muscles. This release of catch occurs by protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of a high (≈600 kDa) molecular mass protein, the regulator of catch. Here, we identify the catch-regulating protein as a homologue of the mini-titin, twitchin, based on (i) a partial cDNA of the purified isolated protein showing 77% amino acid sequence identity to the kinase domain of Aplysia californica twitchin; (ii) a polyclonal antibody to a synthetic peptide in this sequence reacting with the phosphorylated catch-regulating protein band from permeabilized ABRM; and (iii) the similarity of the amino acid composition and molecular weight of the protein to twitchin. In permeabilized ABRM, at all but maximum [Ca2+], phosphorylation of twitchin results in a decreased calcium sensitivity of force production (half-maximum at 2.5 vs. 1.3 μM calcium). At a given submaximal force, with equal numbers of force generators, twitchin phosphorylation increased unloaded shortening velocity ≈2-fold. These data suggest that aspects of the catch state exist not only at resting [Ca2+], but also at higher submaximal [Ca2+]. The mechanism that gives rise to force maintenance in catch probably operates together, to some extent, with that of cycling myosin crossbridges. PMID:9560285

  9. The Characteristics of Force Production of Kinesin-5 on MCF7 Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    Unlike neural mammalian microtubules with class II of beta tubulin as the major beta tubulin in their compositions, MCF7 microtubules composed of 0% class II beta tubulin isotype, 39.1% class I beta tubulin isotype, 2.5% class III beta tubulin isotype and 58.4% class IV beta tubulin isotype. Recent studies have revealed that function of some of motor proteins can be affected by the structural composition of microtubules. In this work, we will show how the function of mitotic kinesin (Kin-5) under external load changed when moving along bovine versus MCF7 microtubules. Along MCF7 microtubules, the detachment force was reduced and the force-velocity curve was different as compared to those related to bovine brain. We will also show that the elimination of the C-terminal tails made the transport almost similar to the two sets of microtubules. This suggests that the C-terminal tails of tubulin plays a regulatory role in Kinesin-5's function.

  10. A drag-based mechanism for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Shannon; Laurenza, Ryan; Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Previous work has shown that the flight kinematics and aerodynamics of the smallest flying insects may be significantly different than that of their larger counterparts. These small insects, such as thrips and parasitoid wasps, are on the order of 1 mm in length and operate at a Reynolds number less than 10. Due to their small size and high wing beat frequency, quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available. As a result, there has been much debate and speculation about the flight strategies employed by these insects. With the challenges associated with generating lift at low Reynolds numbers, it could be beneficial for the smallest insects to use a drag-based motion to generate some or all of its vertical force, however this has not been rigorously investigated. We used computational fluid dynamics to investigate the feasibility of drag-based propulsion in the tiniest insects. We investigated the vertical force generated by an idealized drag-based vertical stroke over a range of Reynolds numbers from 1 to 150. We also compared this stroke to more conventional hovering stroke kinematics such as that of a fruit fly and dragonfly.

  11. Treatment with a corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor agonist modulates skeletal muscle mass and force production in aged and chronically ill animals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Muscle weakness is associated with a variety of chronic disorders such as emphysema (EMP) and congestive heart failure (CHF) as well as aging. Therapies to treat muscle weakness associated with chronic disease or aging are lacking. Corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor (CRF2R) agonists have been shown to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in a variety of acute conditions that lead to skeletal muscle wasting. Hypothesis We hypothesize that treating animals with a CRF2R agonist will maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in animals with chronic disease and in aged animals. Methods We utilized animal models of aging, CHF and EMP to evaluate the potential of CRF2R agonist treatment to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production in aged animals and animals with CHF and EMP. Results In aged rats, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 3 months results in greater extensor digitorum longus (EDL) force production, EDL mass, soleus mass and soleus force production compared to age matched untreated animals. In the hamster EMP model, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 5 months results in greater EDL force production in EMP hamsters when compared to vehicle treated EMP hamsters and greater EDL mass and force in normal hamsters when compared to vehicle treated normal hamsters. In the rat CHF model, we demonstrate that treatment with a CRF2R agonist for up to 3 months results in greater EDL and soleus muscle mass and force production in CHF rats and normal rats when compared to the corresponding vehicle treated animals. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the underlying physiological conditions associated with chronic diseases such as CHF and emphysema in addition to aging do not reduce the potential of CRF2R agonists to maintain skeletal muscle mass and force production. PMID:21235761

  12. Ongoing characterization of the forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source for the selective production of exotic species facility

    SciTech Connect

    Manzolaro, M. Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Vasquez, J.; Corradetti, S.; Calderolla, M.; Prete, G.; Meneghetti, G.

    2014-02-15

    An intense research and development activity to finalize the design of the target ion source system for the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility (operating according to the isotope separation on line technique) is at present ongoing at Legnaro National Laboratories. In particular, the characterization of ion sources in terms of ionization efficiency and transversal emittance is currently in progress, and a preliminary set of data is already available. In this work, the off-line ionization efficiency and emittance measurements for the SPES forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source in the case of a stable Ar beam are presented in detail.

  13. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  14. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  15. Kinematics, hydrodynamics and force production of pleopods suggest jet-assisted walking in the American lobster (Homarus americanus).

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeanette L; Demont, M Edwin

    2009-09-01

    The American lobster (Homarus americanus) displays a diverse set of locomotory behaviours that includes tail flips, walking and paddling. Paddling is carried out by the four pairs of paddle-shaped pleopods on the ventral abdomen. Although it is recognized that pleopod-generated fluid flows have some locomotory role in adults, reports on their relative importance in locomotion are inconsistent. This paper integrates experimental kinematics and hydrodynamics of lobster pleopod beating to determine the mechanism and magnitude of pleopod force production. A kinematic analysis of pleopod beating in live lobsters showed that the pleopods execute an adlocomotory metachronal beating pattern. We modelled in vivo pleopod kinematics with a set of simple trigonometric functions, and used these functions to program a mechanical lobster model consisting of motor-driven pleopods on a lobster abdomen exoskeleton. Based on flow visualizations obtained from applying particle image velocimetry to the lobster model, we propose that the unsteady metachronal kinematics of the pleopods can maximize thrust by exploiting forces arising from individual pleopod activity and interactions among adjacent pairs. The pleopods continuously entrain fluid surrounding the lobster and create a caudally directed fluid jet oriented parallel to the substratum. Inputting wake morphology and velocity data into a simplified model for steady jet thrust showed that the pleopods of the lobster model produced 27-54 mN of thrust, which is comparable to the propulsive forces generated by other proficient swimmers. These results suggest that lobster pleopods are capable of producing forces of a magnitude that could assist the walking legs in forward propulsion.

  16. Mechanism driven structural elucidation of forced degradation products from hydrocortisone in solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fa; Zhou, Jay; Shi, Yiqun; Tavlarakis, Panagiotis; Karaisz, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Hydrocortisone degradation products 1, 2, 3, and 4 along with hemiacetal derivatives 5, 6, 7, and 8 were observed through stressed hydrocortisone in solution. Their structures were identified based on HPLC-UV, HPLC-MS, and HPLC-HRMS (high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry) analyses as well as reaction mechanistic investigation and synthesis for structural confirmation. 1 and 2 are a pair of E/Z isomers and they were generated through acid catalyzed tautomerization/dehydration of hydrocortisone. Incorporation of water to 1 and 2 resulted in the formation of 3. We also discovered new degradation product 4 which was converted from 3 by oxidation. The degradation products were synthesized by stressing hydrocortisone under the optimized conditions and their structures were characterized by NMR ((1)H/(13)C, COSY, HMBC, HSQC, NOESY) and HRMS analyses. The degradation pathway of hydrocortisone is postulated.

  17. Mechanism driven structural elucidation of forced degradation products from hydrocortisone in solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fa; Zhou, Jay; Shi, Yiqun; Tavlarakis, Panagiotis; Karaisz, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Hydrocortisone degradation products 1, 2, 3, and 4 along with hemiacetal derivatives 5, 6, 7, and 8 were observed through stressed hydrocortisone in solution. Their structures were identified based on HPLC-UV, HPLC-MS, and HPLC-HRMS (high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry) analyses as well as reaction mechanistic investigation and synthesis for structural confirmation. 1 and 2 are a pair of E/Z isomers and they were generated through acid catalyzed tautomerization/dehydration of hydrocortisone. Incorporation of water to 1 and 2 resulted in the formation of 3. We also discovered new degradation product 4 which was converted from 3 by oxidation. The degradation products were synthesized by stressing hydrocortisone under the optimized conditions and their structures were characterized by NMR ((1)H/(13)C, COSY, HMBC, HSQC, NOESY) and HRMS analyses. The degradation pathway of hydrocortisone is postulated. PMID:27328360

  18. Development of a Rapid and Accurate Identification Method for Citrobacter Species Isolated from Pork Products Using a Matrix-Assisted Laser-Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hye-Lim; Han, Sun-Kyung; Park, Sunghoon; Park, Si Hong; Shim, Jae-Yong; Oh, Mihwa; Ricke, Steven C; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2015-09-01

    Previous detection methods for Citrobacter are considered time consuming and laborious. In this study, we have developed a rapid and accurate detection method for Citrobacter species in pork products, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 35 Citrobacter strains were isolated from 30 pork products and identified by both MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches. All isolates were identified to the species level by the MALDI-TOF MS, while 16S rRNA gene sequencing results could not discriminate them clearly. These results confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS is a more accurate and rapid detection method for the identification of Citrobacter species.

  19. Coccolithophore export production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California: response to climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziveri, P.; Thunell, R. C.

    The flux and taxonomic composition of coccolithophores has been determined for sediment trap samples collected over a two-year period from Guaymas Basin, central Gulf of California. The Gulf of California is a subtropical marginal sea with exceptionally high rates of primary productivity. The annual biogenic sediment fluxes are largely dominated by silica, with diatoms as the major contributor to the opal flux. For the July 1990 through November 1992 study period, the total coccolithophore export production in Guaymas varied in response to the strength of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Coccolithophore production follows the general surface primary productivity pattern with relatively high fluxes from late fall to late winter, and low production in the summer when the water column is highly stratified and nutrient depleted. High fluxes of up to 10 9 coccoliths m -2 day-1 and 3×10 6 coccospheres m -2 day-1 indicate that coccolithophores are an important component of the phytoplankton population in Guaymas Basin. The intensification of ENSO conditions during 1992 altered the typical hydrography of the Gulf of California by increasing SST and reducing the strength of spring upwelling. This is reflected in reduced opal and diatom fluxes during this period. Conversely, these more oligotrophic conditions resulted in higher total coccolithophore fluxes during spring and summer 1992. Gephyrocapsa oceanica is present in the Gulf throughout the study period, but is dominant during weak or non-ENSO times. Emiliania huxleyi and, to a lesser degree, Florisphaera profunda are abundant during strong ENSO periods. Two major coccolithophore signals are indicative of strong ENSO conditions and could be used as paleo-ENSO indicators in the Gulf of California: (a) the switch in dominance between G. oceanica and E. huxleyi and (b) high abundances of the deep dwelling species F. profunda. The abundance of this latter species shows a strong inverse relationship with opal fluxes. A

  20. Predicting hydration Gibbs energies of alkyl-aromatics using molecular simulation: a comparison of current force fields and the development of a new parameter set for accurate solvation data.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Nuno M; Jorge, Miguel; Queimada, António J; Gomes, José R B; Economou, Ioannis G; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2011-10-14

    The Gibbs energy of hydration is an important quantity to understand the molecular behavior in aqueous systems at constant temperature and pressure. In this work we review the performance of some popular force fields, namely TraPPE, OPLS-AA and Gromos, in reproducing the experimental Gibbs energies of hydration of several alkyl-aromatic compounds--benzene, mono-, di- and tri-substituted alkylbenzenes--using molecular simulation techniques. In the second part of the paper, we report a new model that is able to improve such hydration energy predictions, based on Lennard Jones parameters from the recent TraPPE-EH force field and atomic partial charges obtained from natural population analysis of density functional theory calculations. We apply a scaling factor determined by fitting the experimental hydration energy of only two solutes, and then present a simple rule to generate atomic partial charges for different substituted alkyl-aromatics. This rule has the added advantages of eliminating the unnecessary assumption of fixed charge on every substituted carbon atom and providing a simple guideline for extrapolating the charge assignment to any multi-substituted alkyl-aromatic molecule. The point charges derived here yield excellent predictions of experimental Gibbs energies of hydration, with an overall absolute average deviation of less than 0.6 kJ mol(-1). This new parameter set can also give good predictive performance for other thermodynamic properties and liquid structural information.

  1. Effect of restricted feeding during the rearing period and a "forced moult" at 40 weeks of production on the productivity of Pekin breeder ducks.

    PubMed

    Olver, M D

    1995-12-01

    1. Six males and 24 female Cherry Valley Pekin ducklings were randomly allocated to each of 12 pens to test the effects of quantitative food restriction during the rearing period on the subsequent reproductive performance. At the end of the laying period (60 weeks) a "forced moult" was introduced and its effect on a further 40 weeks production investigated. 2. The 3 rearing treatments were 50% of ad libitum intake from 3 to 20 weeks; 75% of ad libitum intake from 3 to 20 weeks and ad libitum intake throughout. During the laying period (20-60 weeks) and post forced-moult period (60-100 weeks) duck breeder pellets were fed ad libitum to all groups. 3. Highly significant (P < or = 0.01) differences in favour of the restricted groups over the ad libitum-fed groups were observed in most of the responses studied. The following were the main advantages of food restriction: lower lifetime food intake, lower carcase fat content at 20 weeks, delay in sexual maturity, higher egg production, higher peak and terminal production, higher fertility, higher hatchability of eggs set and lower mortality. Egg mass and hatchability of fertile eggs was not influenced by food restriction in this experiment. The use of a "forced moult" showed that it could be of economical importance. 4. Difference between treatments in respect of absolute and relative visceral masses were also investigated. The absolute masses of the intestine, heart, gizzard and liver all decreased as the degree of food restriction increased. The relative visceral masses showed the opposite trend with the exception of the heart which showed no significant differences between treatments.

  2. Itawamba Community College and Tecumseh Products Company, Inc.: A High Performance Work Force Development Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itawamba Community Coll., Tupelo, MS.

    Since 1976, Mississippi's Itawamba Community College (ICC) and Tecumseh Products Company (TPC) have maintained a cooperative relationship providing the firm with support and services stemming from ICC's Skill/Tech One-Stop Career Center. The support offered to TPC has included the following: (1) since 1976, 105 pre-employment classes have been…

  3. LC-MS/MS characterization of forced degradation products of zofenopril.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Thippani; Nageswara Rao, Pothuraju; Nageswara Rao, Ramisetti

    2014-01-01

    A rapid, specific and reliable isocratic LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the identification and characterization of stressed degradation products of Zofenopril. Zofenopril, an anti-hypertensive drug, was subjected to hydrolysis (acidic, alkaline and neutral), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as per ICH-specified conditions. The drug showed extensive degradation under oxidative and base hydrolysis stress conditions. However, it was stable to thermal, acid, neutral and photolysis stress conditions. A total of 6 degradation products were observed and the chromatographic separation of the drug and its degradation products were achieved on Phenomenex (Luna) C18 (250mm×4.6mm, i.d., 5μm) column using 20mM ammonium acetate: acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) as a mobile phase. The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS/MS and its fragmentation pathways were proposed. The LC-MS method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision. No previous reports were found in the literature regarding the degradation behavior of zofenopril. PMID:24211724

  4. Effects of Constant and Doublet Frequency Electrical Stimulation Patterns on Force Production of Knee Extensor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cometti, Carole; Babault, Nicolas; Deley, Gaëlle

    2016-01-01

    This study compared knee extensors’ neuromuscular fatigue in response to two 30-minute stimulation patterns: constant frequency train (CFT) and doublet frequency train (DFT). Fifteen men underwent two separate sessions corresponding to each pattern. Measurements included torque evoked by each contraction and maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) measured before and immediately after the stimulation sessions. In addition, activation level and torque evoked during doublets (Pd) and tetanic contractions at 80-Hz (P80) and 20-Hz (P20) were determined in six subjects. Results indicated greater mean torque during the DFT stimulation session as compared with CFT. But, no difference was obtained between the two stimulation patterns for MVC and evoked torque decreases. Measurements conducted in the subgroup depicted a significant reduction of Pd, P20 and P80. Statistical analyses also revealed bigger P20 immediate reductions after CFT than after DFT. We concluded that DFT could be a useful stimulation pattern to produce and maintain greater force with quite similar fatigue than CFT. PMID:27167066

  5. Development and validation of a stability-indicating LC-UV method for the determination of pantethine and its degradation product based on a forced degradation study.

    PubMed

    Canavesi, Rossana; Aprile, Silvio; Varese, Elena; Grosa, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Pantethine (d-bis-(N-pantothenyl-β-aminoethyl)-disulfide, PAN), the stable disulfide form of pantetheine, has beneficial effects in vascular diseases being able to decrease the hyperlipidaemia, moderate the platelet function and prevent the lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, recent studies suggested that PAN may be an effective therapeutic agent for cerebral malaria and, possibly, for neurodegenerative processes. Interestingly, in the literature, there were no data dealing with the chemical stability and the analytical aspects of PAN. Hence, in the present work the chemical stability of PAN was for the first time established through a forced degradation study followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry investigation showing the formation of three degradation products of PAN (PD1, PD2 and POx) arising from hydrolytic, thermal and oxidative stresses. Based on these data a stability-indicating LC-UV method for simultaneous estimation of PAN, and its most relevant degradation product (PD1) was developed and validated; moreover the method allowed also the separation and the quantification of the preservative system, constituted by a paraben mixture. The method showed linearity for PAN (0.4-1.2mgmL(-1)), MHB, PHB (0.4-1.2μgmL(-1)) and PD1 (2.5-100μgmL(-1)); the precision, determined in terms of intra-day and inter-day precision, expressed as RSDs, were in the ranges 0.4-1.2 and 0.7-1.4, respectively. The method demonstrated to be accurate and robust; indeed the average recoveries were 100.2, 99.9, and 100.0% for PAN, MHB and PHB, respectively, and 99.9% for PD1. By applying small variations of the mobile phase composition, counter-ion concentration and pH the separation of analytes was not affected. Finally, the applicability of this method was evaluated analyzing the available commercial forms at release as well as during stability studies. PMID:24863372

  6. UV microbeam irradiations of the mitotic spindle. II. Spindle fiber dynamics and force production

    SciTech Connect

    Spurck, T.P.; Stonington, O.G.; Snyder, J.A.; Pickett-Heaps, J.D.; Bajer, A.; Mole-Bajer, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Metaphase and anaphase spindles in cultured newt and PtK1 cells were irradiated with a UV microbeam (285 nM), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) in 3 s that selectively either severed a few fibers or cut across the half spindle. In either case, the birefringence at the polewards edge of the ARB rapidly faded polewards, while it remained fairly constant at the other, kinetochore edge. Shorter astral fibers, however, remained present in the enlarged ARB; presumably these had not been cut by the irradiation. After this enlargement of the ARB, metaphase spindles recovered rapidly as the detached pole moved back towards the chromosomes, reestablishing spindle fibers as the ARB closed; this happened when the ARB cut a few fibers or across the entire half spindle. We never detected elongation of the cut kinetochore fibers. Rather, astral fibers growing from the pole appeared to bridge and then close the ARB, just before the movement of the pole toward the chromosomes. When a second irradiation was directed into the closing ARB, the polewards movement again stopped before it restarted. In all metaphase cells, once the pole had reestablished connection with the chromosomes, the unirradiated half spindle then also shortened to create a smaller symmetrical spindle capable of normal anaphase later. Anaphase cells did not recover this way; the severed pole remained detached but the chromosomes continued a modified form of movement, clumping into a telophase-like group. The results are discussed in terms of controls operating on spindle microtubule stability and mechanisms of mitotic force generation.

  7. A rapid and accurate method for determining protein content in dairy products based on asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qin-Qin; Li, Yong-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid method and a system to determine protein content using asynchronous-injection alternating merging zone flow-injection spectrophotometry based on reaction between coomassie brilliant blue G250 (CBBG) and protein was established. Main merit of our approach is that it can avoid interferences of other nitric-compounds in samples, such as melamine and urea. Optimized conditions are as follows: Concentrations of CBBG, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), NaCl and HCl are 150 mg/l, 30 mg/l, 0.1 mol/l and 1.0% (v/v), respectively; volumes of the sample and reagent are 150 μl and 30 μl, respectively; length of a reaction coil is 200 cm; total flow rate is 2.65 ml/min. The linear range of the method is 0.5-15 mg/l (BSA), its detection limit is 0.05 mg/l, relative standard deviation is less than 1.87% (n=11), and analytical speed is 60 samples per hour.

  8. Direct quantification of lycopene in products derived from thermally processed tomatoes: optothermal window as a selective, sensitive, and accurate analytical method without the need for preparatory steps.

    PubMed

    Bicanic, Dane; Swarts, Jan; Luterotti, Svjetlana; Pietraperzia, Giangaetano; Dóka, Otto; de Rooij, Hans

    2004-09-01

    The concept of the optothermal window (OW) is proposed as a reliable analytical tool to rapidly determine the concentration of lycopene in a large variety of commercial tomato products in an extremely simple way (the determination is achieved without the need for pretreatment of the sample). The OW is a relative technique as the information is deduced from the calibration curve that relates the OW data (i.e., the product of the absorption coefficient beta and the thermal diffusion length micro) with the lycopene concentration obtained from spectrophotometric measurements. The accuracy of the method has been ascertained with a high correlation coefficient (R = 0.98) between the OW data and results acquired from the same samples by means of the conventional extraction spectrophotometric method. The intrinsic precision of the OW method is quite high (better than 1%), whereas the repeatability of the determination (RSD = 0.4-9.5%, n= 3-10) is comparable to that of spectrophotometry.

  9. The Importance of Measurement Errors for Deriving Accurate Reference Leaf Area Index Maps for Validation of Moderate-Resolution Satellite LAI Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Dong; Yang, Wenze; Tan, Bin; Rautiainen, Miina; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Jiannan; Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Linder, Sune; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2006-01-01

    The validation of moderate-resolution satellite leaf area index (LAI) products such as those operationally generated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor data requires reference LAI maps developed from field LAI measurements and fine-resolution satellite data. Errors in field measurements and satellite data determine the accuracy of the reference LAI maps. This paper describes a method by which reference maps of known accuracy can be generated with knowledge of errors in fine-resolution satellite data. The method is demonstrated with data from an international field campaign in a boreal coniferous forest in northern Sweden, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus images. The reference LAI map thus generated is used to assess modifications to the MODIS LAI/fPAR algorithm recently implemented to derive the next generation of the MODIS LAI/fPAR product for this important biome type.

