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Sample records for accurate high spatial

  1. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  2. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  3. Accurate temperature measurements in flames with high spatial resolution using Stokes Raman scattering from nitrogen in a multiple-pass cell.

    PubMed

    Utsav, K C; Varghese, Philip L

    2013-07-10

    A multiple-pass cell is aligned to focus light at two regions at the center of the cell. The two "points" are separated by 2.0 mm. Each probe region is 200 μm×300 μm. The cell is used to amplify spontaneous Raman scattering from a CH4-air laminar flame. The signal gain is 20, and the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio varies according to the number of laser pulses used for signal acquisition. The temperature is inferred by curve fitting high-resolution spectra of the Stokes signal from N2. The model accounts for details, such as the angular dependence of Raman scattering, the presence of a rare isotope of N2 in air, anharmonic oscillator terms in the vibrational polarizability matrix elements, and the dependence of Herman-Wallis factors on the vibrational level. The apparatus function is modeled using a new line shape function that is the convolution of a trapezoid function and a Lorentzian. The uncertainty in the value of temperature arising from noise, the uncertainty in the model input parameters, and various approximations in the theory have been characterized. We estimate that the uncertainty in our measurement of flame temperature in the least noisy data is ±9 K. PMID:23852217

  4. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  5. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  6. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  7. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  8. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  9. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities. PMID:12747164

  10. Developing Accurate Spatial Maps of Cotton Fiber Quality Parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Awareness of the importance of cotton fiber quality (Gossypium, L. sps.) has increased as advances in spinning technology require better quality cotton fiber. Recent advances in geospatial information sciences allow an improved ability to study the extent and causes of spatial variability in fiber p...

  11. Multimodal Spatial Calibration for Accurately Registering EEG Sensor Positions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengyong; Xiao, Gang; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a fast and accurate calibration method to calibrate multiple multimodal sensors using a novel photogrammetry system for fast localization of EEG sensors. The EEG sensors are placed on human head and multimodal sensors are installed around the head to simultaneously obtain all EEG sensor positions. A multiple views' calibration process is implemented to obtain the transformations of multiple views. We first develop an efficient local repair algorithm to improve the depth map, and then a special calibration body is designed. Based on them, accurate and robust calibration results can be achieved. We evaluate the proposed method by corners of a chessboard calibration plate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good performance, which can be further applied to EEG source localization applications on human brain. PMID:24803954

  12. Multimodal spatial calibration for accurately registering EEG sensor positions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Jian; Chen, Shengyong; Xiao, Gang; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a fast and accurate calibration method to calibrate multiple multimodal sensors using a novel photogrammetry system for fast localization of EEG sensors. The EEG sensors are placed on human head and multimodal sensors are installed around the head to simultaneously obtain all EEG sensor positions. A multiple views' calibration process is implemented to obtain the transformations of multiple views. We first develop an efficient local repair algorithm to improve the depth map, and then a special calibration body is designed. Based on them, accurate and robust calibration results can be achieved. We evaluate the proposed method by corners of a chessboard calibration plate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve good performance, which can be further applied to EEG source localization applications on human brain. PMID:24803954

  13. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  14. High order accurate solutions of viscous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. E.; Turkel, Eli

    1993-01-01

    We consider a fourth order extension to MacCormack's scheme. The original extension was fourth order only for the inviscid terms but was second order for the viscous terms. We show how to modify the viscous terms so that the scheme is uniformly fourth order in the spatial derivatives. Applications are given to some boundary layer flows. In addition, for applications to shear flows the effect of the outflow boundary conditions are very important. We compare the accuracy of several of these different boundary conditions for both boundary layer and shear flows. Stretching at the outflow usually increases the oscillations in the numerical solution but the addition of a filtered sponge layer (with or without stretching) reduces such oscillations. The oscillations are generated by insufficient resolution of the shear layer. When the shear layer is sufficiently resolved then oscillations are not generated and there is less of a need for a nonreflecting boundary condition.

  15. Highly accurate fast lung CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Heldmann, Stefan; Kipshagen, Till; Fischer, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Lung registration in thoracic CT scans has received much attention in the medical imaging community. Possible applications range from follow-up analysis, motion correction for radiation therapy, monitoring of air flow and pulmonary function to lung elasticity analysis. In a clinical environment, runtime is always a critical issue, ruling out quite a few excellent registration approaches. In this paper, a highly efficient variational lung registration method based on minimizing the normalized gradient fields distance measure with curvature regularization is presented. The method ensures diffeomorphic deformations by an additional volume regularization. Supplemental user knowledge, like a segmentation of the lungs, may be incorporated as well. The accuracy of our method was evaluated on 40 test cases from clinical routine. In the EMPIRE10 lung registration challenge, our scheme ranks third, with respect to various validation criteria, out of 28 algorithms with an average landmark distance of 0.72 mm. The average runtime is about 1:50 min on a standard PC, making it by far the fastest approach of the top-ranking algorithms. Additionally, the ten publicly available DIR-Lab inhale-exhale scan pairs were registered to subvoxel accuracy at computation times of only 20 seconds. Our method thus combines very attractive runtimes with state-of-the-art accuracy in a unique way.

  16. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Satellite Imaging Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Ross, Kenton W.; Stnaley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's Remote Sensing group has been characterizing privately owned high spatial resolution multispectral imaging systems, such as IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3. Natural and man made targets were used for spatial resolution, radiometric, and geopositional characterizations. Higher spatial resolution also presents significant adjacency effects for accurate reliable radiometry.

  17. Accurate localization of in-body medical implants based on spatial sparsity.

    PubMed

    Pourhomayoun, Mohammad; Jin, Zhanpeng; Fowler, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Wearable and implantable wireless communication devices have in recent years gained increasing attention for medical diagnostics and therapeutics. In particular, wireless capsule endoscopy has become a popular method to visualize and diagnose the human gastrointestinal tract. Estimating the exact position of the capsule when each image is taken is a very critical issue in capsule endoscopy. Several approaches have been developed by researchers to estimate the capsule location. However, some unique challenges exist for in-body localization, such as the severe multipath issue caused by the boundaries of different organs, inconsistency of signal propagation velocity and path loss parameters inside the human body, and the regulatory restrictions on using high-bandwidth or high-power signals. In this paper, we propose a novel localization method based on spatial sparsity. We directly estimate the location of the capsule without going through the usual intermediate stage of first estimating time-of-arrival or received-signal strength, and then a second stage of estimating the location. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method through extensive Monte Carlo simulations for radio frequency emission signals within the required power and bandwidth range. The results show that the proposed method is effective and accurate, even in massive multipath conditions. PMID:24108709

  18. ACCURATE CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH-DEGREE MODES USING MDI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Korzennik, S. G.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Schou, J.; Larson, T. P.

    2013-08-01

    We present the first accurate characterization of high-degree modes, derived using the best Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) full-disk full-resolution data set available. A 90 day long time series of full-disk 2 arcsec pixel{sup -1} resolution Dopplergrams was acquired in 2001, thanks to the high rate telemetry provided by the Deep Space Network. These Dopplergrams were spatially decomposed using our best estimate of the image scale and the known components of MDI's image distortion. A multi-taper power spectrum estimator was used to generate power spectra for all degrees and all azimuthal orders, up to l = 1000. We used a large number of tapers to reduce the realization noise, since at high degrees the individual modes blend into ridges and thus there is no reason to preserve a high spectral resolution. These power spectra were fitted for all degrees and all azimuthal orders, between l = 100 and l = 1000, and for all the orders with substantial amplitude. This fitting generated in excess of 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} individual estimates of ridge frequencies, line widths, amplitudes, and asymmetries (singlets), corresponding to some 5700 multiplets (l, n). Fitting at high degrees generates ridge characteristics, characteristics that do not correspond to the underlying mode characteristics. We used a sophisticated forward modeling to recover the best possible estimate of the underlying mode characteristics (mode frequencies, as well as line widths, amplitudes, and asymmetries). We describe in detail this modeling and its validation. The modeling has been extensively reviewed and refined, by including an iterative process to improve its input parameters to better match the observations. Also, the contribution of the leakage matrix on the accuracy of the procedure has been carefully assessed. We present the derived set of corrected mode characteristics, which includes not only frequencies, but line widths, asymmetries, and amplitudes. We present and discuss

  19. Wakeful rest promotes the integration of spatial memories into accurate cognitive maps.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael; Dewar, Michaela; Harris, Mathew A; Della Sala, Sergio; Wolbers, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Flexible spatial navigation, e.g. the ability to take novel shortcuts, is contingent upon accurate mental representations of environments-cognitive maps. These cognitive maps critically depend on hippocampal place cells. In rodents, place cells replay recently travelled routes, especially during periods of behavioural inactivity (sleep/wakeful rest). This neural replay is hypothesised to promote not only the consolidation of specific experiences, but also their wider integration, e.g. into accurate cognitive maps. In humans, rest promotes the consolidation of specific experiences, but the effect of rest on the wider integration of memories remained unknown. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that cognitive map formation is supported by rest-related integration of new spatial memories. We predicted that if wakeful rest supports cognitive map formation, then rest should enhance knowledge of overarching spatial relations that were never experienced directly during recent navigation. Forty young participants learned a route through a virtual environment before either resting wakefully or engaging in an unrelated perceptual task for 10 min. Participants in the wakeful rest condition performed more accurately in a delayed cognitive map test, requiring the pointing to landmarks from a range of locations. Importantly, the benefit of rest could not be explained by active rehearsal, but can be attributed to the promotion of consolidation-related activity. These findings (i) resonate with the demonstration of hippocampal replay in rodents, and (ii) provide the first evidence that wakeful rest can improve the integration of new spatial memories in humans, a function that has, hitherto, been associated with sleep. PMID:26235141

  20. A Simple Iterative Model Accurately Captures Complex Trapline Formation by Bumblebees Across Spatial Scales and Flower Arrangements

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Andrew M.; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Chittka, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Pollinating bees develop foraging circuits (traplines) to visit multiple flowers in a manner that minimizes overall travel distance, a task analogous to the travelling salesman problem. We report on an in-depth exploration of an iterative improvement heuristic model of bumblebee traplining previously found to accurately replicate the establishment of stable routes by bees between flowers distributed over several hectares. The critical test for a model is its predictive power for empirical data for which the model has not been specifically developed, and here the model is shown to be consistent with observations from different research groups made at several spatial scales and using multiple configurations of flowers. We refine the model to account for the spatial search strategy of bees exploring their environment, and test several previously unexplored predictions. We find that the model predicts accurately 1) the increasing propensity of bees to optimize their foraging routes with increasing spatial scale; 2) that bees cannot establish stable optimal traplines for all spatial configurations of rewarding flowers; 3) the observed trade-off between travel distance and prioritization of high-reward sites (with a slight modification of the model); 4) the temporal pattern with which bees acquire approximate solutions to travelling salesman-like problems over several dozen foraging bouts; 5) the instability of visitation schedules in some spatial configurations of flowers; 6) the observation that in some flower arrays, bees' visitation schedules are highly individually different; 7) the searching behaviour that leads to efficient location of flowers and routes between them. Our model constitutes a robust theoretical platform to generate novel hypotheses and refine our understanding about how small-brained insects develop a representation of space and use it to navigate in complex and dynamic environments. PMID:23505353

  1. Explicit off-line criteria for stable accurate time filtering of strongly unstable spatially extended systems.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Grote, Marcus J

    2007-01-23

    Many contemporary problems in science involve making predictions based on partial observation of extremely complicated spatially extended systems with many degrees of freedom and physical instabilities on both large and small scales. Various new ensemble filtering strategies have been developed recently for these applications, and new mathematical issues arise. Here, explicit off-line test criteria for stable accurate discrete filtering are developed for use in the above context and mimic the classical stability analysis for finite difference schemes. First, constant coefficient partial differential equations, which are randomly forced and damped to mimic mesh scale energy spectra in the above problems are developed as off-line filtering test problems. Then mathematical analysis is used to show that under natural suitable hypothesis the time filtering algorithms for general finite difference discrete approximations to an sxs partial differential equation system with suitable observations decompose into much simpler independent s-dimensional filtering problems for each spatial wave number separately; in other test problems, such block diagonal models rigorously provide upper and lower bounds on the filtering algorithm. In this fashion, elementary off-line filtering criteria can be developed for complex spatially extended systems. The theory is illustrated for time filters by using both unstable and implicit difference scheme approximations to the stochastically forced heat equation where the combined effects of filter stability and model error are analyzed through the simpler off-line criteria. PMID:17227864

  2. Accurate strain measurements in highly strained Ge microbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenq, A.; Tardif, S.; Guilloy, K.; Osvaldo Dias, G.; Pauc, N.; Duchemin, I.; Rouchon, D.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Widiez, J.; Escalante, J.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Geiger, R.; Zabel, T.; Sigg, H.; Faist, J.; Chelnokov, A.; Rieutord, F.; Reboud, V.; Calvo, V.

    2016-06-01

    Ge under high strain is predicted to become a direct bandgap semiconductor. Very large deformations can be introduced using microbridge devices. However, at the microscale, strain values are commonly deduced from Raman spectroscopy using empirical linear models only established up to ɛ100 = 1.2% for uniaxial stress. In this work, we calibrate the Raman-strain relation at higher strain using synchrotron based microdiffraction. The Ge microbridges show unprecedented high tensile strain up to 4.9% corresponding to an unexpected Δω = 9.9 cm-1 Raman shift. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the Raman strain relation is not linear and we provide a more accurate expression.

  3. A Highly Accurate Face Recognition System Using Filtering Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Eriko; Ishikawa, Sayuri; Kodate, Kashiko

    2007-09-01

    The authors previously constructed a highly accurate fast face recognition optical correlator (FARCO) [E. Watanabe and K. Kodate: Opt. Rev. 12 (2005) 460], and subsequently developed an improved, super high-speed FARCO (S-FARCO), which is able to process several hundred thousand frames per second. The principal advantage of our new system is its wide applicability to any correlation scheme. Three different configurations were proposed, each depending on correlation speed. This paper describes and evaluates a software correlation filter. The face recognition function proved highly accurate, seeing that a low-resolution facial image size (64 × 64 pixels) has been successfully implemented. An operation speed of less than 10 ms was achieved using a personal computer with a central processing unit (CPU) of 3 GHz and 2 GB memory. When we applied the software correlation filter to a high-security cellular phone face recognition system, experiments on 30 female students over a period of three months yielded low error rates: 0% false acceptance rate and 2% false rejection rate. Therefore, the filtering correlation works effectively when applied to low resolution images such as web-based images or faces captured by a monitoring camera.

  4. Pink-Beam, Highly-Accurate Compact Water Cooled Slits

    SciTech Connect

    Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Jayne, Richard; Waterman, Dave; Caletka, Dave; Steadman, Paul; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-19

    Advanced Design Consulting, Inc. (ADC) has designed accurate compact slits for applications where high precision is required. The system consists of vertical and horizontal slit mechanisms, a vacuum vessel which houses them, water cooling lines with vacuum guards connected to the individual blades, stepper motors with linear encoders, limit (home position) switches and electrical connections including internal wiring for a drain current measurement system. The total slit size is adjustable from 0 to 15 mm both vertically and horizontally. Each of the four blades are individually controlled and motorized. In this paper, a summary of the design and Finite Element Analysis of the system are presented.

  5. Highly Accurate Inverse Consistent Registration: A Robust Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Martin; Rosas, H. Diana; Fischl, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The registration of images is a task that is at the core of many applications in computer vision. In computational neuroimaging where the automated segmentation of brain structures is frequently used to quantify change, a highly accurate registration is necessary for motion correction of images taken in the same session, or across time in longitudinal studies where changes in the images can be expected. This paper, inspired by Nestares and Heeger (2000), presents a method based on robust statistics to register images in the presence of differences, such as jaw movement, differential MR distortions and true anatomical change. The approach we present guarantees inverse consistency (symmetry), can deal with different intensity scales and automatically estimates a sensitivity parameter to detect outlier regions in the images. The resulting registrations are highly accurate due to their ability to ignore outlier regions and show superior robustness with respect to noise, to intensity scaling and outliers when compared to state-of-the-art registration tools such as FLIRT (in FSL) or the coregistration tool in SPM. PMID:20637289

  6. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alan; Harlen, Oliver G.; Harris, Sarah A.; Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming; Lonsdale, Richard; Mulholland, Adrian J.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Read, Daniel J.; Richardson, Robin A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational. PMID:25615870

  7. Efficient and accurate laser shaping with liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared M.; Bartnik, Adam C.; Bazarov, Ivan V.

    2014-10-27

    A phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) is capable of precise transverse laser shaping by either functioning as a variable phase grating or by serving as a variable mask via polarization rotation. As a phase grating, the highest accuracy algorithms, based on computer generated holograms (CGHs), have been shown to yield extended laser shapes with <10% rms error, but conversely little is known about the experimental efficiency of the method in general. In this work, we compare the experimental tradeoff between error and efficiency for both the best known CGH method and polarization rotation-based intensity masking when generating hard-edged flat top beams. We find that the masking method performs comparably with CGHs, both having rms error < 10% with efficiency > 15%. Informed by best practices for high efficiency from a SLM phase grating, we introduce an adaptive refractive algorithm which has high efficiency (92%) but also higher error (16%), for nearly cylindrically symmetric cases.

  8. Efficient and accurate laser shaping with liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared M.; Bartnik, Adam C.; Bazarov, Ivan V.

    2014-10-01

    A phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) is capable of precise transverse laser shaping by either functioning as a variable phase grating or by serving as a variable mask via polarization rotation. As a phase grating, the highest accuracy algorithms, based on computer generated holograms (CGHs), have been shown to yield extended laser shapes with <10% rms error, but conversely little is known about the experimental efficiency of the method in general. In this work, we compare the experimental tradeoff between error and efficiency for both the best known CGH method and polarization rotation-based intensity masking when generating hard-edged flat top beams. We find that the masking method performs comparably with CGHs, both having rms error < 10% with efficiency > 15%. Informed by best practices for high efficiency from a SLM phase grating, we introduce an adaptive refractive algorithm which has high efficiency (92%) but also higher error (16%), for nearly cylindrically symmetric cases.

  9. Highly Accurate Calculations of the Phase Diagram of Cold Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulenburger, Luke; Baczewski, Andrew

    The phase diagram of lithium is particularly complicated, exhibiting many different solid phases under the modest application of pressure. Experimental efforts to identify these phases using diamond anvil cells have been complemented by ab initio theory, primarily using density functional theory (DFT). Due to the multiplicity of crystal structures whose enthalpy is nearly degenerate and the uncertainty introduced by density functional approximations, we apply the highly accurate many-body diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method to the study of the solid phases at low temperature. These calculations span many different phases, including several with low symmetry, demonstrating the viability of DMC as a method for calculating phase diagrams for complex solids. Our results can be used as a benchmark to test the accuracy of various density functionals. This can strengthen confidence in DFT based predictions of more complex phenomena such as the anomalous melting behavior predicted for lithium at high pressures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Modelling the Constraints of Spatial Environment in Fauna Movement Simulations: Comparison of a Boundaries Accurate Function and a Cost Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, L.; Cohen, M.; Ruas, A.

    2015-08-01

    Landscape influences fauna movement at different levels, from habitat selection to choices of movements' direction. Our goal is to provide a development frame in order to test simulation functions for animal's movement. We describe our approach for such simulations and we compare two types of functions to calculate trajectories. To do so, we first modelled the role of landscape elements to differentiate between elements that facilitate movements and the ones being hindrances. Different influences are identified depending on landscape elements and on animal species. Knowledge were gathered from ecologists, literature and observation datasets. Second, we analysed the description of animal movement recorded with GPS at fine scale, corresponding to high temporal frequency and good location accuracy. Analysing this type of data provides information on the relation between landscape features and movements. We implemented an agent-based simulation approach to calculate potential trajectories constrained by the spatial environment and individual's behaviour. We tested two functions that consider space differently: one function takes into account the geometry and the types of landscape elements and one cost function sums up the spatial surroundings of an individual. Results highlight the fact that the cost function exaggerates the distances travelled by an individual and simplifies movement patterns. The geometry accurate function represents a good bottom-up approach for discovering interesting areas or obstacles for movements.

  11. AUTOMATED, HIGHLY ACCURATE VERIFICATION OF RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    George L Mesina; David Aumiller; Francis Buschman

    2014-07-01

    Computer programs that analyze light water reactor safety solve complex systems of governing, closure and special process equations to model the underlying physics. In addition, these programs incorporate many other features and are quite large. RELAP5-3D[1] has over 300,000 lines of coding for physics, input, output, data management, user-interaction, and post-processing. For software quality assurance, the code must be verified and validated before being released to users. Verification ensures that a program is built right by checking that it meets its design specifications. Recently, there has been an increased importance on the development of automated verification processes that compare coding against its documented algorithms and equations and compares its calculations against analytical solutions and the method of manufactured solutions[2]. For the first time, the ability exists to ensure that the data transfer operations associated with timestep advancement/repeating and writing/reading a solution to a file have no unintended consequences. To ensure that the code performs as intended over its extensive list of applications, an automated and highly accurate verification method has been modified and applied to RELAP5-3D. Furthermore, mathematical analysis of the adequacy of the checks used in the comparisons is provided.

  12. Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Haiyan

    Hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique is promising for determining the optical properties and quality attributes of horticultural and food products. However, considerable challenges still exist for accurate determination of spectral absorption and scattering properties from intact horticultural products. The objective of this research was, therefore, to develop and optimize hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique for accurate measurement of the optical properties of horticultural products. Monte Carlo simulations and experiments for model samples of known optical properties were performed to optimize the inverse algorithm of a single-layer diffusion model and the optical designs, for extracting the absorption (micro a) and reduced scattering (micros') coefficients from spatially-resolved reflectance profiles. The logarithm and integral data transformation and the relative weighting methods were found to greatly improve the parameter estimation accuracy with the relative errors of 10.4%, 10.7%, and 11.4% for micro a, and 6.6%, 7.0%, and 7.1% for micros', respectively. More accurate measurements of optical properties were obtained when the light beam was of Gaussian type with the diameter of less than 1 mm, and the minimum and maximum source-detector distances were 1.5 mm and 10--20 transport mean free paths, respectively. An optical property measuring prototype was built, based on the optimization results, and evaluated for automatic measurement of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients for the wavelengths of 500--1,000 nm. The instrument was used to measure the optical properties, and assess quality/maturity, of 500 'Redstar' peaches and 1039 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 1040 'Delicious' (RD) apples. A separate study was also conducted on confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopic image analysis and compression test of fruit tissue specimens to measure the structural and mechanical properties of 'Golden

  13. Enabling accurate photodiode detection of multiple optical traps by spatial filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Dino; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2014-09-01

    Dual and multiple beam optical tweezers allow for advanced trapping geometries beyond single traps, however, these increased manipulation capabilities, usually complicate the detection of position and force. The accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the detected signals, this crosstalk leading to a systematic error on the measured forces and distances. In dual-beam optical trapping setups, the two traps are typically orthogonal polarized and crosstalk can be minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector, however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Moreover, the restriction to two orthogonal polarisation states limits the number of detectable traps to two. Here, we present an easy-to-implement simple method to efficiently eliminate cross-talk in dual beam setups.1 The technique is based on spatial filtering and is highly compatible with standard back-focal-plane photodiode based detection. The reported method significantly improves the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, hence providing much more scientific value for the experimental efforts. Furthermore, it opens the possibility for fast and simultaneous photodiode based detection of multiple holographically generated optical traps.

  14. A new algorithm for generating highly accurate benchmark solutions to transport test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1997-06-01

    We present a new algorithm for solving the neutron transport equation in its discrete-variable form. The new algorithm is based on computing the full matrix relating the scalar flux spatial moments in all cells to the fixed neutron source spatial moments, foregoing the need to compute the angular flux spatial moments, and thereby eliminating the need for sweeping the spatial mesh in each discrete-angular direction. The matrix equation is solved exactly in test cases, producing a solution vector that is free from iteration convergence error, and subject only to truncation and roundoff errors. Our algorithm is designed to provide method developers with a quick and simple solution scheme to test their new methods on difficult test problems without the need to develop sophisticated solution techniques, e.g. acceleration, before establishing the worthiness of their innovation. We demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm by applying it to the Arbitrarily High Order Transport Nodal (AHOT-N) method, and using it to solve two of Burre`s Suite of Test Problems (BSTP). Our results provide highly accurate benchmark solutions, that can be distributed electronically and used to verify the pointwise accuracy of other solution methods and algorithms.

  15. Pigeons use high spatial frequencies when memorizing pictures.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Matthew S; Brooks, Daniel I; Cook, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    The ability of animals to visually memorize and categorize a large number of pictures is well established. Determining the kinds of information animals use to accomplish these goals has been more difficult. This experiment examined the contribution of spatial frequency information to picture memorization by pigeons. A series of grayscale pictures were notch-filtered to eliminate different portions of the spatial frequency spectrum of memorized pictures. The results indicated that the higher spatial frequencies in the pictures were most important to accurate recognition, suggesting that the detection of fine detail at the high range of pigeon visual acuity was a critical component to their memorized representations. Subsequent tests with band-pass and hybrid conflict stimuli confirmed this conclusion. It is suggested that cognitive and task demands may determine how spatial frequency is used by pigeons, with higher frequencies more important to item memorization, while lower spatial frequencies may contribute to categorization in other types of discrimination tasks. PMID:25915753

  16. Accurate optical wavefront reconstruction based on reciprocity of an optical path using low resolution spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyang

    2010-10-01

    A method for high precision optical wavefront reconstruction using low resolution spatial light modulators (SLMs) was proposed. It utilizes an adiabatic waveguide taper consisting of a plurality of single-mode waveguides to decompose an incident light field into simple fundamental modes of the single-mode waveguides. By digital generation of the conjugate fields of those simple fundamental modes a field proportional to the original incident light field might be reconstructed accurately based on reciprocity. Devices based on the method using transparent and reflective SLMs possess no aberration like that of a conventional optic lens and are able to achieve diffraction limited resolution. Specifically on the surface of the narrow end of a taper a resolution much higher than half of the wavelength is attainable. The device may work in linear mode and possesses unlimited theoretical 3D space-bandwidth product (SBP). The SBP of a real device is limited by the accuracy of SLMs. A pair of 8-bit SLMs with 1000 × 1000 = 10 6 pixels could provide a SBP of about 5 × 10 4. The SBP may expand by 16 times if 10-bit SLMs with the same number of pixels are employed or 16 successive frames are used to display one scene. The device might be used as high precision optical tweezers, or employed for continuous or discrete real-time 3D display, 3D measurement, machine vision, etc.

  17. Accurate multi-source forest species mapping using the multiple spectral-spatial classification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrakoudis, Dimitris; Gitas, Ioannis; Karydas, Christos; Kolokoussis, Polychronis; Karathanassi, Vassilia

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes an efficient methodology for combining multiple remotely sensed imagery, in order to increase the classification accuracy in complex forest species mapping tasks. The proposed scheme follows a decision fusion approach, whereby each image is first classified separately by means of a pixel-wise Fuzzy-Output Support Vector Machine (FO-SVM) classifier. Subsequently, the multiple results are fused according to the so-called multiple spectral- spatial classifier using the minimum spanning forest (MSSC-MSF) approach, which constitutes an effective post-regularization procedure for enhancing the result of a single pixel-based classification. For this purpose, the original MSSC-MSF has been extended in order to handle multiple classifications. In particular, the fuzzy outputs of the pixel-based classifiers are stacked and used to grow the MSF, whereas the markers are also determined considering both classifications. The proposed methodology has been tested on a challenging forest species mapping task in northern Greece, considering a multispectral (GeoEye) and a hyper-spectral (CASI) image. The pixel-wise classifications resulted in overall accuracies (OA) of 68.71% for the GeoEye and 77.95% for the CASI images, respectively. Both of them are characterized by high levels of speckle noise. Applying the proposed multi-source MSSC-MSF fusion, the OA climbs to 90.86%, which is attributed both to the ability of MSSC-MSF to tackle the salt-and-pepper effect, as well as the fact that the fusion approach exploits the relative advantages of both information sources.

  18. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Alan; Harlen, Oliver G.; Harris, Sarah A.; Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming; Lonsdale, Richard; Mulholland, Adrian J.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Read, Daniel J.; Richardson, Robin A.

    2015-01-01

    The current computational techniques available for biomolecular simulation are described, and the successes and limitations of each with reference to the experimental biophysical methods that they complement are presented. Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational.

  19. Extensive and Highly Accurate Line Lists for Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Richard, C.; Le Roy, R. J.; Coxon, J. A.; Hajigeorgiou, P.