  10. Maximal Voluntary Static Force Production Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle in Children 8-11 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of maximal voluntary isometric muscle contraction force-time curves among 32 normal, healthy 8- to 11-year-olds performing tasks involving separate muscle groups found that force and maximal rate of force increase were quite reproducible, but time to selected force levels reflected considerable variations. (Author/CB)

  11. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  12. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  13. Skeletal and cardiac α-actin isoforms differently modulate myosin cross-bridge formation and myofibre force production.

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2013-11-01

    Multiple congenital myopathies, including nemaline myopathy, can arise due to mutations in the ACTA1 gene encoding skeletal muscle α-actin. The main characteristics of ACTA1 null mutations (absence of skeletal muscle α-actin) are generalized skeletal muscle weakness and premature death. A mouse model (ACTC(Co)/KO) mimicking these conditions has successfully been rescued by transgenic over-expression of cardiac α-actin in skeletal muscles using the ACTC gene. Nevertheless, myofibres from ACTC(Co)/KO animals generate less force than normal myofibres (-20 to 25%). To understand the underlying mechanisms, here we have undertaken a detailed functional study of myofibres from ACTC(Co)/KO rodents. Mechanical and X-ray diffraction pattern analyses of single membrane-permeabilized myofibres showed, upon maximal Ca(2+) activation and under rigor conditions, lower stiffness and disrupted actin-layer line reflections in ACTC(Co)/KO when compared with age-matched wild-types. These results demonstrate that in ACTC(Co)/KO myofibres, the presence of cardiac α-actin instead of skeletal muscle α-actin alters actin conformational changes upon activation. This later finely modulates the strain of individual actomyosin interactions and overall lowers myofibre force production. Taken together, the present findings provide novel primordial information about actin isoforms, their functional differences and have to be considered when designing gene therapies for ACTA1-based congenital myopathies. PMID:23784376

  14. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  15. Force production and asymmetric deformation of a flexible flapping wing in forward flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Luo, Haoxiang; Song, Jialei; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Insect wings usually are flexible and deform significantly under the combined inertial and aerodynamic load. To study the effect of wing flexibility on both lift and thrust production in forward flight, a two-dimensional numerical simulation is employed to compute the fluid-structure interaction of an elastic wing section translating in an inclined stroke plane while pitching around its leading ledge. The effects of the wing stiffness, mass ratio, stroke plane angle, and flight speed are considered. The results show that the passive pitching due to wing deformation can significantly increase thrust while either maintaining lift at the same level or increasing it simultaneously. Another important finding is that even though the wing structure and actuation kinematics are symmetric, chordwise deformation of the wing shows a larger magnitude during upstroke than during downstroke. The asymmetry is more pronounced when the wing has a low mass ratio so that the fluid-induced deformation is significant. Such an aerodynamic cause may serve as an additional mechanism for the asymmetric deformation pattern observed in real insects.

  16. PRODUCTION OF HIGHLY-ALIGNED COLLAGEN LAMELLAE BY COMBINING SHEAR FORCE AND THIN-FILM CONFINEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A.; Zareian, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Load-bearing tissues owe their mechanical strength to their highly-anisotropic collagenous structure. To date, attempts to engineer mechanically strong connective tissue have failed mainly due to the lack of the ability to reproduce native collagen organization in constructs synthesized by cultured cells in vitro. The ability to influence the direction of the self-assembling collagen molecules and produce highly anisotropic structures has applications ranging from de novo engineering of complex tissues to the production of organized scaffolds for cell culture contact guidance. In this investigation we have used the simple technique of spin coating to produce highly-aligned arrays of collagen fibrils. By a simple modification of the method we have also successfully produced orthogonal collagen lamellae. Alternating collagen lamellae are frequently seen in load-bearing tissues such as cornea, annulus fibrosus, and cortical bone. Culturing of corneal fibroblasts onto aligned collagen shows that the cells adopt the organization of the fibrils. In this investigation, we observed the reversal of fibrillar growth direction or “hook” formation similar to those seen previously in a microfluidic shear-flow chamber. Although the results of this investigation clearly show that it is possible to produce small areas (O) 1 cm2 of collagen fibrils with enough alignment to guide fibroblasts, there is evidence that thin film instabilities are likely to be a significant barrier to producing organized collagen fibrils over larger areas. Successful application of this method to produce highly-controlled and organized collagenous structures will require the development of techniques to control thin film instability and will be the subject of the future work. PMID:21362500

  17. Moisture and Climatic Forcings on Sphagnum Productivity in a Cutover Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. K.; Waddington, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Gross ecosystem production (GEP) was measured at a sub-boreal ombotrophic peatland (Cacouna Bog) 15 km NE of Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec, in the summers of 2005 and 2006. The Cacouna bog was extensively mined between 1940 and 1970 using the block cut method. The combination of exposed, high bulk density peat and low water table (c. 30 cm) has produced a succession vegetation community of ericaceous shrubs, invasive trees, and only c. 10% Sphagnum moss cover. Chamber-based measurements were made at three locations arranged longitudinally along a cut trench. Volumetric water content (VWC) and temperature probes at four depths, tensiometers, and a meteorological station provided high temporal resolution moisture and climatic data. June to August precipitation in 2005 was 167 mm below the 30-year mean; in 2006, the deviation was only 17 mm below normal. The cool and dry summer of 2005 depressed VWC by 10-20 %, soil water tension by 20-40 mb, and maximum GEP by 5-10 g C m-2 d-1 as compared to 2006. Instantaneous GEP did not decline during prolonged rain-free periods in August 2005 where soil tensions exceeded -100 mb, within the hypothetical range of hyaline cell drainage and reduced GEP. The response of these Sphagnum cushions points to a resilience to hydrologic stress at intermediate age (35 years since establishment) not otherwise observed in younger Sphagnum cushions less than 5 years since establishment. These findings have implications on the parameterization of sensitivity to moisture stress in bog growth models, and to management of restored and naturally regenerating peatlands.

  18. Evidence that the spectrin network and a nonosmotic force control the fusion product morphology in electrofused erythrocyte ghosts.

    PubMed Central

    Chernomordik, L V; Sowers, A E

    1991-01-01

    The conversion of the membrane area in the "contact zones" shared by erythrocyte ghosts held in contact by dielectrophoresis into a fusion product by electrofusion was studied by both light and electron microscopy. Fusion products fell into two categories: (a) those with a freely expanding open lumen which ended in the "giant cell morphology" and with considerable internal vesicle membrane fragments, and (b) linear chains of polyghosts with long term stability but having planar diaphragms at the ghost-ghost junctions. Thin section electron microscopy showed each of these planar diaphragms to be a double membrane septum multiply-perforated with fusion pores. Heat and low ionic strength treatments known to denature or detach spectrin caused the stable planar diaphragms to dissolve, thereby quickly converting the polyghost chains to the giant cell morphology, thereby suggesting that spectrin restricts fusion zone diameter expansion if it is intact. Other indications suggest that the expansion of the open lumens appears to take place as a result of one or more membrane-specific forces with a nonosmotic origin but this tendency to expansion can be overcome if the spectrin network on only one side of a contact zone is intact. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:1760502

  19. PredPPCrys: Accurate Prediction of Sequence Cloning, Protein Production, Purification and Crystallization Propensity from Protein Sequences Using Multi-Step Heterogeneous Feature Fusion and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huilin; Wang, Mingjun; Tan, Hao; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Ziding; Song, Jiangning

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the primary approach to solve the three-dimensional structure of a protein. However, a major bottleneck of this method is the failure of multi-step experimental procedures to yield diffraction-quality crystals, including sequence cloning, protein material production, purification, crystallization and ultimately, structural determination. Accordingly, prediction of the propensity of a protein to successfully undergo these experimental procedures based on the protein sequence may help narrow down laborious experimental efforts and facilitate target selection. A number of bioinformatics methods based on protein sequence information have been developed for this purpose. However, our knowledge on the important determinants of propensity for a protein sequence to produce high diffraction-quality crystals remains largely incomplete. In practice, most of the existing methods display poorer performance when evaluated on larger and updated datasets. To address this problem, we constructed an up-to-date dataset as the benchmark, and subsequently developed a new approach termed ‘PredPPCrys’ using the support vector machine (SVM). Using a comprehensive set of multifaceted sequence-derived features in combination with a novel multi-step feature selection strategy, we identified and characterized the relative importance and contribution of each feature type to the prediction performance of five individual experimental steps required for successful crystallization. The resulting optimal candidate features were used as inputs to build the first-level SVM predictor (PredPPCrys I). Next, prediction outputs of PredPPCrys I were used as the input to build second-level SVM classifiers (PredPPCrys II), which led to significantly enhanced prediction performance. Benchmarking experiments indicated that our PredPPCrys method outperforms most existing procedures on both up-to-date and previous datasets. In addition, the predicted crystallization targets of

  20. Slowed muscle force production and sensory organization deficits contribute to altered postural control strategies in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Yiu, Beverley P H L

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to (1) compare the postural control strategies, sensory organization of balance control, and lower limb muscle performance of children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and (2) determine the association between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters and knee muscle performance indices among children with DCD. Fifty-eight DCD-affected children and 46 typically developing children participated in the study. Postural control strategies and sensory organization were evaluated with the sensory organization test (SOT). Knee muscle strength and time to produce maximum muscle torque (at 180°/s) were assessed using an isokinetic machine. Analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between groups, and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters, and isokinetic indices in children with DCD. The DCD group had significantly lower strategy scores (SOT conditions 5 and 6), lower visual and vestibular ratios, and took a longer time to reach peak torque in the knee flexor muscles than the control group (p>0.05). After accounting for age, sex, and body mass index, the vestibular ratio explained 35.8% of the variance in the strategy score of SOT condition 5 (p<0.05). Moreover, the visual ratio, vestibular ratio, and time to peak torque of the knee flexors were all significant predictors (p<0.05) of the strategy score during SOT condition 6, accounting for 14, 19.7, and 19.8% of its variance, respectively. The children with DCD demonstrated deficits in postural control strategy, sensory organization and prolonged duration of muscle force development. Slowed knee muscle force production combined with poor visual and vestibular functioning may result in greater use of hip strategy by children with DCD in sensory challenging environments.

  1. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  2. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  3. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  4. Modelling the environmental transfer of phthalates and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans into agricultural products: the EN-forc model.

    PubMed

    Fierens, T; Cornelis, C; Standaert, A; Sioen, I; De Henauw, S; Van Holderbeke, M

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to predict the occurrence of four phthalates, two polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and two polychlorinated dibenzofurans in environmental and agricultural media from observed concentrations in air, sludge, manure and concentrate. For the environmental and agricultural fate modelling, the newly developed multimedia model "EN-forc" (ENvironmental Food transfer model for ORganic Contaminants) was used. To validate EN-forc calculations, the predicted concentrations of the considered chemicals in soil, groundwater, drinking water, plants and animal products were compared with both observed and modelled concentrations available in the literature. For the majority of the considered matrices, predicted phthalate and dioxin levels differed one order of magnitude at most with observed concentrations. Unfortunately, the transfer models implemented in EN-forc lacked power to predict levels of some phthalates and dioxins in pasture, root crops and/or tubers. Concentrations of phthalates and dioxins in offal could not be predicted due to the absence of suitable models that have an acceptable level of complexity to implement in EN-forc. For this type of food products, further research is highly encouraged. In a next step, the modelling framework of EN-forc will be extended in order to be able to predict human dietary exposure to organic chemicals like phthalates and dioxins.

  5. Proton motive force, energy recycling by end product excretion, and metabolic uncoupling during anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas mendocina.

    PubMed Central

    Verdoni, N; Aon, M A; Lebeault, J M; Thomas, D

    1990-01-01

    Batch cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina, grown in rich medium with glucose excess, showed metabolic differences dependent upon whether the growth conditions were aerobic or anaerobic, with or without added electron acceptor. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of nitrate, P. mendocina reached the stationary phase of growth after 2 or 3 days, followed by a stationary phase of 4 to 5 days. Under these conditions, a mixed-type fermentative metabolism (formic, lactic, and acetic acids) appeared. A fivefold-higher specific rate of glucose consumption and eightfold-higher production of organic acids, compared with aerobic cultures, were shown by this microorganism growing anaerobically in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. The gradients of organic acid produced by P. mendocina under these conditions reached a maximum (lactate, 180 mV; formate, 150 mV; acetate, 215 mV) between days 2 and 3 of culture. The proton motive force (delta p) decreased during growth from -254 to -71 mV. The intracellular pH remained alkaline during the culture, reaching a steady-state value of 7.9. The gradients of organic acids apparently contributed to the generation of a delta p, which, according to the Energy Recycling Model (P. A. M. Michels, J. P. J. Michels, J. Boonstra, and W. N. Konings, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 5:357-364, 1979), would produce an average energy gain of 1 or 1.5 mol of ATP equivalents per mol of glucose consumed with H+/ATP stoichiometry of 3 or 2, respectively. Low YATP and Yglucose values were observed, suggesting that an uncoupled metabolism exists; i.e., ATP produced by catabolic processes is not directly used for biomass synthesis. This metabolic uncoupling could be induced at least in part by organic acids and the ATP wastage could be induced by a membrane-bound ATPase involved in intracellular pH regulation. PMID:2254245

  6. Comparison of muscle force production using the Smith machine and free weights for bench press and squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Michael L; Darby, Lynn A; Skelly, William A

    2005-02-01

    The Smith machine (SM) (vertical motion of bar on fixed path; fixed-form exercise) and free weights (FWs) (free-form path) are commonly used strength training modes. Exercisers may need to alternate between types of equipment, depending on testing, training, rehabilitation, and/or the exercisers' goals. The purposes of this study were to compare muscle force production for SM and FWs using a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for the parallel back squat and supine bench press exercises and to predict the 1RM for one mode from 1RM on the other mode. Men (n = 16) and women (n = 16) alternately completed 1RM testing for squat and bench press using SM and FWs. Analyses of variance (type of equipment x sex) and linear regression models were calculated. A significant difference was found between bench press and squat 1RMs for each mode of equipment for all participants. The squat 1RM was greater for the SM than the FWs; conversely, the bench 1RM was greater for FWs than the SM. When sex was considered, bench 1RM for FWs was greater than SM for men and women. The squat 1RM was greater for SM than FWs for women only. The 1RM on one mode of equipment was the best predictor of 1RM for the other mode. For both sexes, the equation SM bench 1RM (in kilograms) = -6.76 + 0.95 (FW bench 1RM) can be used. For women only, SM squat 1RM (in kilograms) = 28.3 + 0.73 (FW squat 1RM). These findings provide equations for converting between SM and FW equipment for training. PMID:15705030

  7. Comparison of muscle force production using the Smith machine and free weights for bench press and squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Michael L; Darby, Lynn A; Skelly, William A

    2005-02-01

    The Smith machine (SM) (vertical motion of bar on fixed path; fixed-form exercise) and free weights (FWs) (free-form path) are commonly used strength training modes. Exercisers may need to alternate between types of equipment, depending on testing, training, rehabilitation, and/or the exercisers' goals. The purposes of this study were to compare muscle force production for SM and FWs using a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) for the parallel back squat and supine bench press exercises and to predict the 1RM for one mode from 1RM on the other mode. Men (n = 16) and women (n = 16) alternately completed 1RM testing for squat and bench press using SM and FWs. Analyses of variance (type of equipment x sex) and linear regression models were calculated. A significant difference was found between bench press and squat 1RMs for each mode of equipment for all participants. The squat 1RM was greater for the SM than the FWs; conversely, the bench 1RM was greater for FWs than the SM. When sex was considered, bench 1RM for FWs was greater than SM for men and women. The squat 1RM was greater for SM than FWs for women only. The 1RM on one mode of equipment was the best predictor of 1RM for the other mode. For both sexes, the equation SM bench 1RM (in kilograms) = -6.76 + 0.95 (FW bench 1RM) can be used. For women only, SM squat 1RM (in kilograms) = 28.3 + 0.73 (FW squat 1RM). These findings provide equations for converting between SM and FW equipment for training.

  8. Changes in the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Geometry in the Carpal Tunnel Due to Force Production and Posture of Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Index Finger: an MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark. L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is a disorder caused by increased pressure in the carpal tunnel associated with repetitive, stereotypical finger actions. Little is known about in vivo geometrical changes in the carpal tunnel caused by motion at the finger joints and exerting a fingertip force. Methods The hands and forearms of five subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral and extension. For each joint posture subjects either produced no active force (passive condition) or exerted a flexion force to resist a load (~4.0 N) at the fingertip (active condition). Changes in the radii of curvature, position and transverse plane area of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons at the carpal tunnel level were measured. Results The radius of curvature of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons, at the carpal tunnel level, was significantly affected by posture of the index finger metacarpophalangeal joint (p<0.05) and the radii was significantly different between fingers (p<0.05). Actively producing force caused a significant shift (p<0.05) in the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the ventral (palmar) direction. No significant change in the area of an ellipse containing the flexor digitorum profundus tendons was observed between conditions. Interpretation The results show that relatively small changes in the posture and force production of a single finger can lead to significant changes in the geometry of all the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the carpal tunnel. Additionally, voluntary force production at the fingertip increases the moment arm of the FDP tendons about the wrist joint. PMID:23219762

  9. Influence of Adhesion Force on icaA and cidA Gene Expression and Production of Matrix Components in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Chen, Yun; Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of human infections are caused by biofilms. The biofilm mode of growth enhances the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus spp. considerably, because once they adhere, staphylococci embed themselves in a protective, self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of forces of staphylococcal adhesion to different biomaterials on icaA (which regulates the production of EPS matrix components) and cidA (which is associated with cell lysis and extracellular DNA [eDNA] release) gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Experiments were performed with S. aureus ATCC 12600 and its isogenic mutant, S. aureus ATCC 12600 Δpbp4, deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking. Deletion of pbp4 was associated with greater cell wall deformability, while it did not affect the planktonic growth rate, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, or zeta potential of the strains. The adhesion forces of S. aureus ATCC 12600 were the strongest on polyethylene (4.9 ± 0.5 nN), intermediate on polymethylmethacrylate (3.1 ± 0.7 nN), and the weakest on stainless steel (1.3 ± 0.2 nN). The production of poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, and expression of icaA genes decreased with increasing adhesion forces. However, no relation between adhesion forces and cidA expression was observed. The adhesion forces of the isogenic mutant S. aureus ATCC 12600 Δpbp4 (deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking) were much weaker than those of the parent strain and did not show any correlation with the production of poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, or expression of the icaA and cidA genes. This suggests that adhesion forces modulate the production of the matrix molecule poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, and icaA gene expression by inducing nanoscale cell wall deformation, with cross-linked peptidoglycan layers playing a pivotal role in this adhesion force sensing. PMID:25746995

  10. The effect of forced expiration on the uniformity of 99Tcm-DTPA aerosol ventilation images in patients with excess sputum production.

    PubMed

    Middleton, E; Clout, C; Occleshaw, C; Tindale, W B; Parker, B V; Barber, D C; Barrington, N A

    1990-08-01

    This study examines the use of the forced expiratory technique (FET) as a means of improving the uniformity of radionuclide aerosol ventilation images in patients with excess sputum production. Ventilation images are objectively classified by two computer derived indices to characterize the degree of radioaerosol clumping and overall uniformity. In a series of twenty five patients with a long-standing history of daily sputum production, images acquired before and after forced expiration and again after a second ventilation immediately following FET showed no significant change in either index. The results obtained do not provide evidence to support the routine use of FET in conjunction with radioaerosol scintigraphy. The method of image classification correlates well with a visual assessment of image uniformity and has general application.

  11. Improving Productivity in the Work Force: Implications for Research and Development in Vocational Education. Occasional Paper No. 72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Dennis J.

    Declining productivity is a major problem in the American economy. Gains in productivity, and finally, actual rates of productivity, have been declining since the late 1960s. Specific problems arising as a result of this decline in productivity are the inflationary pressures that we face as a nation, the increased regulatory environment under…

  12. Effect of environmental forcing on the biomass, production and growth rate of size-fractionated phytoplankton in the central Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huete-Ortega, María; Calvo-Díaz, Alejandra; Graña, Rocío; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Marañón, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    To ascertain the response of phytoplankton size classes to changes in environmental forcing, we determined size-fractionated biomass, carbon fixation and growth (production/biomass) rates in surface waters along the central Atlantic Ocean (26°N-5°S). As a result of the enhanced input of nutrients into the euphotic layer and the higher water column stability found at the equatorial upwelling, we observed increases not only in phytoplankton biomass and primary production, but also in turnover rates, suggesting nutrient limitation of phytoplankton physiology in the oligotrophic central Atlantic. The phytoplankton groups analysed (pico-, small nano-, large nano- and micro-phytoplankton) showed different responses to the equatorial environmental forcing, in terms of carbon biomass, primary production and growth rate. Large nano- and micro-phytoplankton consistently showed higher growth rates and carbon fixation to chl a ratios than smaller phytoplankton. We observed a higher stimulating effect of increased nitrate supply on the small phytoplankton growth rates. This observation can be explained by the dynamics of the equatorial upwelling, where the continuous but small nutrient input into the euphotic layer provide a competitive advantage for smaller cells adapted to oligotrophic conditions. The size-fractionated approach shown here reveals important group-specific differences in the response to environmental forcing, which cannot be appreciated in bulk measurements of the whole community.

  13. 78 FR 73884 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Joint Task-Force...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ...''), Joint Task-Force Networked Media (``JT-NM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the...; Harman International, Stamford, CT; Janet West (individual member), Reading, United Kingdom, Nicole... to file additional written notifications disclosing all changes in membership. On July 10, 2013,...

  14. Wing inertia and whole-body acceleration: an analysis of instantaneous aerodynamic force production in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) flying across a range of speeds.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Tyson L; Usherwood, James R; Biewener, Andrew A

    2004-04-01

    We used a combination of high-speed 3-D kinematics and three-axis accelerometer recordings obtained from cockatiels flying in a low-turbulence wind tunnel to characterize the instantaneous accelerations and, by extension, the net aerodynamic forces produced throughout the wingbeat cycle across a broad range of flight speeds (1-13 m s(-1)). Our goals were to investigate the variation in instantaneous aerodynamic force production during the wingbeat cycle of birds flying across a range of steady speeds, testing two predictions regarding aerodynamic force generation in upstroke and the commonly held assumption that all of the kinetic energy imparted to the wings of a bird in flapping flight is recovered as useful aerodynamic work. We found that cockatiels produce only a limited amount of lift during upstroke (14% of downstroke lift) at slower flight speeds (1-3 m s(-1)). Upstroke lift at intermediate flight speeds (7-11 m s(-1)) was moderate, averaging 39% of downstroke lift. Instantaneous aerodynamic forces were greatest near mid-downstroke. At the end of each half-stroke, during wing turnaround, aerodynamic forces were minimal, but inertial forces created by wing motion were large. However, we found that the inertial power requirements of downstroke (minimum of 0.29+/-0.10 W at 7 m s(-1) and maximum of 0.56+/-0.13 W at 1 m s(-1)) were consistent with the assumption that nearly all wing kinetic energy in downstroke was applied to the production of aerodynamic forces and therefore should not be added separately to the overall power cost of flight. The inertial power requirements of upstroke (minimum of 0.16+/-0.04 W at 7 m s(-1) and maximum of 0.35+/-0.11 W at 1 m s(-1)) cannot be recovered in a similar manner, but their magnitude was such that the power requirements for the upstroke musculature (minimum of 54+/-13 W kg(-1) at 7 m s(-1) and maximum of 122+/-35 W at 1 m s(-1)) fall within the established range for cockatiel flight muscle (<185 W kg(-1)).