    2011-06-01

    New dipole moment functions (DMF) for the ground X 1Σ+ electronic states of the hydrogen halides (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) have been obtained using a direct fit approach that fits the best available and appropriately weighted experimental line intensity data for individual ro-vibrational transitions. Combining the newly developed (taking into account the most recent experiments) empirical potential energy functions and the DMFs, line positions and line intensities of the hydrogen halides and their isotopologues have been calculated numerically using program LEVEL. In addition, new semi-empirical algorithms for assigning line-shape parameters for these species have been developed. Using these improvements, new line lists for hydrogen halides were created to update the HITRAN spectroscopic database. These new lists are more accurate and significantly more extensive than those included in the current version of the database (HITRAN2008). R.J. Le Roy, ``LEVEL 8.0, 2007'', University of Waterloo Chemical Physics Research Report CP-663 (2007); see http://leroy.uwaterloo.ca/programs/. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.C. Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al., ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  20. Informatics-based, highly accurate, noninvasive prenatal paternity testing

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Allison; Baner, Johan; Demko, Zachary; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Baird, Michael L.; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an informatics-based, noninvasive, prenatal paternity test using array-based single-nucleotide polymorphism measurements of cell-free DNA isolated from maternal plasma. Methods: Blood samples were taken from 21 adult pregnant women (with gestational ages between 6 and 21 weeks), and a genetic sample was taken from the corresponding biological fathers. Paternity was confirmed by genetic testing of the infant, products of conception, control of fertilization, and/or preimplantation genetic diagnosis during in vitro fertilization. Parental DNA samples and maternal plasma cell-free DNA were amplified and analyzed using a HumanCytoSNP-12 array. An informatics-based method measured single-nucleotide polymorphism data, confirming or rejecting paternity. Each plasma sample with a sufficient fetal cell-free DNA fraction was independently tested against the confirmed father and 1,820 random, unrelated males. Results: One of the 21 samples had insufficient fetal cell-free DNA. The test correctly confirmed paternity for the remaining 20 samples (100%) when tested against the biological father, with P values of <10−4. For the 36,400 tests using an unrelated male as the alleged father, 99.95% (36,382) correctly excluded paternity and 0.05% (18) were indeterminate. There were no miscalls. Conclusion: A noninvasive paternity test using informatics-based analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism array measurements accurately determined paternity early in pregnancy. PMID:23258349

  1. Spatially revolved high density electroencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry; Szu, Harold; Chen, Yuechen; Guo, Ran; Gu, Xixi

    2015-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) measures voltage fluctuations resulting from ionic current flows within the neurons of the brain. In practice, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, several tens of minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In order to improve the resolution and the distortion cause by the hair and scalp, large array magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are introduced. The major challenge is to systematically compare the accuracy of epileptic source localization with high electrode density to that obtained with sparser electrode setups. In this report, we demonstrate a two dimension (2D) image Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis along with utilization of Peano (space-filling) curve to further reduce the hardware requirement for high density EEG and improve the accuracy and performance of the high density EEG analysis. The brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) in this work is enhanced by A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board with optimized two dimension (2D) image Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis.

  2. Preschoolers can make highly accurate judgments of learning.

    PubMed

    Lipowski, Stacy L; Merriman, William E; Dunlosky, John

    2013-08-01

    Preschoolers' ability to make judgments of learning (JOLs) was examined in 3 experiments in which they were taught proper names for animals. In Experiment 1, when judgments were made immediately after studying, nearly every child predicted subsequent recall of every name. When judgments were made after a delay, fewer showed this response tendency. The delayed JOLs of those who predicted at least 1 recall failure were still overconfident, however, and were not correlated with final recall. In Experiment 2, children received a second study trial with feedback, made JOLs after a delay, and completed an additional forced-choice judgment task. In this task, an animal whose name had been recalled was pitted against an animal whose name had not been recalled, and the children chose the one they were more likely to remember later. Compared with Experiment 1, more children predicted at least 1 recall failure and predictions were moderately accurate. In the forced-choice task, animal names that had just been successfully recalled were typically chosen over ones that had not. Experiment 3 examined the effect of providing an additional retrieval attempt on delayed JOLs. Half of the children received a single study session, and half received an additional study session with feedback. Children in the practice group showed less overconfidence than those in the no-practice group. Taken together, the results suggest that, with minimal task experience, most preschoolers understand that they will not remember everything and that if they cannot recall something at present, they are unlikely to recall it in the future. PMID:23148937

  3. High energy laser testbed for accurate beam pointing control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dojong; Kim, Jae Jun; Frist, Duane; Nagashima, Masaki; Agrawal, Brij

    2010-02-01

    Precision laser beam pointing is a key technology in High Energy Laser systems. In this paper, a laboratory High Energy Laser testbed developed at the Naval Postgraduate School is introduced. System identification is performed and a mathematical model is constructed to estimate system performance. New beam pointing control algorithms are designed based on this mathematical model. It is shown in both computer simulation and experiment that the adaptive filter algorithm can improve the pointing performance of the system.

  4. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  5. Evaluating Mesoscale Numerical Weather Predictions and Spatially Distributed Meteorologic Forcing Data for Developing Accurate SWE Forecasts over Large Mountain Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, A. R.; Marks, D. G.; Winstral, A. H.; Marshall, H. P.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to forecast snow water equivalent, or SWE, in mountain catchments would benefit many different communities ranging from avalanche hazard mitigation to water resource management. Historical model runs of Isnobal, the physically based energy balance snow model, have been produced over the 2150 km2 Boise River Basin for water years 2012 - 2014 at 100-meter resolution. Spatially distributed forcing parameters such as precipitation, wind, and relative humidity are generated from automated weather stations located throughout the watershed, and are supplied to Isnobal at hourly timesteps. Similarly, the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) Model provides hourly predictions of the same forcing parameters from an atmospheric physics perspective. This work aims to quantitatively compare WRF model output to the spatial meteorologic fields developed to force Isnobal, with the hopes of eventually using WRF predictions to create accurate hourly forecasts of SWE over a large mountainous basin.

  6. An accurate continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Yue; Li Binhong

    2011-02-15

    A continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformers is presented in this paper. The sensor of this system is based on a kind of electronic instrument current transformer, which is a clamp-shape air core coil. This system uses an optical fiber transmission system for its signal transmission and power supply. Finally the digital integrator and fourth-order convolution window algorithm as error calculation methods are realized by the virtual instrument with a personal computer. It is found that this system can calibrate a high voltage current transformer while energized, which means avoiding a long calibrating period in the power system and the loss of power metering expense. At the same time, it has a wide dynamic range and frequency band, and it can achieve a high accuracy measurement in a complex electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results and the on-site operation results presented in the last part of the paper, prove that it can reach the 0.05 accuracy class and is easy to operate on site.

  7. An accurate continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformer.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yue; Li, Bin Hong

    2011-02-01

    A continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformers is presented in this paper. The sensor of this system is based on a kind of electronic instrument current transformer, which is a clamp-shape air core coil. This system uses an optical fiber transmission system for its signal transmission and power supply. Finally the digital integrator and fourth-order convolution window algorithm as error calculation methods are realized by the virtual instrument with a personal computer. It is found that this system can calibrate a high voltage current transformer while energized, which means avoiding a long calibrating period in the power system and the loss of power metering expense. At the same time, it has a wide dynamic range and frequency band, and it can achieve a high accuracy measurement in a complex electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results and the on-site operation results presented in the last part of the paper, prove that it can reach the 0.05 accuracy class and is easy to operate on site. PMID:21361633

  8. Uniqueness of a high-order accurate bicompact scheme for quasilinear hyperbolic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, M. D.; Rogov, B. V.

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of constructing new third- and fourth-order accurate differential-difference bicompact schemes is explored. The schemes are constructed for the one-dimensional quasilinear advection equation on a symmetric three-point spatial stencil. It is proved that this family of schemes consists of a single fourth-order accurate bicompact scheme. The result is extended to the case of an asymmetric three-point stencil.

  9. Accurate Object Recognition Using Orientation Sensor with Refinement on the Lie Group of Spatial Rigid Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckel, Loic; Nishida, Toyoaki

    In this paper, we introduce a method for recognizing a subject complex object in real world environment. We use a three dimensional model described by line segments of the object and the data provided by a three-axis orientation sensor attached to the video camera. We assume that existing methods for finding line features in the image allow at least one model line segment to be detected as a single continuous segment. The method consists of two main steps: generation of pose hypotheses and then evaluation of each pose in order to select the most appropriate one. The first stage is three-fold: model visibility, line matching and pose estimation; the second stage aims to rank the poses by evaluating the similarity between the projected model lines and the image lines. Furthermore, we propose an additional step that consists of refining the best candidate pose by using the Lie group formalism of spatial rigid motions. Such a formalism provides an efficient local parameterization of the set of rigid rotation via the exponential map. A set of experiments demonstrating the robustness of this approach is presented.

  10. Highly accurate adaptive finite element schemes for nonlinear hyperbolic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1992-08-01

    This document is a final report of research activities supported under General Contract DAAL03-89-K-0120 between the Army Research Office and the University of Texas at Austin from July 1, 1989 through June 30, 1992. The project supported several Ph.D. students over the contract period, two of which are scheduled to complete dissertations during the 1992-93 academic year. Research results produced during the course of this effort led to 6 journal articles, 5 research reports, 4 conference papers and presentations, 1 book chapter, and two dissertations (nearing completion). It is felt that several significant advances were made during the course of this project that should have an impact on the field of numerical analysis of wave phenomena. These include the development of high-order, adaptive, hp-finite element methods for elastodynamic calculations and high-order schemes for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic systems. Also, a theory of multi-stage Taylor-Galerkin schemes was developed and implemented in the analysis of several wave propagation problems, and was configured within a general hp-adaptive strategy for these types of problems. Further details on research results and on areas requiring additional study are given in the Appendix.

  11. Developing accurate simulations for high-speed fiber links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, Steven; Stark, Andrew; Hsueh, Yu-Ting; Detwiler, Thomas; Tibuleac, Sorin; Chang, GK; Ralph, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable simulations of high-speed fiber optic links are necessary to understand, design, and deploy fiber networks. Laboratory experiments cannot explore all possible component variations and fiber environments that are found in today's deployed systems. Simulations typically depict relative penalties compared to a reference link. However, absolute performance metrics are required to assess actual deployment configurations. Here we detail the efforts within the Georgia Tech 100G Consortium towards achieving high absolute accuracy between simulation and experimental performance with a goal of +/-0.25 dB for back-to-back configuration, and +/-0.5 dB for transmission over multiple spans with different dispersion maps. We measure all possible component parameters including fiber length, loss, and dispersion for use in simulation. We also validate experimental methods of performance evaluation including OSNR assessment and DSP-based demodulation. We investigate a wide range of parameters including modulator chirp, polarization state, polarization dependent loss, transmit spectrum, laser linewidth, and fiber nonlinearity. We evaluate 56 Gb/s (single-polarization) and 112 Gb/s (dual-polarization) DQPSK and coherent QPSK within a 50 GHz DWDM environment with 10 Gb/s OOK adjacent channels for worst-case XPM effects. We demonstrate good simulation accuracy within linear and some nonlinear regimes for a wide range of OSNR in both back-to-back configuration and up to eight spans, over a range of launch powers. This allows us to explore a wide range of environments not available in the lab, including different fiber types, ROADM passbands, and levels of crosstalk. Continued exploration is required to validate robustness over various demodulation algorithms.

  12. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Satellite Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This document in the form of viewslides, reviews various low-cost alternatives to high spatial resolution thermal satellite technologies. There exists no follow-on to Landsat 7 or ASTER high spatial resolution thermal systems. This document reviews the results of the investigation in to the use of new technologies to create a low-cost useful alternative. Three suggested technologies are examined. 1. Conventional microbolometer pushbroom modes offers potential for low cost Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) thermal or ASTER capability with at least 60-120 ground sampling distance (GSD). 2. Backscanning could produce MultiSpectral Thermal Imager performance without cooled detectors. 3. Cooled detector could produce hyperspectral thermal class system or extremely high spatial resolution class instrument.

  13. High-order accurate multi-phase simulations: building blocks and whats tricky about them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummer, Florian

    2015-11-01

    We are going to present a high-order numerical method for multi-phase flow problems, which employs a sharp interface representation by a level-set and an extended discontinuous Galerkin (XDG) discretization for the flow properties. The shape of the XDG basis functions is dynamically adapted to the position of the fluid interface, so that the spatial approximation space can represent jumps in pressure and kinks in velocity accurately. By this approach, the `hp-convergence' property of the classical discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method can be preserved for the low-regularity, discontinuous solutions, such as those appearing in multi-phase flows. Within the past years, several building blocks of such a method were presented: this includes numerical integration on cut-cells, the spatial discretization by the XDG method, precise evaluation of curvature and level-set algorithms tailored to the special requirements of XDG-methods. The presentation covers a short review on these building-block and their integration into a full multi-phase solver. A special emphasis is put on the discussion of the several pitfalls one may expire in the formulation of such a solver. German Research Foundation.

  14. Earthquake Rupture Dynamics using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and High-Order Accurate Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, J. E.; Wilcox, L.

    2013-12-01

    Our goal is to develop scalable and adaptive (spatial and temporal) numerical methods for coupled, multiphysics problems using high-order accurate numerical methods. To do so, we are developing an opensource, parallel library known as bfam (available at http://bfam.in). The first application to be developed on top of bfam is an earthquake rupture dynamics solver using high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods and summation-by-parts finite difference methods. In earthquake rupture dynamics, wave propagation in the Earth's crust is coupled to frictional sliding on fault interfaces. This coupling is two-way, required the simultaneous simulation of both processes. The use of laboratory-measured friction parameters requires near-fault resolution that is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than that needed to resolve the frequencies of interest in the volume. This, along with earlier simulations using a low-order, finite volume based adaptive mesh refinement framework, suggest that adaptive mesh refinement is ideally suited for this problem. The use of high-order methods is motivated by the high level of resolution required off the fault in earlier the low-order finite volume simulations; we believe this need for resolution is a result of the excessive numerical dissipation of low-order methods. In bfam spatial adaptivity is handled using the p4est library and temporal adaptivity will be accomplished through local time stepping. In this presentation we will present the guiding principles behind the library as well as verification of code against the Southern California Earthquake Center dynamic rupture code validation test problems.

  15. High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Passeri, A; Formiconi, A R; De Cristofaro, M T; Pupi, A; Meldolesi, U

    1997-04-01

    It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64x64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64x64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. PMID:9096089

  16. Accelerating experimental high-order spatial statistics calculations using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Huang, Tao; Lu, De-Tang; Niu, Cong

    2014-09-01

    High-order spatial statistics have been widely used to describe the spatial phenomena in the field of geology science. Spatial statistics are subject to extremely heavy computational burden for large geostatistical models. To improve the computational efficiency, a parallel approach based on GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is proposed for the calculation of high-order spatial statistics. The parallel scheme is achieved by utilizing a two-stage method to calculate the replicate of a moment for a given template simultaneously termed as the node-stage parallelism, and transform the spatial moments to cumulants for all lags of a template simultaneously termed as the template-stage parallelism. Also, a series of optimization strategies are proposed to take full advantage of the computational capabilities of GPUs, including the appropriate task allocation to the CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) threads, proper organization of the GPU physical memory, and optimal improvement of the existed parallel routines. Tests are carried out on two training images to compare the performance of the GPU-based method with that of the serial implementation. Error analysis results indicate that the proposed parallel method can generate accurate cumulant maps, and the performance comparisons on various examples show that all the speedups for third-order, fourth-order and fifth-order cumulants calculation are over 17 times.

  17. Error Estimation in an Optimal Interpolation Scheme for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution SST Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigney, Matt; Jedlovec, Gary; LaFontaine, Frank; Shafer, Jaclyn

    2010-01-01

    Heat and moisture exchange between ocean surface and atmosphere plays an integral role in short-term, regional NWP. Current SST products lack both spatial and temporal resolution to accurately capture small-scale features that affect heat and moisture flux. NASA satellite is used to produce high spatial and temporal resolution SST analysis using an OI technique.

  18. Individual Differences in Spatial Text Processing: High Spatial Ability Can Compensate for Spatial Working Memory Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Gyselinck, Valerie; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the relation between spatial ability and visuo-spatial and verbal working memory in spatial text processing. In two experiments, participants listened to a spatial text (Experiments 1 and 2) and a non-spatial text (Experiment 1), at the same time performing a spatial or a verbal concurrent task, or no secondary task.…

  19. Development of highly accurate approximate scheme for computing the charge transfer integral.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Anton; Szalay, Péter G

    2015-08-21

    The charge transfer integral is a key parameter required by various theoretical models to describe charge transport properties, e.g., in organic semiconductors. The accuracy of this important property depends on several factors, which include the level of electronic structure theory and internal simplifications of the applied formalism. The goal of this paper is to identify the performance of various approximate approaches of the latter category, while using the high level equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory for the electronic structure. The calculations have been performed on the ethylene dimer as one of the simplest model systems. By studying different spatial perturbations, it was shown that while both energy split in dimer and fragment charge difference methods are equivalent with the exact formulation for symmetrical displacements, they are less efficient when describing transfer integral along the asymmetric alteration coordinate. Since the "exact" scheme was found computationally expensive, we examine the possibility to obtain the asymmetric fluctuation of the transfer integral by a Taylor expansion along the coordinate space. By exploring the efficiency of this novel approach, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme represents an attractive alternative to the "exact" calculations due to a substantial reduction of computational costs, when a considerably large region of the potential energy surface is of interest. Moreover, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme, irrespective of the dimer symmetry, is very accurate for the entire range of geometry fluctuations that cover the space the molecule accesses at room temperature. PMID:26298117

  20. Development of highly accurate approximate scheme for computing the charge transfer integral

    SciTech Connect

    Pershin, Anton; Szalay, Péter G.

    2015-08-21

    The charge transfer integral is a key parameter required by various theoretical models to describe charge transport properties, e.g., in organic semiconductors. The accuracy of this important property depends on several factors, which include the level of electronic structure theory and internal simplifications of the applied formalism. The goal of this paper is to identify the performance of various approximate approaches of the latter category, while using the high level equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory for the electronic structure. The calculations have been performed on the ethylene dimer as one of the simplest model systems. By studying different spatial perturbations, it was shown that while both energy split in dimer and fragment charge difference methods are equivalent with the exact formulation for symmetrical displacements, they are less efficient when describing transfer integral along the asymmetric alteration coordinate. Since the “exact” scheme was found computationally expensive, we examine the possibility to obtain the asymmetric fluctuation of the transfer integral by a Taylor expansion along the coordinate space. By exploring the efficiency of this novel approach, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme represents an attractive alternative to the “exact” calculations due to a substantial reduction of computational costs, when a considerably large region of the potential energy surface is of interest. Moreover, we show that the Taylor expansion scheme, irrespective of the dimer symmetry, is very accurate for the entire range of geometry fluctuations that cover the space the molecule accesses at room temperature.

  1. Highly accurate isotope measurements of surface material on planetary objects in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike; Meyer, Stefan; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Studies of isotope variations in solar system objects are of particular interest and importance. Highly accurate isotope measurements provide insight into geochemical processes, constrain the time of formation of planetary material (crystallization ages) and can be robust tracers of pre-solar events and processes. A detailed understanding of the chronology of the early solar system and dating of planetary materials require precise and accurate measurements of isotope ratios, e.g. lead, and abundance of trace element. However, such measurements are extremely challenging and until now, they never have been attempted in space research. Our group designed a highly miniaturized and self-optimizing laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer for space flight for sensitive and accurate measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of extraterrestrial materials in situ. Current studies were performed by using UV radiation for ablation and ionization of sample material. High spatial resolution is achieved by focusing the laser beam to about Ø 20μm onto the sample surface. The instrument supports a dynamic range of at least 8 orders of magnitude and a mass resolution m/Δm of up to 800—900, measured at iron peak. We developed a measurement procedure, which will be discussed in detail, that allows for the first time to measure with the instrument the isotope distribution of elements, e.g. Ti, Pb, etc., with a measurement accuracy and precision in the per mill and sub per mill level, which is comparable to well-known and accepted measurement techniques, such as TIMS, SIMS and LA-ICP-MS. The present instrument performance offers together with the measurement procedure in situ measurements of 207Pb/206Pb ages with the accuracy for age in the range of tens of millions of years. Furthermore, and in contrast to other space instrumentation, our instrument can measure all elements present in the sample above 10 ppb concentration, which offers versatile applications

  2. High-order accurate monotone difference schemes for solving gasdynamic problems by Godunov's method with antidiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, N. Ya.

    2011-04-01

    An approach to the construction of high-order accurate monotone difference schemes for solving gasdynamic problems by Godunov's method with antidiffusion is proposed. Godunov's theorem on monotone schemes is used to construct a new antidiffusion flux limiter in high-order accurate difference schemes as applied to linear advection equations with constant coefficients. The efficiency of the approach is demonstrated by solving linear advection equations with constant coefficients and one-dimensional gasdynamic equations.

  3. Radiometric and Spatial Characterization of High-Spatial Resolution Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Zanoni, Vicki (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development and improvement of commercial hyperspatial sensors in recent years has increased the breadth of information that can be retrieved from spaceborne and airborne imagery. NASA, through it's Scientific Data Purchases, has successfully provided such data sets to its user community. A key element to the usefulness of these data are an understanding of the radiometric and spatial response quality of the imagery. This proposal seeks funding to examine the absolute radiometric calibration of the Ikonos sensor operated by Space Imaging and the recently-launched Quickbird sensor from DigitalGlobe. In addition, we propose to evaluate the spatial response of the two sensors. The proposed methods rely on well-understood, ground-based targets that have been used by the University of Arizona for more than a decade.

  4. A third-order-accurate upwind scheme for Navier-Stokes solutions at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A third-order-accurate upwind scheme is presented for solution of the steady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in stream-function/vorticity form. The scheme is found to be accurate and stable at high Reynolds numbers. A series of test computations is performed on flows with large recirculating regions. In particular, highly accurate solutions are obtained for flow in a driven square cavity up to Reynolds numbers of 10,000. These computations are used to critically evaluate the accuracy of other existing first- and second-order-accurate upwind schemes. In addition, computations are carried out for flow in a channel with symmetric sudden expansion, flow in a channel with a symmetrically placed blunt base, and the flowfield of an impinging jet. Good agreement is obtained with the computations of other investigators as well as with the available experimental data.

  5. Improved Spatial Filter for high power Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, Kent G.; Celliers, Peter M.; Murray, James E.; DaSilva, Luiz; MacGowan, Brian J.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Drake, Robert P.; Afeyan, Bedros

    1998-06-01

    A new pinhole architecture incorporates features intended to reduce the rate of plasma generation in a spatial filter for high-energy laser pulse beams. An elongated pinhole aperture is provided in an apertured body for rejecting off-axis rays of the laser pulse beam. The internal surface of the elongated aperture has a diameter which progressively tapers from a larger entrance cross-sectional area at an inlet to a smaller output cross-sectional area at an outlet. The tapered internal surface causes off-axis rays to be refracted in a low density plasma layer that forms on the internal surface or specularly reflected at grazing incidence from the internal surface. Off-axis rays of the high-energy pulse beam are rejected by this design. The external surface of the apertured body adjacent to the larger entrance cross-sectional area at the inlet to the elongated aperture is angled obliquely with respect to the to direction of the path of the high-energy laser pulse beam to backscatter off-axis rays away from the high-energy pulse beam. The aperture is formed as a truncated cone or alternatively with a tapered square cross-section. The internal surface of the aperture is coated with an ablative material, preferably high-density material which can be deposited with an exploding wire.

  6. Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Rationale and Recommendation for Accurate and Consistent Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Hillman, Robert E.; Mehta, Daryush D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors discuss the rationale behind the term "laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy" to describe the application of high-speed endoscopic imaging techniques to the visualization of vocal fold vibration. Method: Commentary on the advantages of using accurate and consistent terminology in the field of voice research is…

  7. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Timothy D.; Gershoni, David; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    1996-03-01

    Several recent reports employing high spatial resolution have revealed the dominance of exciton localization in the low temperature luminescence of semiconductor quantum structures.^[1-3] Understanding this localization is of critical importance for the reliable studies of low dimensional structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. We report on low temperature and high spatial resolution photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies of cleaved edge overgrown (CEO) single quantum wires. These samples permit the direct and unambiguous comparison between the optical properties of a (100) oriented quantum well, a (110) oriented quantum well, and the quantum wire which is formed at their intersection. Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature in both the 2d systems and the genuinely 1D wire system. We also measure the absorption strength of the 1D system and find it to be a factor of 3 stronger than the absorption of the associated 2D systems.^[2] Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we also determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature. ^[1] H. F. Hess, E. Betzig, T. D. Harris, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Science 264, 1740 (1994). ^[2] T. D. Harris, D. Gershoni, R. D. Grober, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, and N. Chand, Appl. Phys. Lett, in press (1996) ^[3] D. Gammon, E. S. Snow, and D. S. Katzer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 2391 (1995)

  8. Study of Spatially Resolved Temperature Diagnostics for High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H

    2000-04-05

    The next generation of 2-D and 3-D weapon-simulation codes will require marked advances in the spatial and temporal resolution of the various diagnostics to verify the complex physics predicted from these calculations. This is particularly true for the complicated physics of high-explosive (HE) detonation and burn, of which a detailed understanding is crucial to nuclear weapons performance and integrity. The processes involved in the detonation of HEs occur very rapidly and lead to extremely high pressures (several GPa) and temperatures (several thousand Kelvin). A key diagnostic that has so far eluded experimentalists is a temperature diagnostic for burning HE. Temperature is a basic thermodynamic property that enables a fundamental understanding of important HE physics such as the chemical processes involved in the shock-to-detonation transition, and to assess the thermal part of the equation-of-state of the detonation products. Accurate, spatially localized temperature measurements with high temporal resolution are thus crucial, but are unfortunately lacking. Our work address this important problem.

  9. An accurate dynamical electron diffraction algorithm for reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Cai, C. Y.; Lv, C. L.; Zhou, G. W.; Wang, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional multislice method (CMS) method, one of the most popular dynamical electron diffraction calculation procedures in transmission electron microscopy, was introduced to calculate reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as it is well adapted to deal with the deviations from the periodicity in the direction parallel to the surface. However, in the present work, we show that the CMS method is no longer sufficiently accurate for simulating RHEED with the accelerating voltage 3-100 kV because of the high-energy approximation. An accurate multislice (AMS) method can be an alternative for more accurate RHEED calculations with reasonable computing time. A detailed comparison of the numerical calculation of the AMS method and the CMS method is carried out with respect to different accelerating voltages, surface structure models, Debye-Waller factors and glancing angles.

  10. Robust High-Resolution Cloth Using Parallelism, History-Based Collisions and Accurate Friction

    PubMed Central

    Selle, Andrew; Su, Jonathan; Irving, Geoffrey; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we simulate high resolution cloth consisting of up to 2 million triangles which allows us to achieve highly detailed folds and wrinkles. Since the level of detail is also influenced by object collision and self collision, we propose a more accurate model for cloth-object friction. We also propose a robust history-based repulsion/collision framework where repulsions are treated accurately and efficiently on a per time step basis. Distributed memory parallelism is used for both time evolution and collisions and we specifically address Gauss-Seidel ordering of repulsion/collision response. This algorithm is demonstrated by several high-resolution and high-fidelity simulations. PMID:19147895

  11. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  12. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Wei; Ju, Lili; Gunzburger, Max; Price, Stephen; Ringler, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  13. A High-Order Accurate Parallel Solver for Maxwell's Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2005-09-23

    A scheme for the solution of the time dependent Maxwell's equations on composite overlapping grids is described. The method uses high-order accurate approximations in space and time for Maxwell's equations written as a second-order vector wave equation. High-order accurate symmetric difference approximations to the generalized Laplace operator are constructed for curvilinear component grids. The modified equation approach is used to develop high-order accurate approximations that only use three time levels and have the same time-stepping restriction as the second-order scheme. Discrete boundary conditions for perfect electrical conductors and for material interfaces are developed and analyzed. The implementation is optimized for component grids that are Cartesian, resulting in a fast and efficient method. The solver runs on parallel machines with each component grid distributed across one or more processors. Numerical results in two- and three-dimensions are presented for the fourth-order accurate version of the method. These results demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the approach.

  14. A time accurate finite volume high resolution scheme for three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Hsu, Andrew T.

    1989-01-01

    A time accurate, three-dimensional, finite volume, high resolution scheme for solving the compressible full Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The present derivation is based on the upwind split formulas, specifically with the application of Roe's (1981) flux difference splitting. A high-order accurate (up to the third order) upwind interpolation formula for the inviscid terms is derived to account for nonuniform meshes. For the viscous terms, discretizations consistent with the finite volume concept are described. A variant of second-order time accurate method is proposed that utilizes identical procedures in both the predictor and corrector steps. Avoiding the definition of midpoint gives a consistent and easy procedure, in the framework of finite volume discretization, for treating viscous transport terms in the curvilinear coordinates. For the boundary cells, a new treatment is introduced that not only avoids the use of 'ghost cells' and the associated problems, but also satisfies the tangency conditions exactly and allows easy definition of viscous transport terms at the first interface next to the boundary cells. Numerical tests of steady and unsteady high speed flows show that the present scheme gives accurate solutions.

  15. Spatially Regularized Compressed Sensing for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Yogesh; Dolui, Sudipto

    2013-01-01

    Despite the relative recency of its inception, the theory of compressive sampling (aka compressed sensing) (CS) has already revolutionized multiple areas of applied sciences, a particularly important instance of which is medical imaging. Specifically, the theory has provided a different perspective on the important problem of optimal sampling in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with an ever-increasing body of works reporting stable and accurate reconstruction of MRI scans from the number of spectral measurements which would have been deemed unacceptably small as recently as five years ago. In this paper, the theory of CS is employed to palliate the problem of long acquisition times, which is known to be a major impediment to the clinical application of high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). Specifically, we demonstrate that a substantial reduction in data acquisition times is possible through minimization of the number of diffusion encoding gradients required for reliable reconstruction of HARDI scans. The success of such a minimization is primarily due to the availability of spherical ridgelet transformation, which excels in sparsifying HARDI signals. What makes the resulting reconstruction procedure even more accurate is a combination of the sparsity constraints in the diffusion domain with additional constraints imposed on the estimated diffusion field in the spatial domain. Accordingly, the present paper describes an original way to combine the diffusion-and spatial-domain constraints to achieve a maximal reduction in the number of diffusion measurements, while sacrificing little in terms of reconstruction accuracy. Finally, details are provided on an efficient numerical scheme which can be used to solve the aforementioned reconstruction problem by means of standard and readily available estimation tools. The paper is concluded with experimental results which support the practical value of the proposed reconstruction methodology. PMID:21536524

  16. High Order Schemes in Bats-R-US for Faster and More Accurate Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    BATS-R-US is a widely used global magnetohydrodynamics model that originally employed second order accurate TVD schemes combined with block based Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to achieve high resolution in the regions of interest. In the last years we have implemented fifth order accurate finite difference schemes CWENO5 and MP5 for uniform Cartesian grids. Now the high order schemes have been extended to generalized coordinates, including spherical grids and also to the non-uniform AMR grids including dynamic regridding. We present numerical tests that verify the preservation of free-stream solution and high-order accuracy as well as robust oscillation-free behavior near discontinuities. We apply the new high order accurate schemes to both heliospheric and magnetospheric simulations and show that it is robust and can achieve the same accuracy as the second order scheme with much less computational resources. This is especially important for space weather prediction that requires faster than real time code execution.

  17. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Asticio; Mar Sánchez-López, María del; García-Martínez, Pascuala; Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  18. High-order local spatial context modeling by spatialized random forest.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bingbing; Yan, Shuicheng; Wang, Meng; Kassim, Ashraf A; Tian, Qi

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for spatial context modeling toward boosting visual discriminating power. We are particularly interested in how to model high-order local spatial contexts instead of the intensively studied second-order spatial contexts, i.e., co-occurrence relations. Motivated by the recent success of random forest in learning discriminative visual codebook, we present a spatialized random forest (SRF) approach, which can encode an unlimited length of high-order local spatial contexts. By spatially random neighbor selection and random histogram-bin partition during the tree construction, the SRF can explore much more complicated and informative local spatial patterns in a randomized manner. Owing to the discriminative capability test for the random partition in each tree node's split process, a set of informative high-order local spatial patterns are derived, and new images are then encoded by counting the occurrences of such discriminative local spatial patterns. Extensive comparison experiments on face recognition and object/scene classification clearly demonstrate the superiority of the proposed spatial context modeling method over other state-of-the-art approaches for this purpose. PMID:23060330

  19. In Pursuit of Highly Accurate Atomic Lifetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-06-01

    Accurate atomic lifetime data are useful for terrestrial and astrophysical plasma diagnostics. At accuracies higher than those required for these applications, lifetime measurements test atomic structure theory in ways complementary to spectroscopic energy determinations. At the highest level of accuracy, the question arises whether such tests reach the limits of modern theory, a combination of quantum mechanics and QED, adn possibly point to physics beyond the Standard Model. If high-precision atomic lifetime measurements, especially on multiply charged ions, have not quite reached this high accuracy yet, then what is necessary to attain this goal?

  20. The Basingstoke Orthopaedic Database: a high quality accurate information system for audit.

    PubMed

    Barlow, I W; Flynn, N A; Britton, J M

    1994-11-01

    The accuracy of a computerised audit system custom produced for the Orthopaedic Department has been validated by comparison with operating theatre records and patients' case notes. The study revealed only 2.5 per cent missed entries; of the recorded entries information regarding the nature of the operation was found to be 92.5 per cent complete and 98 per cent accurate. The high percentage accuracy reflects the high degree of medical input in operation of the system. The Basingstoke Orthopaedic Database is flexible, cheap and easy to maintain. Data is stored in a form that is readily applicable to standard software packages. PMID:7598401

  1. Accurate Memory for Object Location by Individuals with Intellectual Disability: Absolute Spatial Tagging Instead of Configural Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, Fabienne; Favrod, Jerome; Grasset, Francois; Schenk, Francoise

    2011-01-01

    Using head-mounted eye tracker material, we assessed spatial recognition abilities (e.g., reaction to object permutation, removal or replacement with a new object) in participants with intellectual disabilities. The "Intellectual Disabilities (ID)" group (n = 40) obtained a score totalling a 93.7% success rate, whereas the "Normal Control" group…

  2. Late Enrichment Maintains Accurate Recent and Remote Spatial Memory Only in Aged Rats That Were Unimpaired When Middle Aged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Fanny; Herbeaux, Karine; Aufrere, Noémie; Kelche, Christian; Mathis, Chantal; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Majchrzak, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rodents to a stimulating environment has beneficial effects on some cognitive functions that are impaired during physiological aging, and especially spatial reference memory. The present study investigated whether environmental enrichment rescues these functions in already declining subjects and/or protects them from subsequent…

  3. Defining allowable physical property variations for high accurate measurements on polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Sonne, M. R.; Madruga, D. G.; De Chiffre, L.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Measurement conditions and material properties have a significant impact on the dimensions of a part, especially for polymers parts. Temperature variation causes part deformations that increase the uncertainty of the measurement process. Current industrial tolerances of a few micrometres demand high accurate measurements in non-controlled ambient. Most of polymer parts are manufactured by injection moulding and their inspection is carried out after stabilization, around 200 hours. The overall goal of this work is to reach ±5μm in uncertainty measurements a polymer products which is a challenge in today`s production and metrology environments. The residual deformations in polymer products at room temperature after injection molding are important when micrometer accuracy needs to be achieved. Numerical modelling can give a valuable insight to what is happening in the polymer during cooling down after injection molding. In order to obtain accurate simulations, accurate inputs to the model are crucial. In reality however, the material and physical properties will have some variations. Although these variations may be small, they can act as a source of uncertainty for the measurement. In this paper, we investigated how big the variation in material and physical properties are allowed in order to reach the 5 μm target on the uncertainty.

  4. A high order accurate finite element algorithm for high Reynolds number flow prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Galerkin-weighted residuals formulation is employed to establish an implicit finite element solution algorithm for generally nonlinear initial-boundary value problems. Solution accuracy, and convergence rate with discretization refinement, are quantized in several error norms, by a systematic study of numerical solutions to several nonlinear parabolic and a hyperbolic partial differential equation characteristic of the equations governing fluid flows. Solutions are generated using selective linear, quadratic and cubic basis functions. Richardson extrapolation is employed to generate a higher-order accurate solution to facilitate isolation of truncation error in all norms. Extension of the mathematical theory underlying accuracy and convergence concepts for linear elliptic equations is predicted for equations characteristic of laminar and turbulent fluid flows at nonmodest Reynolds number. The nondiagonal initial-value matrix structure introduced by the finite element theory is determined intrinsic to improved solution accuracy and convergence. A factored Jacobian iteration algorithm is derived and evaluated to yield a consequential reduction in both computer storage and execution CPU requirements while retaining solution accuracy.

  5. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags for High-Throughput Microbial Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard D. ); Anderson, Gordon A. ); Lipton, Mary S. ); Masselon, Christophe D. ); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana ); Shen, Yufeng ); Udseth, Harold R. )

    2002-08-01

    We describe and demonstrate a global strategy that extends the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness, and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of peptide accurate mass tags (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestion. The two-stage strategy exploits Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry to validate peptide AMTs for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from potential mass tags identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods, providing greater confidence in identifications as well as the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/MS, and thus with greater sensitivity and increased throughput. A single high resolution capillary liquid chromatography separation combined with high sensitivity, high resolution and ac-curate FT-ICR measurements has been shown capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of significantly more than 10 5 components with mass accuracies of -1 ppm, sufficient for broad protein identification using AMTs. Other attractions of the approach include the broad and relatively unbiased proteome coverage, the capability for exploiting stable isotope labeling methods to realize high precision for relative protein abundance measurements, and the projected potential for study of mammalian proteomes when combined with additional sample fractionation. Using this strategy, in our first application we have been able to identify AMTs for 60% of the potentially expressed proteins in the organism Deinococcus radiodurans.

  6. ASYMPTOTICALLY OPTIMAL HIGH-ORDER ACCURATE ALGORITHMS FOR THE SOLUTION OF CERTAIN ELLIPTIC PDEs

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Kunyansky, PhD

    2008-11-26

    The main goal of the project, "Asymptotically Optimal, High-Order Accurate Algorithms for the Solution of Certain Elliptic PDE's" (DE-FG02-03ER25577) was to develop fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of scattering problems and spectral problems of photonic crystals theory. The results we obtained lie in three areas: (1) asymptotically fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of eigenvalue problems of photonics, (2) fast, high-order algorithms for the solution of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering problems in the inhomogeneous media, and (3) inversion formulas and fast algorithms for the inverse source problem for the acoustic wave equation, with applications to thermo- and opto- acoustic tomography.

  7. Highly accurate analytical energy of a two-dimensional exciton in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Ngoc-Tram D.; Nguyen, Duy-Anh P.; Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang

    2016-08-01

    Explicit expressions are given for analytically describing the dependence of the energy of a two-dimensional exciton on magnetic field intensity. These expressions are highly accurate with the precision of up to three decimal places for the whole range of the magnetic field intensity. The results are shown for the ground state and some excited states; moreover, we have all formulae to obtain similar expressions of any excited state. Analysis of numerical results shows that the precision of three decimal places is maintained for the excited states with the principal quantum number of up to n=100.

  8. High spatial resolution restoration of IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Inguva, R.; Dyck, H. Melvin; Canterna, R.; Hackwell, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A general technique to improve the spatial resolution of the IRAS AO data was developed at The Aerospace Corporation using the Maximum Entropy algorithm of Skilling and Gull. The technique has been applied to a variety of fields and several individual AO MACROS. With this general technique, resolutions of 15 arcsec were achieved in 12 and 25 micron images and 30 arcsec in 60 and 100 micron images. Results on galactic plane fields show that both photometric and positional accuracy achieved in the general IRAS survey are also achieved in the reconstructed images.

  9. Spatial filters for high average power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, Alvin C

    2012-11-27

    A spatial filter includes a first filter element and a second filter element overlapping with the first filter element. The first filter element includes a first pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a first distance. Each of the first pair of cylindrical lenses has a first focal length. The first filter element also includes a first slit filter positioned between the first pair of cylindrical lenses. The second filter element includes a second pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a second distance. Each of the second pair of cylindrical lenses has a second focal length. The second filter element also includes a second slit filter positioned between the second pair of cylindrical lenses.

  10. Laryngeal High-Speed Videoendoscopy: Rationale and Recommendation for Accurate and Consistent Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The authors discuss the rationale behind the term laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy to describe the application of high-speed endoscopic imaging techniques to the visualization of vocal fold vibration. Method Commentary on the advantages of using accurate and consistent terminology in the field of voice research is provided. Specific justification is described for each component of the term high-speed videoendoscopy, which is compared and contrasted with alternative terminologies in the literature. Results In addition to the ubiquitous high-speed descriptor, the term endoscopy is necessary to specify the appropriate imaging technology and distinguish among modalities such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nonendoscopic optical imaging. Furthermore, the term video critically indicates the electronic recording of a sequence of optical still images representing scenes in motion, in contrast to strobed images using high-speed photography and non-optical high-speed magnetic resonance imaging. High-speed videoendoscopy thus concisely describes the technology and can be appended by the desired anatomical nomenclature such as laryngeal. Conclusions Laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy strikes a balance between conciseness and specificity when referring to the typical high-speed imaging method performed on human participants. Guidance for the creation of future terminology provides clarity and context for current and future experiments and the dissemination of results among researchers. PMID:26375398

  11. Highly accurate coating composition control during co-sputtering, based on controlling plasma chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Anguita, J.V.; Thwaites, M.; Holton, B.; Hockley, P.; Holton, B.; Rand, S.

    2005-03-01

    Highly accurate control of sputtering processes is of paramount importance to industry. Plasma diagnostic equipment based on spectroscopic methods such as optical emission spectroscopy (OES) have been commercially available for many years and have the ability to deliver a high level of accuracy. Despite this, their complexity, demand for operator time, and disregard for the vast majority of the optical emission spectrum have rendered them as unpopular, and they are rarely used in manufacturing lines. This article introduces the measurement of the chromaticity of the plasma as a new method of analysis, as an alternative to OES. This method is simple, while maintaining a high level of sensitivity. Chromaticity monitors a wide range of the optical emission spectrum, obtaining a large amount of process information. It also averages and simplifies the data, making them easier to analyze.

  12. Highly accurate and fast optical penetration-based silkworm gender separation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamtongdee, Chakkrit; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Chanhorm, Sataporn

    2015-07-01

    Based on our research work in the last five years, this paper highlights our innovative optical sensing system that can identify and separate silkworm gender highly suitable for sericulture industry. The key idea relies on our proposed optical penetration concepts and once combined with simple image processing operations leads to high accuracy in identifying of silkworm gender. Inside the system, there are electronic and mechanical parts that assist in controlling the overall system operation, processing the optical signal, and separating the female from male silkworm pupae. With current system performance, we achieve a very highly accurate more than 95% in identifying gender of silkworm pupae with an average system operational speed of 30 silkworm pupae/minute. Three of our systems are already in operation at Thailand's Queen Sirikit Sericulture Centers.

  13. A high-power spatial filter for Thomson scattering stray light reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, J. P.; Litzner, K. D.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.

    2011-03-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) is routinely used to measure electron temperature and density during plasma discharges. Avalanche photodiodes in a five-channel interference filter polychromator measure scattered light from a 6 ns, 800 mJ, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. A low cost, high-power spatial filter was designed, tested, and added to the laser beamline in order to reduce stray laser light to levels which are acceptable for accurate Rayleigh calibration. A detailed analysis of the spatial filter design and performance is given. The spatial filter can be easily implemented in an existing Thomson scattering system without the need to disturb the vacuum chamber or significantly change the beamline. Although apertures in the spatial filter suffer substantial damage from the focused beam, with proper design they can last long enough to permit absolute calibration.

  14. A high-power spatial filter for Thomson scattering stray light reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Litzner, K. D.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.

    2011-03-15

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) is routinely used to measure electron temperature and density during plasma discharges. Avalanche photodiodes in a five-channel interference filter polychromator measure scattered light from a 6 ns, 800 mJ, 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. A low cost, high-power spatial filter was designed, tested, and added to the laser beamline in order to reduce stray laser light to levels which are acceptable for accurate Rayleigh calibration. A detailed analysis of the spatial filter design and performance is given. The spatial filter can be easily implemented in an existing Thomson scattering system without the need to disturb the vacuum chamber or significantly change the beamline. Although apertures in the spatial filter suffer substantial damage from the focused beam, with proper design they can last long enough to permit absolute calibration.

  15. Direct Simulations of Transition and Turbulence Using High-Order Accurate Finite-Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    1997-01-01

    In recent years the techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to compute flows associated with geometrically complex configurations. However, success in terms of accuracy and reliability has been limited to cases where the effects of turbulence and transition could be modeled in a straightforward manner. Even in simple flows, the accurate computation of skin friction and heat transfer using existing turbulence models has proved to be a difficult task, one that has required extensive fine-tuning of the turbulence models used. In more complex flows (for example, in turbomachinery flows in which vortices and wakes impinge on airfoil surfaces causing periodic transitions from laminar to turbulent flow) the development of a model that accounts for all scales of turbulence and predicts the onset of transition may prove to be impractical. Fortunately, current trends in computing suggest that it may be possible to perform direct simulations of turbulence and transition at moderate Reynolds numbers in some complex cases in the near future. This seminar will focus on direct simulations of transition and turbulence using high-order accurate finite-difference methods. The advantage of the finite-difference approach over spectral methods is that complex geometries can be treated in a straightforward manner. Additionally, finite-difference techniques are the prevailing methods in existing application codes. In this seminar high-order-accurate finite-difference methods for the compressible and incompressible formulations of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations and their applications to direct simulations of turbulence and transition will be presented.

  16. Accurate Sample Assignment in a Multiplexed, Ultrasensitive, High-Throughput Sequencing Assay for Minimal Residual Disease.

    PubMed

    Bartram, Jack; Mountjoy, Edward; Brooks, Tony; Hancock, Jeremy; Williamson, Helen; Wright, Gary; Moppett, John; Goulden, Nick; Hubank, Mike

    2016-07-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) (next-generation sequencing) of the rearranged Ig and T-cell receptor genes promises to be less expensive and more sensitive than current methods of monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the adoption of new approaches by clinical laboratories requires careful evaluation of all potential sources of error and the development of strategies to ensure the highest accuracy. Timely and efficient clinical use of HTS platforms will depend on combining multiple samples (multiplexing) in each sequencing run. Here we examine the Ig heavy-chain gene HTS on the Illumina MiSeq platform for MRD. We identify errors associated with multiplexing that could potentially impact the accuracy of MRD analysis. We optimize a strategy that combines high-purity, sequence-optimized oligonucleotides, dual indexing, and an error-aware demultiplexing approach to minimize errors and maximize sensitivity. We present a probability-based, demultiplexing pipeline Error-Aware Demultiplexer that is suitable for all MiSeq strategies and accurately assigns samples to the correct identifier without excessive loss of data. Finally, using controls quantified by digital PCR, we show that HTS-MRD can accurately detect as few as 1 in 10(6) copies of specific leukemic MRD. PMID:27183494

  17. Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high α-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.165×1011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.74×1010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

  18. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Kieslich, Chris A.; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A.; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/. PMID:26859389

  19. Spatial filters for high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, Alvin Charles; Bayramian, Andrew James

    2014-12-02

    A spatial filter includes a first filter element and a second filter element overlapping with the first filter element. The first filter element includes a first pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a first distance. Each of the first pair of cylindrical lenses has a first focal length. The first filter element also includes a first longitudinal slit filter positioned between the first pair of cylindrical lenses. The second filter element includes a second pair of cylindrical lenses separated by a second distance. Each of the second pair of cylindrical lenses has a second focal length. The second filter element also includes a second longitudinal slit filter positioned between the second pair of cylindrical lenses.

  20. All-reflective, highly accurate polarization rotator for high-power short-pulse laser systems.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Kahle, M; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2012-08-27

    We present the setup of a polarization rotating device and its adaption for high-power short-pulse laser systems. Compared to conventional halfwave plates, the all-reflective principle using three zero-phase shift mirrors provides a higher accuracy and a higher damage threshold. Since plan-parallel plates, e.g. these halfwave plates, generate postpulses, which could lead to the generation of prepulses during the subsequent laser chain, the presented device avoids parasitic pulses and is therefore the preferable alternative for high-contrast applications. Moreover the device is easily scalable for large beam diameters and its spectral reflectivity can be adjusted by an appropriate mirror coating to be well suited for ultra-short laser pulses. PMID:23037123

  1. C-Sibelia: an easy-to-use and highly accurate tool for bacterial genome comparison

    PubMed Central

    Minkin, Ilya; Pham, Hoa; Starostina, Ekaterina; Vyahhi, Nikolay; Pham, Son

    2013-01-01

    We present C-Sibelia, a highly accurate and easy-to-use software tool for comparing two closely related bacterial genomes, which can be presented as either finished sequences or fragmented assemblies. C-Sibelia takes as input two FASTA files and produces: (1) a VCF file containing all identified single nucleotide variations and indels; (2) an XMFA file containing alignment information. The software also produces Circos diagrams visualizing high level genomic architecture for rearrangement analyses. C-Sibelia is a part of the Sibelia comparative genomics suite, which is freely available under the GNU GPL v.2 license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sibelia-bio. C-Sibelia is compatible with Unix-like operating systems. A web-based version of the software is available at http://etool.me/software/csibelia. PMID:25110578

  2. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal–noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  3. High-dimensional mode analyzers for spatial quantum entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Oemrawsingh, S. S. R.; Jong, J. A. de; Ma, X.; Aiello, A.; Eliel, E. R.; Hooft, G. W. 't; Woerdman, J. P.

    2006-03-15

    By analyzing entangled photon states in terms of high-dimensional spatial mode superpositions, it becomes feasible to expose high-dimensional entanglement, and even the nonlocality of twin photons. To this end, a proper analyzer should be designed that is capable of handling a large number of spatial modes, while still being convenient to use in an experiment. We compare two variants of a high-dimensional spatial mode analyzer on the basis of classical and quantum considerations. These analyzers have been tested in classical optical experiments.

  4. Use of Monocrystalline Silicon as Tool Material for Highly Accurate Blanking of Thin Metal Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Hildering, Sven; Engel, Ulf; Merklein, Marion

    2011-05-04

    The trend towards miniaturisation of metallic mass production components combined with increased component functionality is still unbroken. Manufacturing these components by forming and blanking offers economical and ecological advantages combined with the needed accuracy. The complexity of producing tools with geometries below 50 {mu}m by conventional manufacturing methods becomes disproportional higher. Expensive serial finishing operations are required to achieve an adequate surface roughness combined with accurate geometry details. A novel approach for producing such tools is the use of advanced etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon that are well-established in the microsystems technology. High-precision vertical geometries with a width down to 5 {mu}m are possible. The present study shows a novel concept using this potential for the blanking of thin copper foils with monocrystallline silicon as a tool material. A self-contained machine-tool with compact outer dimensions was designed to avoid tensile stresses in the brittle silicon punch by an accurate, careful alignment of the punch, die and metal foil. A microscopic analysis of the monocrystalline silicon punch shows appropriate properties regarding flank angle, edge geometry and surface quality for the blanking process. Using a monocrystalline silicon punch with a width of 70 {mu}m blanking experiments on as-rolled copper foils with a thickness of 20 {mu}m demonstrate the general applicability of this material for micro production processes.

  5. Highly accurate potential energy surface for the He-H2 dimer.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Brandon W; Smith, Daniel G A; Patkowski, Konrad

    2013-10-14

    A new highly accurate interaction potential is constructed for the He-H2 van der Waals complex. This potential is fitted to 1900 ab initio energies computed at the very large-basis coupled-cluster level and augmented by corrections for higher-order excitations (up to full configuration interaction level) and the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction. At the vibrationally averaged H-H bond length of 1.448736 bohrs, the well depth of our potential, 15.870 ± 0.065 K, is nearly 1 K larger than the most accurate previous studies have indicated. In addition to constructing our own three-dimensional potential in the van der Waals region, we present a reparameterization of the Boothroyd-Martin-Peterson potential surface [A. I. Boothroyd, P. G. Martin, and M. R. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 3187 (2003)] that is suitable for all configurations of the triatomic system. Finally, we use the newly developed potentials to compute the properties of the lone bound states of (4)He-H2 and (3)He-H2 and the interaction second virial coefficient of the hydrogen-helium mixture. PMID:24116617

  6. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry as a technique for characterization of complex lysimeter leachate samples.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Marshall, Samantha J; Saeed, Mansoor; Earll, Mark; Hadfield, Stephen T; Richardson, Kevan; Rawlinson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Lysimeter studies can be used to identify and quantify soil degradates of agrochemicals (metabolites) that have the potential to leach to groundwater. However, the apparent metabolic profile of such lysimeter leachate samples will often be significantly more complex than would be expected in true groundwater samples. This is particularly true for S-metolachlor, which has an extremely complex metabolic pathway. Consequently, it was not practically possible to apply a conventional analytical approach to identify all metabolites in an S-metolachlor lysimeter study, because there was insufficient mass to enable the use of techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Recent advances in high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry, however, allow innovative screening approaches to characterize leachate samples to a greater extent than previously possible. Leachate from the S-metolachlor study was screened for accurate masses (±5 ppm of the nominal mass) corresponding to more than 400 hypothetical metabolite structures. A refined list of plausible metabolites was constructed from these data to provide a comprehensive description of the most likely metabolites present. The properties of these metabolites were then evaluated using a principal component analysis model, based on molecular descriptors, to visualize the entire chemical space and to cluster the metabolites into a number of subclasses. This characterization and principal component analysis evaluation enabled the selection of suitable representative metabolites that were subsequently used as exemplars to assess the toxicological relevance of the leachate as a whole. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1401-1412. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627902

  7. Highly accurate nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in nitrogen standards based on permeation.

    PubMed

    Flores, Edgar; Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Idrees, Faraz; Wielgosz, Robert Ian

    2012-12-01

    The development and operation of a highly accurate primary gas facility for the dynamic production of mixtures of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) in nitrogen (N(2)) based on continuous weighing of a permeation tube and accurate impurity quantification and correction of the gas mixtures using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is described. NO(2) gas mixtures in the range of 5 μmol mol(-1) to 15 μmol mol(-1) with a standard relative uncertainty of 0.4% can be produced with this facility. To achieve an uncertainty at this level, significant efforts were made to reduce, identify and quantify potential impurities present in the gas mixtures, such as nitric acid (HNO(3)). A complete uncertainty budget, based on the analysis of the performance of the facility, including the use of a FT-IR spectrometer and a nondispersive UV analyzer as analytical techniques, is presented in this work. The mixtures produced by this facility were validated and then selected to provide reference values for an international comparison of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM), number CCQM-K74, (1) which was designed to evaluate the consistency of primary NO(2) gas standards from 17 National Metrology Institutes. PMID:23148702

  8. High-Resolution Tsunami Inundation Simulations Based on Accurate Estimations of Coastal Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.; Furumura, T.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of high-resolution tsunami inundation simulations in detail using the actual observational data of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0) and investigate the methodologies to improve the simulation accuracy.Due to the recent development of parallel computing technologies, high-resolution tsunami inundation simulations are conducted more commonly than before. To evaluate how accurately these simulations can reproduce inundation processes, we test several types of simulation configurations on a parallel computer, where we can utilize the observational data (e.g., offshore and coastal waveforms and inundation properties) that are recorded during the Tohoku-Oki earthquake.Before discussing the accuracy of inundation processes on land, the incident waves at coastal sites must be accurately estimated. However, for megathrust earthquakes, it is difficult to find the tsunami source that can provide accurate estimations of tsunami waveforms at every coastal site because of the complex spatiotemporal distribution of the source and the limitation of observation. To overcome this issue, we employ a site-specific source inversion approach that increases the estimation accuracy within a specific coastal site by applying appropriate weighting to the observational data in the inversion process.We applied our source inversion technique to the Tohoku tsunami and conducted inundation simulations using 5-m resolution digital elevation model data (DEM) for the coastal area around Miyako Bay and Sendai Bay. The estimated waveforms at the coastal wave gauges of these bays successfully agree with the observed waveforms. However, the simulations overestimate the inundation extent indicating the necessity to improve the inundation model. We find that the value of Manning's roughness coefficient should be modified from the often-used value of n = 0.025 to n = 0.033 to obtain proper results at both cities.In this presentation, the simulation results with several

  9. A Highly Accurate Stress Measurement System for Producing Precise X-Ray Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masatoshi; Une, Atsunobu; Okada, Ikuo; Shinohara, Shinji; Nakayama, Yasuo; Yoshihara, Hideo

    1995-12-01

    A new system that measures stress in film deposited on Si wafers has been developed to produce highly accurate X-ray masks. The system consists of very rigid air sliders, an electrostatic sensor, and a soft-handling wafer chuck. With the system, wafer warp is precisely measured before and after film deposition, and the stress distribution is calculated from those measurements. Wafer warps can be measured with a repeatability of a few nanometers by this system. The stress distribution of absorber film on 2-mm-thick Si wafers can be determined with an accuracy of ±5 MPa. The stress distribution agrees well with the pattern position shifts in the membrane.