  15. Wing inertia and whole-body acceleration: an analysis of instantaneous aerodynamic force production in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) flying across a range of speeds.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Tyson L; Usherwood, James R; Biewener, Andrew A

    2004-04-01

    We used a combination of high-speed 3-D kinematics and three-axis accelerometer recordings obtained from cockatiels flying in a low-turbulence wind tunnel to characterize the instantaneous accelerations and, by extension, the net aerodynamic forces produced throughout the wingbeat cycle across a broad range of flight speeds (1-13 m s(-1)). Our goals were to investigate the variation in instantaneous aerodynamic force production during the wingbeat cycle of birds flying across a range of steady speeds, testing two predictions regarding aerodynamic force generation in upstroke and the commonly held assumption that all of the kinetic energy imparted to the wings of a bird in flapping flight is recovered as useful aerodynamic work. We found that cockatiels produce only a limited amount of lift during upstroke (14% of downstroke lift) at slower flight speeds (1-3 m s(-1)). Upstroke lift at intermediate flight speeds (7-11 m s(-1)) was moderate, averaging 39% of downstroke lift. Instantaneous aerodynamic forces were greatest near mid-downstroke. At the end of each half-stroke, during wing turnaround, aerodynamic forces were minimal, but inertial forces created by wing motion were large. However, we found that the inertial power requirements of downstroke (minimum of 0.29+/-0.10 W at 7 m s(-1) and maximum of 0.56+/-0.13 W at 1 m s(-1)) were consistent with the assumption that nearly all wing kinetic energy in downstroke was applied to the production of aerodynamic forces and therefore should not be added separately to the overall power cost of flight. The inertial power requirements of upstroke (minimum of 0.16+/-0.04 W at 7 m s(-1) and maximum of 0.35+/-0.11 W at 1 m s(-1)) cannot be recovered in a similar manner, but their magnitude was such that the power requirements for the upstroke musculature (minimum of 54+/-13 W kg(-1) at 7 m s(-1) and maximum of 122+/-35 W at 1 m s(-1)) fall within the established range for cockatiel flight muscle (<185 W kg(-1)). PMID:15073202

  16. Evaluation of the occurrence and biodegradation of parabens and halogenated by-products in wastewater by accurate-mass liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS).

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Quintana, José Benito; Rodríguez, Isaac; Cela, Rafael

    2011-12-15

    An assessment of the sewage occurrence and biodegradability of seven parabens and three halogenated derivatives of methyl paraben (MeP) is presented. Several wastewater samples were collected at three different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) during April and May 2010, concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). The performance of the QTOF system proved to be comparable to triple-quadrupole instruments in terms of quantitative capabilities, with good linearity (R(2) > 0.99 in the 5-500 ng mL(-1) range), repeatability (RSD < 5.6%) and LODs (0.3-4.0 ng L(-1) after SPE). MeP and n-propyl paraben (n-PrP) were the most frequently detected and the most abundant analytes in raw wastewater (0.3-10 μg L(-1)), in accordance with the data displayed in the bibliography and reflecting their wider use in cosmetic formulations. Samples were also evaluated in search for potential halogenated by-products of parabens, formed as a result of their reaction with residual chlorine contained in tap water. Monochloro- and dichloro-methyl paraben (ClMeP and Cl(2)MeP) were found and quantified in raw wastewater at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L(-1). Halogenated derivatives of n-PrP could not be quantified due to the lack of standards; nevertheless, the monochlorinated species (ClPrP) was identified in several samples from its accurate precursor and product ions mass/charge ratios (m/z). Removal efficiencies of parabens and MeP chlorinated by-products in WWTPs exceeded 90%, with the lowest percentages corresponding to the latter species. This trend was confirmed by an activated sludge biodegradation batch test, where non-halogenated parabens had half-lives lower than 4 days, whereas halogenated derivatives of MeP turned out to be more persistent, with up to 10 days of half-life in the case of dihalogenated derivatives. A further stability test performed with raw wastewater

  17. Fatigue and Motor Redundancy: Adaptive Increase in Finger Force Variance in Multi-Finger Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tarkeshwar; SKM, Varadhan; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of fatigue of the index finger on indices of force variability in discrete and rhythmic accurate force production tasks performed by the index finger and by all four fingers pressing in parallel. An increase in the variance of the force produced by the fatigued index finger was expected. We hypothesized that the other fingers would also show increased variance of their forces, which would be accompanied by co-variation among the finger forces resulting in relatively preserved accuracy of performance. The subjects performed isometric tasks including maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and accurate force production before and after a 1-min MVC fatiguing exercise by the index finger. During fatigue, there was a significant increase in the root mean square index of force variability during accurate force production by the index finger. In the four-finger tasks, the variance of the individual finger force increased for all four fingers, while the total force variance showed only a modest change. We quantified two components of variance in the space of hypothetical commands to fingers, finger modes. There was a large increase in the variance component that did not affect total force and a much smaller increase in the component that did. The results suggest an adaptive increase in force variance by nonfatigued elements as a strategy to attenuate effects of fatigue on accuracy of multi-element performance. These effects were unlikely to originate at the level of synchronization of motor units across muscle compartments but rather involved higher control levels. PMID:20357060

  18. Measurement of the adhesion force between particles for high gradient magnetic separation of pneumatic conveyed powder products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkawa, K.; Nakai, Y.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2011-11-01

    In the industrial plants such as foods, medicines or industrial materials, there are big amount of issues on contamination by metallic wear debris originated from pipes of manufacturing lines. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation system (HGMS) under the dry process by using superconducting magnet to remove the ferromagnetic particles. One of the major problems of dry HGMS systems is, however, the blockage of magnetic filter caused by particle coagulation or deposition. In order to actualize the magnetic separation without blockage, we introduced pneumatic conveyance system as a new method to feed the powder. It is important to increase the drag force acting on the sufficiently dispersed particles, which require strong magnetic fields. To generate the strong magnetic fields, HGMS technique was examined which consists of a magnetic filter and a superconducting solenoid magnet. As a result of the magnetic separation experiment, it was shown that the separation efficiency changes due to the difference of the cohesive property of the particles. On the basis of the result, the adhesion force which acts between the ferromagnetic particles and the medium particles used for the magnetic separation was measured by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and cohesion of particles was studied from the aspect of interparticle interaction. We assessed a suitable flow velocity for magnetic separation according to the cohesive property of each particle based on the result.

  19. Age-related changes in the control of finger force vectors.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Shweta; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2010-12-01

    We explored changes in finger interaction in the process of healthy aging as a window into neural control strategies of natural movements. In particular, we quantified the amount of force produced by noninstructed fingers in different directions, the amount of force produced by the instructed finger orthogonally to the task direction, and the strength of multifinger synergies stabilizing the total force magnitude and direction during accurate force production. Healthy elderly participants performed accurate isometric force production tasks in five directions by individual fingers and by all four fingers acting together. Their data were compared with a dataset obtained in a similar earlier study of young subjects. Finger force vectors were measured using six-component force/torque sensors. Multifinger synergies were quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. The elderly participants produced lower force magnitudes by noninstructed fingers and higher force magnitudes by instructed fingers in nontask directions. They showed strong synergies stabilizing the magnitude and direction of the total force vector. However, the synergy indexes were significantly lower than those observed in the earlier study of young subjects. The results are consistent with an earlier hypothesis of preferential weakening of intrinsic hand muscles with age. We interpret the findings as a shift in motor control from synergic to element-based, which may be causally linked to the documented progressive neuronal death at different levels of the neural axis. PMID:20829494

  20. Age-related changes in the control of finger force vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Shweta; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    We explored changes in finger interaction in the process of healthy aging as a window into neural control strategies of natural movements. In particular, we quantified the amount of force produced by noninstructed fingers in different directions, the amount of force produced by the instructed finger orthogonally to the task direction, and the strength of multifinger synergies stabilizing the total force magnitude and direction during accurate force production. Healthy elderly participants performed accurate isometric force production tasks in five directions by individual fingers and by all four fingers acting together. Their data were compared with a dataset obtained in a similar earlier study of young subjects. Finger force vectors were measured using six-component force/torque sensors. Multifinger synergies were quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. The elderly participants produced lower force magnitudes by noninstructed fingers and higher force magnitudes by instructed fingers in nontask directions. They showed strong synergies stabilizing the magnitude and direction of the total force vector. However, the synergy indexes were significantly lower than those observed in the earlier study of young subjects. The results are consistent with an earlier hypothesis of preferential weakening of intrinsic hand muscles with age. We interpret the findings as a shift in motor control from synergic to element-based, which may be causally linked to the documented progressive neuronal death at different levels of the neural axis. PMID:20829494

  1. Holocene evolution of summer winds and marine productivity in the tropical Indian Ocean in response to insolation forcing: data-model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassinot, F. C.; Marzin, C.; Braconnot, P.; Marti, O.; Mathien-Blard, E.; Lombard, F.; Bopp, L.

    2011-07-01

    The relative abundance of Globigerinoides bulloides was used to infer Holocene paleo-productivity changes on the Oman margin and at the southern tip of India. Today, the primary productivity at both sites reaches its maximum during the summer season, when monsoon winds result in local Eckman pumping, which brings more nutrients to the surface. On a millennium time-scale, however, the % G. bulloides records indicate an opposite evolution of paleo-productivity at these sites through the Holocene. The Oman Margin productivity was maximal at ~9 ka (boreal summer insolation maximum) and has decreased since then, suggesting a direct response to insolation forcing. On the contrary, the productivity at the southern tip of India was minimum at ~9 ka, and strengthened towards the present. Paleo-reconstructions of wind patterns, marine productivity and foraminifera assemblages were obtained using the IPSL-CM4 climate model coupled to the PISCES marine biogeochemical model and the FORAMCLIM ecophysiological model. These reconstructions are fully coherent with the marine core data. They confirm that the evolution of particulate export production and foraminifera assemblages at our two sites were directly linked with the strength of the upwelling. Model simulations at 9 ka and 6 ka BP show that the relative evolution between the two sites since the early Holocene can be explained by the weakening but also the southward shift of monsoon winds over the Arabian Sea during boreal summer.

  2. Effects of the Index Finger Position and Force Production on the Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Moment Arms at the Metacarpophalangeal Joints- an Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging to measure the moment arm of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon about the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers when the position and force production level of the index finger was altered. A secondary goal was to create regression models using anthropometric data to predict moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis about the metacarpophalangeal joint of each finger. Methods The hands of subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral, and extension. For each joint configuration subjects produced no active force (passive condition) and exerted a flexion force to resist a load at the fingertip (active condition). Results The following was found: (1) The moment arm of the flexor digitorum superficialis at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger (a) increased with the joint flexion and stayed unchanged with finger extension; and (b) decreased with the increase of force at the neutral and extended finger postures and did not change at the flexed posture. (2) The moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon of the middle, ring, and little fingers (a) did not change when the index metacarpophalangeal joint position changed (p > 0.20); and (b) The moment arms of the middle and little fingers increased when the index finger actively produced force at the flexed metacarpophalangeal joint posture. (4) The moment arms showed a high correlation with anthropometric measurements. Interpretation Moment arms of the flexor digitorum superficialis change due to both changes in joint angle and muscle activation; they scale with various anthropometric measures. PMID:22192658

  3. Effects of supra-physiological changes in human ovarian hormone levels on maximum force production of the first dorsal interosseus muscle.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kirsty Jayne; Cable, Nigel Timothy; Reilly, Thomas; Sefton, Victoria; Kingsland, Charles; Diver, Michael

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of supra-physiological changes in ovarian hormone levels on maximum force production in two conditions, one physiological (pregnancy) and one pseudo-physiological (in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment). Forty IVF patients were tested at four distinct stages of treatment and 35 women were tested during each trimester of pregnancy and following parturition. Maximum voluntary isometric force per unit cross-sectional area of the first dorsal interosseus muscle was measured. Plasma concentrations of total and bioavailable oestradiol and testosterone were measured, in addition to the total concentrations of progesterone and human chorionic gonadotropin. Despite significant changes in the concentrations of total progesterone, 17beta-oestradiol, bioavailable oestradiol and testosterone between phases, strength did not change significantly throughout IVF treatment (1.30+/-0.29, 1.16+/-0.38, 1.20+/-0.29 and 1.26+/-0.34 N mm-2, respectively, in the 4 phases of IVF treatment). Force production was significantly higher during the second trimester of pregnancy than following childbirth (1.33+/-0.20 N mm-2 at week 12 of pregnancy, 1.51+/-0.42 N mm-2 at week 20, 1.15+/-0.26 N mm-2 at week 36 and 0.94+/-0.31 N mm-2 at week 6 postnatal) but was not significantly correlated with any of the hormones measured. These data suggest that extreme changes in the concentrations of reproductive hormones do not affect the maximum force-generating capacity of young women.

  4. Using Market Forces to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Product-Level Life Cycle Analysis and Eco-Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. F.; Davis, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Established protocols allow entity-level accounting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The information contained within GHG inventories is used by entities to manage their carbon footprint and to anticipate future exposure to compulsory GHG markets or taxes. The efficacy of such inventories, as experienced by the consumer, can be improved upon by product-level GHG inventories applying the methods of traditional life cycle analysis (LCA). A voluntary product-level assessment of this type, coupled with an eco-label, would 1) empower consumers with information about the total embodied GHG content of a product, 2) allow companies to understand and manage GHG emissions outside the narrow scope of their entities, and 3) drive reduction of GHG emissions throughout product value chains. The Climate Conservancy (TCC) is a non-profit organization founded to help companies calculate their GHG emissions at the level of individual product units, and to inform consumers about the GHG intensity of the products they choose to purchase. With the assistance of economists, policy experts and scientists, TCC has developed a useful metric for reporting product-level GHG emissions that allows for a normalized comparison of a product's GHG intensity irrespective of industry sector or competitors, where GHG data are often unavailable or incomplete. Using this metric, we envision our Climate Conscious label becoming an important arbiter of choice for consumers seeking ways to mitigate their climate impacts without the need for governmental regulation.

  5. Diapocynin, a Dimer of the NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor Apocynin, Reduces ROS Production and Prevents Force Loss in Eccentrically Contracting Dystrophic Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hesham M.; Scapozza, Leonardo; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dorchies, Olivier M.

    2014-01-01

    Elevation of intracellular Ca2+, excessive ROS production and increased phospholipase A2 activity contribute to the pathology in dystrophin-deficient muscle. Moreover, Ca2+, ROS and phospholipase A2, in particular iPLA2, are thought to potentiate each other in positive feedback loops. NADPH oxidases (NOX) have been considered as a major source of ROS in muscle and have been reported to be overexpressed in muscles of mdx mice. We report here on our investigations regarding the effect of diapocynin, a dimer of the commonly used NOX inhibitor apocynin, on the activity of iPLA2, Ca2+ handling and ROS generation in dystrophic myotubes. We also examined the effects of diapocynin on force production and recovery ability of isolated EDL muscles exposed to eccentric contractions in vitro, a damaging procedure to which dystrophic muscle is extremely sensitive. In dystrophic myotubes, diapocynin inhibited ROS production, abolished iPLA2 activity and reduced Ca2+ influx through stretch-activated and store-operated channels, two major pathways responsible for excessive Ca2+ entry in dystrophic muscle. Diapocynin also prevented force loss induced by eccentric contractions of mdx muscle close to the value of wild-type muscle and reduced membrane damage as seen by Procion orange dye uptake. These findings support the central role played by NOX-ROS in the pathogenic cascade leading to muscular dystrophy and suggest diapocynin as an effective NOX inhibitor that might be helpful for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:25329652

  6. On the correlation between force production and the flow field around a flapping flat-plate wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Sören; Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen

    2015-11-01

    One of the several sophisticated flight skills that insects exhibit is hovering, which is accomplished largely by modulating the wing kinematics and thereby the flow field around the wings. Along with the prolonged attachment of the leading edge vortex, the wing reversal mechanisms form the basis by which insects regulate the magnitude and direction of forces produced. The duration and starting point of these directional flips are studied in the current experimental investigation. Particle image velocimetry is conducted to evaluate the flow features inherent to changes in wing reversal during the stroke of a flat plate, which is modelled based on hoverfly characteristics. The duration of rotation is one-third of the total time period. A +10% phase shift is used for delayed rotation, a -10% phase shift for advanced rotation. Phase-averaged data is analysed to understand the influence of a delayed or advanced rotation on the formation and evolution of large and small scale structures, their interactions with the wing, and disintegration. Additionally, force data is used to quantify the effects of phase-shift in terms of lift and drag variation and is correlated with the vortex dynamics.

  7. Exciplexes versus Loose Ion Pairs: How Does the Driving Force Impact the Initial Product Ratio of Photoinduced Charge Separation Reactions?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many donor–acceptor systems can undergo a photoinduced charge separation reaction, yielding loose ion pairs (LIPs). LIPs can be formed either directly via (distant) electron transfer (ET) or indirectly via the dissociation of an initially formed exciplex or tight ion pair. Establishing the prevalence of one of the reaction pathways is challenging because differentiating initially formed exciplexes from LIPs is difficult due to similar spectroscopic footprints. Hence, no comprehensive reaction model has been established for moderately polar solvents. Here, we employ an approach based on the time-resolved magnetic field effect (MFE) of the delayed exciplex luminescence to distinguish the two reaction channels. We focus on the effects of the driving force of ET and the solvent permittivity. We show that, surprisingly, the exciplex channel is significant even for an exergonic ET system with a free energy of ET of −0.58 eV and for the most polar solutions studied (butyronitrile). Our findings demonstrate that exciplexes play a crucial role even in polar solvents and at moderate driving forces, contrary to what is usually assumed. PMID:25243054

  8. Does living and working in a hot environment induce clinically relevant changes in immune function and voluntary force production capacity?

    PubMed

    Knez, Wade; Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sebastien; Walsh, Andrew; Gaoua, Nadia; Grantham, Justin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of living (summer vs. winter) and working (morning vs. afternoon) in a hot environment on markers of immune function and forearm strength. Thirty-one healthy male gas field employees were screened before (between 05:30 and 07:00) and after their working day (between 15:30 and 17:00) during both seasons. Body core temperature and physical activity were recorded throughout the working days. The hot condition (i.e. summer) led a higher (p≤0.05) average body core temperature (~37.2 vs. ~37.4 °C) but reduced physical activity (-14.8%) during the work-shift. Our data showed an increase (p≤0.05) in lymphocyte and monocyte counts in the summer. Additionally, work-shift resulted in significant (p≤0.001) changes in leukocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes independently of the environment. Handgrip (p=0.069) and pinch (p=0.077) forces tended to be reduced from pre-to post-work, while only force produced during handgrip manoeuvres was significantly reduced (p≤0.05) during the hot compared to the temperate season. No interactions were observed between the environment and work-shift for any marker of immune function or forearm strength. In summary, working and living in hot conditions impact on markers of immune function and work capacity; however by self-regulating energy expenditure, immune markers remained in a healthy reference range.

  9. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  10. A coupled force-restore model of surface temperature and soil moisture using the maximum entropy production model of heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-Y.; Wang, J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled force-restore model of surface soil temperature and moisture (FRMEP) is formulated by incorporating the maximum entropy production model of surface heat fluxes and including the gravitational drainage term. The FRMEP model driven by surface net radiation and precipitation are independent of near-surface atmospheric variables with reduced sensitivity to the uncertainties of model input and parameters compared to the classical force-restore models (FRM). The FRMEP model was evaluated using observations from two field experiments with contrasting soil moisture conditions. The modeling errors of the FRMEP predicted surface temperature and soil moisture are lower than those of the classical FRMs forced by observed or bulk formula based surface heat fluxes (bias 1 ~ 2°C versus ~4°C, 0.02 m3 m-3 versus 0.05 m3 m-3). The diurnal variations of surface temperature, soil moisture, and surface heat fluxes are well captured by the FRMEP model measured by the high correlations between the model predictions and observations (r ≥ 0.84). Our analysis suggests that the drainage term cannot be neglected under wet soil condition. A 1 year simulation indicates that the FRMEP model captures the seasonal variation of surface temperature and soil moisture with bias less than 2°C and 0.01 m3 m-3 and correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.9 with observations, respectively.

  11. The effect of swinging the arms on muscle activation and production of leg force during ski skating at different skiing speeds.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Caroline; Lindinger, Stefan J; Ohtonen, Olli; Rapp, Walter; Müller, Erich; Linnamo, Vesa

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated the effects of arm swing during leg push-off in V2-alternate/G4 skating on neuromuscular activation and force production by the leg muscles. Nine skilled cross-country skiers performed V2-alternate skating without poles at moderate, high, and maximal speeds, both with free (SWING) and restricted arm swing (NOSWING). Maximal speed was 5% greater in SWING (P<0.01), while neuromuscular activation and produced forces did not differ between techniques. At both moderate and high speed the maximal (2% and 5%, respectively) and average (both 5%) vertical force and associated impulse (10% and 14%) were greater with SWING (all P<0.05). At high speed range of motion and angular velocity of knee flexion were 24% greater with SWING (both P<0.05), while average EMG of m. biceps femoris was 31% lower (all P<0.05) in SWING. In a similar manner, the average EMG of m. vastus medialis and m. biceps femoris were lower (17% and 32%, P<0.05) during the following knee extension. Thus, swinging the arms while performing V2-alternate can enhance both maximal speed and skiing economy at moderate and, in particularly, high speeds.

  12. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  13. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  14. Using DOE-ARM and Space-Based Assets to Assess the Quality of Air Force Weather 3D Cloud Analysis and Forecast Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for global cloud analysis and forecasting to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes a number of cloud products. Cloud analyses are constructed using 17 different near real time satellite sources. Products include analysis of the individual satellite transmissions at native satellite resolution and an hourly global merge of all 17 sources on a 24km grid. AFW has also recently started creation of a time delayed global cloud reanalysis to produce a 'best possible' analysis for climatology and verification purposes. Forecasted cloud products include global short-range cloud forecasts created using advection techniques as well as statistically post processed cloud forecast products derived from various global and regional numerical weather forecast models. All of these cloud products cover different spatial and temporal resolutions and are produced on a number of different grid projections. The longer term vision of AFW is to consolidate these various approaches into uniform global numerical weather modeling (NWM) system using advanced cloudy-data assimilation processes to construct the analysis and a licensed version of UKMO's Unified Model to produce the various cloud forecast products. In preparation for this evolution in cloud modeling support, AFW has started to aggressively benchmark the performance of their current capabilities. Cloud information collected from so called 'active' sensors on the ground at the DOE-ARM sites and from space by such instruments as CloudSat, CALIPSO and CATS are being utilized to characterize the performance of AFW products derived largely by passive means. The goal is to understand the performance of the 3D cloud analysis and forecast products of today to help shape the requirements and standards for the future NWM driven system.This presentation will present selected results from these benchmarking efforts and highlight insights and observations

  15. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    as land use change and heavy regional concentrations of BC aerosols, include more specific regional characteristics. We suggest that anthropogenic tropospheric O3 and the BC snow albedo effect contribute substantially to rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic. As a complement to a priori forcings, such as Fi, Fa, and Fs, we tabulate the a posteriori effective forcing, Fe, which is the product of the forcing and its efficacy. Fe requires calculation of the climate response and introduces greater model dependence, but once it is calculated for a given amount of a forcing agent it provides a good prediction of the response to other forcing amounts.

  16. Force-stabilizing synergies in motor tasks involving two actors

    PubMed Central

    Solnik, Stanislaw; Reschechtko, Sasha; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ability of two persons to produce force-stabilizing synergies in accurate multi-finger force production tasks under visual feedback on the total force only. The subjects produced a time profile of total force (the sum of two hand forces in one-person tasks and the sum of two subject forces in two-person tasks) consisting of a ramp-up, steady-state, and ramp-down segments; the steady-state segment was interrupted in the middle by a quick force pulse. Analyses of the structure of inter-trial finger force variance, motor equivalence, anticipatory synergy adjustments (ASAs), and the unintentional drift of the sharing pattern were performed. The two-person performance was characterized by a dramatically higher amount of inter-trial variance that did not affect total force, higher finger force deviations that did not affect total force (motor equivalent deviations), shorter ASAs, and larger drift of the sharing pattern. The rate of sharing pattern drift correlated with the initial disparity between the forces produced by the two persons (or two hands). The drift accelerated following the quick force pulse. Our observations show that sensory information on the task-specific performance variable is sufficient for the organization of performance-stabilizing synergies. They suggest, however, that two actors are less likely to follow a single optimization criterion as compared to a single performer. The presence of ASAs in the two-person condition might reflect fidgeting by one or both of the subjects. We discuss the characteristics of the drift in the sharing pattern as reflections of different characteristic times of motion within the sub-spaces that affect and do not affect salient performance variables. PMID:26105756

  17. Force-stabilizing synergies in motor tasks involving two actors.

    PubMed

    Solnik, Stanislaw; Reschechtko, Sasha; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the ability of two persons to produce force-stabilizing synergies in accurate multi-finger force production tasks under visual feedback on the total force only. The subjects produced a time profile of total force (the sum of two hand forces in one-person tasks and the sum of two subject forces in two-person tasks) consisting of a ramp-up, steady-state, and ramp-down segments; the steady-state segment was interrupted in the middle by a quick force pulse. Analyses of the structure of inter-trial finger force variance, motor equivalence, anticipatory synergy adjustments (ASAs), and the unintentional drift of the sharing pattern were performed. The two-person performance was characterized by a dramatically higher amount of inter-trial variance that did not affect total force, higher finger force deviations that did not affect total force (motor equivalent deviations), shorter ASAs, and larger drift of the sharing pattern. The rate of sharing pattern drift correlated with the initial disparity between the forces produced by the two persons (or two hands). The drift accelerated following the quick force pulse. Our observations show that sensory information on the task-specific performance variable is sufficient for the organization of performance-stabilizing synergies. They suggest, however, that two actors are less likely to follow a single optimization criterion as compared to a single performer. The presence of ASAs in the two-person condition might reflect fidgeting by one or both of the subjects. We discuss the characteristics of the drift in the sharing pattern as reflections of different characteristic times of motion within the subspaces that affect and do not affect salient performance variables. PMID:26105756

  18. Comparison Studies of Applied Pressure and Concentration Gradient Driving Forces in Ceramic Nano-Filtration Membrane for the Production of Intravenous Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbatly, Rosalam; Krishnaiah, Duduku; England, Richard; Abang, Sariah; Jeffery, Jeanette

    In this study, the boundary-resistance layer model and solution-diffusion model were used to investigate the applied driving pressure force technique and the concentration driving force technique, respectively, for the production of intravenous drip solution. A 5 kD monolithic membrane coated with Al2O3 and TiO and NaCl aqueous solution as the feed solution was used. The results show that the boundary-resistance layer model diffusivity coefficient, D = 1.8x10-9 m2 sec-1 and the mass transfer coefficient, k = 1.19-10-4 m sec-1 which were both slightly higher than the solution-diffusion model. Applying Fick`s law for the solution diffusion model, the calculated operating pressure inside the lumen was 15 kPa. Clearly, the findings suggested that the boundary-resistance layer model should be chosen for the production of pure and sterile intravenous salt solution as it provided higher diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient than the solution-diffusion model.

  19. Genotoxicity testing of biotechnology-derived products. Report of a GUM task force. Gesellschaft für Umweltmutationsforschung.

    PubMed

    Gocke, E; Albertini, S; Brendler-Schwaab, S; Müller, L; Suter, W; Würgler, F E

    1999-03-01

    Various aspects of genotoxicity testing of biotechnology-derived products are discussed based on information gathered from a questionnaire which was sent to about 30 predominantly European companies. Feedback was received from 13 companies on 78 compounds, mostly recombinant proteins but also on a number of nonrecombinant proteins, which had been assessed for genotoxicity in a total of 177 tests. Four of the 78 compounds appeared to elicit reproducible genotoxic effects. For one of these compounds, the activity could be related to a nonpeptidic linker molecule. No scientifically convincing rationale for the other three compounds could be established, although, at least for two compounds, their activity may be connected with the enzymatic/hormonal activity. In addition to the survey, published reports on genotoxicity testing of biotechnology products were reviewed. The data are discussed relative to whether genotoxicity testing is a valuable exercise when assessing potentially toxic liabilities of biotechnology-derived compounds. It is concluded that genotoxicity testing is generally inappropriate and unnecessary, a position which is in accordance with the available guidelines addressing this area. For the 'average' protein, electrophilic reactions are difficult to envision. Indirect reactions via DNA metabolism and growth regulation seem possible for only very specific proteins such as nucleases, growth factors, cytokines. No information on testing of different types of biotechnology-derived products (e.g., ribozymes, antisense-oligonucleotides, DNA vaccines) has been received in the questionnaires. Discussion of their potential to cause genotoxic changes was based on literature reports. Even for those products for which concerns of genotoxic/tumourigenic potential cannot be completely ruled out, e.g., because of their interaction with DNA metabolism or proliferation control, the performance of standard genotoxicity assays generally appears to be of little value

  20. Holocene evolution of summer winds and marine productivity in the tropical Indian Ocean in response to insolation forcing: data-model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassinot, F. C.; Marzin, C.; Braconnot, P.; Marti, O.; Mathien-Blard, E.; Lombard, F.; Bopp, L.

    2011-02-01

    The relative abundance of Globigerinoides bulloides was used to infer Holocene paleo-productivity changes at ODP Site 723 (19°03' N, 57°37' E; Oman Margin) and core MD77-191 (07°30' N, 76°43' E; Southern tip of India). Today, the primary productivity at both sites peaks during the summer season, when monsoon winds result in local Eckman pumping, which brings more nutrients to the surface. On a millennium time-scale, however, the % G.~bulloides records indicate an opposite evolution of paleo-productivity at these sites through the Holocene. The Oman Margin productivity was maximal at ~9 ka (boreal summer insolation maximum) and decreased since then, suggesting a direct response to insolation forcing. On the opposite, the productivity at the southern tip of India was minimum at ~9 ka, and strengthened towards the present. Paleo-reconstructions of wind patterns, marine productivity and foraminifera assemblages were obtained using the IPSL-CM4 climate model coupled to the PISCES marine biogeochemical model and the FORAMCLIM ecophysiological model. These reconstructions are fully coherent with the marine core data. They confirm that the evolution of particulate export production and foraminifera assemblages at our two sites have been directly linked with the strength of the upwelling. Model simulations at 9 ka and 6 ka BP show that the relative evolution between the two sites since the early Holocene can be explained by the weakening but also the southward shift of monsoon winds over the Arabian sea during boreal summer.

  1. A beginners guide for video production. [Prepared by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the municipal solid and liquid waste streams. Many innovative programs for managing small sources of hazardous waste have been developed in response to the Plan. With the assistance of Urban Consortium grants, the City of Seattle has researched and developed a series of reports describing the planning, operation and evaluation of the plan's HHW collection programs. Three of the Plan's programs of particular interest to other jurisdictions are the fixed site and mobile HHW Collection Facilities, and the Business Waste Consultations provided to SQG's. In 1991, Seattle received an Urban Consortium grant to produce two videos showing how the HHW Collection Facilities and Business Consultations programs work. This report provides an overviews of the video development and production process and a discussion of the lessons learned by the staff directing the production.

  2. Preparation and accurate measurement of pure ozone.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christof; Simone, Daniela; Guinet, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    Preparation of high purity ozone as well as precise and accurate measurement of its pressure are metrological requirements that are difficult to meet due to ozone decomposition occurring in pressure sensors. The most stable and precise transducer heads are heated and, therefore, prone to accelerated ozone decomposition, limiting measurement accuracy and compromising purity. Here, we describe a vacuum system and a method for ozone production, suitable to accurately determine the pressure of pure ozone by avoiding the problem of decomposition. We use an inert gas in a particularly designed buffer volume and can thus achieve high measurement accuracy and negligible degradation of ozone with purities of 99.8% or better. The high degree of purity is ensured by comprehensive compositional analyses of ozone samples. The method may also be applied to other reactive gases. PMID:21456766

  3. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; GALNANDER, B.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LOFNES, T.; SIDORIN, A.O.; SMIRNOV, A.V.; ZIEMANN, V.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  5. Forced expression of stabilized c-Fos in dendritic cells reduces cytokine production and immune responses in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Sakaguchi, Ryota; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Kimura, Akihiro; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kouji; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos produced less inflammatory cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos activated T cells less efficiently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transgenic mice expressing stabilized c-Fos were resistant to EAE model. -- Abstract: Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses innate immunity by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytic cells. We have shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is responsible for cAMP-mediated suppression of inflammatory cytokine production, and that c-Fos protein is stabilized by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation. We found that S308 is one of the major phosphorylation sites, and that the S308D mutation prolongs c-Fos halflife. To investigate the role of stabilized c-Fos protein in dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, we generated CD11c-promoter-deriven c-FosS308D transgenic mice. As expected, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from these Tg mice produced smaller amounts of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-12, and IL-23, but higher levels of IL-10, in response to LPS, than those from wild-type (Wt) mice. When T cells were co-cultured with BMDCs from Tg mice, production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines was reduced, although T cell proliferation was not affected. Tg mice demonstrated more resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) than did Wt mice. These data suggest that c-Fos in DCs plays a suppressive role in certain innate and adaptive immune responses.

  6. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  7. Entropy production in mesoscopic stochastic thermodynamics: nonequilibrium kinetic cycles driven by chemical potentials, temperatures, and mechanical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong; Kjelstrup, Signe; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-04-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics (NET) investigates processes in systems out of global equilibrium. On a mesoscopic level, it provides a statistical dynamic description of various complex phenomena such as chemical reactions, ion transport, diffusion, thermochemical, thermomechanical and mechanochemical fluxes. In the present review, we introduce a mesoscopic stochastic formulation of NET by analyzing entropy production in several simple examples. The fundamental role of nonequilibrium steady-state cycle kinetics is emphasized. The statistical mechanics of Onsager’s reciprocal relations in this context is elucidated. Chemomechanical, thermomechanical, and enzyme-catalyzed thermochemical energy transduction processes are discussed. It is argued that mesoscopic stochastic NET in phase space provides a rigorous mathematical basis of fundamental concepts needed for understanding complex processes in chemistry, physics and biology. This theory is also relevant for nanoscale technological advances.

  8. Static in situ calibration of force plates.

    PubMed

    Hall, M G; Fleming, H E; Dolan, M J; Millbank, S F; Paul, J P

    1996-05-01

    An in situ calibration protocol for ground-to-foot force measuring platforms is described. The methodology allows verification of the function of the force plate and allows accurate calibration for three force and moment channels. The effect of cross-sensitivity on recorded data is discussed along with the need for improvements in methodology to quantify this property.

  9. Assessing photocatalytic power of g-C3N4 for solar fuel production: A first-principles study involving quasi-particle theory and dispersive forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Espinosa-García, W. F.; Moyses Araujo, C.

    2015-09-01

    First-principles quasi-particle theory has been employed to assess catalytic power of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C3N4, for solar fuel production. A comparative study between g-h-triazine and g-h-heptazine has been carried out taking also into account van der Waals dispersive forces. The band edge potentials have been calculated using a recently developed approach where quasi-particle effects are taken into account through the GW approximation. First, it was found that the description of ground state properties such as cohesive and surface formation energies requires the proper treatment of dispersive interaction. Furthermore, through the analysis of calculated band-edge potentials, it is shown that g-h-triazine has high reductive power reaching the potential to reduce CO2 to formic acid, coplanar g-h-heptazine displays the highest thermodynamics force toward H2O/O2 oxidation reaction, and corrugated g-h-heptazine exhibits a good capacity for both reactions. This rigorous theoretical study shows a route to further improve the catalytic performance of g-C3N4.

  10. Assessing photocatalytic power of g-C3N4 for solar fuel production: A first-principles study involving quasi-particle theory and dispersive forces.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Guillén, J M; Espinosa-García, W F; Moyses Araujo, C

    2015-09-01

    First-principles quasi-particle theory has been employed to assess catalytic power of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C3N4, for solar fuel production. A comparative study between g-h-triazine and g-h-heptazine has been carried out taking also into account van der Waals dispersive forces. The band edge potentials have been calculated using a recently developed approach where quasi-particle effects are taken into account through the GW approximation. First, it was found that the description of ground state properties such as cohesive and surface formation energies requires the proper treatment of dispersive interaction. Furthermore, through the analysis of calculated band-edge potentials, it is shown that g-h-triazine has high reductive power reaching the potential to reduce CO2 to formic acid, coplanar g-h-heptazine displays the highest thermodynamics force toward H2O/O2 oxidation reaction, and corrugated g-h-heptazine exhibits a good capacity for both reactions. This rigorous theoretical study shows a route to further improve the catalytic performance of g-C3N4.

  11. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  12. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  13. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  14. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  15. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  16. Impaired Growth and Force Production in Skeletal Muscles of Young Partially Pancreatectomized Rats: A Model of Adolescent Type 1 Diabetic Myopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Carly S.; Serino, Antonio S.; Krause, Matthew P.; Campbell, Jonathan E.; Cafarelli, Enzo; Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A. J.; Hawke, Thomas J.; Riddell, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    This present study investigated the temporal effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on adolescent skeletal muscle growth, morphology and contractile properties using a 90% partial pancreatecomy (Px) model of the disease. Four week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to Px (n = 25) or Sham (n = 24) surgery groups and euthanized at 4 or 8 weeks following an in situ assessment of muscle force production. Compared to Shams, Px were hyperglycemic (>15 mM) and displayed attenuated body mass gains by days 2 and 4, respectively (both P<0.05). Absolute maximal force production of the gastrocnemius plantaris soleus complex (GPS) was 30% and 50% lower in Px vs. Shams at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively (P<0.01). GP mass was 35% lower in Px vs Shams at 4 weeks (1.24±0.06 g vs. 1.93±0.03 g, P<0.05) and 45% lower at 8 weeks (1.57±0.12 vs. 2.80±0.06, P<0.05). GP fiber area was 15–20% lower in Px vs. Shams at 4 weeks in all fiber types. At 8 weeks, GP type I and II fiber areas were ∼25% and 40% less, respectively, in Px vs. Shams (group by fiber type interactions, P<0.05). Phosphorylation states of 4E-BP1 and S6K1 following leucine gavage increased 2.0- and 3.5-fold, respectively, in Shams but not in Px. Px rats also had impaired rates of muscle protein synthesis in the basal state and in response to gavage. Taken together, these data indicate that exposure of growing skeletal muscle to uncontrolled T1DM significantly impairs muscle growth and function largely as a result of impaired protein synthesis in type II fibers. PMID:21103335

  17. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  18. Forced degradation of fingolimod: effect of co-solvent and characterization of degradation products by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS and 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prinesh N; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Gananadhamu, S; Srinivas, R

    2015-11-10

    Fingolimod (FGL), an immunomodulator drug for treating multiple sclerosis, was subjected to hydrolysis (acidic, alkaline and neutral), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as per International Conference on Harmonization specified conditions. The drug showed extensive degradation under base hydrolysis, however, it was stable under all other conditions. A total of three degradation products (DPs) were observed. The chromatographic separation of the drug and its degradation products was achieved on a Fortis C18 (100×2.1mm, 1.7μm) column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid (Solvent A) and acetonitrile (Solvent B) in gradient mode. All the DPs were identified and characterized by liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) in combination with accurate mass measurements. The major DP was isolated and characterized by Nuclear Magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This is a typical case of degradation where acetonitrile used as co-solvent in stress studies, reacts with FGL in base hydrolytic conditions to produce acetylated DPs. Hence, it can be suggested that acetonitrile is not preferable as a co-solvent for stress degradation of FGL. The developed UHPLC method was validated as per ICH guidelines.

  19. Forced degradation of fingolimod: effect of co-solvent and characterization of degradation products by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS and 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prinesh N; Kalariya, Pradipbhai D; Gananadhamu, S; Srinivas, R

    2015-11-10

    Fingolimod (FGL), an immunomodulator drug for treating multiple sclerosis, was subjected to hydrolysis (acidic, alkaline and neutral), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as per International Conference on Harmonization specified conditions. The drug showed extensive degradation under base hydrolysis, however, it was stable under all other conditions. A total of three degradation products (DPs) were observed. The chromatographic separation of the drug and its degradation products was achieved on a Fortis C18 (100×2.1mm, 1.7μm) column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid (Solvent A) and acetonitrile (Solvent B) in gradient mode. All the DPs were identified and characterized by liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) in combination with accurate mass measurements. The major DP was isolated and characterized by Nuclear Magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This is a typical case of degradation where acetonitrile used as co-solvent in stress studies, reacts with FGL in base hydrolytic conditions to produce acetylated DPs. Hence, it can be suggested that acetonitrile is not preferable as a co-solvent for stress degradation of FGL. The developed UHPLC method was validated as per ICH guidelines. PMID:26279369

  20. Calibration of lateral force measurements in atomic force microscopy with a piezoresistive force sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hui; Vitard, Julien; Haliyo, Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2008-03-15

    We present here a method to calibrate the lateral force in the atomic force microscope. This method makes use of an accurately calibrated force sensor composed of a tipless piezoresistive cantilever and corresponding signal amplifying and processing electronics. Two ways of force loading with different loading points were compared by scanning the top and side edges of the piezoresistive cantilever. Conversion factors between the lateral force and photodiode signal using three types of atomic force microscope cantilevers with rectangular geometries (normal spring constants from 0.092 to 1.24 N/m and lateral stiffness from 10.34 to 101.06 N/m) were measured in experiments using the proposed method. When used properly, this method calibrates the conversion factors that are accurate to {+-}12.4% or better. This standard has less error than the commonly used method based on the cantilever's beam mechanics. Methods such of this allow accurate and direct conversion between lateral forces and photodiode signals without any knowledge of the cantilevers and the laser measuring system.

  1. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  2. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  3. Recent Advances in the Method of Forces: Integrated Force Method of Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    Stress that can be induced in an elastic continuum can be determined directly through the simultaneous application of the equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions. In the literature, this direct stress formulation is referred to as the integrated force method. This method, which uses forces as the primary unknowns, complements the popular equilibrium-based stiffness method, which considers displacements as the unknowns. The integrated force method produces accurate stress, displacement, and frequency results even for modest finite element models. This version of the force method should be developed as an alternative to the stiffness method because the latter method, which has been researched for the past several decades, may have entered its developmental plateau. Stress plays a primary role in the development of aerospace and other products, and its analysis is difficult. Therefore, it is advisable to use both methods to calculate stress and eliminate errors through comparison. This paper examines the role of the integrated force method in analysis, animation and design.

  4. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  5. Accurate stress resultants equations for laminated composite deep thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper derives accurate equations for the normal and shear force as well as bending and twisting moment resultants for laminated composite deep, thick shells. The stress resultant equations for laminated composite thick shells are shown to be different from those of plates. This is due to the fact the stresses over the thickness of the shell have to be integrated on a trapezoidal-like shell element to obtain the stress resultants. Numerical results are obtained and showed that accurate stress resultants are needed for laminated composite deep thick shells, especially if the curvature is not spherical.

  6. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  7. Effect of feed consumption levels on growth performance and carcass composition during the force-feeding period in foie gras production of male Mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z G; Jiang, Y; Tang, J; Xie, M; Yang, P L; Hou, S S

    2016-09-01

    In order to avoid excess feed consumption during the force-feeding period in foie gras production, a dose-response experiment with seven feed consumption levels (450, 540, 630, 720, 810, 900, 990 g/day per bird) was conducted to evaluate the effects of feed consumption levels on growth performance and carcass composition of male Mule ducks from 91 to 102 days of age. One-day-old Mule ducklings (sterile and artificial hybrid of male Albatre Muscovy duck and female Pekin duck were fed a two-phase commercial diets for ad libitum intake from hatching to 91 days of age, followed by graded feeding levels of a corn diet by force-feeding from 91 to 102 days of age. Fifty-six 91-day-old male Mule ducks with similar BW were randomly assigned to seven treatments, with eight birds per treatment. Birds were housed in individual pens. At 102 days of age, final BW was measured and BW gain and feed conversion ratio of ducks from each treatment were calculated from day 91 to 102, and then all ducks were slaughtered to evaluate the yields of skin with subcutaneous fat, abdominal fat, breast meat (including pectoralis major and pectoralis minor), leg meat (including thigh and drum stick), and liver. Significant differences in BW gain, total liver weight and liver relative weight were observed among the treatments (P<0.001). According to the broken-line regression analysis, the optimal feed consumption levels of male Mule ducks from 91 to 102 days of age for maximum BW gain, total liver weight and liver relative weight were 217, 227 and 216 g feed/kg BW0.75·per day, respectively.