  10. Procedure for accurate fabrication of tissue compensators with high-density material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejaddem, Younes; Lax, Ingmar; Adakkai K, Shamsuddin

    1997-02-01

    An accurate method for producing compensating filters using high-density material (Cerrobend) is described. The procedure consists of two cutting steps in a Styrofoam block: (i) levelling a surface of the block to a reference level; (ii) depth-modulated milling of the levelled block in accordance with pre-calculated thickness profiles of the compensator. The calculated thickness (generated by a dose planning system) can be reproduced within acceptable accuracy. The desired compensator thickness manufactured according to this procedure is reproduced to within 0.1 mm, corresponding to a 0.5% change in dose at a beam quality of 6 MV. The results of our quality control checks performed with the technique of stylus profiling measurements show an accuracy of 0.04 mm in the milling process over an arbitrary profile along the milled-out Styrofoam block.

  11. Highly accurate thickness measurement of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimi, Soufiene; Klier, Jens; Jonuscheit, Joachim; von Freymann, Georg; Urbansky, Ralph; Beigang, René

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present a highly accurate approach for thickness measurements of multi-layered automotive paints using terahertz time domain spectroscopy in reflection geometry. The proposed method combines the benefits of a model-based material parameters extraction method to calibrate the paint coatings, a generalized Rouard's method to simulate the terahertz radiation behavior within arbitrary thin films, and the robustness of a powerful evolutionary optimization algorithm to increase the sensitivity of the minimum thickness measurement limit. Within the framework of this work, a self-calibration model is introduced, which takes into consideration the real industrial challenges such as the effect of wet-on-wet spray in the painting process.

  12. Geometrically invariant and high capacity image watermarking scheme using accurate radial transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandan; Ranade, Sukhjeet K.

    2013-12-01

    Angular radial transform (ART) is a region based descriptor and possesses many attractive features such as rotation invariance, low computational complexity and resilience to noise which make them more suitable for invariant image watermarking than that of many transform domain based image watermarking techniques. In this paper, we introduce ART for fast and geometrically invariant image watermarking scheme with high embedding capacity. We also develop an accurate and fast framework for the computation of ART coefficients based on Gaussian quadrature numerical integration, 8-way symmetry/anti-symmetry properties and recursive relations for the calculation of sinusoidal kernel functions. ART coefficients so computed are then used for embedding the binary watermark using dither modulation. Experimental studies reveal that the proposed watermarking scheme not only provides better robustness against geometric transformations and other signal processing distortions, but also has superior advantages over the existing ones in terms of embedding capacity, speed and visual imperceptibility.

  13. Indirect Terahertz Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions Using Highly Accurate and Precise Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew A.; Ford, Kyle B.; Kreckel, Holger; Perera, Manori; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    With the advent of Herschel and SOFIA, laboratory methods capable of providing molecular rest frequencies in the terahertz and sub-millimeter regime are increasingly important. As of yet, it has been difficult to perform spectroscopy in this wavelength region due to the limited availability of radiation sources, optics, and detectors. Our goal is to provide accurate THz rest frequencies for molecular ions by combining previously recorded microwave transitions with combination differences obtained from high precision mid-IR spectroscopy. We are constructing a Sensitive Resolved Ion Beam Spectroscopy setup which will harness the benefits of kinematic compression in a molecular ion beam to enable very high resolution spectroscopy. This ion beam is interrogated by continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy using a home-made widely tunable difference frequency laser that utilizes two near-IR lasers and a periodically-poled lithium niobate crystal. Here, we report our efforts to optimize our ion beam spectrometer and to perform high-precision and high-accuracy frequency measurements using an optical frequency comb. footnote

  14. Highly accurate recognition of human postures and activities through classification with rejection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenlong; Sazonov, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of postures and activities is used in many clinical and research applications, some of which may require highly reliable posture and activity recognition with desired accuracy well above 99% mark. This paper suggests a method for performing highly accurate recognition of postures and activities from data collected by a wearable shoe monitor (SmartShoe) through classification with rejection. Signals from pressure and acceleration sensors embedded in SmartShoe are used either as raw sensor data or after feature extraction. The Support vector machine (SVM) and multilayer perceptron (MLP) are used to implement classification with rejection. Unreliable observations are rejected by measuring the distance from the decision boundary and eliminating those observations that reside below rejection threshold. The results show a significant improvement (from 97.3% ± 2.3% to 99.8% ± 0.1%) in the classification accuracy after the rejection, using MLP with raw sensor data and rejecting 31.6% of observations. The results also demonstrate that MLP outperformed the SVM, and the classification accuracy based on raw sensor data was higher than the accuracy based on extracted features. The proposed approach will be especially beneficial in applications where high accuracy of recognition is desired while not all observations need to be assigned a class label. PMID:24403429

  15. Conservative high-order-accurate finite-difference methods for curvilinear grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man M.; Chakrvarthy, Sukumar

    1993-01-01

    Two fourth-order-accurate finite-difference methods for numerically solving hyperbolic systems of conservation equations on smooth curvilinear grids are presented. The first method uses the differential form of the conservation equations; the second method uses the integral form of the conservation equations. Modifications to these schemes, which are required near boundaries to maintain overall high-order accuracy, are discussed. An analysis that demonstrates the stability of the modified schemes is also provided. Modifications to one of the schemes to make it total variation diminishing (TVD) are also discussed. Results that demonstrate the high-order accuracy of both schemes are included in the paper. In particular, a Ringleb-flow computation demonstrates the high-order accuracy and the stability of the boundary and near-boundary procedures. A second computation of supersonic flow over a cylinder demonstrates the shock-capturing capability of the TVD methodology. An important contribution of this paper is the dear demonstration that higher order accuracy leads to increased computational efficiency.

  16. High spatial resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Bonanni, P. G.; Gasiewski, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two extensive series of flights aboard the ER-2 aircraft were conducted with the MIT 118 GHz imaging spectrometer together with a 53.6 GHz nadir channel and a TV camera record of the mission. Other microwave sensors, including a 183 GHz imaging spectrometer were flown simultaneously by other research groups. Work also continued on evaluating the impact of high-resolution passive microwave soundings upon numerical weather prediction models.

  17. Towards more accurate numerical modeling of impedance based high frequency harmonic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yee Yan; Kiong Soh, Chee

    2014-03-01

    The application of smart materials in various fields of engineering has recently become increasingly popular. For instance, the high frequency based electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique employing smart piezoelectric materials is found to be versatile in structural health monitoring (SHM). Thus far, considerable efforts have been made to study and improve the technique. Various theoretical models of the EMI technique have been proposed in an attempt to better understand its behavior. So far, the three-dimensional (3D) coupled field finite element (FE) model has proved to be the most accurate. However, large discrepancies between the results of the FE model and experimental tests, especially in terms of the slope and magnitude of the admittance signatures, continue to exist and are yet to be resolved. This paper presents a series of parametric studies using the 3D coupled field finite element method (FEM) on all properties of materials involved in the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) structure interaction of the EMI technique, to investigate their effect on the admittance signatures acquired. FE model updating is then performed by adjusting the parameters to match the experimental results. One of the main reasons for the lower accuracy, especially in terms of magnitude and slope, of previous FE models is the difficulty in determining the damping related coefficients and the stiffness of the bonding layer. In this study, using the hysteretic damping model in place of Rayleigh damping, which is used by most researchers in this field, and updated bonding stiffness, an improved and more accurate FE model is achieved. The results of this paper are expected to be useful for future study of the subject area in terms of research and application, such as modeling, design and optimization.

  18. Raman spectroscopy for highly accurate estimation of the age of refrigerated porcine muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timinis, Constantinos; Pitris, Costas

    2016-03-01

    The high water content of meat, combined with all the nutrients it contains, make it vulnerable to spoilage at all stages of production and storage even when refrigerated at 5 °C. A non-destructive and in situ tool for meat sample testing, which could provide an accurate indication of the storage time of meat, would be very useful for the control of meat quality as well as for consumer safety. The proposed solution is based on Raman spectroscopy which is non-invasive and can be applied in situ. For the purposes of this project, 42 meat samples from 14 animals were obtained and three Raman spectra per sample were collected every two days for two weeks. The spectra were subsequently processed and the sample age was calculated using a set of linear differential equations. In addition, the samples were classified in categories corresponding to the age in 2-day steps (i.e., 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 or 14 days old), using linear discriminant analysis and cross-validation. Contrary to other studies, where the samples were simply grouped into two categories (higher or lower quality, suitable or unsuitable for human consumption, etc.), in this study, the age was predicted with a mean error of ~ 1 day (20%) or classified, in 2-day steps, with 100% accuracy. Although Raman spectroscopy has been used in the past for the analysis of meat samples, the proposed methodology has resulted in a prediction of the sample age far more accurately than any report in the literature.

  19. Pairagon: a highly accurate, HMM-based cDNA-to-genome aligner

    PubMed Central

    Lu, David V.; Brown, Randall H.; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Brent, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The most accurate way to determine the intron–exon structures in a genome is to align spliced cDNA sequences to the genome. Thus, cDNA-to-genome alignment programs are a key component of most annotation pipelines. The scoring system used to choose the best alignment is a primary determinant of alignment accuracy, while heuristics that prevent consideration of certain alignments are a primary determinant of runtime and memory usage. Both accuracy and speed are important considerations in choosing an alignment algorithm, but scoring systems have received much less attention than heuristics. Results: We present Pairagon, a pair hidden Markov model based cDNA-to-genome alignment program, as the most accurate aligner for sequences with high- and low-identity levels. We conducted a series of experiments testing alignment accuracy with varying sequence identity. We first created ‘perfect’ simulated cDNA sequences by splicing the sequences of exons in the reference genome sequences of fly and human. The complete reference genome sequences were then mutated to various degrees using a realistic mutation simulator and the perfect cDNAs were aligned to them using Pairagon and 12 other aligners. To validate these results with natural sequences, we performed cross-species alignment using orthologous transcripts from human, mouse and rat. We found that aligner accuracy is heavily dependent on sequence identity. For sequences with 100% identity, Pairagon achieved accuracy levels of >99.6%, with one quarter of the errors of any other aligner. Furthermore, for human/mouse alignments, which are only 85% identical, Pairagon achieved 87% accuracy, higher than any other aligner. Availability: Pairagon source and executables are freely available at http://mblab.wustl.edu/software/pairagon/ Contact: davidlu@wustl.edu; brent@cse.wustl.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19414532

  20. Accurate Quantification of High Density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration by Calibrated Ion Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Ronsein, Graziella E.; Monette, Jeffrey S.; Pamir, Nathalie; Wimberger, Jake; He, Yi; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Kim, Daniel Seung; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Vaisar, Tomas; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is critical to develop new metrics to determine whether high density lipoprotein (HDL) is cardioprotective in humans. One promising approach is HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) – the size and concentration of HDL in plasma or serum. However, the two methods currently used to determine HDL-P yield concentrations that differ more than 5-fold. We therefore developed and validated an improved approach to quantify HDL-P, termed calibrated ion mobility analysis (calibrated IMA). Methods HDL was isolated from plasma by ultracentrifugation, introduced into the gas phase with electrospray ionization, separated by size, and quantified by particle counting. A calibration curve constructed with purified proteins was used to correct for the ionization efficiency of HDL particles. Results The concentrations of gold nanoparticles and reconstituted HDLs measured by calibrated IMA were indistinguishable from concentrations determined by orthogonal methods. In plasma of control (n=40) and cerebrovascular disease (n=40) subjects, three subspecies of HDL were reproducibility measured, with an estimated total HDL-P of 13.4±2.4 µM (mean±SD). HDL-C accounted for 48% of the variance in HDL-P. HDL-P was significantly lower in subjects with cerebrovascular disease, and this difference remained significant after adjustment for HDL cholesterol levels. Conclusions Calibrated IMA accurately and reproducibly determined the concentration of gold nanoparticles and synthetic HDL, strongly suggesting the method could accurately quantify HDL particle concentration. Importantly, the estimated stoichiometry of apoA-I determined by calibrated IMA was 3–4 per HDL particle, in excellent agreement with current structural models. Furthermore, HDL-P associated with cardiovascular disease status in a clinical population independently of HDL cholesterol. PMID:25225166

  1. High Spatial Variation Tropospheric Model for GPS-Data Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf; Moore, Terry; Hill, Chris J.

    2005-09-01

    Precise GPS simulated data requires accurate simulation of the two major sources of error in GPS measurements, namely the ionospheric and tropospheric delays. The ionospheric delay modelling has been handled in a previous work (Farah, 2002). In this paper the simulation of the tropospheric delay is discussed. The suggested model should be accurate in estimating the tropospheric delay as well as capable of simulating high spatial variations of the troposphere resulting in more realistic simulated GPS data. In this paper, the EGNOS tropospheric correction model is considered as a possible tool for simulating the tropospheric delay in order to obtain more realistic simulated GPS data. Comparing the total tropospheric zenith delays from the EGNOS model with the CODE-tropospheric product has allowed the quality of the EGNOS model to be assessed. Four IGS-tracking stations have been selected for this study. Data from four non-consecutive weeks in different seasons over a period of one year were tested to assess the seasonal variation of the weather conditions. It is shown that the EGNOS model agrees well with the CODE-estimations with a mean zenith delay difference of approximately 2 cm. The maximum zenith delay difference between the EGNOS model and the CODE-estimations was in the range of 5 cm to 16 cm, which agrees well with previous studies. A second study has investigated the behaviour of the EGNOS model with other established tropospheric models such as the Saastamoinen, the Hopfield, the Marini and the Magnet model for three IGS-stations. It can be concluded from this study that the EGNOS model shows better agreement with the IGS estimations than the Magnet model and compares well with other models. The major shortcoming in the EGNOS model is its inability to simulate the variations in the troposphere over small regions. This shortcoming could be overcome by using the theory of Gaussian Random Fields, which has been previously used to model real life phenomena

  2. Accurate time delay technology in simulated test for high precision laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Wenjian; Wang, Weiming; Xue, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous development of technology, the ranging accuracy of pulsed laser range finder (LRF) is higher and higher, so the maintenance demand of LRF is also rising. According to the dominant ideology of "time analog spatial distance" in simulated test for pulsed range finder, the key of distance simulation precision lies in the adjustable time delay. By analyzing and comparing the advantages and disadvantages of fiber and circuit delay, a method was proposed to improve the accuracy of the circuit delay without increasing the count frequency of the circuit. A high precision controllable delay circuit was designed by combining the internal delay circuit and external delay circuit which could compensate the delay error in real time. And then the circuit delay accuracy could be increased. The accuracy of the novel circuit delay methods proposed in this paper was actually measured by a high sampling rate oscilloscope actual measurement. The measurement result shows that the accuracy of the distance simulated by the circuit delay is increased from +/- 0.75m up to +/- 0.15m. The accuracy of the simulated distance is greatly improved in simulated test for high precision pulsed range finder.

  3. Solar system events at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, K H; Gavel, D T; Getz, A M; Gibbartd, S G; MacIntosh, B; Max, C E; McKay, C P; Young, E F; de Pater, I

    1999-02-19

    Until relatively recent advances in technology, astronomical observations from the ground were limited in image resolution by the blurring effects of earth's atmosphere. The blur extent, ranging typically from 0.5 to 2 seconds of arc at the best astronomical sights, precluded ground-based observations of the details of the solar system's moons, asteroids, and outermost planets. With the maturing of a high resolution image processing technique called speckle imaging the resolution limitation of the atmosphere can now be largely overcome. Over the past three years they have used speckle imaging to observe Titan, a moon of Saturn with an atmospheric density comparable to Earth's, Io, the volcanically active innermost moon of Jupiter, and Neptune, a gas giant outer planet which has continually changing planet-encircling storms. These observations were made at the world's largest telescope, the Keck telescope in Hawaii and represent the highest resolution infrared images of these objects ever taken.

  4. Gold nanospikes based microsensor as a highly accurate mercury emission monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Ylias M.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Tardio, James; Bansal, Vipul; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2014-10-01

    Anthropogenic elemental mercury (Hg0) emission is a serious worldwide environmental problem due to the extreme toxicity of the heavy metal to humans, plants and wildlife. Development of an accurate and cheap microsensor based online monitoring system which can be integrated as part of Hg0 removal and control processes in industry is still a major challenge. Here, we demonstrate that forming Au nanospike structures directly onto the electrodes of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) using a novel electrochemical route results in a self-regenerating, highly robust, stable, sensitive and selective Hg0 vapor sensor. The data from a 127 day continuous test performed in the presence of volatile organic compounds and high humidity levels, showed that the sensor with an electrodeposted sensitive layer had 260% higher response magnitude, 3.4 times lower detection limit (~22 μg/m3 or ~2.46 ppbv) and higher accuracy (98% Vs 35%) over a Au control based QCM (unmodified) when exposed to a Hg0 vapor concentration of 10.55 mg/m3 at 101°C. Statistical analysis of the long term data showed that the nano-engineered Hg0 sorption sites on the developed Au nanospikes sensitive layer play a critical role in the enhanced sensitivity and selectivity of the developed sensor towards Hg0 vapor.

  5. High-order accurate physical-constraints-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for special relativistic hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kailiang; Tang, Huazhong

    2015-10-01

    The paper develops high-order accurate physical-constraints-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for special relativistic hydrodynamical (RHD) equations, built on the local Lax-Friedrichs splitting, the WENO reconstruction, the physical-constraints-preserving flux limiter, and the high-order strong stability preserving time discretization. They are extensions of the positivity-preserving finite difference WENO schemes for the non-relativistic Euler equations [20]. However, developing physical-constraints-preserving methods for the RHD system becomes much more difficult than the non-relativistic case because of the strongly coupling between the RHD equations, no explicit formulas of the primitive variables and the flux vectors with respect to the conservative vector, and one more physical constraint for the fluid velocity in addition to the positivity of the rest-mass density and the pressure. The key is to prove the convexity and other properties of the admissible state set and discover a concave function with respect to the conservative vector instead of the pressure which is an important ingredient to enforce the positivity-preserving property for the non-relativistic case. Several one- and two-dimensional numerical examples are used to demonstrate accuracy, robustness, and effectiveness of the proposed physical-constraints-preserving schemes in solving RHD problems with large Lorentz factor, or strong discontinuities, or low rest-mass density or pressure etc.

  6. Revisiting binary sequence length requirements to accurately emulate optical transmission systems in highly dispersive regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grellier, Edouard; Antona, Jean-Christophe; Bononi, Alberto; Bigo, Sébastien

    2008-11-01

    When increasing channel bit rate beyond 10Gb/s or when operating over fiber lines with sparse or no in-line dispersion compensation, Kerr-like non-linear effects can be considered as second order with respect to dispersive effects, because pulse broadening can expand over numerous neighbor pulses, before optical non-linear effects imprint their signature noticeably. To accurately emulate the interactions between pulses in this case, a few studies emphasized that Pseudo- Random Binary Sequences (PRBS) should be used, with exponential dependence of the required PRBS length on bit rate and accumulated dispersion. In this paper, we explain our strategy to numerically estimate the required number of random, noisy bits for Monte-Carlo simulations, and show that it weakly increases in presence of pulse to pulse correlations and commonly tolerated levels of non-linearities (i.e. leading to transmission penalties as high as 1.5dB, for reference BERs of 10-2, 10-3 or 10-5) . Then we determine the actual required PRBS length that yields the same (sufficient) BER accuracy as the MC method. We demonstrate its actual dependence on BER, and show that MC theory provides a reliable upper bound in FEC-assisted, highly dispersive systems.

  7. Highly ordered protein nanorings designed by accurate control of glutathione S-transferase self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Zhang, Wei; Miao, Lu; Xu, Jiayun; Li, Hongbin; Liu, Junqiu

    2013-07-31

    Protein self-assembly into exquisite, complex, yet highly ordered architectures represents the supreme wisdom of nature. However, precise manipulation of protein self-assembly behavior in vitro is a great challenge. Here we report that by taking advantage of the cooperation of metal-ion-chelating interactions and nonspecific protein-protein interactions, we achieved accurate control of the orientation of proteins and their self-assembly into protein nanorings. As a building block, we utilized the C2-symmetric protein sjGST-2His, a variant of glutathione S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum having two properly oriented His metal-chelating sites on the surface. Through synergic metal-coordination and non-covalent interactions, sjGST-2His self-assembled in a fixed bending manner to form highly ordered protein nanorings. The diameters of the nanorings can be regulated by tuning the strength of the non-covalent interaction network between sjGST-2His interfaces through variation of the ionic strength of the solution. This work provides a de novo design strategy that can be applied in the construction of novel protein superstructures. PMID:23865524

  8. High accurate interpolation of NURBS tool path for CNC machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Songmei

    2016-06-01

    Feedrate fluctuation caused by approximation errors of interpolation methods has great effects on machining quality in NURBS interpolation, but few methods can efficiently eliminate or reduce it to a satisfying level without sacrificing the computing efficiency at present. In order to solve this problem, a high accurate interpolation method for NURBS tool path is proposed. The proposed method can efficiently reduce the feedrate fluctuation by forming a quartic equation with respect to the curve parameter increment, which can be efficiently solved by analytic methods in real-time. Theoretically, the proposed method can totally eliminate the feedrate fluctuation for any 2nd degree NURBS curves and can interpolate 3rd degree NURBS curves with minimal feedrate fluctuation. Moreover, a smooth feedrate planning algorithm is also proposed to generate smooth tool motion with considering multiple constraints and scheduling errors by an efficient planning strategy. Experiments are conducted to verify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method. This research presents a novel NURBS interpolation method with not only high accuracy but also satisfying computing efficiency.

  9. Rapid and Accurate Machine Learning Recognition of High Performing Metal Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Boyd, Peter G; Daff, Thomas D; Aghaji, Mohammad Zein; Woo, Tom K

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we have developed quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models using advanced machine learning algorithms that can rapidly and accurately recognize high-performing metal organic framework (MOF) materials for CO2 capture. More specifically, QSPR classifiers have been developed that can, in a fraction of a section, identify candidate MOFs with enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity (>1 mmol/g at 0.15 bar and >4 mmol/g at 1 bar). The models were tested on a large set of 292 050 MOFs that were not part of the training set. The QSPR classifier could recover 945 of the top 1000 MOFs in the test set while flagging only 10% of the whole library for compute intensive screening. Thus, using the machine learning classifiers as part of a high-throughput screening protocol would result in an order of magnitude reduction in compute time and allow intractably large structure libraries and search spaces to be screened. PMID:26278259

  10. Gold nanospikes based microsensor as a highly accurate mercury emission monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Ylias M.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Tardio, James; Bansal, Vipul; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic elemental mercury (Hg0) emission is a serious worldwide environmental problem due to the extreme toxicity of the heavy metal to humans, plants and wildlife. Development of an accurate and cheap microsensor based online monitoring system which can be integrated as part of Hg0 removal and control processes in industry is still a major challenge. Here, we demonstrate that forming Au nanospike structures directly onto the electrodes of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) using a novel electrochemical route results in a self-regenerating, highly robust, stable, sensitive and selective Hg0 vapor sensor. The data from a 127 day continuous test performed in the presence of volatile organic compounds and high humidity levels, showed that the sensor with an electrodeposted sensitive layer had 260% higher response magnitude, 3.4 times lower detection limit (~22 μg/m3 or ~2.46 ppbv) and higher accuracy (98% Vs 35%) over a Au control based QCM (unmodified) when exposed to a Hg0 vapor concentration of 10.55 mg/m3 at 101°C. Statistical analysis of the long term data showed that the nano-engineered Hg0 sorption sites on the developed Au nanospikes sensitive layer play a critical role in the enhanced sensitivity and selectivity of the developed sensor towards Hg0 vapor. PMID:25338965

  11. Assessing temporal flux of plant hormones in stored processing potatoes using high definition accurate mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Ortiz, José Juan; Foukaraki, Sofia; Terry, Leon Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones are important molecules which at low concentration can regulate various physiological processes. Mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique for the quantification of multiple classes of plant hormones because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed a new ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–full-scan high-definition accurate mass spectrometry method, for simultaneous determination of abscisic acid and four metabolites phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid, 7′-hydroxy-abscisic acid and abscisic acid glucose ester, cytokinins zeatin, zeatin riboside, gibberellins (GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7) and indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid. We measured the amount of plant hormones in the flesh and skin of two processing potato cvs. Sylvana and Russet Burbank stored for up to 30 weeks at 6 °C under ambient air conditions. Herein, we report for the first time that abscisic acid glucose ester seems to accumulate in the skin of potato tubers throughout storage time. The method achieved a lowest limit of detection of 0.22 ng g−1 of dry weight and a limit of quantification of 0.74 ng g−1 dry weight (zeatin riboside), and was able to recover, detect and quantify a total of 12 plant hormones spiked on flesh and skin of potato tubers. In addition, the mass accuracy for all compounds (<5 ppm) was evaluated. PMID:26504563

  12. Robust and Accurate Shock Capturing Method for High-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Harold L.; Pampell, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    A simple yet robust and accurate approach for capturing shock waves using a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is presented. The method uses the physical viscous terms of the Navier-Stokes equations as suggested by others; however, the proposed formulation of the numerical viscosity is continuous and compact by construction, and does not require the solution of an auxiliary diffusion equation. This work also presents two analyses that guided the formulation of the numerical viscosity and certain aspects of the DG implementation. A local eigenvalue analysis of the DG discretization applied to a shock containing element is used to evaluate the robustness of several Riemann flux functions, and to evaluate algorithm choices that exist within the underlying DG discretization. A second analysis examines exact solutions to the DG discretization in a shock containing element, and identifies a "model" instability that will inevitably arise when solving the Euler equations using the DG method. This analysis identifies the minimum viscosity required for stability. The shock capturing method is demonstrated for high-speed flow over an inviscid cylinder and for an unsteady disturbance in a hypersonic boundary layer. Numerical tests are presented that evaluate several aspects of the shock detection terms. The sensitivity of the results to model parameters is examined with grid and order refinement studies.

  13. High-power CMOS current driver with accurate transconductance for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Loucas; Triantis, Iasonas F; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Current drivers are fundamental circuits in bioimpedance measurements including electrical impedance tomography (EIT). In the case of EIT, the current driver is required to have a large output impedance to guarantee high current accuracy over a wide range of load impedance values. This paper presents an integrated current driver which meets these requirements and is capable of delivering large sinusoidal currents to the load. The current driver employs a differential architecture and negative feedback, the latter allowing the output current to be accurately set by the ratio of the input voltage to a resistor value. The circuit was fabricated in a 0.6- μm high-voltage CMOS process technology and its core occupies a silicon area of 0.64 mm (2) . It operates from a ± 9 V power supply and can deliver output currents up to 5 mA p-p. The accuracy of the maximum output current is within 0.41% up to 500 kHz, reducing to 0.47% at 1 MHz with a total harmonic distortion of 0.69%. The output impedance is 665 k Ω at 100 kHz and 372 k Ω at 500 kHz. PMID:25073130

  14. The French proposal for a high spatial resolution Hyperspectral mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrère, Véronique; Briottet, Xavier; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Marion, Rodolphe; Bourguignon, Anne; Chami, Malik; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Chevrel, Stéphane; Deliot, Philippe; Dumont, Marie; Foucher, Pierre-Yves; Gomez, Cécile; Roman-Minghelli, Audrey; Sheeren, David; Weber, Christiane; Lefèvre, Marie-José; Mandea, Mioara

    2014-05-01

    More than 25 years of airborne imaging spectroscopy and spaceborne sensors such as Hyperion or HICO have clearly demonstrated the ability of such a remote sensing technique to produce value added information regarding surface composition and physical properties for a large variety of applications. Scheduled missions such as EnMAP and PRISMA prove the increased interest of the scientific community for such a type of remote sensing data. In France, a group of Science and Defence users of imaging spectrometry data (Groupe de Synthèse Hyperspectral, GSH) established an up-to-date review of possible applications, define instrument specifications required for accurate, quantitative retrieval of diagnostic parameters, and identify fields of application where imaging spectrometry is a major contribution. From these conclusions, CNES (French Space Agency) decided a phase 0 study for an hyperspectral mission concept, named at this time HYPXIM (HYPerspectral-X IMagery), the main fields of applications are vegetation biodiversity, coastal and inland waters, geosciences, urban environment, atmospheric sciences, cryosphere and Defence. Results pointed out applications where high spatial resolution was necessary and would not be covered by the other foreseen hyperspectral missions. The phase A started at the beginning of 2013 based on the following HYPXIM characteristics: a hyperspectral camera covering the [0.4 - 2.5 µm] spectral range with a 8 m ground sampling distance (GSD) and a PAN camera with a 1.85 m GSD, onboard a mini-satellite platform. This phase A is currently stopped due to budget constraints. Nevertheless, the Science team is currently focusing on the preparation for the next CNES prospective meeting (March, 2014), an important step for the future of the mission. This paper will provide an update of the status of this mission and of new results obtained by the Science team.