  8. Regional and monthly and clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (and forcing) derived from the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR satellite aerosol product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Chalmers, N.; Harris, B.; Grainger, R. G.; Highwood, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Using the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR dataset, estimates of the instantaneous, clear-sky, direct aerosol radiative effect and radiative forcing have been produced for the year 2006. Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer measurements have been used to characterise the random and systematic error in the GlobAEROSOL product for 22 regions covering the globe. Representative aerosol properties for each region were derived from the results of a wide range of literature sources and, along with the de-biased GlobAEROSOL AODs, were used to drive an offline version of the Met Office unified model radiation scheme. In addition to the mean AOD, best-estimate run of the radiation scheme, a range of additional calculations were done to propagate uncertainty estimates in the AOD, optical properties, surface albedo and errors due to the temporal and spatial averaging of the AOD fields. This analysis produced monthly, regional estimates of the clear-sky aerosol radiative effect and its uncertainty, which were combined to produce annual, global mean values of (-6.7 ± 3.9) W m-2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and (-12 ± 6) W m-2 at the surface. These results were then used to give estimates of regional, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative forcing, using modelled pre-industrial AOD fields for the year 1750 calculated for the AEROCOM PRE experiment. However, as it was not possible to quantify the uncertainty in the pre-industrial aerosol loading, these figures can only be taken as indicative and their uncertainties as lower bounds on the likely errors. Although the uncertainty on aerosol radiative effect presented here is considerably larger than most previous estimates, the explicit inclusion of the major sources of error in the calculations suggest that they are closer to the true constraint on this figure from similar methodologies, and point to the need for more, improved estimates of both global aerosol loading and aerosol optical properties.

  9. Regional and monthly and clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (and forcing) derived from the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR satellite aerosol product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Chalmers, N.; Harris, B.; Grainger, R. G.; Highwood, E. J.

    2012-07-01

    Using the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR dataset, estimates of the instantaneous, clear-sky, direct aerosol radiative effect and radiative forcing have been produced for the year 2006. Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer measurements have been used to characterise the random and systematic error in the GlobAEROSOL product for 22 regions covering the globe. Representative aerosol properties for each region have been derived from the results of a wide range of literature sources and, along with the de-biased GlobAEROSOL AODs, were used to drive an offline version of the Met Office unified model radiation scheme. In addition to the mean AOD, best-estimate run of the radiation scheme, a range of additional calculations were done to propagate uncertainty estimates in the AOD, optical properties, surface albedo and errors due to the temporal and spatial averaging of the AOD fields. This analysis produced monthly, regional estimates of the clear-sky aerosol radiative effect and its uncertainty, which produce annual, global mean values of (-6.7 ± 3.9) W m-2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and (-12 ± 6) W m-2 at the surface. These results were then used to produce estimates of regional, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative forcing, using modelled pre-industrial AOD fields for 1750 calculated for the AEROCOM PRE experiment. However, as it was not possible to quantify the uncertainty in the pre-industrial aerosol loading, these figures can only be taken as indicative and their uncertainties as lower bounds on the likely errors. Although the uncertainty on aerosol radiative effect presented here is considerably larger than most previous estimates, the explicit inclusion of the major sources of error in the calculations suggest that they are closer to the true constraint on this figure from similar methodologies, and point to the need for more, improved estimates of both global aerosol loading and aerosol optical properties.

  10. Chromosome motion during attachment to the vertebrate spindle: initial saltatory-like behavior of chromosomes and quantitative analysis of force production by nascent kinetochore fibers

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    error, there appears to be a remarkable consistency in force production per microtubule throughout the various stages of mitosis and between groups of diverse taxonomic affinities. PMID:2026651

  11. Facing the partner influences exchanges in force

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Atsushi; Bagnato, Carlo; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in psychology have documented how the behaviour of verbally communicating pairs is affected by social factors such as the partner’s gaze. However, few studies have examined whether physically interacting pairs are influenced by social factors. Here, we asked two partners to exchange forces with one another, where the goal was to accurately replicate the force back onto the other. We first measured an individual’s accuracy in reproducing a force from a robot. We then tested pairs who knowingly exchanged forces whilst separated by a curtain. These separated pairs exchanged forces as two independent individuals would, hence the force reproduction accuracy of partners is not affected by knowingly reproducing a force onto a nonvisible partner. On the other hand, pairs who exchanged forces whilst facing one another consistently under-reproduced the partner’s force in comparison to separated partners. Thus, the force reproduction accuracy of subjects is strongly biased by facing a partner. PMID:27739492

  12. The effects of a customized over-the-counter mouth guard on neuromuscular force and power production in trained men and women.

    PubMed

    Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Luk, Hui-Ying; Comstock, Brett A; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Kupchak, Brian R; Watts, Ashley M; Putney, Brendan J; Hydren, Jay R; Volek, Jeff S; Denegar, Craig R; Kraemer, William J

    2012-04-01

    Although mouth guards were originally designed for injury prevention, even elite athletes are now using performance mouth guards to improve athletic success. Both expensive custom models and over-the-counter models are available, but the efficacy is not well known. Some athletes remain wary of the perceived potential for detriments using a mouth guard to their performance. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine various physical performance tests when using a mouth guard including a customized over-the-counter mouth guard. Twenty-six trained men (25 ± 4 years; 1.78 ± 0.07 m; 83.3 ± 11.4 kg) and 24 trained women (23 ± 3 years; 1.65 ± 0.08 m; 62.6 ± 7.8 kg) volunteered for the investigation. The subjects completed a familiarization period and then balanced and randomized treatment conditions that included: (a) a customized Power Balance performance mouth guard (PB MG); (b) a regular over the counter boil-and-bite mouth guard (Reg MG); and (c) a no mouth guard (No MG) treatment condition. At each visit, the subjects completed a testing protocol that was sequenced in the following order: sit-and-reach flexibility, medial-lateral balance, visual reaction time, vertical jump, 10-m sprint, bench throw, and plyo press power quotient (3PQ). Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded around the 3PQ. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Expected significant sex differences existed for all power, strength, and speed variables. Bench throw power (watts) and force (newtons) were significantly higher under PB MG than either Reg MG or No MG or in both men and women. The 3PQ power and force production were higher than that for the other 2 treatments for the PB MG for men only. There were no significant differences for treatment conditions in the heart rate or RPE after the 3PQ test. Men were better able to maintain significantly higher 3PQ power production under PB MG treatment condition compared with the other 2 treatment conditions. Rate of power

  13. A numerical study of the relationship between atmospheric forcing, cold intermediate layer generation and primary production in the Black Sea over interannual time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannaby, Heather

    2015-04-01

    The Cold Intermediate Layer (CIL) is a characteristic feature of the Black Sea formed during winter when cool surface waters penetrate to the depth of the upper halocline. The CIL typically persists throughout the year and is defined at its upper and lower boundaries by the 8 °C isotherm. CIL formation is concentrated in the central regions of the Black Sea basin and on the NW shelf, although the relative contribution of these two sources is still debated. Previous studies have suggested that CIL formation on the NW shelf may play an important role in the subduction of nutrient rich shelf waters into the upper pycnocline, thus removing nutrients from the euphotic zone and impacting rates of primary production. A 20 year hydrodynamic model (Princeton Ocean Model) simulation extending from 1990-2009 and forced by the DMI atmospheric reanalysis is used to investigate (i) interactions between atmospheric forcing and regional CIL formation and (ii) rates of CIL formation and the subduction of NW shelf waters to depths below the euphotic zone. Model skill in simulating CIL characteristics is demonstrated. Results suggest that the ratio of CIL waters formed in the central regions of the Black Sea basin and on the NW shelf varies considerably from one year to another due to sub-domain scale atmospheric variability. Exceptionally warm years when CIL formation is considerably reduced are associated with anomalously high concentrations of fresh riverine water residing in the euphotic zone, and hence a higher percentage of riverine nutrients are available to fuel primary production. Years when anomalously large volumes of CIL water are formed on the NW shelf are not necessarily cold years when considering the domain as a whole. During these years an anomalously high volume of riverine water is subducted into the CIL where it remains trapped throughout the following spring and summer. This study provides a physics based explanation for the occurrence of higher phytoplankton

  14. Vacuum force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    To study on vacuum force, we must clear what is vacuum, vacuum is a space do not have any air and also ray. There is not exist an absolute the vacuum of space. The vacuum of space is relative, so that the vacuum force is relative. There is a certain that vacuum vacuum space exists. In fact, the vacuum space is relative, if the two spaces compared to the existence of relative vacuum, there must exist a vacuum force, and the direction of the vacuum force point to the vacuum region. Any object rotates and radiates. Rotate bend radiate- centripetal, gravity produced, relative gravity; non gravity is the vacuum force. Gravity is centripetal, is a trend that the objects who attracted wants to Centripetal, or have been do Centripetal movement. Any object moves, so gravity makes the object curve movement, that is to say, the radiation range curve movement must be in the gravitational objects, gravity must be existed in non vacuum region, and make the object who is in the region of do curve movement (for example: The earth moves around the sun), or final attracted in the form gravitational objects, and keep relatively static with attract object. (for example: objects on the earth moves but can't reach the first cosmic speed).

  15. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  16. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars. PMID:21952980

  17. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  18. Energetics of shortening muscles in twitches and tetanic contractions. II. Force-determined shortening heat.

    PubMed

    Homsher, E; Mommaerts, W F; Ricchiuti, N V

    1973-12-01

    The extra heat liberation accompanying muscular shortening, the force-determined shortening heat, is defined as the difference between the heat produced when shortening occurs and that produced in an isometric contraction developing the same amount of force and performing the same amount of internal work. Based on this definition, the initial energy production in twitches and tetanic contractions (E) is given by E = A + f (P, t) + alpha(F)x + W, where A is the activation heat, f(P, t), the tension-related heat (a heat production associated with the development and maintenance of tension), alpha(F)x, the force-determined shortening heat, and W, the external work. It is demonstrated that this equation accurately accounts for the time-course of heat evolution and the total initial energy production in both twitches and tetani at 0 degrees C. The force-determined shortening heat is liberated, during shortening, in direct proportion to (a) the distance shortened, and (b) the force against which shortening occurs. The normalized value of the force-determined shortening heat coefficient, alpha(F)/P(o), is the same in both the twitch and the tetanus. Finally, this formulation of the muscle's energy production also accounts for the total energy production in afterload isotonic twitches at 20 degrees C, where a Fenn effect is not demonstrable. PMID:4548714

  19. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  20. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  1. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  2. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. Accurately measuring dynamic coefficient of friction in ultraform finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Dennis; Echaves, Samantha; Pidgeon, Brendan; Travis, Nathan; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    UltraForm Finishing (UFF) is a deterministic sub-aperture computer numerically controlled grinding and polishing platform designed by OptiPro Systems. UFF is used to grind and polish a variety of optics from simple spherical to fully freeform, and numerous materials from glasses to optical ceramics. The UFF system consists of an abrasive belt around a compliant wheel that rotates and contacts the part to remove material. This work aims to accurately measure the dynamic coefficient of friction (μ), how it changes as a function of belt wear, and how this ultimately affects material removal rates. The coefficient of friction has been examined in terms of contact mechanics and Preston's equation to determine accurate material removal rates. By accurately predicting changes in μ, polishing iterations can be more accurately predicted, reducing the total number of iterations required to meet specifications. We have established an experimental apparatus that can accurately measure μ by measuring triaxial forces during translating loading conditions or while manufacturing the removal spots used to calculate material removal rates. Using this system, we will demonstrate μ measurements for UFF belts during different states of their lifecycle and assess the material removal function from spot diagrams as a function of wear. Ultimately, we will use this system for qualifying belt-wheel-material combinations to develop a spot-morphing model to better predict instantaneous material removal functions.

  5. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  6. Heritabilities and phenotypic and genetic correlations for bovine postrigor calpastatin activity, intramuscular fat content, Warner-Bratzler shear force, retail product yield, and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M; Cundiff, L V; Gregory, K E; Rohrer, G A; Savell, J W

    1994-04-01

    To estimate the heritability (h2) of postrigor calpastatin activity (CA), 555 steers were reared and processed conventionally. Breed-types included purebreds (Angus [A], Braunvieh [B], Charolais [C], Gelbvieh [G], Hereford [H], Limousin [L], Pinzgauer [P], Red Poll [RP], and Simmental [S]), composite populations (MARC I [1/4 C, 1/4 B, 1/4 L, 1/8 H, 1/8 A], MARC II [1/4 S, 1/4 G, 1/4 H, 1/4 A], and MARC III [1/4 RP, 1/4 H, 1/4 P, 1/4 A]), and F1 crosses (H, A, C, G, P, Shorthorn, Galloway, Longhorn, Nellore, Piedmontese, or Salers x H or A). Steers were serially slaughtered on an age-constant (across breed groups) basis. Heritability estimates for CA, i.m. fat content (IMF), Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force, retail product yield (RPY), and ADG were .65 +/- .19, .93 +/- .02, .53 +/- .15, .45 +/- .18, and .32 +/- .26, respectively. The genetic correlations (rg) of CA with WBS, RPY, and ADG were .50 +/- .22, .44 +/- .25, and -.52 +/- .37, respectively. The rg of IMF with WBS, RPY, and ADG were -.57 +/- .16, -.63 +/- .15, and -.04 +/- .11, respectively. These h2 and rg estimates indicate that it should be possible to select for improvements in CA, IMF, and WBS. However, selection against CA may be a more suitable approach for improving meat tenderness than selection for increased IMF because the level of genetic antagonism between CA and RPY was not as great as that between IMF and RPY.

  7. American Society of Cytopathology workload recommendations for automated Pap test screening: developed by the productivity and quality assurance in the era of automated screening task force.

    PubMed

    Elsheikh, Tarik M; Austin, R Marshall; Chhieng, David F; Miller, Fern S; Moriarty, Ann T; Renshaw, Andrew A

    2013-02-01

    Based on current literature and the best available research to date, the current FDA workload limits for automated image-assisted screening, including the ThinPrep Imaging System and the FocalPoint GS, of 100 slides/day (imaged only slides counted as 0.5) are extremely high and may be associated with significant reduction in sensitivity. This task force has proposed six recommendations relating to cytotechnologist (CT) workload in automated image-guided Pap test screening, which have already been endorsed by major pathology professional societies. These evidence-based recommendations, however, pertain only to gynecologic specimens with image-assisted screening, as there is no current available data to justify modifying screening practices regarding non-gynecologic specimens. The proposed recommendations are as follow: 1) CT workday should not include more than 7 hours of Pap test screening in a 24-hr period, and an 8-hr shift day must include at least 2 paid mini-breaks of 15 minutes each and a 30-minute lunch break. 2) Future Studies examining CT workload should use actual hours of screening rather than lesser number of hours extrapolated to 8-hour days. 3) Average laboratory CT workload should NOT exceed 70 slides/day (slides counted per 2010 FDA bulletin). 4) Proportion of imaged slides that undergo full manual review should be at least either 15%, or twice (2×) the epithelial cell abnormality (ECA) rate, whichever is greater. 5) ECA-adjusted workload measure is a promising method for calculating and monitoring CT workload, but further studies of this method are necessary before full endorsement. 6) CT productivity and workload limits are just one aspect of a good quality assurance program in a cytology laboratory, so other quality indicators to assess CT performance are essential. PMID:22351120

  8. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  9. EMG and force production of the flexor hallucis longus muscle in isometric plantarflexion and the push-off phase of walking.

    PubMed

    Péter, Annamária; Hegyi, András; Stenroth, Lauri; Finni, Taija; Cronin, Neil J

    2015-09-18

    Large forces are generated under the big toe in the push-off phase of walking. The largest flexor muscle of the big toe is the flexor hallucis longus (FHL), which likely contributes substantially to these forces. This study examined FHL function at different levels of isometric plantarflexion torque and in the push-off phase at different speeds of walking. FHL and calf muscle activity were measured with surface EMG and plantar pressure was recorded with pressure insoles. FHL activity was compared to the activity of the calf muscles. Force and impulse values were calculated under the big toe, and were compared to the entire pressed area of the insole to determine the relative contribution of big toe flexion forces to the ground reaction force. FHL activity increased with increasing plantarflexion torque level (F=2.8, P=0.024) and with increasing walking speed (F=11.608, P<0.001). No differences were observed in the relative contribution of the force under the big toe to the entire sole between different plantarflexion torque levels (F=0.836, P=0.529). On the contrary, in the push-off phase of walking, peak force under the big toe increased at a higher rate than force under the other areas of the plantar surface (F=3.801, P=0.018), implying a greater relative contribution to total force at faster speeds. Moreover, substantial differences were found between isometric plantarflexion and walking concerning FHL activity relative to that of the calf muscles, highlighting the task-dependant behaviour of FHL.

  10. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir F; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  11. Entropic elasticity in the generation of muscle force--a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2002-11-01

    A novel simplified structural model of sarcomeric force production in striate muscle is presented. Using some simple assumptions regarding the distribution of myosin spring lengths at different sliding velocities it is possible to derive a very simple expression showing the main components of the experimentally observed force-velocity relationship of muscle: nonlinearity during contraction (Hill, 1938), maximal force production during stretching equal to two times the isometric force (Katz, 1939), yielding at high stretching velocity, slightly concave force-extension relationship during sudden length changes (Ford et al., 1977; Lombardi & Piazzesi, 1990), accurate reproduction of the rate of ATP consumption (Shirakawa et al., 2000; He et al., 2000) and of the extra energy liberation rate (Hill, 1964a). Different assumptions regarding the force-length relationship of individual cross-bridges are explored [linear, power function and worm-like chain (WLC) model based], and it is shown that the best results are obtained if the individual myosin-spring forces are modelled using a WLC model, thus hinting that entropic elasticity could be the main source of force in myosin undergoing the conformational changes associated with the power stroke.

  12. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  13. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  14. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  15. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  16. On the nature of unintentional action: a study of force/moment drifts during multifinger tasks.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Behnoosh; O'Shea, Daniel J; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    We explored the origins of unintentional changes in performance during accurate force production in isometric conditions seen after turning visual feedback off. The idea of control with referent spatial coordinates suggests that these phenomena could result from drifts of the referent coordinate for the effector. Subjects performed accurate force/moment production tasks by pressing with the fingers of a hand on force sensors. Turning the visual feedback off resulted in slow drifts of both total force and total moment to lower magnitudes of these variables; these drifts were more pronounced in the right hand of the right-handed subjects. Drifts in individual finger forces could be in different direction; in particular, fingers that produced moments of force against the required total moment showed an increase in their forces. The force/moment drift was associated with a drop in the index of synergy stabilizing performance under visual feedback. The drifts in directions that changed performance (non-motor equivalent) and in directions that did not (motor equivalent) were of about the same magnitude. The results suggest that control with referent coordinates is associated with drifts of those referent coordinates toward the corresponding actual coordinates of the hand, a reflection of the natural tendency of physical systems to move toward a minimum of potential energy. The interaction between drifts of the hand referent coordinate and referent orientation leads to counterdirectional drifts in individual finger forces. The results also demonstrate that the sensory information used to create multifinger synergies is necessary for their presence over the task duration. PMID:27193319

  17. Changes in force production and stroke parameters of trained able-bodied and unilateral arm-amputee female swimmers during a 30 s tethered front-crawl swim.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey Jane; Sanders, Ross H; Payton, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined changes in the propulsive force and stroke parameters of arm-amputee and able-bodied swimmers during tethered swimming. Eighteen well-trained female swimmers (nine unilateral arm amputees and nine able-bodied) were videotaped performing maximal-effort 30 s front-crawl swims, while attached to a load cell mounted on a pool wall. Tether force, stroke rate, stroke phase durations and inter-arm angle were quantified. The able-bodied group produced significantly higher mean and maximum tether forces than the amputee group. The mean of the intra-cyclic force peaks was very similar for both groups. Mean and maximum tether force had significant negative associations with 100 m swim time, for both groups. Both groups exhibited a similar fatigue index (relative decrease in tether force) during the test, but the amputees had a significantly greater stroke rate decline. A significant positive association between stroke rate decline and fatigue index was obtained for the able-bodied group only. Inter-arm angle and relative phase durations did not change significantly during the test for either group, except the recovery phase duration of the arm amputees, which decreased significantly. This study's results can contribute to the development of a more evidence-based classification system for swimmers with a disability.

  18. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  19. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  20. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  1. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shellmore » nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.« less

  2. Cutting Force Control Applying Sensorless Cutting Force Monitoring Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Intelligent machine tools require the functions of high-accurate process monitoring and adaptive control to fit the optimum process condition in each workpieces. For realizing these functions, the various techniques to monitor the cutting process and control it using additional sensors have been proposed and widely studied. Authors propose the sensorless cutting force control method using parallel disturbance observer. The performance of our proposed method is evaluated through simulation and experiments using a linear motor driving table.

  3. Accurate theoretical chemistry with coupled pair models.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank; Hansen, Andreas; Wennmohs, Frank; Grimme, Stefan

    2009-05-19

    Quantum chemistry has found its way into the everyday work of many experimental chemists. Calculations can predict the outcome of chemical reactions, afford insight into reaction mechanisms, and be used to interpret structure and bonding in molecules. Thus, contemporary theory offers tremendous opportunities in experimental chemical research. However, even with present-day computers and algorithms, we cannot solve the many particle Schrodinger equation exactly; inevitably some error is introduced in approximating the solutions of this equation. Thus, the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations is of critical importance. The affordable accuracy depends on molecular size and particularly on the total number of atoms: for orientation, ethanol has 9 atoms, aspirin 21 atoms, morphine 40 atoms, sildenafil 63 atoms, paclitaxel 113 atoms, insulin nearly 800 atoms, and quaternary hemoglobin almost 12,000 atoms. Currently, molecules with up to approximately 10 atoms can be very accurately studied by coupled cluster (CC) theory, approximately 100 atoms with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), approximately 1000 atoms with density functional theory (DFT), and beyond that number with semiempirical quantum chemistry and force-field methods. The overwhelming majority of present-day calculations in the 100-atom range use DFT. Although these methods have been very successful in quantum chemistry, they do not offer a well-defined hierarchy of calculations that allows one to systematically converge to the correct answer. Recently a number of rather spectacular failures of DFT methods have been found-even for seemingly simple systems such as hydrocarbons, fueling renewed interest in wave function-based methods that incorporate the relevant physics of electron correlation in a more systematic way. Thus, it would be highly desirable to fill the gap between 10 and 100 atoms with highly correlated ab initio methods. We have found that one of the earliest (and now

  4. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  5. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics. PMID:27497538

  6. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  7. Social forces and tobacco in society.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, M P

    1999-01-01

    The continued widespread use of tobacco is one of the greatest paradoxes of the 20th century. The cigarette was introduced to society early in this century, received a broad public acceptance in response to massive marketing and distribution efforts, and survives--or, more accurately, thrives--in a complex and controversial social, medical, and legal environment. Today, over 50 million Americans continue to use tobacco regularly, despite the fact that it is almost universally known that use of the product as intended is likely to result in ultimate death and disability for one out of two regular users. The latest statistics tell us that over 400,000 Americans die each year, accounting for over 5 million years of lost life, $50 billion in medical expenditures, and another $50 billion in indirect costs. We estimate that 10 million Americans have died from smoking since the first Surgeon General's Report in 1964, and another 25 million Americans alive today will ultimately die, including 5 million children, as a result of a fundamentally adolescent decision. Clearly, a unique mix of social and political forces have combined to result in a deadly and addicting product being sold and marketed like candy, resulting in 90% of users acknowledging the addictive nature of the product, 70% of whom would like to quit and wish they had never started. But despite near-universal knowledge of the harm and addictive nature of the product and widespread public support for changes in the status quo, the status quo has not changed. Despite a consistent belief that tobacco should be treated commensurate with the harm that it causes, changes in public policy have been surprisingly recalcitrant. This introduction briefly examines the social, cultural, economic, and public policy forces that have contributed to maintaining the status quo for nearly 100 years, the barriers to meaningful change, and the research needs that could result in profound improvements in public health.