  15. High resolution DEM from Tandem-X interferometry: an accurate tool to characterize volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, Francois

    2013-04-01

    Tandem-X mission was launched by the German agency (DLR) in June 2010. It is a new generation high resolution SAR sensor mainly dedicated to topographic applications. For the purpose of our researches focused on the study of the volcano-tectonic activity in the Kivu Rift area, a set of Tandem-X bistatic radar images were used to produce a high resolution InSAR DEM of the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP). The VVP is part of the Western branch of the African rift, situated at the boundary between D.R. Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. It has two highly active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira. A first task concerns the quantitative assessment of the vertical accuracy that can be achieved with these new data. The new DEMs are compared to other space borne datasets (SRTM, ASTER) but also to field measurements given by differential GPS. Multi-temporal radar acquisitions allow us to produce several DEM of the same area. This appeared to be very useful in the context of an active volcanic context where new geomorphological features (faults, fissures, volcanic cones and lava flows) appear continuously through time. For example, since the year 2000, time of the SRTM acquisition, we had one eruption at Nyiragongo (2002) and six eruptions at Nyamulagira (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010 and 2011) which all induce large changes in the landscape with the emplacement of new lava fields and scoria cones. From our repetitive Tandem-X DEM production, we have a tool to identify and also quantify in term of size and volume all the topographic changes relative to this past volcanic activity. These parameters are high value information to improve the understanding of the Virunga volcanoes; the accurate estimation of erupted volume and knowledge of structural features associated to past eruptions are key parameters to understand the volcanic system, to ameliorate the hazard assessment, and finally contribute to risk mitigation in a densely populated area.

  16. Procedures for accurate U and Th isotope measurements by high precision MC-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dirk L.; Prytulak, Julie; Richards, David A.; Elliott, Tim; Coath, Christopher D.; Smart, Peter L.; Scholz, Denis

    2007-07-01

    We present multi-collector (MC) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) protocols developed to obtain high precision, accurate determinations of U and Th isotope ratios that are applicable to a wide range of geological materials. MC-ICPMS provides a means to make high precision measurements but a recent laboratory inter-comparison, Regular European Inter-laboratory Measurement Evaluation Programme (REIMEP)-18, indicates that accurate results for U isotope ratios are not currently achieved by all facilities using MC-ICPMS. We detail a suite of protocols that can be used for a wide variety of U and Th isotope ratios and total loads. Particular attention is devoted to instrument optimisation, instrumental backgrounds, stability and memory effects, multiplier nonlinearity and yield determinations. Our results indicate that the extent of mass fractionation of U and Th analyses run under similar instrumental conditions is 0.48% per amu and 0.45% per amu, respectively, but cannot be distinguished at per mil precision levels. However, we note that multiplier-Faraday cup gain can be significantly different for U and Th by 1% and thus a U standard should not be used to correct Th measurements. For this reason, a combination of thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and MC-ICPMS methods have been used to determine the isotopic ratio of an in-house Th standard (TEDDi). As part of our methods, TEDDi and the U standard NBL-112a are used as bracketing standards for Th and U samples, respectively. While the in-house Th standard has 229Th-230Th-232Th composition specific for bracketing low 232Th analyses, the methods have been also successful for silicates with 230Th/232Th <10-5. Using NBL-112a, TEDDi and a gravimetrically calibrated mixed 229Th-236U spike, we demonstrate secular equilibrium in natural materials such as Table Mountain Latite and a Long Valley Glass Mountain sample with a reproducibility of ±3.8 per mil for 230Th/238U and ±2.8 per mil for 234U

  17. A High-Accurate and High-Efficient Monte Carlo Code by Improved Molière Functions with Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Takao; Okei, Kazuhide

    2003-07-01

    Although the Molière theory of multiple Coulomb scattering is less accue rate in tracing solid angles than the Goudsmit and Saunderson theory due to the small angle approximation, it still acts very important roles in developments of high-efficient simulation codes of relativistic charged particles like cosmic-ray particles. Molière expansion is well explained by the physical model, that is the e normal distribution attributing to the high-frequent moderate scatterings and subsequent correction terms attributing to the additive large-angle scatterings. Based on these physical concepts, we have improved a high-accurate and highefficient Monte Carlo code taking account of ionization loss.

  18. Multiple apolipoprotein kinetics measured in human HDL by high-resolution/accurate mass parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Andraski, Allison B; Pieper, Brett; Goh, Wilson; Mendivil, Carlos O; Sacks, Frank M; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous labeling with stable isotopes is used to study the metabolism of proteins in vivo. However, traditional detection methods such as GC/MS cannot measure tracer enrichment in multiple proteins simultaneously, and multiple reaction monitoring MS cannot measure precisely the low tracer enrichment in slowly turning-over proteins as in HDL. We exploited the versatility of the high-resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) quadrupole Orbitrap for proteomic analysis of five HDL sizes. We identified 58 proteins in HDL that were shared among three humans and that were organized into five subproteomes according to HDL size. For seven of these proteins, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoC-III, apoD, apoE, and apoM, we performed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to measure trideuterated leucine tracer enrichment between 0.03 to 1.0% in vivo, as required to study their metabolism. The results were suitable for multicompartmental modeling in all except apoD. These apolipoproteins in each HDL size mainly originated directly from the source compartment, presumably the liver and intestine. Flux of apolipoproteins from smaller to larger HDL or the reverse contributed only slightly to apolipoprotein metabolism. These novel findings on HDL apolipoprotein metabolism demonstrate the analytical breadth and scope of the HR/AM-PRM technology to perform metabolic research. PMID:26862155

  19. Continuous Digital Light Processing (cDLP): Highly Accurate Additive Manufacturing of Tissue Engineered Bone Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dean, David; Jonathan, Wallace; Siblani, Ali; Wang, Martha O; Kim, Kyobum; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2012-03-01

    Highly accurate rendering of the external and internal geometry of bone tissue engineering scaffolds effects fit at the defect site, loading of internal pore spaces with cells, bioreactor-delivered nutrient and growth factor circulation, and scaffold resorption. It may be necessary to render resorbable polymer scaffolds with 50 μm or less accuracy to achieve these goals. This level of accuracy is available using Continuous Digital Light processing (cDLP) which utilizes a DLP(®) (Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX) chip. One such additive manufacturing device is the envisionTEC (Ferndale, MI) Perfactory(®). To use cDLP we integrate a photo-crosslinkable polymer, a photo-initiator, and a biocompatible dye. The dye attenuates light, thereby limiting the depth of polymerization. In this study we fabricated scaffolds using the well-studied resorbable polymer, poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) as a dye, Irgacure(®) 819 (BASF [Ciba], Florham Park, NJ) as an initiator, and diethyl fumarate as a solvent to control viscosity. PMID:23066427

  20. Accurate and reliable high-throughput detection of copy number variation in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Fiegler, Heike; Redon, Richard; Andrews, Dan; Scott, Carol; Andrews, Robert; Carder, Carol; Clark, Richard; Dovey, Oliver; Ellis, Peter; Feuk, Lars; French, Lisa; Hunt, Paul; Kalaitzopoulos, Dimitrios; Larkin, James; Montgomery, Lyndal; Perry, George H.; Plumb, Bob W.; Porter, Keith; Rigby, Rachel E.; Rigler, Diane; Valsesia, Armand; Langford, Cordelia; Humphray, Sean J.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Lee, Charles; Hurles, Matthew E.; Carter, Nigel P.

    2006-01-01

    This study describes a new tool for accurate and reliable high-throughput detection of copy number variation in the human genome. We have constructed a large-insert clone DNA microarray covering the entire human genome in tiling path resolution that we have used to identify copy number variation in human populations. Crucial to this study has been the development of a robust array platform and analytic process for the automated identification of copy number variants (CNVs). The array consists of 26,574 clones covering 93.7% of euchromatic regions. Clones were selected primarily from the published “Golden Path,” and mapping was confirmed by fingerprinting and BAC-end sequencing. Array performance was extensively tested by a series of validation assays. These included determining the hybridization characteristics of each individual clone on the array by chromosome-specific add-in experiments. Estimation of data reproducibility and false-positive/negative rates was carried out using self–self hybridizations, replicate experiments, and independent validations of CNVs. Based on these studies, we developed a variance-based automatic copy number detection analysis process (CNVfinder) and have demonstrated its robustness by comparison with the SW-ARRAY method. PMID:17122085

  1. Highly accurate analytic formulae for projectile motion subjected to quadratic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    The classical phenomenon of motion of a projectile fired (thrown) into the horizon through resistive air charging a quadratic drag onto the object is revisited in this paper. No exact solution is known that describes the full physical event under such an exerted resistance force. Finding elegant analytical approximations for the most interesting engineering features of dynamical behavior of the projectile is the principal target. Within this purpose, some analytical explicit expressions are derived that accurately predict the maximum height, its arrival time as well as the flight range of the projectile at the highest ascent. The most significant property of the proposed formulas is that they are not restricted to the initial speed and firing angle of the object, nor to the drag coefficient of the medium. In combination with the available approximations in the literature, it is possible to gain information about the flight and complete the picture of a trajectory with high precision, without having to numerically simulate the full governing equations of motion.

  2. Accurate calculation of the dissociation energy of the highly anharmonic system ClHCl(-).

    PubMed

    Stein, Christopher; Oswald, Rainer; Botschwina, Peter; Peterson, Kirk A

    2015-05-28

    Accurate bond dissociation energies (D0) are reported for different isotopologues of the highly anharmonic system ClHCl(-). The mass-independent equilibrium dissociation energy De was obtained by a composite method with frozen-core (fc) CCSD(T) as the basic contribution. Basis sets as large as aug-cc-pV8(+d)Z were employed, and extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit was carried out. Explicitly correlated calculations with the CCSD(T)-F12b method were also performed to support the conventionally calculated values. Core-core and core-valence correlation, scalar relativity, and higher-order correlation were considered as well. Two mass-dependent contributions, namely, the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction and the difference in zero-point energies between the complex and the HCl fragment, were then added in order to arrive at precise D0 values. Results for (35)ClH(35)Cl(-) and (35)ClD(35)Cl(-) are 23.81 and 23.63 kcal/mol, respectively, with estimated uncertainties of 0.05 kcal/mol. In contrast to FHF(-) ( Stein , C. ; Oswald , R. ; Sebald , P. ; Botschwina , P. ; Stoll , H. , Peterson , K. A. Mol. Phys. 2013 , 111 , 2647 - 2652 ), the D0 values of the bichloride species are larger than their De counterparts, which is an unusual situation in hydrogen-bonded systems. PMID:25405989

  3. Development of a high accurate gear measuring machine based on laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hu; Xue, Zi; Yang, Guoliang; Huang, Yao; Wang, Heyan

    2015-02-01

    Gear measuring machine is a specialized device for gear profile, helix or pitch measurement. The classic method for gear measurement and the conventional gear measuring machine are introduced. In this gear measuring machine, the Abbe errors arisen from the angle error of guideways hold a great weight in affection of profile measurement error. For minimize of the Abbe error, a laser measuring system is applied to develop a high accurate gear measuring machine. In this laser measuring system, two cube-corner reflectors are placed close to the tip of probe, a laser beam from laser head is splited along two paths, one is arranged tangent to the base circle of gear for the measurement of profile and pitch, another is arranged parallel to the gear axis for the measurement of helix, both laser measurement performed with a resolution of 0.3nm. This approach not only improves the accuracy of length measurement but minimize the Abbe offset directly. The configuration of this improved measuring machine is illustrated in detail. The measurements are performed automatically, and all the measurement signals from guide rails, rotary table, probe and laser measuring system are obtained synchronously. Software collects all the data for further calculation and evaluation. The first measurements for a gear involute artifact and a helix artifact are carried out, the results are shown and analyzed as well.

  4. Continuous Digital Light Processing (cDLP): Highly Accurate Additive Manufacturing of Tissue Engineered Bone Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David; Wallace, Jonathan; Siblani, Ali; Wang, Martha O.; Kim, Kyobum; Mikos, Antonios G.; Fisher, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly accurate rendering of the external and internal geometry of bone tissue engineering scaffolds effects fit at the defect site, loading of internal pore spaces with cells, bioreactor-delivered nutrient and growth factor circulation, and scaffold resorption. It may be necessary to render resorbable polymer scaffolds with 50 μm or less accuracy to achieve these goals. This level of accuracy is available using Continuous Digital Light processing (cDLP) which utilizes a DLP® (Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX) chip. One such additive manufacturing device is the envisionTEC (Ferndale, MI) Perfactory®. To use cDLP we integrate a photo-crosslinkable polymer, a photo-initiator, and a biocompatible dye. The dye attenuates light, thereby limiting the depth of polymerization. In this study we fabricated scaffolds using the well-studied resorbable polymer, poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye, Irgacure® 819 (BASF [Ciba], Florham Park, NJ) as an initiator, and diethyl fumarate as a solvent to control viscosity. PMID:23066427

  5. Highly accurate retrieval method of Japanese document images through a combination of morphological analysis and OCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuyama, Yutaka; Takebe, Hiroaki; Kurokawa, Koji; Saitoh, Takahiro; Naoi, Satoshi

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a method that allows Japanese document images to be retrieved more accurately by using OCR character candidate information and a conventional plain text search engine. In this method, the document image is first recognized by normal OCR to produce text. Keyword areas are then estimated from the normal OCR produced text through morphological analysis. A lattice of candidate- character codes is extracted from these areas, and then character strings are extracted from the lattice using a word-matching method in noun areas and a K-th DP-matching method in undefined word areas. Finally, these extracted character strings are added to the normal OCR produced text to improve document retrieval accuracy when u sing a conventional plain text search engine. Experimental results from searches of 49 OHP sheet images revealed that our method has a high recall rate of 98.2%, compared to 90.3% with a conventional method using only normal OCR produced text, while requiring about the same processing time as normal OCR.

  6. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. I. SPATIAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Friedel, Douglas N. E-mail: friedel@astro.illinois.edu

    2012-08-01

    Here we present high spatial resolution (<1'') observations of molecular emission in Orion-KL conducted using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. This work was motivated by recent millimeter continuum imaging studies of this region conducted at a similarly high spatial resolution, which revealed that the bulk of the emission arises from numerous compact sources, rather than the larger-scale extended structures typically associated with the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge. Given that the spatial extent of molecular emission greatly affects the determination of molecular abundances, it is important to determine the true spatial scale for complex molecules in this region. Additionally, it has recently been suggested that the relative spatial distributions of complex molecules in a source might give insight into the chemical mechanisms that drive complex chemistry in star-forming regions. In order to begin to address these issues, this study seeks to determine the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], dimethyl ether [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, methanol [CH{sub 3}OH], and methyl cyanide [CH{sub 3}CN] in Orion-KL at {lambda} = 3 mm. We find that for all observed molecules, the molecular emission arises from multiple components of the cloud that include a range of spatial scales and physical conditions. Here, we present the results of these observations and discuss the implications for studies of complex molecules in star-forming regions.

  7. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  8. Achieving accurate simulations of urban impacts on ozone at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Georgescu, M.; Hyde, P.; Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of urbanization on ozone levels have been widely investigated over cities primarily located in temperate and/or humid regions. In this study, nested WRF-Chem simulations with a finest grid resolution of 1 km are conducted to investigate ozone concentrations [O3] due to urbanization within cities in arid/semi-arid environments. First, a method based on a shape preserving Monotonic Cubic Interpolation (MCI) is developed and used to downscale anthropogenic emissions from the 4 km resolution 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI05) to the finest model resolution of 1 km. Using the rapidly expanding Phoenix metropolitan region as the area of focus, we demonstrate the proposed MCI method achieves ozone simulation results with appreciably improved correspondence to observations relative to the default interpolation method of the WRF-Chem system. Next, two additional sets of experiments are conducted, with the recommended MCI approach, to examine impacts of urbanization on ozone production: (1) the urban land cover is included (i.e., urbanization experiments) and, (2) the urban land cover is replaced with the region’s native shrubland. Impacts due to the presence of the built environment on [O3] are highly heterogeneous across the metropolitan area. Increased near surface [O3] due to urbanization of 10-20 ppb is predominantly a nighttime phenomenon while simulated impacts during daytime are negligible. Urbanization narrows the daily [O3] range (by virtue of increasing nighttime minima), an impact largely due to the region’s urban heat island. Our results demonstrate the importance of the MCI method for accurate representation of the diurnal profile of ozone, and highlight its utility for high-resolution air quality simulations for urban areas.

  9. Spatial Classification of Orchards and Vineyards with High Spatial Resolution Panchromatic Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Timothy; Steinmaus, Karen L.

    2005-02-01

    New high resolution single spectral band imagery offers the capability to conduct image classifications based on spatial patterns in imagery. A classification algorithm based on autocorrelation patterns was developed to automatically extract orchards and vineyards from satellite imagery. The algorithm was tested on IKONOS imagery over Granger, WA, which resulted in a classification accuracy of 95%.

  10. Spatial filter pinhole for high-energy pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Celliers, P M; Estabrook, K G; Wallace, R J; Murray, J E; Da Silva, L B; Macgowan, B J; Van Wonterghem, B M; Manes, K R

    1998-04-20

    Spatial filters are essential components for maintaining high beam quality in high-energy pulsed laser systems. The long-duration (21 ns) high-energy pulses envisioned for future inertial-confinement fusion drive systems, such as the U.S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), are likely to lead to increased plasma generation and closure effects within the pinholes in the spatial filters. The design goal for the pinhole spatial filter for the NIF design is to remove small-angle scatter in the beam to as little as a ?100-murad divergence. It is uncertain whether this design requirement can be met with a conventional pinhole design. We propose a new pinhole architecture that addresses these issues by incorporating features intended to reduce the rate of plasma generation. Initial experiments with this design have verified its performance improvement relative to a conventional pinhole design. PMID:18273166

  11. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  12. Enabling high grayscale resolution displays and accurate response time measurements on conventional computers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrui; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Display systems based on conventional computer graphics cards are capable of generating images with 8-bit gray level resolution. However, most experiments in vision research require displays with more than 12 bits of luminance resolution. Several solutions are available. Bit++ (1) and DataPixx (2) use the Digital Visual Interface (DVI) output from graphics cards and high resolution (14 or 16-bit) digital-to-analog converters to drive analog display devices. The VideoSwitcher (3) described here combines analog video signals from the red and blue channels of graphics cards with different weights using a passive resister network (4) and an active circuit to deliver identical video signals to the three channels of color monitors. The method provides an inexpensive way to enable high-resolution monochromatic displays using conventional graphics cards and analog monitors. It can also provide trigger signals that can be used to mark stimulus onsets, making it easy to synchronize visual displays with physiological recordings or response time measurements. Although computer keyboards and mice are frequently used in measuring response times (RT), the accuracy of these measurements is quite low. The RTbox is a specialized hardware and software solution for accurate RT measurements. Connected to the host computer through a USB connection, the driver of the RTbox is compatible with all conventional operating systems. It uses a microprocessor and high-resolution clock to record the identities and timing of button events, which are buffered until the host computer retrieves them. The recorded button events are not affected by potential timing uncertainties or biases associated with data transmission and processing in the host computer. The asynchronous storage greatly simplifies the design of user programs. Several methods are available to synchronize the clocks of the RTbox and the host computer. The RTbox can also receive external triggers and be used to measure RT with respect

  13. Highly accurate incremental CCSD(T) calculations on aqua- and amine-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacker, Tony; Friedrich, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the accuracy of the second-order incremental expansion using the domain-specific basis set approach is tested for 20 cationic metal-aqua and 25 cationic metal-amine complexes. The accuracy of the approach is analysed by the statistical measures range, arithmetic mean, mean absolute deviation, root mean square deviation and standard deviation. Using these measures we find that the error due to the local approximations decreases with increasing basis set. Next we construct a local virtual space using projected atomic orbitals (PAOs). The accuracy of the incremental series in combination with a distance-based truncation of the PAO space is analysed and compared to the convergence of the incremental series within the domain-specific basis set approach. Furthermore, we establish the recently proposed incremental CCSD(T)|MP2 method as a benchmark method to obtain highly accurate CCSD(T) energies. In combination with a basis set of quintuple-ζ quality we establish benchmarks for the binding energies of the investigated complexes. Finally, we use the inc-CCSD(T)|MP2/aV5Z' binding energies of 45 complexes and 34 dissociation reactions to compute the accuracy of several state of the art density functional theory (DFT) functionals like BP86, B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP, M06, PBE0 and TPSSh. With our implementation of the incremental scheme it was possible to compute the inc-CCSD(T)|MP2/aV5Z' energy for Al(H2O)3+ 25 (6106 AOs).

  14. Accurate Visual Heading Estimation at High Rotation Rate Without Oculomotor or Static-Depth Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Perrone, John A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    It has been claimed that either oculomotor or static depth cues provide the signals about self-rotation necessary approx.-1 deg/s. We tested this hypothesis by simulating self-motion along a curved path with the eyes fixed in the head (plus or minus 16 deg/s of rotation). Curvilinear motion offers two advantages: 1) heading remains constant in retinotopic coordinates, and 2) there is no visual-oculomotor conflict (both actual and simulated eye position remain stationary). We simulated 400 ms of rotation combined with 16 m/s of translation at fixed angles with respect to gaze towards two vertical planes of random dots initially 12 and 24 m away, with a field of view of 45 degrees. Four subjects were asked to fixate a central cross and to respond whether they were translating to the left or right of straight-ahead gaze. From the psychometric curves, heading bias (mean) and precision (semi-interquartile) were derived. The mean bias over 2-5 runs was 3.0, 4.0, -2.0, -0.4 deg for the first author and three naive subjects, respectively (positive indicating towards the rotation direction). The mean precision was 2.0, 1.9, 3.1, 1.6 deg. respectively. The ability of observers to make relatively accurate and precise heading judgments, despite the large rotational flow component, refutes the view that extra-flow-field information is necessary for human visual heading estimation at high rotation rates. Our results support models that process combined translational/rotational flow to estimate heading, but should not be construed to suggest that other cues do not play an important role when they are available to the observer.

  15. In-Depth Glycoproteomic Characterization of γ-Conglutin by High-Resolution Accurate Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schiarea, Silvia; Arnoldi, Lolita; Fanelli, Roberto; De Combarieu, Eric; Chiabrando, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s), and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation) were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography–multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants), but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit. PMID:24069245

  16. Random generalized linear model: a highly accurate and interpretable ensemble predictor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ensemble predictors such as the random forest are known to have superior accuracy but their black-box predictions are difficult to interpret. In contrast, a generalized linear model (GLM) is very interpretable especially when forward feature selection is used to construct the model. However, forward feature selection tends to overfit the data and leads to low predictive accuracy. Therefore, it remains an important research goal to combine the advantages of ensemble predictors (high accuracy) with the advantages of forward regression modeling (interpretability). To address this goal several articles have explored GLM based ensemble predictors. Since limited evaluations suggested that these ensemble predictors were less accurate than alternative predictors, they have found little attention in the literature. Results Comprehensive evaluations involving hundreds of genomic data sets, the UCI machine learning benchmark data, and simulations are used to give GLM based ensemble predictors a new and careful look. A novel bootstrap aggregated (bagged) GLM predictor that incorporates several elements of randomness and instability (random subspace method, optional interaction terms, forward variable selection) often outperforms a host of alternative prediction methods including random forests and penalized regression models (ridge regression, elastic net, lasso). This random generalized linear model (RGLM) predictor provides variable importance measures that can be used to define a “thinned” ensemble predictor (involving few features) that retains excellent predictive accuracy. Conclusion RGLM is a state of the art predictor that shares the advantages of a random forest (excellent predictive accuracy, feature importance measures, out-of-bag estimates of accuracy) with those of a forward selected generalized linear model (interpretability). These methods are implemented in the freely available R software package randomGLM. PMID:23323760

  17. Spatial Mode Control of High-Order Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, I.; Mevel, E.; Zerne, R.; LHuillier, A.; Antoine, P.; Wahlstroem, C.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spatial mode of high-order harmonics can be continuously controlled. The control is achieved by spatially modulating the degree of elliptical polarization of the fundamental field using birefringent optics. A highly sensitive relationship between the efficiency of harmonic generation and the degree of laser elliptical polarization leads to atoms emitting harmonics only in regions of linear polarization. The harmonics are emitted as annular beams whose angles of divergence can be continuously varied. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. High resolution as a key feature to perform accurate ELISPOT measurements using Zeiss KS ELISPOT readers.

    PubMed

    Malkusch, Wolf

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay was originally developed for the detection of individual antibody secreting B-cells. Since then, the method has been improved, and ELISPOT is used for the determination of the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interferon (IFN)-gamma, or various interleukins (IL)-4, IL-5. ELISPOT measurements are performed in 96-well plates with nitrocellulose membranes either visually or by means of image analysis. Image analysis offers various procedures to overcome variable background intensity problems and separate true from false spots. ELISPOT readers offer a complete solution for precise and automatic evaluation of ELISPOT assays. Number, size, and intensity of each single spot can be determined, printed, or saved for further statistical evaluation. Cytokine spots are always round, but because of floating edges with the background, they have a nonsmooth borderline. Resolution is a key feature for a precise detection of ELISPOT. In standard applications shape and edge steepness are essential parameters in addition to size and color for an accurate spot recognition. These parameters need a minimum spot diameter of 6 pixels. Collecting one single image per well with a standard color camera with 750 x 560 pixels will result in a resolution much too low to get all of the spots in a specimen. IFN-gamma spots may have only 25 microm diameters, and TNF-alpha spots just 15 microm. A 750 x 560 pixel image of a 6-mm well has a pixel size of 12 microm, resulting in only 1 or 2 pixel for a spot. Using a precise microscope optic in combination with a high resolution (1300 x 1030 pixel) integrating digital color camera, and at least 2 x 2 images per well will result in a pixel size of 2.5 microm and, as a minimum, 6 pixel diameter per spot. New approaches try to detect two cytokines per cell at the same time (i.e., IFN-gamma and IL-5). Standard staining procedures produce brownish spots (horseradish peroxidase) and blue spots

  19. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  20. X-ray and microwave emissions from the July 19, 2012 solar flare: Highly accurate observations and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-08-01

    The M7.7 solar flare of July 19, 2012, at 05:58 UT was observed with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions in the hard X-ray and optical ranges. The flare occurred at the solar limb, which allowed us to see the relative positions of the coronal and chromospheric X-ray sources and to determine their spectra. To explain the observations of the coronal source and the chromospheric one unocculted by the solar limb, we apply an accurate analytical model for the kinetic behavior of accelerated electrons in a flare. We interpret the chromospheric hard X-ray source in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and the coronal one in the thin-target approximation. Our estimates of the slopes of the hard X-ray spectra for both sources are consistent with the observations. However, the calculated intensity of the coronal source is lower than the observed one by several times. Allowance for the acceleration of fast electrons in a collapsing magnetic trap has enabled us to remove this contradiction. As a result of our modeling, we have estimated the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 15 keV to be ˜5 × 1010 erg cm-2 s-1, which exceeds the values typical of the thick-target model without a reverse current by a factor of ˜5. To independently test the model, we have calculated the microwave spectrum in the range 1-50 GHz that corresponds to the available radio observations.

  1. Detailed and Highly Accurate 3d Models of High Mountain Areas by the Macs-Himalaya Aerial Camera Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauchle, J.; Hein, D.; Berger, R.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing in areas with extreme altitude differences is particularly challenging. In high mountain areas specifically, steep slopes result in reduced ground pixel resolution and degraded quality in the DEM. Exceptionally high brightness differences can in part no longer be imaged by the sensors. Nevertheless, detailed information about mountainous regions is highly relevant: time and again glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs) and debris avalanches claim dozens of victims. Glaciers are sensitive to climate change and must be carefully monitored. Very detailed and accurate 3D maps provide a basic tool for the analysis of natural hazards and the monitoring of glacier surfaces in high mountain areas. There is a gap here, because the desired accuracies are often not achieved. It is for this reason that the DLR Institute of Optical Sensor Systems has developed a new aerial camera, the MACS-Himalaya. The measuring unit comprises four camera modules with an overall aperture angle of 116° perpendicular to the direction of flight. A High Dynamic Range (HDR) mode was introduced so that within a scene, bright areas such as sun-flooded snow and dark areas such as shaded stone can be imaged. In 2014, a measuring survey was performed on the Nepalese side of the Himalayas. The remote sensing system was carried by a Stemme S10 motor glider. Amongst other targets, the Seti Valley, Kali-Gandaki Valley and the Mt. Everest/Khumbu Region were imaged at heights up to 9,200 m. Products such as dense point clouds, DSMs and true orthomosaics with a ground pixel resolution of up to 15 cm were produced. Special challenges and gaps in the investigation of high mountain areas, approaches for resolution of these problems, the camera system and the state of evaluation are presented with examples.