  8. Social forces and tobacco in society.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, M P

    1999-01-01

    The continued widespread use of tobacco is one of the greatest paradoxes of the 20th century. The cigarette was introduced to society early in this century, received a broad public acceptance in response to massive marketing and distribution efforts, and survives--or, more accurately, thrives--in a complex and controversial social, medical, and legal environment. Today, over 50 million Americans continue to use tobacco regularly, despite the fact that it is almost universally known that use of the product as intended is likely to result in ultimate death and disability for one out of two regular users. The latest statistics tell us that over 400,000 Americans die each year, accounting for over 5 million years of lost life, $50 billion in medical expenditures, and another $50 billion in indirect costs. We estimate that 10 million Americans have died from smoking since the first Surgeon General's Report in 1964, and another 25 million Americans alive today will ultimately die, including 5 million children, as a result of a fundamentally adolescent decision. Clearly, a unique mix of social and political forces have combined to result in a deadly and addicting product being sold and marketed like candy, resulting in 90% of users acknowledging the addictive nature of the product, 70% of whom would like to quit and wish they had never started. But despite near-universal knowledge of the harm and addictive nature of the product and widespread public support for changes in the status quo, the status quo has not changed. Despite a consistent belief that tobacco should be treated commensurate with the harm that it causes, changes in public policy have been surprisingly recalcitrant. This introduction briefly examines the social, cultural, economic, and public policy forces that have contributed to maintaining the status quo for nearly 100 years, the barriers to meaningful change, and the research needs that could result in profound improvements in public health. PMID

  9. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  10. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear-Layer. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Lockard, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady computational simulations of a multi-element, high-lift configuration are performed. Emphasis is placed on accurate spatiotemporal resolution of the free shear layer in the slat-cove region. The excessive dissipative effects of the turbulence model, so prevalent in previous simulations, are circumvented by switching off the turbulence-production term in the slat cove region. The justifications and physical arguments for taking such a step are explained in detail. The removal of this excess damping allows the shear layer to amplify large-scale structures, to achieve a proper non-linear saturation state, and to permit vortex merging. The large-scale disturbances are self-excited, and unlike our prior fully turbulent simulations, no external forcing of the shear layer is required. To obtain the farfield acoustics, the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is evaluated numerically using the simulated time-accurate flow data. The present comparison between the computed and measured farfield acoustic spectra shows much better agreement for the amplitude and frequency content than past calculations. The effect of the angle-of-attack on the slat's flow features radiated acoustic field are also simulated presented.

  11. A high order accurate difference scheme for complex flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dexun Fu; Yanwen Ma

    1997-06-01

    A high order accurate finite difference method for direct numerical simulation of coherent structure in the mixing layers is presented. The reason for oscillation production in numerical solutions is analyzed. It is caused by a nonuniform group velocity of wavepackets. A method of group velocity control for the improvement of the shock resolution is presented. In numerical simulation the fifth-order accurate upwind compact difference relation is used to approximate the derivatives in the convection terms of the compressible N-S equations, a sixth-order accurate symmetric compact difference relation is used to approximate the viscous terms, and a three-stage R-K method is used to advance in time. In order to improve the shock resolution the scheme is reconstructed with the method of diffusion analogy which is used to control the group velocity of wavepackets. 18 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  13. Predicting propulsive forces using distributed sensors in a compliant, high DOF, robotic fin.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeff C; Peretz, David J; Tangorra, James L

    2015-05-18

    Engineered robotic fins have adapted principles of propulsion from bony-finned fish, using spatially-varying compliance and complex kinematics to produce and control the fin's propulsive force through time. While methods of force production are well understood, few models exist to predict the propulsive forces of a compliant, high degree of freedom, robotic fin as it moves through fluid. Inspired by evidence that the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) has bending sensation in its pectoral fins, the objective of this study is to understand how sensors distributed within a compliant robotic fin can be used to estimate and predict the fin's propulsive force. A biorobotic model of a bluegill sunfish pectoral fin was instrumented with pressure and bending sensors at multiple locations. Experiments with the robotic fin were executed that varied the swimming gait, flapping frequency, stroke phase, and fin stiffness to understand the forces and sensory measures that occur during swimming. A convolution-based, multi-input-single-output (MISO) model was selected to model and study the relationships between sensory data and propulsive force. Subsets of sensory data were studied to determine which sensor modalities and sensor placement locations resulted in the best force predictions. The propulsive forces of the fin were accurately predicted using the linear MISO model on intrinsic sensory data. Bending sensation was more effective than pressure sensation for predicting propulsive forces, and the importance of bending sensation was consistent with several results in biology and engineering studies. It was important to have a spatial distribution of sensors and multiple sensory modalities in order to predict forces across large changes to dynamics. The relationship between propulsive forces and intrinsic sensory measures is complex, and good models should allow for temporal lags between forces and sensory data, changes to the model within a fin stroke, and changes to the

  14. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  15. Separation and concentration of natural products by fast forced adsorption using well-dispersed velvet-like graphitic carbon nitride with response surface methodology optimisation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinru; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Qian; Bi, Wentao; Yang, Xiaodi; Yang, Jinfei

    2016-07-01

    Well-dispersed velvet-like graphitic carbon nitride nanoparticles with a large surface area were prepared and utilized for separation and concentration of bioactive compounds from fruit extracts by fast (20s) forced adsorption. The large surface area, enhanced non-covalent interactions of this nanoparticle with bioactive compounds and good dispersity in different solvents benefited its application as a good sorbent. To evaluate their adsorption capabilities, these carbon nitride nanoparticles were used for separation and concentration of flavonoids from fruit extracts by a forced-adsorption dispersive solid phase extraction method. The combined use of this nanoparticle and our experimental conditions showed excellent precision (3.6-4.7%) and sensitivity (limits of detection (S/N=3): 0.6-3.75ng/mL). This research provides an alternative strategy to prepare suitable sorbents for adsorption, separation and concentration of various compounds from different extracts. PMID:27154656

  16. Separation and concentration of natural products by fast forced adsorption using well-dispersed velvet-like graphitic carbon nitride with response surface methodology optimisation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinru; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Qian; Bi, Wentao; Yang, Xiaodi; Yang, Jinfei

    2016-07-01

    Well-dispersed velvet-like graphitic carbon nitride nanoparticles with a large surface area were prepared and utilized for separation and concentration of bioactive compounds from fruit extracts by fast (20s) forced adsorption. The large surface area, enhanced non-covalent interactions of this nanoparticle with bioactive compounds and good dispersity in different solvents benefited its application as a good sorbent. To evaluate their adsorption capabilities, these carbon nitride nanoparticles were used for separation and concentration of flavonoids from fruit extracts by a forced-adsorption dispersive solid phase extraction method. The combined use of this nanoparticle and our experimental conditions showed excellent precision (3.6-4.7%) and sensitivity (limits of detection (S/N=3): 0.6-3.75ng/mL). This research provides an alternative strategy to prepare suitable sorbents for adsorption, separation and concentration of various compounds from different extracts.

  17. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  18. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  19. Forces and moments generated by the human arm: Variability and control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Terekhov, AV; Latash, ML; Zatsiorsky, VM

    2012-01-01

    This is an exploratory study of the accurate endpoint force vector production by the human arm in isometric conditions. We formulated three common-sense hypotheses and falsified them in the experiment. The subjects (n=10) exerted static forces on the handle in eight directions in a horizontal plane for 25 seconds. The forces were of 4 magnitude levels (10 %, 20%, 30% and 40% of individual MVC). The torsion moment on the handle (grasp moment) was not specified in the instruction. The two force components and the grasp moment were recorded, and the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joint torques were computed. The following main facts were observed: (a) While the grasp moment was not prescribed by the instruction, it was always produced. The moment magnitude and direction depended on the instructed force magnitude and direction. (b) The within-trial angular variability of the exerted force vector (angular precision) did not depend on the target force magnitude (a small negative correlation was observed). (c) Across the target force directions, the variability of the exerted force magnitude and directional variability exhibited opposite trends: In the directions where the variability of force magnitude was maximal, the directional variability was minimal and vice versa. (d) The time profiles of joint torques in the trials were always positively correlated, even for the force directions where flexion torque was produced at one joint and extension torque was produced at the other joint. (e) The correlations between the grasp moment and the wrist torque were negative across the tasks and positive within the individual trials. (f) In static serial kinematic chains, the pattern of the joint torques distribution could not be explained by an optimization cost function additive with respect to the torques. Plans for several future experiments have been suggested. PMID:23080084

  20. Forces and moments generated by the human arm: variability and control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Terekhov, A V; Latash, M L; Zatsiorsky, V M

    2012-11-01

    This is an exploratory study of the accurate endpoint force vector production by the human arm in isometric conditions. We formulated three common-sense hypotheses and falsified them in the experiment. The subjects (n = 10) exerted static forces on the handle in eight directions in a horizontal plane for 25 s. The forces were of 4 magnitude levels (10, 20, 30 and 40 % of individual maximal voluntary contractions). The torsion moment on the handle (grasp moment) was not specified in the instruction. The two force components and the grasp moment were recorded, and the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joint torques were computed. The following main facts were observed: (a) While the grasp moment was not prescribed by the instruction, it was always produced. The moment magnitude and direction depended on the instructed force magnitude and direction. (b) The within-trial angular variability of the exerted force vector (angular precision) did not depend on the target force magnitude (a small negative correlation was observed). (c) Across the target force directions, the variability of the exerted force magnitude and directional variability exhibited opposite trends: In the directions where the variability of force magnitude was maximal, the directional variability was minimal and vice versa. (d) The time profiles of joint torques in the trials were always positively correlated, even for the force directions where flexion torque was produced at one joint and extension torque was produced at the other joint. (e) The correlations between the grasp moment and the wrist torque were negative across the tasks and positive within the individual trials. (f) In static serial kinematic chains, the pattern of the joint torques distribution could not be explained by an optimization cost function additive with respect to the torques. Plans for several future experiments have been suggested. PMID:23080084

  1. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2014-01-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  2. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  3. Calculation of injection forces for highly concentrated protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ingo; Schmidt, Astrid; Bryant, Andrew; Besheer, Ahmed

    2015-09-30

    Protein solutions often manifest a high viscosity at high solution concentrations, thus impairing injectability. Accordingly, accurate prediction of the injection force based on solution viscosity can greatly support protein formulation and device development. In this study, the shear-dependent viscosity of three concentrated protein solutions is reported, and calculated injection forces obtained by two different mathematical models are compared against measured values. The results show that accurate determination of the needle dimensions and the shear-thinning behavior of the protein solutions is vital for injection force prediction. Additionally, one model delivered more accurate results, particularly for solutions with prominent shear-thinning behavior.

  4. An epidemiologic investigation of forced expiratory volume at 1 second and respiratory symptoms among employees of a toluene diisocyanate production plant.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G W; Shellenberger, R; Bodner, K M; Flores, G H; Emmitte, J A; Bond, G G; Saunders, J H

    1989-08-01

    Pulmonary function tests were done and compared to current and past potential exposure levels of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) for 57 TDI manufacturing workers and 89 workers not exposed to TDI or other known respiratory hazards. The average TDI plant experience was 4.1 years (standard deviation = 2.8). Routine industrial hygiene measurements have shown TDI exposure below a time-weighted average of 0.005 parts per million and a short-term exposure level of 0.02 parts per million. A certified industrial hygienist ranked department and job classification by level of potential exposure to TDI (none, low, moderate, and high). A questionnaire was administered to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Using backward regression analysis, cumulative pack-years of cigarette smoking and prevalence of lower respiratory symptoms were statistically significant predictors of a standardized forced expiratory volume at 1 second observed v expected difference; however, TDI exposure, whether classified as current, highest career level, cumulative, or cumulative highest-to-date, was not associated with a decline in forced expiratory volume. PMID:2547915

  5. Physical forcing and nutrient conditions associated with patterns of Chl a and phytoplankton productivity in the southeastern Bering Sea during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambrotto, Raymond N.; Mordy, Calvin; Zeeman, Stephan I.; Stabeno, Phyllis J.; Macklin, S. Allen

    2008-08-01

    Measurements of nutrients, primary ( 14C) productivity and new (nitrate) productivity collected in the southeastern Bering Sea in July and August 2004 together with measurements from July 1981 are used to characterize the regional production system during summer and to analyze the major physical and nutrient factors controlling biological patterns. The patterns of surface productivity suggested by the two different summers were remarkably similar in the regions of data overlap and agree with recent compilations of summer conditions from remotely sensed data. Summer was characterized by low production in the middle and outer shelf associated with surface mixed layers that were stabilized by heat. Elevated productivity was restricted to regions associated with the surface expression of thermohaline fronts, as well as to tidally mixed regions adjacent to and between the Pribilof Islands. Based on Chl a and productivity measurements, the biological impact of the shelf-break front of the southeastern Bering Sea extends at least as far inshore as the Pribilof Islands. The existence of elevated summer productivity associated with a recently identified shelf-partition front between the Pribilof domain and the middle shelf domain east of St. Paul Island was confirmed, and its thermohaline nature resulting from cumulative intrusions of slope-derived water is described. Yearly estimates of new and primary productivity compiled for the various biophysical regimes range from >1800 mmol N m -2 yr -1 and >170 g C m -2 yr -1 at the shelf-break front to less than 700 mmol N m -2 yr -1 and 100 g C m -2 yr -1 in oceanic and coastal waters. We hypothesize that trace metals, rather than macronutrients or grazing, likely restrict the seaward extent of elevated production at the shelf-break front. Iron may be supplied to the front by isopycnal mixing from deeper shelf waters that were in contact with sediments. By extending elevated production throughout the summer, the thermohaline and

  6. ADAPTIVE INCREASE IN FORCE VARIANCE DURING FATIGUE IN TASKS WITH LOW REDUNDANCY

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tarkeshwar; Varadhan, SKM; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We tested a hypothesis that fatigue of an element (a finger) leads to an adaptive neural strategy that involves an increase in force variability in the other finger(s) and an increase in co-variation of commands to fingers to keep total force variability relatively unchanged. We tested this hypothesis using a system with small redundancy (two fingers) and a marginally redundant system (with an additional constraint related to the total moment of force produced by the fingers). The subjects performed isometric accurate rhythmic force production tasks by the index (I) finger and two fingers (I and middle, M) pressing together before and after a fatiguing exercise by the I finger. Fatigue led to a large increase in force variance in the I-finger task and a smaller increase in the IM-task. We quantified two components of variance in the space of hypothetical commands to fingers, finger modes. Under both stable and unstable conditions, there was a large increase in the variance component that did not affect total force and a much smaller increase in the component that did. This resulted in an increase in an index of the force-stabilizing synergy. These results indicate that marginal redundancy is sufficient to allow the central nervous system to use adaptive increase in variability to shield important variables from effects of fatigue. We offer an interpretation of these results based on a recent development of the equilibrium-point hypothesis known as the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:20849913

  7. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  8. On the use of Ethephon as abscising agent in cv. Crimson Seedless table grape production: combination of Fruit Detachment Force, Fruit Drop and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Rizzuti, Antonino; Aguilera-Sáez, Luis Manuel; Gallo, Vito; Cafagna, Isabella; Mastrorilli, Piero; Latronico, Mario; Pacifico, Andrea; Matarrese, Angela Maria Stella; Ferrara, Giuseppe

    2015-03-15

    The effect of 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (Ethephon, in the following ETH) as abscising agent on cv. Crimson Seedless table grape was investigated by means of Fruit Detachment Force (FDF) and Fruit Drop (FD) analyses combined with a metabolomic study carried out by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRMS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The effectiveness of ETH as abscising agent was ascertained with ETH concentration ranging from 1.4 to 4.0 g/L in a two-year study. The ETH treatments caused berry drops higher than 40% and induced an increase of tartaric acid, procyanidin P2, terpenoid derivatives and peonidin-3-glucoside as well as a decrease of catechin and epicatechin. HRMS-NMR covariance analysis was carried out to correlate the fluctuations of tartaric acid NMR signals to those of MS peaks of the secondary metabolites affected by ETH treatments.

  9. Can Appraisers Rate Work Performance Accurately?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedge, Jerry W.; Laue, Frances J.

    The ability of individuals to make accurate judgments about others is examined and literature on this subject is reviewed. A wide variety of situational factors affects the appraisal of performance. It is generally accepted that the purpose of the appraisal influences the accuracy of the appraiser. The instrumentation, or tools, available to the…

  10. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  11. Preparation and characterization of two new forced degradation products of letrozole and development of a stability-indicating RP-LC method for its determination.

    PubMed

    Elkady, Ehab Farouk; Fouad, Marwa Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Two new hydrolytic products of letrozole were identified and proved to be true degradation products obtained by alkaline and acidic degradation of the drug. The acid and amide forms of the nitrile groups of letrozole were prepared and identified by IR and mass spectroscopic techniques. Subsequently, a simple, precise and selective stability-indicating RPLC method was developed and validated for the determination of letrozole in the presence of its degradation products. Letrozole was subjected to alkali and acid hydrolysis, oxidation, thermal degradation and photo-degradation. The degradation products were well isolated from letrozole. The chromatographic method was achieved using gradient elution of the drug and its degradation products on a reversed phase Zorbax Eclipse C18 column (100mm x 4.6mm, 3.5 μm) using a mobile phase consisting of 0.01M KH₂PO₄and methanol at a flow rate of 1 mL min⁻¹. Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 230 nm. Linearity, accuracy and precision were found to be acceptable over the concentration range of 0.01-80 μgmL⁻¹. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of letrozole in bulk, plasma and in its pharmaceutical preparation.

  12. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  13. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  14. Study of the forced degradation behavior of prasugrel hydrochloride by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with NMR detection and prediction of the toxicity of the characterized degradation products.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dilip Kumar; Sahu, Archana; Handa, Tarun; Narayanam, Mallikarjun; Singh, Saranjit

    2015-09-01

    Prasugrel was subjected to forced degradation studies under conditions of hydrolysis (acid, base, and neutral), photolysis, oxidation, and thermal stress. The drug showed liability in hydrolytic as well as oxidative conditions, resulting in a total of four degradation products. In order to characterize the latter, initially mass fragmentation pathway of the drug was established with the help of mass spectrometry/time-of-flight, multiple stage mass spectrometry and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data. The degradation products were then separated on a C18 column using a stability-indicating volatile buffer method, which was later extended to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry studies. The latter highlighted that three degradation products had the same molecular mass, while one was different. To characterize all, their mass fragmentation pathways were established in the same manner as the drug. Subsequently, liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy data were collected. Proton and correlation liquid chromatography with NMR spectroscopy studies highlighted existence of diastereomeric behavior in one pair of degradation products. Lastly, toxicity prediction by computer-assisted technology (TOPKAT) and deductive estimation of risk from existing knowledge (DEREK) software were employed to assess in silico toxicity of the characterized degradation products.

  15. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  16. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  17. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  18. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  19. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  20. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  1. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  2. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  3. Line gas sampling system ensures accurate analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Tremendous changes in the natural gas business have resulted in new approaches to the way natural gas is measured. Electronic flow measurement has altered the business forever, with developments in instrumentation and a new sensitivity to the importance of proper natural gas sampling techniques. This paper reports that YZ Industries Inc., Snyder, Texas, combined its 40 years of sampling experience with the latest in microprocessor-based technology to develop the KynaPak 2000 series, the first on-line natural gas sampling system that is both compact and extremely accurate. This means the composition of the sampled gas must be representative of the whole and related to flow. If so, relative measurement and sampling techniques are married, gas volumes are accurately accounted for and adjustments to composition can be made.

  4. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  5. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields

    PubMed Central

    Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. PMID:25717155

  6. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    PubMed

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain.

  7. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  8. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  9. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-04-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  10. The challenge of accurately quantifying future megadrought risk in the American Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Sloan; Mankin, Justin S.

    2016-09-01

    American Southwest (ASW) megadroughts represent decadal-scale periods of dry conditions the near-term risks of which arise from natural low-frequency hydroclimate variability and anthropogenic forcing. A large single-climate-model ensemble indicates that anthropogenic forcing increases near-term ASW megadrought risk by a factor of 100; however, accurate risk assessment remains a challenge. At the global-scale we find that anthropogenic forcing may alter the variability driving megadroughts over 55% of land areas, undermining accurate assessments of their risk. For the remaining areas, current ensembles are too small to characterize megadroughts' driving variability. For example, constraining uncertainty in near-term ASW megadrought risk to 5 percentage points with high confidence requires 287 simulations. Such ensemble sizes are beyond current computational and storage resources, and these limitations suggest that constraining errors in near-term megadrought risk projections with high confidence—even in places where underlying variability is stationary—is not currently possible.

  11. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  12. Chewing simulation with a physically accurate deformable model.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Andra Maria; Ruge, Sebastian; Hauth, Steffen; Kordaß, Bernd; Linsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, CAD/CAM software is being used to compute the optimal shape and position of a new tooth model meant for a patient. With this possible future application in mind, we present in this article an independent and stand-alone interactive application that simulates the human chewing process and the deformation it produces in the food substrate. Chewing motion sensors are used to produce an accurate representation of the jaw movement. The substrate is represented by a deformable elastic model based on the finite linear elements method, which preserves physical accuracy. Collision detection based on spatial partitioning is used to calculate the forces that are acting on the deformable model. Based on the calculated information, geometry elements are added to the scene to enhance the information available for the user. The goal of the simulation is to present a complete scene to the dentist, highlighting the points where the teeth came into contact with the substrate and giving information about how much force acted at these points, which therefore makes it possible to indicate whether the tooth is being used incorrectly in the mastication process. Real-time interactivity is desired and achieved within limits, depending on the complexity of the employed geometric models. The presented simulation is a first step towards the overall project goal of interactively optimizing tooth position and shape under the investigation of a virtual chewing process using real patient data (Fig 1). PMID:26389135

  13. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  14. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  15. A meteorological forcing data set for global crop modeling: Development, evaluation, and intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, Toshichika; Okada, Masashi; Yokozawza, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The Global Risk Assessment toward Stable Production of Food (GRASP) project uses global crop models to evaluate the impacts on global food security by changes in climate extremes, water resources, and land use. Such models require meteorological forcing data. This study presents the development of the GRASP forcing data that is a hybrid of the reanalyses (ERA-40 and JRA-25) and observations. The GRASP data offer daily mean, maximum, and minimum 2 m air temperatures as well as precipitation, solar radiation, vapor pressure, and 10 m wind speed over global land areas, excluding Antarctica, for the period 1961-2010 at a grid size of 1.125°. The monthly climatologies of the variables of the GRASP data were forced to be close to those of the observations for the baseline period (1961-1990 or 1983-2005) through bias corrections. The GRASP data are intercompared with other forcing data for land surface modeling (the S06, WATCH Forcing Data, and WATCH Forcing Data Methodology Applied to ERA-Interim data). The results demonstrate that the daily minimum temperature, diurnal temperature range, vapor pressure, solar radiation, and wind speed from the GRASP data are more valuable for crop modeling than the reanalyses and other forcing data. For remaining variables, the reliability of the GRASP data is higher than that of the reanalyses and on a similar level with that of the other forcing data. The GRASP data offer accurate estimates of daily weather as the inputs for crop models, providing unique opportunities to link historical changes in climate with crop production over the last half century.