  2. Decoding Rich Spatial Information with High Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Mark G.; Wolff, Michael J.; Spaak, Eelke

    2015-01-01

    New research suggests that magnetoencephalography (MEG) contains rich spatial information for decoding neural states. Even small differences in the angle of neighbouring dipoles generate subtle, but statistically separable field patterns. This implies MEG (and electroencephalography: EEG) is ideal for decoding neural states with high-temporal resolution in the human brain. PMID:26440122

  3. Highly effective and accurate weak point monitoring method for advanced design rule (1x nm) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongho; Seong, ShiJin; Yoon, Minjung; Park, Il-Suk; Kim, HyungSeop; Ihm, Dongchul; Chin, Soobok; Sivaraman, Gangadharan; Li, Mingwei; Babulnath, Raghav; Lee, Chang Ho; Kurada, Satya; Brown, Christine; Galani, Rajiv; Kim, JaeHyun

    2014-04-01

    Historically when we used to manufacture semiconductor devices for 45 nm or above design rules, IC manufacturing yield was mainly determined by global random variations and therefore the chip manufacturers / manufacturing team were mainly responsible for yield improvement. With the introduction of sub-45 nm semiconductor technologies, yield started to be dominated by systematic variations, primarily centered on resolution problems, copper/low-k interconnects and CMP. These local systematic variations, which have become decisively greater than global random variations, are design-dependent [1, 2] and therefore designers now share the responsibility of increasing yield with manufacturers / manufacturing teams. A widening manufacturing gap has led to a dramatic increase in design rules that are either too restrictive or do not guarantee a litho/etch hotspot-free design. The semiconductor industry is currently limited to 193 nm scanners and no relief is expected from the equipment side to prevent / eliminate these systematic hotspots. Hence we have seen a lot of design houses coming up with innovative design products to check hotspots based on model based lithography checks to validate design manufacturability, which will also account for complex two-dimensional effects that stem from aggressive scaling of 193 nm lithography. Most of these hotspots (a.k.a., weak points) are especially seen on Back End of the Line (BEOL) process levels like Mx ADI, Mx Etch and Mx CMP. Inspecting some of these BEOL levels can be extremely challenging as there are lots of wafer noises or nuisances that can hinder an inspector's ability to detect and monitor the defects or weak points of interest. In this work we have attempted to accurately inspect the weak points using a novel broadband plasma optical inspection approach that enhances defect signal from patterns of interest (POI) and precisely suppresses surrounding wafer noises. This new approach is a paradigm shift in wafer inspection

  4. Performance measurements of a high-spatial-resolution YAP camera.

    PubMed

    Uzunov, N; Bello, M; Boccaccio, P; Moschini, G; Baldazzi, G; Bollini, D; de Notaristefani, F; Mazzi, U; Riondato, M

    2005-02-01

    Physical properties of a position-sensitive camera for the analysis of biodistributions of gamma- and beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in small animals have been studied, in order to achieve optimal operating conditions. The camera consisted of a highly segmented yttrium-aluminate perovskite (YAP) scintillator, coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier. The energy resolution, the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, the spatial linearity and the count-rate linearity of the YAP camera have been determined. Images related to initial activity levels and successive biodistribution evolution in mice organs are presented as an illustration of the camera performance. PMID:15773730

  5. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  6. Novel electromagnetic surface integral equations for highly accurate computations of dielectric bodies with arbitrarily low contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Erguel, Ozguer; Guerel, Levent

    2008-12-01

    We present a novel stabilization procedure for accurate surface formulations of electromagnetic scattering problems involving three-dimensional dielectric objects with arbitrarily low contrasts. Conventional surface integral equations provide inaccurate results for the scattered fields when the contrast of the object is low, i.e., when the electromagnetic material parameters of the scatterer and the host medium are close to each other. We propose a stabilization procedure involving the extraction of nonradiating currents and rearrangement of the right-hand side of the equations using fictitious incident fields. Then, only the radiating currents are solved to calculate the scattered fields accurately. This technique can easily be applied to the existing implementations of conventional formulations, it requires negligible extra computational cost, and it is also appropriate for the solution of large problems with the multilevel fast multipole algorithm. We show that the stabilization leads to robust formulations that are valid even for the solutions of extremely low-contrast objects.

  7. Accurate determination of specific heat at high temperatures using the flash diffusivity method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, J. W.; Zoltan, A.; Wood, C.

    1989-01-01

    The flash diffusivity method of Parker et al. (1961) was used to measure accurately the specific heat of test samples simultaneously with thermal diffusivity, thus obtaining the thermal conductivity of these materials directly. The accuracy of data obtained on two types of materials (n-type silicon-germanium alloys and niobium), was + or - 3 percent. It is shown that the method is applicable up to at least 1300 K.

  8. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which are not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  9. Anatomically accurate high resolution modeling of human whole heart electromechanics: A strongly scalable algebraic multigrid solver method for nonlinear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Neic, Aurel; Liebmann, Manfred; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Haase, Gundolf; Plank, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical (EM) models of the heart have been used successfully to study fundamental mechanisms underlying a heart beat in health and disease. However, in all modeling studies reported so far numerous simplifications were made in terms of representing biophysical details of cellular function and its heterogeneity, gross anatomy and tissue microstructure, as well as the bidirectional coupling between electrophysiology (EP) and tissue distension. One limiting factor is the employed spatial discretization methods which are not sufficiently flexible to accommodate complex geometries or resolve heterogeneities, but, even more importantly, the limited efficiency of the prevailing solver techniques which is not sufficiently scalable to deal with the incurring increase in degrees of freedom (DOF) when modeling cardiac electromechanics at high spatio-temporal resolution. This study reports on the development of a novel methodology for solving the nonlinear equation of finite elasticity using human whole organ models of cardiac electromechanics, discretized at a high para-cellular resolution. Three patient-specific, anatomically accurate, whole heart EM models were reconstructed from magnetic resonance (MR) scans at resolutions of 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm, yielding meshes of approximately 184.6, 24.4 and 3.7 million tetrahedral elements and 95.9, 13.2 and 2.1 million displacement DOF, respectively. The same mesh was used for discretizing the governing equations of both electrophysiology (EP) and nonlinear elasticity. A novel algebraic multigrid (AMG) preconditioner for an iterative Krylov solver was developed to deal with the resulting computational load. The AMG preconditioner was designed under the primary objective of achieving favorable strong scaling characteristics for both setup and solution runtimes, as this is key for exploiting current high performance computing hardware. Benchmark results using the 220 μm, 440 μm and 880 μm meshes demonstrate

  10. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26510657

  11. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  12. Going Rogue in the Spatial Cuing Paradigm: High Spatial Validity Is Insufficient to Elicit Voluntary Shifts of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Gregory J.; Gibson, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary shifts of attention are often motivated in experimental contexts by using well-known symbols that accurately predict the direction of targets. The authors report 3 experiments, which showed that the presentation of predictive spatial information does not provide sufficient incentive to elicit voluntary shifts of attention. For instance,…

  13. Mapping Spatial Variability in Health and Wealth Indicators in Accra, Ghana Using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, R.; Ashcroft, E.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a tremendous amount of research conducted that examines disparities in health and wealth of persons between urban and rural areas however, relatively little research has been undertaken to examine variations within urban areas. A major limitation to elucidating differences with urban areas is the lack of social and demographic data at a sufficiently high spatial resolution to determine these differences. Generally the only available data that contain this information are census data which are collected at most every ten years and are often difficult to obtain at a high enough spatial resolution to allow for examining in depth variability in health and wealth indicators at high spatial resolutions, especially in developing countries. High spatial resolution satellite imagery may be able to provide timely and synoptic information that is related to health and wealth variability within a city. In this study we use two dates of Quickbird imagery (2003 and 2010) classified into the vegetation-impervious surface-soil (VIS) model introduced by Ridd (1995). For 2003 we only have partial coverage of the city, while for 2010 we have a mosaic, which covers the entire city of Accra, Ghana. Variations in the VIS values represent the physical variations within the city and these are compared to variations in economic, and/or sociodemographic data derived from the 2000 Ghanaian census at two spatial resolutions, the enumeration area (approximately US Census Tract) and the neighborhood for the city. Results indicate a significant correlation between both vegetation and impervious surface to type of cooking fuel used in the household, population density, housing density, availability of sewers, cooking space usage, and other variables. The correlations are generally stronger at the neighborhood level and the relationships are stable through time and space. Overall, the results indicate that information derived from high resolution satellite data is related to

  14. Spatially Weighted Principal Component Regression for High-dimensional Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dan; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of using high dimensional data residing on graphs to predict a low-dimensional outcome variable, such as disease status. Examples of data include time series and genetic data measured on linear graphs and imaging data measured on triangulated graphs (or lattices), among many others. Many of these data have two key features including spatial smoothness and intrinsically low dimensional structure. We propose a simple solution based on a general statistical framework, called spatially weighted principal component regression (SWPCR). In SWPCR, we introduce two sets of weights including importance score weights for the selection of individual features at each node and spatial weights for the incorporation of the neighboring pattern on the graph. We integrate the importance score weights with the spatial weights in order to recover the low dimensional structure of high dimensional data. We demonstrate the utility of our methods through extensive simulations and a real data analysis based on Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging initiative data. PMID:26213452

  15. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  16. Accurate documentation in cultural heritage by merging TLS and high-resolution photogrammetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Alby, Emmanuel; Assali, Pierre; Poitevin, Valentin; Hullo, Jean-François; Smigiel, Eddie

    2011-07-01

    Several recording techniques are used together in Cultural Heritage Documentation projects. The main purpose of the documentation and conservation works is usually to generate geometric and photorealistic 3D models for both accurate reconstruction and visualization purposes. The recording approach discussed in this paper is based on the combination of photogrammetric dense matching and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) techniques. Both techniques have pros and cons, and criteria as geometry, texture, accuracy, resolution, recording and processing time are often compared. TLS techniques (time of flight or phase shift systems) are often used for the recording of large and complex objects or sites. Point cloud generation from images by dense stereo or multi-image matching can be used as an alternative or a complementary method to TLS. Compared to TLS, the photogrammetric solution is a low cost one as the acquisition system is limited to a digital camera and a few accessories only. Indeed, the stereo matching process offers a cheap, flexible and accurate solution to get 3D point clouds and textured models. The calibration of the camera allows the processing of distortion free images, accurate orientation of the images, and matching at the subpixel level. The main advantage of this photogrammetric methodology is to get at the same time a point cloud (the resolution depends on the size of the pixel on the object), and therefore an accurate meshed object with its texture. After the matching and processing steps, we can use the resulting data in much the same way as a TLS point cloud, but with really better raster information for textures. The paper will address the automation of recording and processing steps, the assessment of the results, and the deliverables (e.g. PDF-3D files). Visualization aspects of the final 3D models are presented. Two case studies with merged photogrammetric and TLS data are finally presented: - The Gallo-roman Theatre of Mandeure, France); - The

  17. Development of an unmanned aerial vehicle-based spray system for highly accurate site-specific application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of crop production and protection materials is a crucial component in the high productivity of American agriculture. Agricultural chemical application is frequently needed at a specific time and location for accurate site-specific management of crop pests. Piloted aircrafts that carry ...

  18. Correction for solute/solvent interaction extends accurate freezing point depression theory to high concentration range.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, G D; Keener, C R; Cameron, I L

    1994-12-01

    The authors describe empirical corrections to ideally dilute expressions for freezing point depression of aqueous solutions to arrive at new expressions accurate up to three molal concentration. The method assumes non-ideality is due primarily to solute/solvent interactions such that the correct free water mass Mwc is the mass of water in solution Mw minus I.M(s) where M(s) is the mass of solute and I an empirical solute/solvent interaction coefficient. The interaction coefficient is easily derived from the constant in the linear regression fit to the experimental plot of Mw/M(s) as a function of 1/delta T (inverse freezing point depression). The I-value, when substituted into the new thermodynamic expressions derived from the assumption of equivalent activity of water in solution and ice, provides accurate predictions of freezing point depression (+/- 0.05 degrees C) up to 2.5 molal concentration for all the test molecules evaluated; glucose, sucrose, glycerol and ethylene glycol. The concentration limit is the approximate monolayer water coverage limit for the solutes which suggests that direct solute/solute interactions are negligible below this limit. This is contrary to the view of many authors due to the common practice of including hydration forces (a soft potential added to the hard core atomic potential) in the interaction potential between solute particles. When this is recognized the two viewpoints are in fundamental agreement. PMID:7699200

  19. Accurate taxonomy assignments from 16S rRNA sequences produced by highly parallel pyrosequencers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongzhi; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Andersen, Gary L.; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The recent introduction of massively parallel pyrosequencers allows rapid, inexpensive analysis of microbial community composition using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. However, a major challenge is to design a workflow so that taxonomic information can be accurately and rapidly assigned to each read, so that the composition of each community can be linked back to likely ecological roles played by members of each species, genus, family or phylum. Here, we use three large 16S rRNA datasets to test whether taxonomic information based on the full-length sequences can be recaptured by short reads that simulate the pyrosequencer outputs. We find that different taxonomic assignment methods vary radically in their ability to recapture the taxonomic information in full-length 16S rRNA sequences: most methods are sensitive to the region of the 16S rRNA gene that is targeted for sequencing, but many combinations of methods and rRNA regions produce consistent and accurate results. To process large datasets of partial 16S rRNA sequences obtained from surveys of various microbial communities, including those from human body habitats, we recommend the use of Greengenes or RDP classifier with fragments of at least 250 bases, starting from one of the primers R357, R534, R798, F343 or F517. PMID:18723574

  20. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  1. Spatial augmented reality based high accuracy human face projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Xie, Jinghui; Li, Yufeng; Weng, Dongdong; Liu, Yue

    2015-08-01

    This paper discusses the imaging principles and the technical difficulties of spatial augmented reality based human face projection. A novel geometry correction method is proposed to realize fast, high-accuracy face model projection. Using a depth camera to reconstruct the projected object, the relative position from the rendered model to the projector can be accessed and the initial projection image is generated. Then the projected image is distorted by using Bezier interpolation to guarantee that the projected texture matches with the object surface. The proposed method is under a simple process flow and can achieve high perception registration of virtual and real object. In addition, this method has a good performance in the condition that the reconstructed model is not exactly same with the rendered virtual model which extends its application area in the spatial augmented reality based human face projection.

  2. Accurate and Precise in Situ Zircon U-Pb age Dating With High Sample Throughput by Automated LA-SF-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, D.; Gerdes, A.; Schersten, A.; Hollis, J. A.; Martina, F.; Knudsen, C.

    2006-12-01

    Zircon is an ubiquitous mineral in most crystalline rocks as well as clastic sediments. The high resistance to thermal resetting and physical erosion makes zircon an exceptionally useful mineral for precise and accurate dating of thermal geological events. For example, the analysis of the U-Pb ages of detrital zircon grains in clastic sediments is a powerful tool in sedimentary provenance studies. Accurate and precise U-Pb ages of > 100 zircon grains in a sample usually allow to detect all major sedimentary source age components with statistical confidence. U-Pb age dating of detrital zircons is generally the domain of high resolution ion microprobe techniques (high resolution SIMS), where relatively rapid in situ analysis can be achieved. The major limitations of these techniques are sample throughput (about 75 zircon age dates per 24 hours), the very high purchasing and operating costs of the equipment and the need for highly specialised personnel, resulting in high cost. These high costs usually impose uncomfortable restrictions on the number of samples that can be analysed in a provenance study. Here, we present a high sample throughput technique for highly accurate and precise U-Pb dating of zircons by laser ablation magnetic sectorfield inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-SF-ICP-MS). This technique takes advantage of recent progress in laser technology and the introduction of magnetic sectorfield ICP-MS instruments. Based on a ThermoFinnigan Element2 magnetic sctorfield ICP-MS and a New Wave UP 213 laser ablation system, this techniques allows U-Pb dating of zircon grains with precision, accuray and spatial resolution comparable to high resolution SIMS. Because an individual analysis is carried out in less than two minutes and all data is acquired automated in pre-set mode with only minimal operator presence, the sample throughput is an order of magnitude higher compared to high resolution SIMS. Furthermore, the purchasing and operating costs of

  3. Spatially continuous mapping of snow depth in high alpine catchments using digital photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühler, Y.; Marty, M.; Egli, L.; Veitinger, J.; Jonas, T.; Thee, P.; Ginzler, C.

    2014-06-01

    Information on snow depth and its spatial distribution is crucial for many applications in snow and avalanche research as well as in hydrology and ecology. Today snow depth distributions are usually estimated using point measurements performed by automated weather stations and observers in the field combined with interpolation algorithms. However, these methodologies are not able to capture the high spatial variability of the snow depth distribution present in alpine terrain. Continuous and accurate snow depth mapping has been done using laser scanning but this method can only cover limited areas and is expensive. We use the airborne ADS80 opto-electronic scanner with 0.25 m spatial resolution to derive digital surface models (DSMs) of winter and summer terrains in the neighborhood of Davos, Switzerland. The DSMs are generated using photogrammetric image correlation techniques based on the multispectral nadir and backward looking sensor data. We compare these products with the following independent datasets acquired simultaneously: (a) manually measured snow depth plots (b) differential Global Navigation Satellite System (dGNSS) points (c) Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) and (d) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) datasets, to assess the accuracy of the photogrammetric products. The results of this investigation demonstrate the potential of optical scanners for wide-area, continuous and high spatial resolution snow-depth mapping over alpine catchments above tree line.

  4. Mapping urban and peri-urban agriculture using high spatial resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Dionys; Buehler, Yves; Kellenberger, Tobias W.

    2009-03-01

    In rapidly changing peri-urban environments where biophysical and socio-economic processes lead to spatial fragmentation of agricultural land, remote sensing offers an efficient tool to collect land cover/land use (LCLU) data for decision-making. Compared to traditional pixel-based approaches, remote sensing with object-based classification methods is reported to achieve improved classification results in complex heterogeneous landscapes. This study assessed the usefulness of object-oriented analysis of Quickbird high spatial resolution satellite data to classify urban and peri-urban agriculture in a limited peri-urban area of Hanoi, Vietnam. The results revealed that segmentation was essential in developing the object-oriented classification approach. Accurate segmentation of shape and size of an object enhanced classification with spectral, textural, morphological, and topological features. A qualitative, visual comparison of the classification results showed successful localisation and identification of most LCLU classes. Quantitative evaluation was conducted with a classification error matrix reaching an overall accuracy of 67% and a kappa coefficient of 0.61. In general, object-oriented classification of high spatial resolution satellite data proved the promising approach for LCLU analysis at village level. Capturing small-scale urban and peri-urban agricultural diversity offers a considerable potential for environmental monitoring. Challenges remain with the delineation of field boundaries and LCLU diversity on more spatially extensive datasets.

  5. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Imaging of Peripheral Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mostardi, Petrice M.; Young, Phillip M.; McKusick, Michael A.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the performance of a recently developed 3D time-resolved CE-MRA technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection-Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), for accurate characterization and treatment planning of vascular malformations of the periphery. Materials and Methods Twelve patient studies were performed (eight female, four male; average age, 33 years). The protocol consisted of three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved CE-MRA followed by a single late phase T1-weighted acquisition. Vascular malformations were imaged in the forearm, hand, thigh, and foot. Imaging evaluation was performed for accurate characterization of lesion type, identification of feeding and draining vessels, involvement with surrounding tissue, overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning, and correlation with conventional angiography. Results Time-resolved CE-MRA allowed for characterization of malformation flow and type. Feeding and draining vessels were identified in all cases. Overall quality for diagnosis and treatment planning was 3.58/4.0, and correlation with conventional angiography was scored as 3.89/4.0. Conclusion The CAPR time series has been shown to portray the temporal dynamics and structure of vascular malformations as well as the normal vasculature with high quality. CAPR time-resolved imaging is able to accurately characterize high and low flow lesions, allowing for pretreatment lesion assessment and treatment planning. Delayed imaging is important to capture complete filling of very slow flow vascular malformations. PMID:22674646

  6. Highly accurate P-SV complete synthetic seismograms using modified DSM operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Nozomu; Geller, Robert J.; Cummins, Phil R.

    In previous papers [Cummins et al., 1994ab] (hereafter referred to as DSMI and DSMII respectively), we presented accurate methods for computing complete synthetic seismograms for SH and P-SV respectively in a spherical earth model. The SH calculations used computationally efficient modified matrix operators, but the P-SV synthetics were computationally intensive. Geller and Takeuchi [1995] (hereafter referred to as GT95) presented a general theory for deriving modified operators and gave the explicit form of the modified operators for the P-SV case in cylindrical or cartesian coordinates. In this paper we extend GT95's results to derive modified operators for the P-SV case in spherical coordinates. The use of the modified operators reduces the CPU time by a factor of about 5 without a loss of accuracy. 10 CPU min on a SPARC-20 workstation with one CPU are required to compute a profile of synthetic seismograms from DC to 20 sec period.

  7. Highly accurate apparatus for electrochemical characterization of the felt electrodes used in redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Ho; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O. Ok; Jin, Chang-Soo; Yang, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Because of the rise in renewable energy use, the redox flow battery (RFB) has attracted extensive attention as an energy storage system. Thus, many studies have focused on improving the performance of the felt electrodes used in RFBs. However, existing analysis cells are unsuitable for characterizing felt electrodes because of their complex 3-dimensional structure. Analysis is also greatly affected by the measurement conditions, viz. compression ratio, contact area, and contact strength between the felt and current collector. To address the growing need for practical analytical apparatus, we report a new analysis cell for accurate electrochemical characterization of felt electrodes under various conditions, and compare it with previous ones. In this cell, the measurement conditions can be exhaustively controlled with a compression supporter. The cell showed excellent reproducibility in cyclic voltammetry analysis and the results agreed well with actual RFB charge-discharge performance.

  8. A stable and high-order accurate conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Jens; Nordström, Jan

    2010-08-01

    This paper analyzes well-posedness and stability of a conjugate heat transfer problem in one space dimension. We study a model problem for heat transfer between a fluid and a solid. The energy method is used to derive boundary and interface conditions that make the continuous problem well-posed and the semi-discrete problem stable. The numerical scheme is implemented using 2nd-, 3rd- and 4th-order finite difference operators on Summation-By-Parts (SBP) form. The boundary and interface conditions are implemented weakly. We investigate the spectrum of the spatial discretization to determine which type of coupling that gives attractive convergence properties. The rate of convergence is verified using the method of manufactured solutions.

  9. High dimensional data analysis using multivariate generalized spatial quantiles

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Chatterjee, Snigdhansu

    2015-01-01

    High dimensional data routinely arises in image analysis, genetic experiments, network analysis, and various other research areas. Many such datasets do not correspond to well-studied probability distributions, and in several applications the data-cloud prominently displays non-symmetric and non-convex shape features. We propose using spatial quantiles and their generalizations, in particular, the projection quantile, for describing, analyzing and conducting inference with multivariate data. Minimal assumptions are made about the nature and shape characteristics of the underlying probability distribution, and we do not require the sample size to be as high as the data-dimension. We present theoretical properties of the generalized spatial quantiles, and an algorithm to compute them quickly. Our quantiles may be used to obtain multidimensional confidence or credible regions that are not required to conform to a pre-determined shape. We also propose a new notion of multidimensional order statistics, which may be used to obtain multidimensional outliers. Many of the features revealed using a generalized spatial quantile-based analysis would be missed if the data was shoehorned into a well-known probabilistic configuration. PMID:26617421

  10. High dose bystander effects in spatially fractionated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asur, Rajalakshmi; Butterworth, Karl T.; Penagaricano, Jose A.; Prise, Kevin M.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional radiotherapy of bulky tumors has certain limitations. Spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are examples of advanced modulated beam therapies that help in significant reductions in normal tissue damage. GRID refers to the delivery of a single high dose of radiation to a large treatment area that is divided into several smaller fields, while IMRT allows improved dose conformity to the tumor target compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. In this review, we consider spatially fractionated radiotherapy approaches focusing on GRID and IMRT, and present complementary evidence from different studies which support the role of radiation induced signaling effects in the overall radiobiological rationale for these treatments. PMID:24246848

  11. A high fructose diet impairs spatial memory in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ross, A P; Bartness, T J; Mielke, J G; Parent, M B

    2009-10-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a substantial increase in the amount of fructose consumed by North Americans. Recent evidence from rodents indicates that hippocampal insulin signaling facilitates memory and excessive fructose consumption produces hippocampal insulin resistance. Based on this evidence, the present study tested the hypothesis that a high fructose diet would impair hippocampal-dependent memory. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (postnatal day 61) were fed either a control (0% fructose) or high fructose diet (60% of calories). Food intake and body mass were measured regularly. After 19 weeks, the rats were given 3 days of training (8 trials/day) in a spatial version of the water maze task, and retention performance was probed 48 h later. The high fructose diet did not affect acquisition of the task, but did impair performance on the retention test. Specifically, rats fed a high fructose diet displayed significantly longer latencies to reach the area where the platform had been located, made significantly fewer approaches to that area, and spent significantly less time in the target quadrant than did control diet rats. There was no difference in swim speed between the two groups. The retention deficits correlated significantly with fructose-induced elevations of plasma triglyceride concentrations. Consequently, the impaired spatial water maze retention performance seen with the high fructose diet may have been attributable, at least in part, to fructose-induced increases in plasma triglycerides. PMID:19500683

  12. High-resolution TFT-LCD for spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, JaeWon; Kim, Yong-Hae; Byun, Chun-Won; Pi, Jae-Eun; Oh, Himchan; Kim, GiHeon; Lee, Myung-Lae; Chu, Hye-Yong; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2014-06-01

    SLM with very fine pixel pitch is needed for the holographic display system. Among various kinds of SLMs, commercially available high resolution LCoS has been widely used as a spatial light modulator. But the size of commercially available LCoS SLM is limited because the manufacturing technology of LCoS is based on the semiconductor process developed on small size Si wafer. Recently very high resolution flat panel display panel (~500ppi) was developed as a "retina display". Until now, the pixel pitch of flat panel display is several times larger than the pixel pitch of LCoS. But considering the possibility of shrink down the pixel pitch with advanced lithographic tools, the application of flat panel display will make it possible to build a SLM with high spatial bandwidth product. We simulated High resolution TFT-LCD panel on glass substrate using oxide semiconductor TFT with pixel pitch of 20um. And we considered phase modulation behavior of LC(ECB) mode. The TFT-LCD panel is reflective type with 4-metal structure with organic planarization layers. The technical challenge for high resolution large area SLM will be discussed with very fine pixel.

  13. A highly accurate method for the determination of mass and center of mass of a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.; Egwuatu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An extremely accurate method for the measurement of mass and the lateral center of mass of a spacecraft has been developed. The method was needed for the Voyager spacecraft mission requirement which limited the uncertainty in the knowledge of lateral center of mass of the spacecraft system weighing 750 kg to be less than 1.0 mm (0.04 in.). The method consists of using three load cells symmetrically located at 120 deg apart on a turntable with respect to the vertical axis of the spacecraft and making six measurements for each load cell. These six measurements are taken by cyclic rotations of the load cell turntable and of the spacecraft, about the vertical axis of the measurement fixture. This method eliminates all alignment, leveling, and load cell calibration errors for the lateral center of mass determination, and permits a statistical best fit of the measurement data. An associated data reduction computer program called MASCM has been written to implement this method and has been used for the Voyager spacecraft.

  14. Towards first-principles based prediction of highly accurate electrochemical Pourbiax diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Chan, Maria; Greeley, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Electrochemical Pourbaix diagrams lie at the heart of aqueous electrochemical processes and are central to the identification of stable phases of metals for processes ranging from electrocatalysis to corrosion. Even though standard DFT calculations are potentially powerful tools for the prediction of such Pourbaix diagrams, inherent errors in the description of strongly-correlated transition metal (hydr)oxides, together with neglect of weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions, has limited the reliability of the predictions for even the simplest bulk systems; corresponding predictions for more complex alloy or surface structures are even more challenging . Through introduction of a Hubbard U correction, employment of a state-of-the-art van der Waals functional, and use of pure water as a reference state for the calculations, these errors are systematically corrected. The strong performance is illustrated on a series of bulk transition metal (Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) hydroxide, oxyhydroxide, binary and ternary oxides where the corresponding thermodynamics of oxidation and reduction can be accurately described with standard errors of less than 0.04 eV in comparison with experiment.