  16. Robotic Force Stabilization for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Yip, Michael C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Perrin, Douglas P; Del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2009-10-01

    The manipulation of fast moving, delicate tissues in beating heart procedures presents a considerable challenge to surgeons. We present a new robotic force stabilization system that assists surgeons by maintaining a constant contact force with the beating heart. The system incorporates a novel, miniature uniaxial force sensor that is mounted to surgical instrumentation to measure contact forces during surgical manipulation. Using this sensor in conjunction with real-time tissue motion information derived from 3D ultrasound, we show that a force controller with feed-forward motion terms can provide safe and accurate force stabilization in an in vivo contact task against the beating mitral valve annulus. This confers a 50% reduction in force fluctuations when compared to a standard force controller and a 75% reduction in fluctuations when compared to manual attempts to maintain the same force. PMID:20431713

  17. Robotic force stabilization for beating heart intracardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Shelten G; Yip, Michael C; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Perrin, Douglas P; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    The manipulation of fast moving, delicate tissues in beating heart procedures presents a considerable challenge to surgeons. We present a new robotic force stabilization system that assists surgeons by maintaining a constant contact force with the beating heart. The system incorporates a novel, miniature uniaxial force sensor that is mounted to surgical instrumentation to measure contact forces during surgical manipulation. Using this sensor in conjunction with real-time tissue motion information derived from 3D ultrasound, we show that a force controller with feed-forward motion terms can provide safe and accurate force stabilization in an in vivo contact task against the beating mitral valve annulus. This confers a 50% reduction in force fluctuations when compared to a standard force controller and a 75% reduction in fluctuations when compared to manual attempts to maintain the same force. PMID:20425967

  18. Motor adaptation to a small force field superimposed on a large background force.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayin; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2007-04-01

    The human motor system adapts to novel force field perturbations during reaching by forming an internal model of the external dynamics and by modulating arm impedance. We studied whether it uses similar strategies when the perturbation is superimposed on a much larger background force. Consistent with the Weber-Fechner law for force perception, subjects had greater difficulty consciously perceiving the force field perturbation when it was superimposed on the large background force. However, they still adapted to the perturbation, decreasing trajectory distortion with repeated reaching and demonstrating kinematic after effects when the perturbation was unexpectedly removed. They also adapted by increasing their arm impedance when the background force was not present, but did not vary the arm impedance when the background force was present. The identified parameters of a previously proposed mathematical model of motor adaptation changed significantly with the presence of the background force. These results indicate that the motor system maintains its sensitivity for internal model formation even when there are large background forces that mask perception. Further, the motor system modulates arm impedance differently in response to the same perturbation depending on the background force onto which that perturbation is superimposed. Finally, these results suggest that computational models of motor adaptation will likely need to include force-dependent parameters to accurately predict errors.

  19. New formula of Nuclear Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Kamal

    2011-04-01

    It is well established that the forces between nucleons are transmitted by meson. The quantitative explanation of nuclear forces in terms of meson theory was extremely tentative & in complete but this theory supplies a valuable point of view . it is fairly certain now that the nucleons within nuclear matter are in a state made rather different from their free condition by the proximity of other nucleons charge independence of nuclear forces demand the existence of neutral meson as amongst the same type of nucleolus (P-P) or (N-N). this force demand the same spin & orbital angular momentum. The exchange interaction in produced by only a neutral meson. The involving mesons without electric charge, that it gives exchanges forces between proton & Neutron & also therefore maintains charge in dependence character. It is evident for the nature of the products that neutral mesons decay by strong & weak interaction both. It means that neutral mesons constituents responsible for the electromagnetic interaction. Dramatically neutral mesons plays important role for electromagnetic & nuclear force both.

  20. Optimization of solid-state fermentation parameters for the production of xylanase by Trichoderma longibrachiatum on wheat bran in a forced aeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, E.R.; Nokes, S.E.; Knutson, B.L.

    1999-12-01

    The effect of aeration on the production of xylanase by Trichoderma longibrachiatum on wheat bran in a solid-state fermentation (SSF) system has not been investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of aeration, initial moisture content of the substrate, and depth of the substrate on xylanase activity produced in a tray fermenter. The experiment was conducted as a split plot experiment with factorial treatments and three replications of each treatment combination. The whole plot treatment was aeration rate (0, 2.9, 5.7 L/min/kg bran). Initial moisture content (45, 55, 65% w.b.) and depth of substrate (1.0 and 2.5 cm) were investigated factorially. Trays of wheat bran were assayed after fermentation by Trichoderma longibrachiatum to determine the production of xylanase activity. Aeration rate had a significant nonlinear effect on enzyme activity with highest yields obtained at an aeration rate of 2.9 L/min/kg bran (738 U/g, averaged over all initial moisture contents and depth of substrates). Initial moisture content of the substrate also had a significant nonlinear effect on enzyme activity with the highest yields at 55% (556 U/g, averaged over all airflow rates and depths of substrate). Depth of substrate had no significant statistical effect on enzyme activity. The treatment combination of 2.9 L/min/kg airflow rate and 55% moisture content resulted in the highest yields (948 U/g, averaged over depth of substrate).

  1. Forced degradation study of racecadotril: Effect of co-solvent, characterization of degradation products by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS, NMR and cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Chiguru, Vishnuvardhan; Lingesh, Allakonda; R, Srinivas; N, Satheeshkumar

    2016-09-01

    Racecadotril, an enkephalinase inhibitor, was subjected to hydrolysis (acidic and alkaline), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as per ICH specified conditions. The drug showed extensive degradation under acidic, basic hydrolysis and oxidative stress conditions whereas, it was stable under other stress conditions. A total of seven degradation products (DPs) were observed. The chromatographic separation was optimized on Acquity HSS Cyano (100×2.1mm, 1.8μ) column using 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile as mobile phase in gradient mode. Six DPs were characterised by LC-MS/MS and DP1 by GC-MS. The major DPs (DP 2 and DP 5) were isolated and characterised by NMR. This is a typical case of degradation where co solvent methanol reacts with racecadotril leading to the formation of pseudo DPs, DP 6 and DP 5. Interestingly the MS/MS spectra of protonated drug, DP 4 and DP 7 showed product ions which were formed due to intramolecular benzyl migrations. In vitro cytotoxic activity studies on isolated DP 2 and DP 5 revealed that the former has no cytotoxic nature, whereas the latter has potential pulmonary and hepatic toxicity. PMID:27209450

  2. A Technique for Assimilating GOES-Derived Land Surface Products into Regional Models to Improve the Representation of Land Surface Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary

    1998-01-01

    As the parameterizations of surface energy budgets in regional models have become more complete physically, models have the potential to be much more realistic in simulations of coupling between surface radiation, hydrology, and surface energy transfer. Realizing the importance of properly specifying the surface energy budget, many institutions are using land-surface models to represent the lower boundary forcing associated with biophysical processes and soil hydrology. However, the added degrees of freedom due to inclusion of such land-surface schemes require the specification of additional parameters within the model system such as vegetative resistances, green vegetation fraction, leaf area index, soil physical and hydraulic characteristics, stream flow, runoff, and the vertical distribution of soil moisture. A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-IR skin temperature tendencies into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite-observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. An advantage of this technique for short-range forecasts is that it does not require a complex land-surface formulation within the

  3. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  4. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  5. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  6. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  7. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  8. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  9. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  10. Universality: Accurate Checks in Dyson's Hierarchical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina, J. J.; Meurice, Y.; Oktay, M. B.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk we present high-accuracy calculations of the susceptibility near βc for Dyson's hierarchical model in D = 3. Using linear fitting, we estimate the leading (γ) and subleading (Δ) exponents. Independent estimates are obtained by calculating the first two eigenvalues of the linearized renormalization group transformation. We found γ = 1.29914073 ± 10 -8 and, Δ = 0.4259469 ± 10-7 independently of the choice of local integration measure (Ising or Landau-Ginzburg). After a suitable rescaling, the approximate fixed points for a large class of local measure coincide accurately with a fixed point constructed by Koch and Wittwer.

  11. Rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations of arm trajectory.

    PubMed

    Lackner, J R; Dizio, P

    1994-07-01

    1. Forward reaching movements made during body rotation generate tangential Coriolis forces that are proportional to the cross product of the angular velocity of rotation and the linear velocity of the arm. Coriolis forces are inertial forces that do not involve mechanical contact. Virtually no constant centrifugal forces will be present in the background when motion of the arm generates transient Coriolis forces if the radius of body rotation is small. 2. We measured the trajectories of arm movements made in darkness to a visual target that was extinguished as movement began. The reaching movements were made prerotation, during rotation at 10 rpm in a fully enclosed rotating room, and postrotation. During testing the subject was seated at the center of the room and pointed radially. Neither visual nor tactile feedback about movement accuracy was present. 3. In experiment 1, subjects reached at a fast or slow rate and their hands made contact with a horizontal surface at the end of the reach. Their initial perrotary movements were highly significantly deviated relative to prerotation in both trajectories and end-points in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces that had been generated during the reaches. Despite the absence of visual and tactile feedback about reaching accuracy, all subjects rapidly regained straight movement trajectories and accurate endpoints. Postrotation, transient errors of opposite sign were present for both trajectories and endpoints. 4. In a second experiment the conditions were identical except that subjects pointed just above the location of the extinguished target so that no surface contact was involved. All subjects showed significant initial perrotation deviations of trajectories and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces. With repeated reaches the trajectories, as viewed from above, again became straight, but there was only partial restoration of endpoint accuracy, so that subjects reached in a straight

  12. Rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations of arm trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Dizio, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Forward reaching movements made during body rotation generate tangential Coriolis forces that are proportional to the cross product of the angular velocity of rotation and the linear velocity of the arm. Coriolis forces are inertial forces that do not involve mechanical contact. Virtually no constant centrifugal forces will be present in the background when motion of the arm generates transient Coriolis forces if the radius of body rotation is small. 2. We measured the trajectories of arm movements made in darkness to a visual target that was extinguished as movement began. The reaching movements were made prerotation, during rotation at 10 rpm in a fully enclosed rotating room, and postrotation. During testing the subject was seated at the center of the room and pointed radially. Neither visual nor tactile feedback about movement accuracy was present. 3. In experiment 1, subjects reached at a fast or slow rate and their hands made contact with a horizontal surface at the end of the reach. Their initial perrotary movements were highly significantly deviated relative to prerotation in both trajectories and end-points in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces that had been generated during the reaches. Despite the absence of visual and tactile feedback about reaching accuracy, all subjects rapidly regained straight movement trajectories and accurate endpoints. Postrotation, transient errors of opposite sign were present for both trajectories and endpoints. 4. In a second experiment the conditions were identical except that subjects pointed just above the location of the extinguished target so that no surface contact was involved. All subjects showed significant initial perrotation deviations of trajectories and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces. With repeated reaches the trajectories, as viewed from above, again became straight, but there was only partial restoration of endpoint accuracy, so that subjects reached in a straight

  13. Assessing photocatalytic power of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} for solar fuel production: A first-principles study involving quasi-particle theory and dispersive forces

    SciTech Connect

    Osorio-Guillén, J. M.; Espinosa-García, W. F.; Moyses Araujo, C.

    2015-09-07

    First-principles quasi-particle theory has been employed to assess catalytic power of graphitic carbon nitride, g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, for solar fuel production. A comparative study between g-h-triazine and g-h-heptazine has been carried out taking also into account van der Waals dispersive forces. The band edge potentials have been calculated using a recently developed approach where quasi-particle effects are taken into account through the GW approximation. First, it was found that the description of ground state properties such as cohesive and surface formation energies requires the proper treatment of dispersive interaction. Furthermore, through the analysis of calculated band-edge potentials, it is shown that g-h-triazine has high reductive power reaching the potential to reduce CO{sub 2} to formic acid, coplanar g-h-heptazine displays the highest thermodynamics force toward H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2} oxidation reaction, and corrugated g-h-heptazine exhibits a good capacity for both reactions. This rigorous theoretical study shows a route to further improve the catalytic performance of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  14. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  15. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  16. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  17. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  18. Accurate Stellar Parameters for Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John Michael; Fischer, Debra; Basu, Sarbani; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2015-01-01

    A large impedement to our understanding of planet formation is obtaining a clear picture of planet radii and densities. Although determining precise ratios between planet and stellar host are relatively easy, determining accurate stellar parameters is still a difficult and costly undertaking. High resolution spectral analysis has traditionally yielded precise values for some stellar parameters but stars in common between catalogs from different authors or analyzed using different techniques often show offsets far in excess of their uncertainties. Most analyses now use some external constraint, when available, to break observed degeneracies between surface gravity, effective temperature, and metallicity which can otherwise lead to correlated errors in results. However, these external constraints are impossible to obtain for all stars and can require more costly observations than the initial high resolution spectra. We demonstrate that these discrepencies can be mitigated by use of a larger line list that has carefully tuned atomic line data. We use an iterative modeling technique that does not require external constraints. We compare the surface gravity obtained with our spectral synthesis modeling to asteroseismically determined values for 42 Kepler stars. Our analysis agrees well with only a 0.048 dex offset and an rms scatter of 0.05 dex. Such accurate stellar gravities can reduce the primary source of uncertainty in radii by almost an order of magnitude over unconstrained spectral analysis.

  19. Thermal recoil force, telemetry, and the Pioneer anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Viktor T.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2009-02-15

    Precision navigation of spacecraft requires accurate knowledge of small forces, including the recoil force due to anisotropies of thermal radiation emitted by spacecraft systems. We develop a formalism to derive the thermal recoil force from the basic principles of radiative heat exchange and energy-momentum conservation. The thermal power emitted by the spacecraft can be computed from engineering data obtained from flight telemetry, which yields a practical approach to incorporate the thermal recoil force into precision spacecraft navigation. Alternatively, orbit determination can be used to estimate the contribution of the thermal recoil force. We apply this approach to the Pioneer anomaly using a simulated Pioneer 10 Doppler data set.

  20. Prediction of Spacecraft Vibration using Acceleration and Force Envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel; Kern, Dennis; Scharton, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The base forces in the GLAST X- and Z-axis sine vibration tests were similar to those derived using generic inputs (from users guide and handbook), but the base forces in the sine test were generally greater than the flight data. Basedrive analyses using envelopes of flight acceleration data provided more accurate predictions of the base force than generic inputs, and as expected, using envelopes of both the flight acceleration and force provided even more accurate predictions The GLAST spacecraft interface accelerations and forces measured during the MECO transient were relatively low in the 60 to 150 Hz regime. One may expect the flight forces measured at the base of various spacecraft to be more dependent on the mass, frequencies, etc. of the spacecraft than are the corresponding interface acceleration data, which may depend more on the launch vehicle configuration.

  1. Contraceptive product advertising.

    PubMed

    Kastor, A

    1985-07-01

    In the US, all national broadcast networks refuse to accept ads for contraceptive products. About 10 years ago, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), a trade association, inserted a ban on contraceptive ads in its advertising code for member stations. The ban was voluntary, but all NAB stations adhered to it. When the NAB dropped its advertising code in 1982, for legal reasons unrelated to contraceptive advertising, individual networks established their own codes. These codes continued the ban on contraceptives along with bans on ads for cigarettes, X-rated movies, sex magazines, and astrology services. In recent years, a few local radio and television stations and cable networks began accepting contraceptive ads. The ads, which are tasteful and straightforward, met with little or no public disapproval. Given that the national television networks through their programming willingly expose viewers to an estimated 9230 sexual acts or references a year, it is hard to understand why they persist in refusing to air contraceptive ads or to allow any references to contraceptive use in their programming. There are some hopeful signs. A number of national organizations are now publicly urging the networks to drop their ban. These organizations include the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Jewish Congress, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine. The Center for Population Options recently organized a task force to promote contraceptive advertising. The task force is composed of representatives from a wide range of national organizations, including the American Public Health Association and the National Urban League. The task force developed guidelines for the production and selection of contraceptive ads. The guidelines state that ads must provide accurate and clear information on product effectiveness, present comparisons with other products fairly, advise users to read all instructions, and inform listeners if there is an effectiveness waiting

  2. A submillimetric 3-DOF force sensing instrument with integrated fiber Bragg grating for retinal microsurgery.

    PubMed

    He, Xingchi; Handa, James; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell; Iordachita, Iulian

    2014-02-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery requires very fine motor control to perform precise manipulation of the delicate tissue in the interior of the eye. Besides physiological hand tremor, fatigue, poor kinesthetic feedback, and patient movement, the absence of force sensing is one of the main technical challenges. Previous two degrees of freedom (DOF) force sensing instruments have demonstrated robust force measuring performance. The main design challenge is to incorporate high sensitivity axial force sensing. This paper reports the development of a submillimetric 3-DOF force sensing pick instrument based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The configuration of the four FBG sensors is arranged to maximize the decoupling between axial and transverse force sensing. A superelastic nitinol flexure is designed to achieve high axial force sensitivity. An automated calibration system was developed for repeatability testing, calibration, and validation. Experimental results demonstrate a FBG sensor repeatability of 1.3 pm. The linear model for calculating the transverse forces provides an accurate global estimate. While the linear model for axial force is only locally accurate within a conical region with a 30° vertex angle, a second-order polynomial model can provide a useful global estimate for axial force. Combining the linear model for transverse forces and nonlinear model for axial force, the 3-DOF force sensing instrument can provide sub-millinewton resolution for axial force and a quarter millinewton for transverse forces. Validation with random samples show the force sensor can provide consistent and accurate measurement of 3-D forces.

  3. Mechanical force analysis of peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Takeda, Seiji; Kageshima, Masami; Ito, Miyuki; Sugimoto, Naoki; Sekizawa, Kazuko; Miyake, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Some peptides have previously been reported to bind low molecular weight chemicals. One such peptide with the amino acid sequence His-Ala-Ser-Tyr-Ser was selectively screened from a phage library and bound to a cationic porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-21H,23H-porphine (TMpyP), with a binding constant of 10(5) M(-1) (J. Kawakami, T. Kitano, and N. Sugimoto, Chemical Communications, 1999, pp. 1765-1766). The proposed binding was due to pi-electron stacking from two aromatic amino acids of histidine and tyrosine. In this study, the weak interactions between TMpyP and the peptide were further investigated by force curve analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical force required to unbind the peptide-porphyrin complex was measured by vertical movement of the AFM tip. Peptide self-assembled monolayers were formed on both a gold-coated mica substrate and a gold-coated AFM tip. The TMpyPs could bind between the two peptide layers when the peptide-immobilized AFM tip contacted the peptide-immobilized substrate in solution containing TMpyP. In the retracting process a force that ruptured the interaction between TMpyPs and peptides was observed. The unbinding force values correlated to the concentration of TMpyP. A detection limit of 100 ng/mL porphyrin was obtained for the force measurement, and was similar to surface plasmon resonance sensor detection limits. Furthermore, we calculated the product of the observed force and the length of the molecular elongation to determine the work required to unbind the complexes. The obtained values of unbinding work were in a reasonable range compared to the binding energy of porphyrin-peptide.

  4. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  5. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  6. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  7. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  8. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  9. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  10. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  11. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception.

  12. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  13. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  14. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  15. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  16. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  17. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  18. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  19. Microprocessor controlled force actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. C.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical design of a prototype force actuator for vibration control of large space structures (LSS) is described. The force actuator is an electromagnetic system that produces a force by reacting against a proof-mass. The actuator has two colocated sensors, a digital microcontroller, and a power amplifier. The total weight of actuator is .998 kg. The actuator has a steady state force output of approximately 2.75 N from approximately 2 Hz to well beyond 1000 Hz.

  20. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  1. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  2. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  3. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  4. Rheological characterization and injection forces of concentrated protein formulations: an alternative predictive model for non-Newtonian solutions.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, Andrea; Fischer, Stefan; Huwyler, Joerg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Schwarb, Edward; Zarraga, Isidro E; Mueller, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Development of injection devices for subcutaneous drug administration requires a detailed understanding of user capability and forces occurring during the drug administration process. Injection forces of concentrated protein therapeutics are influenced by syringe properties (e.g., needle diameter) and injection speed, and are driven by solution properties such as rheology. In the present study, it is demonstrated that concentrated protein therapeutics may show significantly reduced injection forces because of shear-thinning (non-Newtonian) behavior. A mathematical model was thus established to predict/correlate injection forces of Newtonian and non-Newtonian solutions with viscosity data from plate/cone rheometry. The model was verified experimentally by glide-force measurements of reference and surrogate solutions. Application of the suggested model was demonstrated for injection force measurements of concentrated protein solutions to determine viscosity data at high shear rates (3 × 10(4)-1.6 × 10(5)s(-1)). By combining these data with viscosity data obtained by different viscosity methods (plate/cone and capillary rheometry), a viscosity-shear rate profile of the protein solution between 10(2) and 1.6 × 10(5)s(-1) was obtained, which was mathematically described by the Carreau model. Characterization of rheological properties allows to accurately predict injection forces for different syringe-needle combinations as well as injection rates, thus supporting the development of injection devices for combination products.

  5. Bridging the gap between cadaveric and in vivo experiments: a biomechanical model evaluating thumb-tip endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Wohlman, Sarah J; Murray, Wendy M

    2013-03-15

    The thumb is required for a majority of tasks of daily living. Biomechanical modeling is a valuable tool, with the potential to help us bridge the gap between our understanding of the mechanical actions of individual thumb muscles, derived from anatomical cadaveric experiments, and our understanding of how force is produced by the coordination of all of the thumb muscles, derived from studies involving human subjects. However, current biomechanical models do not replicate muscle force production at the thumb-tip. We hypothesized that accurate representations of the axes of rotation of the thumb joints were necessary to simulate the magnitude of endpoint forces produced by human subjects. We augmented a musculoskeletal model with axes of rotation derived from experimental measurements (Holzbaur et al., 2005) by defining muscle-tendon paths and maximum isometric force-generating capacity for the five intrinsic muscles. We then evaluated if this augmented model replicated a broad range of experimental data from the literature and identified which parameters most influenced model performance. The simulated endpoint forces generated by the combined action of all thumb muscles in our model yielded comparable forces in magnitude to those produced by nonimpaired subjects. A series of 8 sets of Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that the difference in the axes of rotation of the thumb joints between studies best explains the improved performance of our model relative to previous work. In addition, we demonstrate that the endpoint forces produced by individual muscles cannot be replicated with existing experimental data describing muscle moment arms.