  15. High- and low-pressure pneumotachometers measure respiration rates accurately in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagot, R. J.; Mc Donald, R. T.; Roman, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Respiration-rate transducers in the form of pneumotachometers measure respiration rates of pilots operating high performance research aircraft. In each low pressure or high pressure oxygen system a sensor is placed in series with the pilots oxygen supply line to detect gas flow accompanying respiration.

  16. A Polymer Visualization System with Accurate Heating and Cooling Control and High-Speed Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Anson; Guo, Yanting; Park, Chul B.; Zhou, Nan Q.

    2015-01-01

    A visualization system to observe crystal and bubble formation in polymers under high temperature and pressure has been developed. Using this system, polymer can be subjected to a programmable thermal treatment to simulate the process in high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HPDSC). With a high-temperature/high-pressure view-cell unit, this system enables in situ observation of crystal formation in semi-crystalline polymers to complement thermal analyses with HPDSC. The high-speed recording capability of the camera not only allows detailed recording of crystal formation, it also enables in situ capture of plastic foaming processes with a high temporal resolution. To demonstrate the system’s capability, crystal formation and foaming processes of polypropylene/carbon dioxide systems were examined. It was observed that crystals nucleated and grew into spherulites, and they grew at faster rates as temperature decreased. This observation agrees with the crystallinity measurement obtained with the HPDSC. Cell nucleation first occurred at crystals’ boundaries due to CO2 exclusion from crystal growth fronts. Subsequently, cells were nucleated around the existing ones due to tensile stresses generated in the constrained amorphous regions between networks of crystals. PMID:25915031

  17. A Generalized Subspace Least Mean Square Method for High-resolution Accurate Estimation of Power System Oscillation Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Ning; Abdollahi, Ali

    2013-09-10

    A Generalized Subspace-Least Mean Square (GSLMS) method is presented for accurate and robust estimation of oscillation modes from exponentially damped power system signals. The method is based on orthogonality of signal and noise eigenvectors of the signal autocorrelation matrix. Performance of the proposed method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation and compared with Prony method. Test results show that the GSLMS is highly resilient to noise and significantly dominates Prony method in tracking power system modes under noisy environments.

  18. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles. PMID:26517180

  19. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  20. Accurate calculations of the high-pressure elastic constants based on the first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Ju; Gu, Jian-Bing; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Yang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-08-01

    The energy term corresponding to the first order of the strain in Taylor series expansion of the energy with respect to strain is always ignored when high-pressure elastic constants are calculated. Whether the modus operandi would affect the results of the high-pressure elastic constants is still unsolved. To clarify this query, we calculate the high-pressure elastic constants of tantalum and rhenium when the energy term mentioned above is considered and neglected, respectively. Results show that the neglect of the energy term corresponding to the first order of the strain indeed would influence the veracity of the high-pressure elastic constants, and this influence becomes larger with pressure increasing. Therefore, the energy term corresponding to the first-order of the strain should be considered when the high-pressure elastic constants are calculated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274235), the Young Scientist Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11104190), and the Doctoral Education Fund of Education Ministry of China (Grant Nos. 20100181110086 and 20110181120112).

  1. Kashima RAy-Tracing Service (KARATS) for high accurate GNSS positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, R.; Hobiger, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Tsutsumi, M.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2010-12-01

    Radio signal delays associated with the neutral atmosphere are one of the major error sources of space geodesy such as GPS, GLONASS, GALILEO, VLBI, In-SAR measurements. We have developed a state-of-art tool to estimate the atmospheric path delays by ray-tracing through JMA meso-scale analysis (MANAL data) data. The tools, which we have named 'KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)', are capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. Numerical weather models such as MANAL data have undergone a significant improvement of accuracy and spatial resolution, which makes it feasible to utilize them for the correction of atmosphere excess path delays. In the previous studies for evaluating KARAT performance, the KARAT solutions are slightly better than the solutions using VMF1 and GMF with linear gradient model for horizontal and height positions. Based on these results we have started the web-based online service, 'KAshima RAytracing Service (KARATS)' for providing the atmospheric delay correction of RINEX files on Jan 27th, 2010. The KARATS receives user's RINEX data via a proper web site (http://vps.nict.go.jp/karats/index.html) and processes user's data files using KARAT for reducing atmospheric slant delays. The reduced RINEX files are archived in the specific directory for each user on the KARATS server. Once the processing is finished the information of data archive is sent privately via email to each user. If user want to process a large amount of data files, user can prepare own server which archives them. The KARATS can get these files from the user's server using GNU ¥emph{wget} and performs ray-traced corrections. We will present a brief status of the KARATS and summarize first experiences gained after this service went operational in December 2009. In addition, we will also demonstrate the newest KARAT performance based on the 5km MANAL data which has been operational from April 7th, 2009 and an outlook on

  2. High-throughput Accurate-wavelength Lens-based Visible Spectrometera

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Belll and Filippo Scotti

    2010-06-04

    A scanning visible spectrometer has been prototyped to complement fixed-wavelength transmission grating spectrometers for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. Fast f/1.8 200 mm commercial lenses are used with a large 2160 mm-1 grating for high throughput. A stepping-motor controlled sine drive positions the grating, which is mounted on a precision rotary table. A high-resolution optical encoder on the grating stage allows the grating angle to be measured with an absolute accuracy of 0.075 arcsec, corresponding to a wavelength error ≤ 0.005 Å. At this precision, changes in grating groove density due to thermal expansion and variations in the refractive index of air are important. An automated calibration procedure determines all relevant spectrometer parameters to high accuracy. Changes in bulk grating temperature, atmospheric temperature and pressure are monitored between the time of calibration and the time of measurement to insure a persistent wavelength calibration

  3. Wind-tunnel tests and modeling indicate that aerial dispersant delivery operations are highly accurate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture’s high-speed wind tunnel facility in College Station, Texas, USA was used to determine droplet size distributions generated by dispersant delivery nozzles at wind speeds comparable to those used in aerial dispersant application. A laser particle size anal...

  4. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  5. Implementing an Inexpensive and Accurate Introductory Gas Density Activity with High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, W. Patrick; Joseph, Christopher; Morey, Samantha; Santos Romo, Ana; Shope, Cullen; Strang, Jonathan; Yang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A simplified activity examined gas density while employing cost-efficient syringes in place of traditional glass bulbs. The exercise measured the density of methane, with very good accuracy and precision, in both first-year high school and AP chemistry settings. The participating students were tasked with finding the density of a gas. The…

  6. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  7. Effect of spatial distribution of dissipated power on modeling of SMR BAW resonators at high power levels.

    PubMed

    Tag, Andreas; Bader, Bernhard; Huck, Christian; Karolewski, Dominik; Pitschi, Maximilian; Weigel, Robert; Hagelauer, Amelie

    2015-10-01

    The modeling of bulk acoustic wave resonators at elevated power levels has been improved by taking the spatial distribution of the dominating loss mechanisms into account. The spatial distribution of the dissipated power enables more accurate modeling of the temperature increase caused by the applied power. Thus, it is also possible to more accurately model the frequency shifts of the resonators' impedance curves resulting from the temperature increase caused by the applied power. Simulation and measurement results for the temperatures and impedances of the resonators with different layerstacks at high power loads are presented. The simulation and measurement results are in good agreement, confirming the presented modeling approach. Furthermore, the de-embedding procedure used to obtain vectorial scattering parameters of the resonators during high power loads, the according measurement setup, and the procedure for measuring absolute temperatures by infrared thermography are discussed. PMID:26470048

  8. High-spatial resolution multispectral and panchromatic satellite imagery for mapping perennial desert plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharrah, Saad A.; Bruce, David A.; Bouabid, Rachid; Somenahalli, Sekhar; Corcoran, Paul A.

    2015-10-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques to extract vegetation cover information for the assessment and monitoring of land degradation in arid environments has gained increased interest in recent years. However, such a task can be challenging, especially for medium-spatial resolution satellite sensors, due to soil background effects and the distribution and structure of perennial desert vegetation. In this study, we utilised Pleiades high-spatial resolution, multispectral (2m) and panchromatic (0.5m) imagery and focused on mapping small shrubs and low-lying trees using three classification techniques: 1) vegetation indices (VI) threshold analysis, 2) pre-built object-oriented image analysis (OBIA), and 3) a developed vegetation shadow model (VSM). We evaluated the success of each approach using a root of the sum of the squares (RSS) metric, which incorporated field data as control and three error metrics relating to commission, omission, and percent cover. Results showed that optimum VI performers returned good vegetation cover estimates at certain thresholds, but failed to accurately map the distribution of the desert plants. Using the pre-built IMAGINE Objective OBIA approach, we improved the vegetation distribution mapping accuracy, but this came at the cost of over classification, similar to results of lowering VI thresholds. We further introduced the VSM which takes into account shadow for further refining vegetation cover classification derived from VI. The results showed significant improvements in vegetation cover and distribution accuracy compared to the other techniques. We argue that the VSM approach using high-spatial resolution imagery provides a more accurate representation of desert landscape vegetation and should be considered in assessments of desertification.

  9. Spatial beam shaping for high-power frequency tripling lasers based on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sensen; Wang, Yulei; Lu, Zhiwei; Ding, Lei; Cui, Can; Chen, Yi; Pengyuan, Du; Ba, Dexin; Zheng, Zhenxing; Yuan, Hang; Shi, Lei; Bai, Zhenxu; Liu, Zhaohong; Zhu, Chengyu; Dong, Yongkang; Zhou, Luoxian

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a spatial beam shaping method to achieve high-quality near-field for a high-power frequency tripling laser system by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). Considering the nonlinear relationship between the output 3ω intensity and the input 1ω intensity of the frequency conversion system and the transmittance nonuniformity of the whole laser system, we introduce an efficient spatial beam shaping method that improves the output near-field beam quality of frequency tripling laser dramatically. Results show that the near-field peak-to-mean value of the frequency tripling laser improves from 1.83:1 to 1.42:1 after spatial beam shaping within four shots. This method provides effective guidance for spatial beam shaping of high-power frequency tripling laser systems.

  10. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-11-15

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400–820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm{sup −1} grating is matched with fast f/1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ≤0.075 arc sec. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount at the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  11. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-07-11

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ≤ 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. The computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection,more » and wavelength calibration.« less

  12. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-11-01

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f/1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ≤0.075 arc sec. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount at the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  13. Development and Operation of High-throughput Accurate-wavelength Lens-based Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Ronald E

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  14. Features of creation of highly accurate models of triumphal pylons for archaeological reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkanich, A. S.; Sidorov, I. S.; Redka, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Cited a measuring operation for determining the geometric characteristics of objects in space and geodetic survey objects on the ground. In the course of the work, data were obtained on a relative positioning of the pylons in space. There are deviations from verticality. In comparison with traditional surveying this testing method is preferable because it allows you to get in semi-automated mode, the CAD model of the object is high for subsequent analysis that is more economical-ly advantageous.

  15. An experimental device for accurate ultrasounds measurements in liquid foods at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Baltasar, E.; Taravillo, M.; Baonza, V. G.; Sanz, P. D.; Guignon, B.

    2012-12-01

    The use of high hydrostatic pressure to ensure safe and high-quality product has markedly increased in the food industry during the last decade. Ultrasonic sensors can be employed to control such processes in an equivalent way as they are currently used in processes carried out at room pressure. However, their installation, calibration and use are particularly challenging in the context of a high pressure environment. Besides, data about acoustic properties of food under pressure and even for water are quite scarce in the pressure range of interest for food treatment (namely, above 200 MPa). The objective of this work was to establish a methodology to determine the speed of sound in foods under pressure. An ultrasonic sensor using the multiple reflections method was adapted to a lab-scale HHP equipment to determine the speed of sound in water between 253.15 and 348.15 K, and at pressures up to 700 MPa. The experimental speed-of-sound data were compared to the data calculated from the equation of state of water (IAPWS-95 formulation). From this analysis, the way to calibrate cell path was validated. After this calibration procedure, the speed of sound could be determined in liquid foods by using this sensor with a relative uncertainty between (0.22 and 0.32) % at a confidence level of 95 % over the whole pressure domain.

  16. High-throughput baggage scanning employing x-ray diffraction for accurate explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael C.; Partain, Larry D.

    2003-07-01

    X-ray systems dominate the installed base of airport baggage scanning systems for explosives detection. The majority are conveyer systems with projection line scanners. These systems can achieve a high throughput but exhibit a high false positive rate and require significant operator involvement. Systems employing computed tomography (CT) are currently being installed at a rapid rate. These can provide good discrimination of levels of xray absorption coefficient and can largely circumvent superimposition effects. Nonetheless CT measures only x-ray absorption coefficient per voxel which does not provide a means of specific material identification resulting in many false positives, and it is relatively straightforward to configure explosive materials so that they are undetectable by CT systems. Diffraction-based x-ray systems present a solution to this problem. They detect and measure atomic layer spacings in crystalline and microcrystalline materials with high sensitivity. This provides a means of specific material identification. The majority of explosive compounds are well crystallized solids at room temperature. X-ray diffraction systems using both conventional wavelength-dispersive diffraction and fixed-angle, multi-wavelength diffraction for improved throughput are described. Large-area, flat-panel x-ray detector technology coupled with an extended x-ray source will permit a full 3D volumetric x-ray diffraction scan of a bag in a single pass, (patent pending).

  17. High-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based visible spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ronald E; Scotti, Filippo

    2010-10-01

    A scanning visible spectrometer has been prototyped to complement fixed-wavelength transmission grating spectrometers for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. Fast f/1.8 200 mm commercial lenses are used with a large 2160 mm(-1) grating for high throughput. A stepping-motor controlled sine drive positions the grating, which is mounted on a precision rotary table. A high-resolution optical encoder on the grating stage allows the grating angle to be measured with an absolute accuracy of 0.075 arc  sec, corresponding to a wavelength error ≤0.005 Å. At this precision, changes in grating groove density due to thermal expansion and variations in the refractive index of air are important. An automated calibration procedure determines all the relevant spectrometer parameters to high accuracy. Changes in bulk grating temperature, atmospheric temperature, and pressure are monitored between the time of calibration and the time of measurement to ensure a persistent wavelength calibration. PMID:21033924

  18. Accurate structure prediction of peptide–MHC complexes for identifying highly immunogenic antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Min-Sun; Park, Sung Yong; Miller, Keith R.; Collins, Edward J.; Lee, Ha Youn

    2013-11-01

    Designing an optimal HIV-1 vaccine faces the challenge of identifying antigens that induce a broad immune capacity. One factor to control the breadth of T cell responses is the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex. Here, we present an in silico protocol for predicting peptide–MHC structure. A robust signature of a conformational transition was identified during all-atom molecular dynamics, which results in a model with high accuracy. A large test set was used in constructing our protocol and we went another step further using a blind test with a wild-type peptide and two highly immunogenic mutants, which predicted substantial conformational changes in both mutants. The center residues at position five of the analogs were configured to be accessible to solvent, forming a prominent surface, while the residue of the wild-type peptide was to point laterally toward the side of the binding cleft. We then experimentally determined the structures of the blind test set, using high resolution of X-ray crystallography, which verified predicted conformational changes. Our observation strongly supports a positive association of the surface morphology of a peptide–MHC complex to its immunogenicity. Our study offers the prospect of enhancing immunogenicity of vaccines by identifying MHC binding immunogens.

  19. High spatial and temporal resolution cell manipulation techniques in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Novo, Pedro; Dell'Aica, Margherita; Janasek, Dirk; Zahedi, René P

    2016-03-21

    The advent of microfluidics has enabled thorough control of cell manipulation experiments in so called lab on chips. Lab on chips foster the integration of actuation and detection systems, and require minute sample and reagent amounts. Typically employed microfluidic structures have similar dimensions as cells, enabling precise spatial and temporal control of individual cells and their local environments. Several strategies for high spatio-temporal control of cells in microfluidics have been reported in recent years, namely methods relying on careful design of the microfluidic structures (e.g. pinched flow), by integration of actuators (e.g. electrodes or magnets for dielectro-, acousto- and magneto-phoresis), or integrations thereof. This review presents the recent developments of cell experiments in microfluidics divided into two parts: an introduction to spatial control of cells in microchannels followed by special emphasis in the high temporal control of cell-stimulus reaction and quenching. In the end, the present state of the art is discussed in line with future perspectives and challenges for translating these devices into routine applications. PMID:26891209

  20. Dense and accurate motion and strain estimation in high resolution speckle images using an image-adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Digital image processing methods represent a viable and well acknowledged alternative to strain gauges and interferometric techniques for determining full-field displacements and strains in materials under stress. This paper presents an image adaptive technique for dense motion and strain estimation using high-resolution speckle images that show the analyzed material in its original and deformed states. The algorithm starts by dividing the speckle image showing the original state into irregular cells taking into consideration both spatial and gradient image information present. Subsequently the Newton-Raphson digital image correlation technique is applied to calculate the corresponding motion for each cell. Adaptive spatial regularization in the form of the Geman- McClure robust spatial estimator is employed to increase the spatial consistency of the motion components of a cell with respect to the components of neighbouring cells. To obtain the final strain information, local least-squares fitting using a linear displacement model is performed on the horizontal and vertical displacement fields. To evaluate the presented image partitioning and strain estimation techniques two numerical and two real experiments are employed. The numerical experiments simulate the deformation of a specimen with constant strain across the surface as well as small rigid-body rotations present while real experiments consist specimens that undergo uniaxial stress. The results indicate very good accuracy of the recovered strains as well as better rotation insensitivity compared to classical techniques.

  1. Towards high accurate neutron-induced fission cross sections of 240,242Pu: Spontaneous fission half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross sections of transuranic isotopes are being of special demand in order to provide accurate data for the new GEN-IV nuclear power plants. To minimize the uncertainties on these measurements accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives and detector efficiencies are a key point. High α-active actinides need special attention since the misinterpretation of detector signals can lead to low efficiency values or underestimation in fission fragment detection. In that context, 240,242Pu isotopes have been studied by means of a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) for measurements of their neutron-induced fission cross section. Gases with different drift velocities have been used, namely P10 and CH4. The detector efficiencies for both samples have been determined and improved spontaneous fission half-life values were obtained.

  2. SINA: Accurate high-throughput multiple sequence alignment of ribosomal RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Pruesse, Elmar; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: In the analysis of homologous sequences, computation of multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) has become a bottleneck. This is especially troublesome for marker genes like the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) where already millions of sequences are publicly available and individual studies can easily produce hundreds of thousands of new sequences. Methods have been developed to cope with such numbers, but further improvements are needed to meet accuracy requirements. Results: In this study, we present the SILVA Incremental Aligner (SINA) used to align the rRNA gene databases provided by the SILVA ribosomal RNA project. SINA uses a combination of k-mer searching and partial order alignment (POA) to maintain very high alignment accuracy while satisfying high throughput performance demands. SINA was evaluated in comparison with the commonly used high throughput MSA programs PyNAST and mothur. The three BRAliBase III benchmark MSAs could be reproduced with 99.3, 97.6 and 96.1 accuracy. A larger benchmark MSA comprising 38 772 sequences could be reproduced with 98.9 and 99.3% accuracy using reference MSAs comprising 1000 and 5000 sequences. SINA was able to achieve higher accuracy than PyNAST and mothur in all performed benchmarks. Availability: Alignment of up to 500 sequences using the latest SILVA SSU/LSU Ref datasets as reference MSA is offered at http://www.arb-silva.de/aligner. This page also links to Linux binaries, user manual and tutorial. SINA is made available under a personal use license. Contact: epruesse@mpi-bremen.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22556368

  3. Fast and accurate probability density estimation in large high dimensional astronomical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Connolly, Andrew J.; Gardner, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical surveys will generate measurements of hundreds of attributes (e.g. color, size, shape) on hundreds of millions of sources. Analyzing these large, high dimensional data sets will require efficient algorithms for data analysis. An example of this is probability density estimation that is at the heart of many classification problems such as the separation of stars and quasars based on their colors. Popular density estimation techniques use binning or kernel density estimation. Kernel density estimation has a small memory footprint but often requires large computational resources. Binning has small computational requirements but usually binning is implemented with multi-dimensional arrays which leads to memory requirements which scale exponentially with the number of dimensions. Hence both techniques do not scale well to large data sets in high dimensions. We present an alternative approach of binning implemented with hash tables (BASH tables). This approach uses the sparseness of data in the high dimensional space to ensure that the memory requirements are small. However hashing requires some extra computation so a priori it is not clear if the reduction in memory requirements will lead to increased computational requirements. Through an implementation of BASH tables in C++ we show that the additional computational requirements of hashing are negligible. Hence this approach has small memory and computational requirements. We apply our density estimation technique to photometric selection of quasars using non-parametric Bayesian classification and show that the accuracy of the classification is same as the accuracy of earlier approaches. Since the BASH table approach is one to three orders of magnitude faster than the earlier approaches it may be useful in various other applications of density estimation in astrostatistics.

  4. Highly-accurate metabolomic detection of early-stage ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaul, David A.; Mezencev, Roman; Long, Tran Q.; Jones, Christina M.; Benigno, Benedict B.; Gray, Alexander; Fernández, Facundo M.; McDonald, John F.

    2015-01-01

    High performance mass spectrometry was employed to interrogate the serum metabolome of early-stage ovarian cancer (OC) patients and age-matched control women. The resulting spectral features were used to establish a linear support vector machine (SVM) model of sixteen diagnostic metabolites that are able to identify early-stage OC with 100% accuracy in our patient cohort. The results provide evidence for the importance of lipid and fatty acid metabolism in OC and serve as the foundation of a clinically significant diagnostic test. PMID:26573008

  5. High-Order Accurate Solutions to the Helmholtz Equation in the Presence of Boundary Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, Darrell Steven, Jr.

    Problems of time-harmonic wave propagation arise in important fields of study such as geological surveying, radar detection/evasion, and aircraft design. These often involve highfrequency waves, which demand high-order methods to mitigate the dispersion error. We propose a high-order method for computing solutions to the variable-coefficient inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation in two dimensions on domains bounded by piecewise smooth curves of arbitrary shape with a finite number of boundary singularities at known locations. We utilize compact finite difference (FD) schemes on regular structured grids to achieve highorder accuracy due to their efficiency and simplicity, as well as the capability to approximate variable-coefficient differential operators. In this work, a 4th-order compact FD scheme for the variable-coefficient Helmholtz equation on a Cartesian grid in 2D is derived and tested. The well known limitation of finite differences is that they lose accuracy when the boundary curve does not coincide with the discretization grid, which is a severe restriction on the geometry of the computational domain. Therefore, the algorithm presented in this work combines high-order FD schemes with the method of difference potentials (DP), which retains the efficiency of FD while allowing for boundary shapes that are not aligned with the grid without sacrificing the accuracy of the FD scheme. Additionally, the theory of DP allows for the universal treatment of the boundary conditions. One of the significant contributions of this work is the development of an implementation that accommodates general boundary conditions (BCs). In particular, Robin BCs with discontinuous coefficients are studied, for which we introduce a piecewise parameterization of the boundary curve. Problems with discontinuities in the boundary data itself are also studied. We observe that the design convergence rate suffers whenever the solution loses regularity due to the boundary conditions. This is

  6. Accurate human microsatellite genotypes from high-throughput resequencing data using informed error profiles.

    PubMed

    Highnam, Gareth; Franck, Christopher; Martin, Andy; Stephens, Calvin; Puthige, Ashwin; Mittelman, David

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive sequences are biologically and clinically important because they can influence traits and disease, but repeats are challenging to analyse using short-read sequencing technology. We present a tool for genotyping microsatellite repeats called RepeatSeq, which uses Bayesian model selection guided by an empirically derived error model that incorporates sequence and read properties. Next, we apply RepeatSeq to high-coverage genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project to evaluate performance and accuracy. The software uses common formats, such as VCF, for compatibility with existing genome analysis pipelines. Source code and binaries are available at http://github.com/adaptivegenome/repeatseq. PMID:23090981

  7. High-order accurate difference schemes for solving gasdynamic equations by the Godunov method with antidiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, N. Ya.; Silant'eva, I. Yu.

    2009-05-01

    A technique is proposed for improving the accuracy of the Godunov method as applied to gasdynamic simulations in one dimension. The underlying idea is the reconstruction of fluxes arsoss cell boundaries (“large” values) by using antidiffusion corrections, which are obtained by analyzing the differential approximation of the schemes. In contrast to other approaches, the reconstructed values are not the initial data but rather large values calculated by solving the Riemann problem. The approach is efficient and yields higher accuracy difference schemes with a high resolution.

  8. Rapid, high-order accurate calculation of flows due to free source or vortex distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsey, D.

    1981-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques are applied to the problem of finding the flow due to source or vortex distributions in the field outside an airfoil or other two-dimensional body. Either the complex potential or the complex velocity may be obtained to a high order of accuracy, with computational effort similar to that required by second-order fast Poisson solvers. These techniques are applicable to general flow problems with compressibility and rotation. An example is given of their use for inviscid compressible flow.

  9. Objective Delineation of River Bed Surface Patches from High-Resolution Spatial Grain Size Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. A.; Bellugi, D.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    Gravel-bed rivers commonly display distinct sorting patterns on their beds. Visually, this heterogeneity often appears to form an organization of distinct textural patches or facies. The local bed surface grain size, and therefore bed surface patchiness, exerts considerable influence on local bed mobility, bedload transport rates, hydrodynamic roughness, and benthic microhabitats. Despite the ecological and morphodynamic importance of bed surface patchiness, we lack accurate and objective methods to delineate bed patches. However, recent advances in photographic measurement of bed surface grain size distributions are capable of providing data at a spatial resolution high enough to allow us an opportunity to answer the question: what is a patch? Here, we explore a variety of techniques that can be applied to high-resolution spatial grain size data to automatically generate maps of grain size patches. We apply a state-of-the-art image processing and machine learning procedure to a photographic survey of the bed surface of a near-field scale flume to extract grain size data and to generate a spatial grid of bed surface grain size distributions. The flume bed was composed of gravel 2-45 mm in diameter and it featured clearly identifiable sorting features. Using this dataset, we investigate several possible methods of patch delineation. The grid of grain size distributions can be represented by a graph of nodes (grain size distributions) connected by edges whose weight is a function of the similarity between two nodes. Spectral graph theory is then used to optimally cut the edges in order to produce a spatial structure of patches that minimizes the association between patches and maximizes the association of nodes within a patch. In a different approach, agglomerative clustering of spatially adjacent grain size distributions is used to produce a hierarchical dendrogram that can be thresholded to partition the bed into patches. We also explore using the k-means algorithm

  10. Accurate Mass Searching of Individual Lipid Species Candidate from High-resolution Mass Spectra for Shotgun Lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Huang, Yingying; Han, Xianlin

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE With the increased mass accuracy and resolution in commercialized mass spectrometers, new development on shotgun lipidomics could be expected with increased speed, dynamic range, and coverage over lipid species and classes. However, we found that the major issue by using high mass accuracy/resolution instruments to search lipid species is the partial overlap between the two 13C atom-containing isotopologue of a species M (i.e., M+2 isotopologue) and the ion of a species less a double bond than M (assigned here as L). This partial overlap alone could cause a mass shift of the species L to the lower mass end up to 12 ppm around m/z 750 as well as significant peak broadening. METHODS We developed an approach for accurate mass searching by exploring one of the major features of shotgun lipidomics data that lipid species of a class are present in ion clusters where neighboring masses from different species differ by one or a few double bonds. In the approach, a mass-searching window of 18 ppm (from −15 to 3 ppm) was first searched for an entire group of species of a lipid class. Then accurate mass searching of the plus one 13C isotopologue of individual species was used to eliminate the potential false positive. RESULTS The approach was extensively validated through comparing with the species determined by the multi-dimensional MS-based shotgun lipidomics platform. The newly developed strategy of accurate mass search enables identifying the overlapped L species and acquiring the corresponding peak intensities. CONCLUSIONS We believe that this novel approach could substantially broaden the applications of high mass accurate/resolution mass spectrometry for shotgun lipidomics. PMID:25178724

  11. The S-model: A highly accurate MOST model for CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satter, J. H.

    1986-09-01

    A new MOST model which combines simplicity and a logical structure with a high accuracy of only 0.5-4.5% is presented. The model is suited for enhancement and depletion devices with either large or small dimensions. It includes the effects of scattering and carrier-velocity saturation as well as the influence of the intrinsic source and drain series resistance. The decrease of the drain current due to substrate bias is incorporated too. The model is in the first place intended for digital purposes. All necessary quantities are calculated in a straightforward manner without iteration. An almost entirely new way of determining the parameters is described and a new cluster parameter is introduced, which is responsible for the high accuracy of the model. The total number of parameters is 7. A still simpler β expression is derived, which is suitable for only one value of the substrate bias and contains only three parameters, while maintaining the accuracy. The way in which the parameters are determined is readily suited for automatic measurement. A simple linear regression procedure programmed in the computer, which controls the measurements, produces the parameter values.