  6. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-D heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.

  7. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-Dmore » heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.« less

  8. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  9. Turkish Students' Force Meanings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menekse, Muhsin; Clark, Douglas B.; Ozdemir, Gokhan; D'angelo, Cynthia; Scheligh, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    What are Turkish pre, elementary, middle, and high school students' force ideas? And, how do Turkish students' non-normative force ideas differ or be similar to the well-known force misconceptions reported in the literature? Students have false and persistent beliefs about the physical world and they struggle with challenging misconceptions based…

  10. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  11. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  12. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  13. Modeling of Electrostatic Forces between Glycosaminoglycan Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Delphine; Seog, Joonil; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2002-03-01

    Repulsive forces between end-grafted chondroitin-4-sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) polymer brushes have been measured and reported by us using the technique of high-resolution force microscopy as a function of pH and ionic strength. To understand the nature of these forces, we have compared our experimental data to three electrostatic double layer models based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The first two models are formulated in the literature and represent the GAG brush as a planar surface of constant charge and as a smoothed volume of known fixed charge density, while the third model is newly developed and represents the GAGs as rods of uniform charge density, which more accurately describes the molecular morphology and nonuniform charge distributions. The GAG brush could not be modeled accurately using a planar charge model, which severely underestimated the magnitude of the intersurface force throughout the distance range measured. The volume charge model fit better to experimental data for reasonable values of the brush height suggesting that the volume distribution of charge on the GAGs leads to a significant increase in repulsive force.

  14. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  15. Accurate masses for dispersion-supported galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joe; Martinez, Gregory D.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Geha, Marla; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Simon, Joshua D.; Avedo, Frank F.

    2010-08-01

    We derive an accurate mass estimator for dispersion-supported stellar systems and demonstrate its validity by analysing resolved line-of-sight velocity data for globular clusters, dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies. Specifically, by manipulating the spherical Jeans equation we show that the mass enclosed within the 3D deprojected half-light radius r1/2 can be determined with only mild assumptions about the spatial variation of the stellar velocity dispersion anisotropy as long as the projected velocity dispersion profile is fairly flat near the half-light radius, as is typically observed. We find M1/2 = 3 G-1< σ2los > r1/2 ~= 4 G-1< σ2los > Re, where < σ2los > is the luminosity-weighted square of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion and Re is the 2D projected half-light radius. While deceptively familiar in form, this formula is not the virial theorem, which cannot be used to determine accurate masses unless the radial profile of the total mass is known a priori. We utilize this finding to show that all of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies (MW dSphs) are consistent with having formed within a halo of a mass of approximately 3 × 109 Msolar, assuming a Λ cold dark matter cosmology. The faintest MW dSphs seem to have formed in dark matter haloes that are at least as massive as those of the brightest MW dSphs, despite the almost five orders of magnitude spread in luminosity between them. We expand our analysis to the full range of observed dispersion-supported stellar systems and examine their dynamical I-band mass-to-light ratios ΥI1/2. The ΥI1/2 versus M1/2 relation for dispersion-supported galaxies follows a U shape, with a broad minimum near ΥI1/2 ~= 3 that spans dwarf elliptical galaxies to normal ellipticals, a steep rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 3200 for ultra-faint dSphs and a more shallow rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 800 for galaxy cluster spheroids.

  16. Optimal Cluster Mill Pass Scheduling With an Accurate and Rapid New Strip Crown Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Arif S.; Grandhi, Ramana V.; Zipf, Mark E.

    2007-05-01

    Besides the requirement to roll coiled sheet at high levels of productivity, the optimal pass scheduling of cluster-type reversing cold mills presents the added challenge of assigning mill parameters that facilitate the best possible strip flatness. The pressures of intense global competition, and the requirements for increasingly thinner, higher quality specialty sheet products that are more difficult to roll, continue to force metal producers to commission innovative flatness-control technologies. This means that during the on-line computerized set-up of rolling mills, the mathematical model should not only determine the minimum total number of passes and maximum rolling speed, it should simultaneously optimize the pass-schedule so that desired flatness is assured, either by manual or automated means. In many cases today, however, on-line prediction of strip crown and corresponding flatness for the complex cluster-type rolling mills is typically addressed either by trial and error, by approximate deflection models for equivalent vertical roll-stacks, or by non-physical pattern recognition style models. The abundance of the aforementioned methods is largely due to the complexity of cluster-type mill configurations and the lack of deflection models with sufficient accuracy and speed for on-line use. Without adequate assignment of the pass-schedule set-up parameters, it may be difficult or impossible to achieve the required strip flatness. In this paper, we demonstrate optimization of cluster mill pass-schedules using a new accurate and rapid strip crown model. This pass-schedule optimization includes computations of the predicted strip thickness profile to validate mathematical constraints. In contrast to many of the existing methods for on-line prediction of strip crown and flatness on cluster mills, the demonstrated method requires minimal prior tuning and no extensive training with collected mill data. To rapidly and accurately solve the multi-contact problem

  17. Spatially resolved force spectroscopy of bacterial surfaces using force-volume imaging.

    PubMed

    Gaboriaud, Fabien; Parcha, Bhargava S; Gee, Michelle L; Holden, James A; Strugnell, Richard A

    2008-04-01

    Force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful technique for measuring physical properties and interaction forces at microbial cell surfaces. Typically for such a study, the point at which a force measurement will be made is located by first imaging the cell using AFM in contact mode. In this study, we image the bacterial cell Shewanella putrefaciens for subsequent force measurements using AFM in force-volume mode and compare this to contact-mode images. It is known that contact-mode imaging does not accurately locate the apical surface and periphery of the cell since, in contact mode, a component of the applied load laterally deforms the cell during the raster scan. Here, we illustrate that contact-mode imaging does not accurately locate the apical surface and periphery of the cell since, in contact mode, a component of the applied load laterally deforms the cell during the raster scan. This is an artifact due to the deformability and high degree of curvature of bacterial cells. We further show that force-volume mode imaging avoids the artifacts associated with contact-mode imaging due to surface deformation since it involves the measurement of a grid of individual force profiles. The topographic image is subsequently reconstructed from the zero-force height (the contact distance between the AFM tip and the surface) at each point on the cell surface. We also show how force-volume measurements yield applied load versus indentation data from which mechanical properties of the cell such as Young's modulus, cell turgor pressure and elastic and plastic energies can be extracted.

  18. The Falsification of Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Perez, R.; Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2016-03-01

    We review our work on the statistical uncertainty analysis of the NN force. This is based on the Granada-2013 database where a statistically meaningful partial wave analysis comprising a total of 6713 np and pp published scattering data from 1950 till 2013 below pion production threshold has been made. We stress the necessary conditions required for a correct and self-consistent statistical interpretation of the discrepancies between theory and experiment which enable a subsequent statistical error propagation and correlation analysis

  19. Entropic force between biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Song, Fan

    2016-08-01

    Undulation force, an entropic force, stems from thermally excited fluctuations, and plays a key role in the essential interactions between neighboring surfaces of objects. Although the characteristics of the undulation force have been widely studied theoretically and experimentally, the distance dependence of the force, which constitutes its most fundamental characteristic, remains poorly understood. In this paper, first, we obtain a novel expression for the undulation force by employing elasticity and statistical mechanics and prove it to be in good agreement with existing experimental results. Second, we clearly demonstrate that the two representative forms of the undulation force proposed by Helfrich and Freund were respectively the upper and lower bounds of the present expression when the separation between membranes is sufficiently small, which was intrinsically different from the existing results where Helfrich's and Freund's forms of the undulation force were only suitable for the intermediate and small separations. The investigations show that only in a sufficiently small separation does Helfrich's result stand for the undulation force with a large wave number and Freund's result express the force with a small wave number. Finally, a critical acting distance of the undulation force, beyond which the entropic force will rapidly decay approaching zero, is presented.

  20. Evaluation of intermolecular forces in a circulating system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiuquan; Liu, Mei; Yang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Intercellular interactions, which are mediated by a variety of complex intercellular molecules through the processes of formation and dissociation of molecular bonds, play a critical role in regulating cellular functions in biological systems. Various approaches are applied to evaluate intercellular or molecular bonding forces. To quantify the intermolecular interaction forces, flow chamber has become a meaningful technique as it can ultimately mimic the cellular microenvironment in vivo under physiological flow conditions. Hydrodynamic forces are usually used to predict the intercellular forces down to the single molecular level. However, results show that only using hydrodynamic force will overestimate up to 30% of the receptor-ligand strength when the non-specific forces such as Derjaguin-Landau-Verway-Overbeek (DLVO) forces become un-neglected. Due to the nature of high ion concentration in the physiological condition, electrostatic force is largely screened which will cause DLVO force unbalanced. In this study, we propose to take account of the DLVO force, including van der Waals (VDW) force and electrostatic force, to predict the intermolecular forces of a cell doublet and cell-substrate model in a circulating system. Results also show that the DLVO force has a nonlinear effect as the cell-cell or cell-substrate distance changes. In addition, we used the framework of high accuracy hydrodynamic theories proved in colloidal systems. It is concluded that DLVO force could not be ignored in quantitative studies of molecular interaction forces in circulating system. More accurate prediction of intercellular forces needs to take account of both hydrodynamic force and DLVO force.

  1. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  2. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  3. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  4. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Castle, Joseph P.; Lvov, Nikolay

    2005-01-01

    The following concepts were introduced: a) Bayesian adaptive sampling for solving biomass estimation; b) Characterization of MISR Rahman model parameters conditioned upon MODIS landcover. c) Rigorous non-parametric Bayesian approach to analytic mixture model determination. d) Unique U.S. asset for science product validation and verification.

  5. Content validity--establishing and reporting the evidence in newly developed patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments for medical product evaluation: ISPOR PRO Good Research Practices Task Force report: part 2--assessing respondent understanding.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Donald L; Burke, Laurie B; Gwaltney, Chad J; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Martin, Mona L; Molsen, Elizabeth; Ring, Lena

    2011-12-01

    The importance of content validity in developing patient reported outcomes (PRO) instruments is stressed by both the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. Content validity is the extent to which an instrument measures the important aspects of concepts developers or users purport it to assess. A PRO instrument measures the concepts most relevant and important to a patient's condition and its treatment. For PRO instruments, items and domains as reflected in the scores of an instrument should be important to the target population and comprehensive with respect to patient concerns. Documentation of target population input in item generation, as well as evaluation of patient understanding through cognitive interviewing, can provide the evidence for content validity. Part 1 of this task force report covers elicitation of key concepts using qualitative focus groups and/or interviews to inform content and structure of a new PRO instrument. Building on qualitative interviews and focus groups used to elicit concepts, cognitive interviews help developers craft items that can be understood by respondents in the target population and can ultimately confirm that the final instrument is appropriate, comprehensive, and understandable in the target population. Part 2 details: 1) the methods for conducting cognitive interviews that address patient understanding of items, instructions, and response options; and 2) the methods for tracking item development through the various stages of research and preparing this tracking for submission to regulatory agencies. The task force report's two parts are meant to be read together. They are intended to offer suggestions for good practice in planning, executing, and documenting qualitative studies that are used to support the content validity of PRO instruments to be used in medical product evaluation.

  6. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  7. Accurate free energy calculation along optimized paths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    The path-based methods of free energy calculation, such as thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation, are simple in theory, but difficult in practice because in most cases smooth paths do not exist, especially for large molecules. In this article, we present a novel method to build the transition path of a peptide. We use harmonic potentials to restrain its nonhydrogen atom dihedrals in the initial state and set the equilibrium angles of the potentials as those in the final state. Through a series of steps of geometrical optimization, we can construct a smooth and short path from the initial state to the final state. This path can be used to calculate free energy difference. To validate this method, we apply it to a small 10-ALA peptide and find that the calculated free energy changes in helix-helix and helix-hairpin transitions are both self-convergent and cross-convergent. We also calculate the free energy differences between different stable states of beta-hairpin trpzip2, and the results show that this method is more efficient than the conventional molecular dynamics method in accurate free energy calculation.

  8. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Deigan, Katherine E.; Li, Tian W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all RNAs can fold to form extensive base-paired secondary structures. Many of these structures then modulate numerous fundamental elements of gene expression. Deducing these structure–function relationships requires that it be possible to predict RNA secondary structures accurately. However, RNA secondary structure prediction for large RNAs, such that a single predicted structure for a single sequence reliably represents the correct structure, has remained an unsolved problem. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative, nucleotide-resolution information from a SHAPE experiment can be interpreted as a pseudo-free energy change term and used to determine RNA secondary structure with high accuracy. Free energy minimization, by using SHAPE pseudo-free energies, in conjunction with nearest neighbor parameters, predicts the secondary structure of deproteinized Escherichia coli 16S rRNA (>1,300 nt) and a set of smaller RNAs (75–155 nt) with accuracies of up to 96–100%, which are comparable to the best accuracies achievable by comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19109441

  9. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  10. Fast and Provably Accurate Bilateral Filtering.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Dabhade, Swapnil D

    2016-06-01

    The bilateral filter is a non-linear filter that uses a range filter along with a spatial filter to perform edge-preserving smoothing of images. A direct computation of the bilateral filter requires O(S) operations per pixel, where S is the size of the support of the spatial filter. In this paper, we present a fast and provably accurate algorithm for approximating the bilateral filter when the range kernel is Gaussian. In particular, for box and Gaussian spatial filters, the proposed algorithm can cut down the complexity to O(1) per pixel for any arbitrary S . The algorithm has a simple implementation involving N+1 spatial filterings, where N is the approximation order. We give a detailed analysis of the filtering accuracy that can be achieved by the proposed approximation in relation to the target bilateral filter. This allows us to estimate the order N required to obtain a given accuracy. We also present comprehensive numerical results to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed and accuracy. PMID:27093722

  11. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  12. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  13. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  14. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10(-12) at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10(-7) cm(-1), which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels. PMID:25494728

  15. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  16. Sparse regularization for force identification using dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Zhang, Hang; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-04-01

    The classical function expansion method based on minimizing l2-norm of the response residual employs various basis functions to represent the unknown force. Its difficulty lies in determining the optimum number of basis functions. Considering the sparsity of force in the time domain or in other basis space, we develop a general sparse regularization method based on minimizing l1-norm of the coefficient vector of basis functions. The number of basis functions is adaptively determined by minimizing the number of nonzero components in the coefficient vector during the sparse regularization process. First, according to the profile of the unknown force, the dictionary composed of basis functions is determined. Second, a sparsity convex optimization model for force identification is constructed. Third, given the transfer function and the operational response, Sparse reconstruction by separable approximation (SpaRSA) is developed to solve the sparse regularization problem of force identification. Finally, experiments including identification of impact and harmonic forces are conducted on a cantilever thin plate structure to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of SpaRSA. Besides the Dirac dictionary, other three sparse dictionaries including Db6 wavelets, Sym4 wavelets and cubic B-spline functions can also accurately identify both the single and double impact forces from highly noisy responses in a sparse representation frame. The discrete cosine functions can also successfully reconstruct the harmonic forces including the sinusoidal, square and triangular forces. Conversely, the traditional Tikhonov regularization method with the L-curve criterion fails to identify both the impact and harmonic forces in these cases.

  17. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  18. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  19. Toward accurate and fast iris segmentation for iris biometrics.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaofeng; Tan, Tieniu; Sun, Zhenan; Qiu, Xianchao

    2009-09-01

    Iris segmentation is an essential module in iris recognition because it defines the effective image region used for subsequent processing such as feature extraction. Traditional iris segmentation methods often involve an exhaustive search of a large parameter space, which is time consuming and sensitive to noise. To address these problems, this paper presents a novel algorithm for accurate and fast iris segmentation. After efficient reflection removal, an Adaboost-cascade iris detector is first built to extract a rough position of the iris center. Edge points of iris boundaries are then detected, and an elastic model named pulling and pushing is established. Under this model, the center and radius of the circular iris boundaries are iteratively refined in a way driven by the restoring forces of Hooke's law. Furthermore, a smoothing spline-based edge fitting scheme is presented to deal with noncircular iris boundaries. After that, eyelids are localized via edge detection followed by curve fitting. The novelty here is the adoption of a rank filter for noise elimination and a histogram filter for tackling the shape irregularity of eyelids. Finally, eyelashes and shadows are detected via a learned prediction model. This model provides an adaptive threshold for eyelash and shadow detection by analyzing the intensity distributions of different iris regions. Experimental results on three challenging iris image databases demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art methods in both accuracy and speed. PMID:19574626

  20. Toward accurate and fast iris segmentation for iris biometrics.

    PubMed

    He, Zhaofeng; Tan, Tieniu; Sun, Zhenan; Qiu, Xianchao

    2009-09-01

    Iris segmentation is an essential module in iris recognition because it defines the effective image region used for subsequent processing such as feature extraction. Traditional iris segmentation methods often involve an exhaustive search of a large parameter space, which is time consuming and sensitive to noise. To address these problems, this paper presents a novel algorithm for accurate and fast iris segmentation. After efficient reflection removal, an Adaboost-cascade iris detector is first built to extract a rough position of the iris center. Edge points of iris boundaries are then detected, and an elastic model named pulling and pushing is established. Under this model, the center and radius of the circular iris boundaries are iteratively refined in a way driven by the restoring forces of Hooke's law. Furthermore, a smoothing spline-based edge fitting scheme is presented to deal with noncircular iris boundaries. After that, eyelids are localized via edge detection followed by curve fitting. The novelty here is the adoption of a rank filter for noise elimination and a histogram filter for tackling the shape irregularity of eyelids. Finally, eyelashes and shadows are detected via a learned prediction model. This model provides an adaptive threshold for eyelash and shadow detection by analyzing the intensity distributions of different iris regions. Experimental results on three challenging iris image databases demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art methods in both accuracy and speed.

  1. Progress in fast, accurate multi-scale climate simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, W. D.; Johansen, H.; Evans, K. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Caldwell, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to contribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth with these computational improvements include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme events, an accurate representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enabling improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allowing more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, partnerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures such as many-core processors and GPUs. As a result, approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.

  2. Progress in fast, accurate multi-scale climate simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, W. D.; Johansen, H.; Evans, K. J.; Woodward, C. S.; Caldwell, P. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to contribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth with these computational improvements include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme events, an accurate representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enablingmore » improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allowing more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, partnerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures such as many-core processors and GPUs. As a result, approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.« less

  3. Progress in Fast, Accurate Multi-scale Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, William D; Johansen, Hans; Evans, Katherine J; Woodward, Carol S.; Caldwell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of physical and computational techniques that have the potential to con- tribute to the next generation of high-fidelity, multi-scale climate simulations. Examples of the climate science problems that can be investigated with more depth include the capture of remote forcings of localized hydrological extreme events, an accurate representation of cloud features over a range of spatial and temporal scales, and parallel, large ensembles of simulations to more effectively explore model sensitivities and uncertainties. Numerical techniques, such as adaptive mesh refinement, implicit time integration, and separate treatment of fast physical time scales are enabling improved accuracy and fidelity in simulation of dynamics and allow more complete representations of climate features at the global scale. At the same time, part- nerships with computer science teams have focused on taking advantage of evolving computer architectures, such as many-core processors and GPUs, so that these approaches which were previously considered prohibitively costly have become both more efficient and scalable. In combination, progress in these three critical areas is poised to transform climate modeling in the coming decades.

  4. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  5. DETAILED STUDIES OF ELECTRON COOLING FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; ABELL, D.T.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling for RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires detailed simulation of the electron cooling process. The first step towards such calculations is to have an accurate description of the cooling force. Numerical simulations are being used to explore various features of the friction force which appear due to several effects, including the anisotropy of the electron distribution in velocity space and the effect of a strong solenoidal magnetic field. These aspects are being studied in detail using the VORFAL code, which explicitly resolves close binary collisions. Results are compared with available asymptotic and empirical formulas and also, using the BETACOOL code, with direct numerical integration of less approximate expressions over the specified electron distribution function.

  6. Force-Mediated Kinetics of Single P-Selectin/Ligand Complexes Observed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Jurgen; Katopodis, Andreas G.; Kolbinger, Frank; Anselmetti, Dario

    1998-10-01

    Leukocytes roll along the endothelium of postcapillary venules in response to inflammatory signals. Rolling under the hydrodynamic drag forces of blood flow is mediated by the interaction between selectins and their ligands across the leukocyte and endothelial cell surfaces. Here we present force-spectroscopy experiments on single complexes of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 by atomic force microscopy to determine the intrinsic molecular properties of this dynamic adhesion process. By modeling intermolecular and intramolecular forces as well as the adhesion probability in atomic force microscopy experiments we gain information on rupture forces, elasticity, and kinetics of the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 interaction. The complexes are able to withstand forces up to 165 pN and show a chain-like elasticity with a molecular spring constant of 5.3 pN nm-1 and a persistence length of 0.35 nm. The dissociation constant (off-rate) varies over three orders of magnitude from 0.02 s-1 under zero force up to 15 s-1 under external applied forces. Rupture force and lifetime of the complexes are not constant, but directly depend on the applied force per unit time, which is a product of the intrinsic molecular elasticity and the external pulling velocity. The high strength of binding combined with force-dependent rate constants and high molecular elasticity are tailored to support physiological leukocyte rolling.

  7. Vibromyographic quantification of voluntary isometric contractile force in the brachioradialis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jason P; Madhavan, Guruprasad; McLeod, Kenneth J

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of vibromyography (VMG) to accurately represent voluntary forearm muscle contractile force during attempted-isometric contraction of the brachioradialis. VMG signals were collected from the brachioradialis of healthy adult men (mean age, 26.6+/-9.8 years, N=24) during attempted-isometric contraction over a force range of 4.45 N to maximum sustained load. The VMG signals were decomposed using wavelet packet analysis techniques, and the corresponding wavelet packets were utilized in a multiple regression model for parameter reduction and identification of signal components which best correlated to muscle force. It was observed that just two wavelet components were sufficient to accurately predict muscle force (R2=0.984, P<0.0001). The signal force relationship observed is monotonic, though quadratic in form. More importantly, the wavelet data was able to predict absolute force output of the brachioradialis without normalization or prior knowledge of a subject's maximum voluntary force. These data show that VMG recordings are capable of providing a monotonic relationship between VMG signal and muscle force. Moreover, in contrast to EMG technology which can only provide relative force levels, VMG appears to be capable of reporting absolute force levels, an observation which is expected to lead to numerous applications in medicine and rehabilitation. PMID:17946062

  8. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  9. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  10. Accurate Thermal Conductivities from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbogno, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity at high temperatures has remained elusive. On the one hand, Boltzmann transport techniques that include anharmonic effects in the nuclear dynamics only perturbatively become inaccurate or inapplicable under such conditions. On the other hand, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) methods suffer from enormous finite-size artifacts in the computationally feasible supercells, which prevent an