  12. Accurate Angle Estimator for High-Frame-Rate 2-D Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Villagomez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for estimating 2-D flow angles using a high-frame-rate ultrasound method. The angle estimator features high accuracy and low standard deviation (SD) over the full 360° range. The method is validated on Field II simulations and phantom measurements using the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS and a flow rig before being tested in vivo. An 8-MHz linear array transducer is used with defocused beam emissions. In the simulations of a spinning disk phantom, a 360° uniform behavior on the angle estimation is observed with a median angle bias of 1.01° and a median angle SD of 1.8°. Similar results are obtained on a straight vessel for both simulations and measurements, where the obtained angle biases are below 1.5° with SDs around 1°. Estimated velocity magnitudes are also kept under 10% bias and 5% relative SD in both simulations and measurements. An in vivo measurement is performed on a carotid bifurcation of a healthy individual. A 3-s acquisition during three heart cycles is captured. A consistent and repetitive vortex is observed in the carotid bulb during systoles. PMID:27093598

  13. Science with High Spatial Resolution Far-Infrared Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan (Editor); Mazzarella, Joseph M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to discuss new science and techniques relevant to high spatial resolution processing of far-infrared data, with particular focus on high resolution processing of IRAS data. Users of the maximum correlation method, maximum entropy, and other resolution enhancement algorithms applicable to far-infrared data gathered at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) for two days in June 1993 to compare techniques and discuss new results. During a special session on the third day, interested astronomers were introduced to IRAS HIRES processing, which is IPAC's implementation of the maximum correlation method to the IRAS data. Topics discussed during the workshop included: (1) image reconstruction; (2) random noise; (3) imagery; (4) interacting galaxies; (5) spiral galaxies; (6) galactic dust and elliptical galaxies; (7) star formation in Seyfert galaxies; (8) wavelet analysis; and (9) supernova remnants.

  14. Highly accurate servo control of reference beam angle in holographic memory with polarized servo beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Makoto; Ogata, Takeshi; Yamada, Kenichiro; Yamazaki, Kazuyoshi; Shimada, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new servo technique for controlling the reference beam angle in angular multiplexing holographic memory to attain higher capacity and higher speed data archiving. An orthogonally polarized beam with an incident angle slightly different from that of the reference beam is newly applied to the optics. The control signal for the servo is generated as the difference between the diffracted light intensities of these two beams from a hologram. The incident angle difference between the beams to the medium was optimized as sufficient properties of the control signal were obtained. The high accuracy of the control signal with an angle error lower than 1.5 mdeg was successfully confirmed in the simulations and experiments.

  15. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1–2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1–2+ MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8+ T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8+ subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8+ TRAV1–2+ cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161hi was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161dim. Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1–2, and CD26hi in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis. PMID:25752900

  16. Do high functioning persons with autism present superior spatial abilities?

    PubMed

    Caron, M-J; Mottron, L; Rainville, C; Chouinard, S

    2004-01-01

    This series of experiments was aimed at assessing spatial abilities in high functioning individuals with autism (HFA), using a human-size labyrinth. In the context of recent findings that the performance of individuals with HFA was superior to typically developing individuals in several non-social cognitive operations, it was expected that the HFA group would outperform a typically developing comparison group matched on full-scale IQ. Results showed that individuals with autism performed all spatial tasks at a level at least equivalent to the typically developing comparison group. No differences between groups were found in route and survey tasks. Superior performance for individuals with HFA was found in tasks involving maps, in the form of superior accuracy in graphic cued recall of a path, and shorter learning times in a map learning task. We propose that a superior ability to detect [Human Perception and Performance 27 (3) (2001) 719], match [Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 34 (1993) 1351] and reproduce [Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 40 (5) (1999) 743] simple visual elements yields superior performance in tasks relying on the detection and graphic reproduction of the visual elements composing a map. Enhanced discrimination, detection, and memory for visually simple patterns in autism may account for the superior performance of persons with autism on visuo-spatial tasks that heavily involve pattern recognition, either in the form of recognizing and memorizing landmarks or in detecting the similarity between map and landscape features. At a neuro-anatomical level, these findings suggest an intact dorso-lateral pathway, and enhanced performance in non social tasks relying on the infero-temporal pathway. PMID:14728920

  17. Prognostic factors in pediatric high-grade astrocytoma: the importance of accurate pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hales, Russell K; Shokek, Ori; Burger, Peter C; Paynter, Nina P; Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Jallo, George I; Cohen, Kenneth J; Song, Danny Y; Carson, Benjamin S; Wharam, Moody D

    2010-08-01

    To characterize a population of pediatric high-grade astrocytoma (HGA) patients by confirming the proportion with a correct diagnosis, and determine prognostic factors for survival in a subset diagnosed with uniform pathologic criteria. Sixty-three children diagnosed with HGA were treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1977 and 2004. A single neuropathologist (P.C.B.) reviewed all available histologic samples (n = 48). Log-rank analysis was used to compare survival by patient, tumor, and treatment factors. Median follow-up was 16 months for all patients and 155 months (minimum 54 months) for surviving patients. Median survival for all patients (n = 63) was 14 months with 10 long-term survivors (survival >48 months). At initial diagnosis, 27 patients were grade III (43%) and 36 grade IV (57%). Forty-eight patients had pathology slides available for review, including seven of ten long-term surviving patients. Four patients had non-HGA pathology, all of whom were long term survivors. The remaining 44 patients with confirmed HGG had a median survival of 14 months and prognostic analysis was confined to these patients. On multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with inferior survival: performance status (Lansky) <80% (13 vs. 15 months), bilaterality (13 vs. 19 months), parietal lobe location (13 vs. 16 months), resection less than gross total (13 vs. 22 months), and radiotherapy dose <50 Gy (9 vs. 16 months). Among patients with more than one of the five adverse factors (n = 27), median survival and proportion of long-term survivors were 12.9 months and 0%, compared with 41.4 months and 18% for patients with 0-1 adverse factors (n = 17). In an historical cohort of children with HGA, the potential for long term survival was confined to the subset with less than two of the following adverse prognostic factors: low performance status, bilaterality, parietal lobe site, less than gross total resection, and radiotherapy dose <50 Gy. Pathologic misdiagnosis

  18. Rapid and accurate developmental stage recognition of C. elegans from high-throughput image data

    PubMed Central

    White, Amelia G.; Cipriani, Patricia G.; Kao, Huey-Ling; Lees, Brandon; Geiger, Davi; Sontag, Eduardo; Gunsalus, Kristin C.; Piano, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    We present a hierarchical principle for object recognition and its application to automatically classify developmental stages of C. elegans animals from a population of mixed stages. The object recognition machine consists of four hierarchical layers, each composed of units upon which evaluation functions output a label score, followed by a grouping mechanism that resolves ambiguities in the score by imposing local consistency constraints. Each layer then outputs groups of units, from which the units of the next layer are derived. Using this hierarchical principle, the machine builds up successively more sophisticated representations of the objects to be classified. The algorithm segments large and small objects, decomposes objects into parts, extracts features from these parts, and classifies them by SVM. We are using this system to analyze phenotypic data from C. elegans high-throughput genetic screens, and our system overcomes a previous bottleneck in image analysis by achieving near real-time scoring of image data. The system is in current use in a functioning C. elegans laboratory and has processed over two hundred thousand images for lab users. PMID:22053146

  19. Cost-effective accurate coarse-grid method for highly convective multidimensional unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Niknafs, H. S.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamentally multidimensional convection scheme is described based on vector transient interpolation modeling rewritten in conservative control-volume form. Vector third-order upwinding is used as the basis of the algorithm; this automatically introduces important cross-difference terms that are absent from schemes using component-wise one-dimensional formulas. Third-order phase accuracy is good; this is important for coarse-grid large-eddy or full simulation. Potential overshoots or undershoots are avoided by using a recently developed universal limiter. Higher order accuracy is obtained locally, where needed, by the cost-effective strategy of adaptive stencil expansion in a direction normal to each control-volume face; this is controlled by monitoring the absolute normal gradient and curvature across the face. Higher (than third) order cross-terms do not appear to be needed. Since the wider stencil is used only in isolated narrow regions (near discontinuities), extremely high (in this case, seventh) order accuracy can be achieved for little more than the cost of a globally third-order scheme.

  20. Material response mechanisms are needed to obtain highly accurate experimental shock wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    The field of shock wave compression of matter has provided a simple set of equations relating thermodynamic and kinematic parameters that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and energy across a steady shock wave with one-dimensional flow. Well-known condensed matter shock wave experimental results will be reviewed to see whether the assumptions required for deriving these simple R-H equations are met. Note that the material compression model is not required for deriving the 1-D conservation flow equations across a steady shock front. However, this statement is misleading from a practical experimental viewpoint since obtaining small systematic errors in shock wave measured parameters requires the material compression and release mechanisms to be known. A brief review will be presented on systematic errors in shock wave data from common experimental techniques for fluids, elastic-plastic solids, materials with negative volume phase transitions, glass and ceramic materials, and high explosives. Issues related to time scales of experiments and quasi-steady flow will also be presented.

  1. Accurate High-Temperature Reaction Networks for Alternative Fuels: Butanol Isomers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Geem, K. M.; Pyl, S. P.; Marin, G. B.; Harper, M. R.; Green, W. H.

    2010-11-03

    Oxygenated hydrocarbons, particularly alcohol compounds, are being studied extensively as alternatives and additives to conventional fuels due to their propensity of decreasing soot formation and improving the octane number of gasoline. However, oxygenated fuels also increase the production of toxic byproducts, such as formaldehyde. To gain a better understanding of the oxygenated functional group’s influence on combustion properties—e.g., ignition delay at temperatures above the negative temperature coefficient regime, and the rate of benzene production, which is the common precursor to soot formation—a detailed pressure-dependent reaction network for n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol consisting of 281 species and 3608 reactions is presented. The reaction network is validated against shock tube ignition delays and doped methane flame concentration profiles reported previously in the literature, in addition to newly acquired pyrolysis data. Good agreement between simulated and experimental data is achieved in all cases. Flux and sensitivity analyses for each set of experiments have been performed, and high-pressure-limit reaction rate coefficients for important pathways, e.g., the dehydration reactions of the butanol isomers, have been computed using statistical mechanics and quantum chemistry. The different alcohol decomposition pathways, i.e., the pathways from primary, secondary, and tertiary alcohols, are discussed. Furthermore, comparisons between ethanol and n-butanol, two primary alcohols, are presented, as they relate to ignition delay.

  2. Obtaining Accurate Change Detection Results from High-Resolution Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N.; Bunch, W.; Fretz, R.; Kim, P.; Logan, T.; Smyth, M.; Zobrist, A.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-date acquisitions of high-resolution imaging satellites (e.g. GeoEye and WorldView), can display local changes of current economic interest. However, their large data volume precludes effective manual analysis, requiring image co-registration followed by image-to-image change detection, preferably with minimal analyst attention. We have recently developed an automatic change detection procedure that minimizes false-positives. The processing steps include: (a) Conversion of both the pre- and post- images to reflectance values (this step is of critical importance when different sensors are involved); reflectance values can be either top-of-atmosphere units or have full aerosol optical depth calibration applied using bi-directional reflectance knowledge. (b) Panchromatic band image-to-image co-registration, using an orthorectified base reference image (e.g. Digital Orthophoto Quadrangle) and a digital elevation model; this step can be improved if a stereo-pair of images have been acquired on one of the image dates. (c) Pan-sharpening of the multispectral data to assure recognition of change objects at the highest resolution. (d) Characterization of multispectral data in the post-image ( i.e. the background) using unsupervised cluster analysis. (e) Band ratio selection in the post-image to separate surface materials of interest from the background. (f) Preparing a pre-to-post change image. (g) Identifying locations where change has occurred involving materials of interest.

  3. Proceedings of the 2004 High Spatial Resolution Commercial Imagery Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: NASA Applied Sciences Program; USGS Land Remote Sensing: Overview; QuickBird System Status and Product Overview; ORBIMAGE Overview; IKONOS 2004 Calibration and Validation Status; OrbView-3 Spatial Characterization; On-Orbit Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Measurement of QuickBird; Spatial Resolution Characterization for QuickBird Image Products 2003-2004 Season; Image Quality Evaluation of QuickBird Super Resolution and Revisit of IKONOS: Civil and Commercial Application Project (CCAP); On-Orbit System MTF Measurement; QuickBird Post Launch Geopositional Characterization Update; OrbView-3 Geometric Calibration and Geopositional Accuracy; Geopositional Statistical Methods; QuickBird and OrbView-3 Geopositional Accuracy Assessment; Initial On-Orbit Spatial Resolution Characterization of OrbView-3 Panchromatic Images; Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps; Stennis Space Center Verification and Validation Capabilities; Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) Team; Adjacency Effects in High Resolution Imagery; Effect of Pulse Width vs. GSD on MTF Estimation; Camera and Sensor Calibration at the USGS; QuickBird Geometric Verification; Comparison of MODTRAN to Heritage-based Results in Vicarious Calibration at University of Arizona; Using Remotely Sensed Imagery to Determine Impervious Surface in Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Estimating Sub-Pixel Proportions of Sagebrush with a Regression Tree; How Do YOU Use the National Land Cover Dataset?; The National Map Hazards Data Distribution System; Recording a Troubled World; What Does This-Have to Do with This?; When Can a Picture Save a Thousand Homes?; InSAR Studies of Alaska Volcanoes; Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Data Products; Improving Access to the USGS Aerial Film Collections: High Resolution Scanners; Improving Access to the USGS Aerial Film Collections: Phoenix Digitizing System Product Distribution; System and Product Characterization: Issues Approach

  4. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  5. Sampling strategies for accurate computational inferences of gametic phase across highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex loci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are very popular genetic markers among evolutionary biologists because of their potential role in pathogen confrontation and sexual selection. However, MHC genotyping still remains challenging and time-consuming in spite of substantial methodological advances. Although computational haplotype inference has brought into focus interesting alternatives, high heterozygosity, extensive genetic variation and population admixture are known to cause inaccuracies. We have investigated the role of sample size, genetic polymorphism and genetic structuring on the performance of the popular Bayesian PHASE algorithm. To cover this aim, we took advantage of a large database of known genotypes (using traditional laboratory-based techniques) at single MHC class I (N = 56 individuals and 50 alleles) and MHC class II B (N = 103 individuals and 62 alleles) loci in the lesser kestrel Falco naumanni. Findings Analyses carried out over real MHC genotypes showed that the accuracy of gametic phase reconstruction improved with sample size as a result of the reduction in the allele to individual ratio. We then simulated different data sets introducing variations in this parameter to define an optimal ratio. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a critical influence of the allele to individual ratio on PHASE performance. We found that a minimum allele to individual ratio (1:2) yielded 100% accuracy for both MHC loci. Sampling effort is therefore a crucial step to obtain reliable MHC haplotype reconstructions and must be accomplished accordingly to the degree of MHC polymorphism. We expect our findings provide a foothold into the design of straightforward and cost-effective genotyping strategies of those MHC loci from which locus-specific primers are available. PMID:21615903

  6. Accurate glass forming for high-temperature solar applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    Development work was undertaken to thermally form glass for solar concentrators. Sagging and pressing glass to parabolic shapes was investigated with goal of achieving slope errors less than 2.0 mr RMS and costs of $1.25/ft/sup 2/. In addition, a laminating process was investigated to overcome the problem of silvering of a curved surface and to reduce corrosion of the silver. Thermal sagging is a process in which glass is shaped by heating the glass until it is sufficiently soft to deform under its own weight and conform to a mold. For cylindrical parabolic shapes, a method for producing low cost high accuracy molds was developed using castable ceramics and a grinder. Thermal conditions were established for a commercial glass bending furnace to obtain good replication of the mold. The accuracy and cost goals were met for glass size up to 30 x 30 x 0.125 inches and for low iron and regular iron float and sheet glasses. Lamination of two curved pieces of glass using automotive technology was investigated. A silver film was placed between two layers of polyvinyl and butyral (PVB) and this was used to bond two sheets of glass. Economically, and technically, the process appears feasible. However, the non-uniform thickness of PBV cause distortion in the reflected image. More work is needed to assess accuracy of curved laminated composites. Thermal pressing of glass is accomplished by heating the glass until it is soft and mechanically stamping the shape. Equipment was built and operated to determine important parameters in pressing. Control of thermal stresses in the glass is critical to preventing cracks. No glass pieces were produced without cracks.

  7. TROP-2 immunohistochemistry: a highly accurate method in the differential diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Andrey; Sampatanukul, Pichet; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Keelawat, Somboon

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the novel immunohistochemical marker TROP-2 on thyroid specimens (226 tumours and 207 controls). Whole slide immunohistochemistry was performed and scored by automated digital image analysis. Non-neoplastic thyroid, follicular adenomas, follicular carcinomas, and medullary carcinomas were negative for TROP-2 immunostaining. The majority of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) specimens (94/114, 82.5%) were positive for TROP-2; however, the pattern of staining differed significantly between the histopathological variants. All papillary microcarcinomas (mPTC), PTC classic variant (PTC cv), and tall cell variant (PTC tcv) were TROP-2 positive, with mainly diffuse staining. In contrast, less than half of the PTC follicular variant specimens were positive for TROP-2, with only focal immunoreactivity. TROP-2 could identify PTC cv with 98.1% sensitivity and 97.5% specificity. ROC curve analysis found that the presence of >10% of TROP-2 positive cells in a tumour supported a diagnosis of PTC. The study of intratumoural heterogeneity showed that low-volume cytological samples of PTC cv could be adequately assessed by TROP-2 immunostaining. The TROP-2 H-score (intensity multiplied by proportion) was significantly associated with PTC variant and capsular invasion in encapsulated PTC follicular variant (p<0.001). None of the baseline (age, gender) and clinical (tumour size, nodal disease, stage) parameters were correlated with TROP-2 expression. In conclusion, TROP-2 membranous staining is a very sensitive and specific marker for PTC cv, PTC tcv, and mPTC, with high overall specificity for PTC. PMID:27311870

  8. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (∼0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ∼ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ∼24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ∼15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  9. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  10. Dual window method for processing spectroscopic optical coherence tomography signals with high spectral and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Graf, Robert N.; Wax, Adam

    2009-02-01

    The generation of spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) signals suffers from an inherent trade off between spatial and spectral resolution. Here, we present a dual window (DW) method that uses two Gaussian windows to simultaneously obtain high spectral and spatial resolution. We show that the DW method probes the Winger time-frequency distribution (TFD) with two orthogonal windows set by the standard deviation of the Gaussian windows used for processing. We also show that in the limit of an infinitesimally narrow window, combined with a large window, this method is equivalent to the Kirkwood & Richaczek TFD and, if the real part is taken, it is equivalent to the Margenau & Hill (MH) TFD. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by simulating a signal with four components separated in depth or center frequency. Six TFD are compared: the ideal, the Wigner, the MH, narrow window short time Fourier transform (STFT), wide window STFT, and the DW. The results show that the DW method contains features of the Wigner TFD, and that it contains the highest spatial and spectral resolution that is free of artifacts. This method can enable powerful applications, including accurate acquisition of the spectral information for cancer diagnosis.

  11. A highly accurate absolute gravimetric network for Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard; Butta, Hubert; Qirko, Kristaq; Pavicevic, Bozidar; Murat, Meha

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a basic gravity network in Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro to enable further investigations in geodetic and geophysical issues. Therefore the first time in history absolute gravity measurements were performed in these countries. The Norwegian mapping authority Kartverket is assisting the national mapping authorities in Kosovo (KCA) (Kosovo Cadastral Agency - Agjencia Kadastrale e Kosovës), Albania (ASIG) (Autoriteti Shtetëror i Informacionit Gjeohapësinor) and in Montenegro (REA) (Real Estate Administration of Montenegro - Uprava za nekretnine Crne Gore) in improving the geodetic frameworks. The gravity measurements are funded by Kartverket. The absolute gravimetric measurements were performed from BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) with the absolute gravimeter FG5-242. As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Laser and clock of the absolute gravimeter were calibrated before and after the measurements. The absolute gravimetric survey was carried out from September to October 2015. Finally all 8 scheduled stations were successfully measured: there are three stations located in Montenegro, two stations in Kosovo and three stations in Albania. The stations are distributed over the countries to establish a gravity network for each country. The vertical gradients were measured at all 8 stations with the relative gravimeter Scintrex CG5. The high class quality of some absolute gravity stations can be used for gravity monitoring activities in future. The measurement uncertainties of the absolute gravity measurements range around 2.5 micro Gal at all stations (1 microgal = 10-8 m/s2). In Montenegro the large gravity difference of 200 MilliGal between station Zabljak and Podgorica can be even used for calibration of relative gravimeters

  12. Spatial Experiences of High Academic Achievers: Insights from a Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weckbacher, Lisa Marie; Okamoto, Yukari

    2012-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between types of spatial experiences and spatial abilities among 13- to 14-year-old high academic achievers. Each participant completed two spatial tasks and a survey assessing favored spatial activities across five categories (computers, toys, sports, music, and art) and three developmental periods (early…

  13. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  14. Challenges in building high performance geoscientific spatial data infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubros, Fabrice; Tellez-Arenas, Agnes; Boulahya, Faiza; Quique, Robin; Le Cozanne, Goneri; Aochi, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main challenges in Geosciences is to deal with both the huge amounts of data available nowadays and the increasing need for fast and accurate analysis. On one hand, computer aided decision support systems remain a major tool for quick assessment of natural hazards and disasters. High performance computing lies at the heart of such systems by providing the required processing capabilities for large three-dimensional time-dependent datasets. On the other hand, information from Earth observation systems at different scales is routinely collected to improve the reliability of numerical models. Therefore, various efforts have been devoted to design scalable architectures dedicated to the management of these data sets (Copernicus, EarthCube, EPOS). Indeed, standard data architectures suffer from a lack of control over data movement. This situation prevents the efficient exploitation of parallel computing architectures as the cost for data movement has become dominant. In this work, we introduce a scalable architecture that relies on high performance components. We discuss several issues such as three-dimensional data management, complex scientific workflows and the integration of high performance computing infrastructures. We illustrate the use of such architectures, mainly using off-the-shelf components, in the framework of both coastal flooding assessments and earthquake early warning systems.

  15. Accurate and robust registration of high-speed railway viaduct point clouds using closing conditions and external geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zheng; Song, Mengxiao; Guan, Haiyan; Yu, Yongtao

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes an automatic method for registering multiple laser scans without a control network. The proposed registration method first uses artificial targets to pair-wise register adjacent scans for initial transformation estimates; the proposed registration method then employs combined adjustments with closing conditions and external triangle constraints to globally register all scans along a long-range, high-speed railway corridor. The proposed registration method uses (1) closing conditions to eliminate registration errors that gradually accumulate as the length of a corridor (the number of scan stations) increases, and (2) external geometric constraints to ensure the shape correctness of an elongated high-speed railway. A 640-m high-speed railway viaduct with twenty-one piers is used to conduct experiments using our proposed registration method. A group of comparative experiments is undertaken to evaluate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed registration method to accurately register long-range corridors.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Initial 230TH/232TH in Sumatran Corals and its Influence on the Accurate Dating of Young Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, H.; Shen, C.; Meltzner, A. J.; Philibosian, B.; WU, C.; Sieh, K. E.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate and precise determination of initial 230Th/232Th (230Th/232Th0) is important in dating young fossil corals, and it can significantly influence our understanding of paleoclimate, paleoceanographic and paleoseismic histories. A total of 47 unpublished and published isochrons (Shen et al., 2008; Meltzner et al., 2010, 2012; Philibosian et al., 2012), covering most of the Sumatran outer-arc islands, provide a more robust estimate of the 230Th/232Th0 variability in the region. The weighted average of 230Th/232Th0 atomic values is 4.7 (+5.5/-4.7) × 10-6 (2σ), consistent with the previously reported value of 6.5 ± 6.5 × 10-6 obtained from a handful of samples from the southern part of Sumatran outer-arc. Specifically, the calculated 230Th/232Th0 in the north and south are identical. The weighted mean of 3.5 (+7.0/-3.5) × 10-6 for fossil corals of 300-2000-yr old is slightly lower than the value of 5.4 ± 4.5 × 10-6 obtained from corals younger than 300 yrs B.P.. For corals containing less than 2 ppb of thorium, however, the age offset will be less than 10 yr by using different 230Th/232Th0, which is acceptable for most studies. We hereby recommend an updated 230Th/232Th0 value of 4.7 (+5.5/-4.7) × 10-6 for corals throughout the Sumatran outer-arc islands. For very high-precision age determination (<10 yr), coral samples with low Th concentration (< 2 ppb) are preferred.; ;

  17. Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion for Generating High-Resolution Land Cover Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong

    Currently, remote sensing imagery has been widely used for generating global land cover products, but due to certain physical and budget limitations related to the sensors, their spatial and temporal resolution are too low to attain more accurate and more reliable global change research. In this situation, there is an urgent need to study and develop a more advanced satellite image processing method and land cover producing techniques to generate higher resolution images and land cover products for global change research. Through conducting a comprehensive study of the related theories and methods related to data fusion, various methods are systematically reviewed and summarized, such as HIS transformation image fusion, Wavelet transform image fusion, the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM), etc. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are highlighted according to their specific applications in the field of remote sensing. Based on my research target, the following are the main contents of this thesis: (1) Data fusion theory will be systematically studied and summarized, including various fusion models and specific applications, such as IHS transformation, PCA transformation, Wavelet analysis based data fusion, etc. Furthermore, their advantages and disadvantages are pointed out in relation to specific applications. (2) As traditional data fusion methods rely on spatial information and it is hard to deal with multi-source data fusion with temporal variation, therefore, the traditional data fusion theory and methods will be improved by a consideration of temporal information. Accordingly, some spatial and temporal data fusion methods will be proposed, in which both high-resolution & low-temporary imagery and low-resolution & high-temporary imagery are incorporated. Our experiments also show that they are suitable for dealing with multi-temporal data integration and generating high-resolution, multi-temporal images for global

  18. Accurate calculation and assignment of highly excited vibrational levels of floppy triatomic molecules in a basis of adiabatic vibrational eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bačić, Z.

    1991-09-01

    We show that the triatomic adiabatic vibrational eigenstates (AVES) provide a convenient basis for accurate discrete variable representation (DVR) calculation and automatic assignment of highly excited, large amplitude motion vibrational states of floppy triatomic molecules. The DVR-AVES states are eigenvectors of the diagonal (in the stretch states) blocks of the adiabatically rearranged triatomic DVR-ray eigenvector (DVR-REV) Hamiltonian [J. C. Light and Z. Bačić, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 4008 (1987)]. The transformation of the full triatomic vibrational Hamiltonian from the DVR-REV basis to the new DVR-AVES basis is simple, and does not involve calculation of any new matrix elements. No dynamical approximation is made in the energy level calculation by the DVR-AVES approach; its accuracy and efficiency are identical to those of the DVR-REV method. The DVR-AVES states, as the adiabatic approximation to the vibrational states of a triatomic molecule, are labeled by three vibrational quantum numbers. Consequently, accurate large amplitude motion vibrational levels obtained by diagonalizing the full vibrational Hamiltonian transformed to the DVR-AVES basis, can be assigned automatically by the code, with the three quantum numbers of the dominant DVR-AVES state associated with the largest (by modulus) eigenvector element in the DVR-AVES basis. The DVR-AVES approach is used to calculate accurate highly excited localized and delocalized vibrational levels of HCN/HNC and LiCN/LiNC. A significant fraction of localized states of both systems, below and above the isomerization barrier, is assigned automatically, without inspection of wave function plots or separate approximate calculations.

  19. Development and Validation of a Highly Accurate Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, David W; Smith, William L; Chadwick, Sean G; Toner, Geoffrey; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E; Aguin, Tina J; Sobel, Jack D; Gygax, Scott E

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common gynecological infection in the United States. Diagnosis based on Amsel's criteria can be challenging and can be aided by laboratory-based testing. A standard method for diagnosis in research studies is enumeration of bacterial morphotypes of a Gram-stained vaginal smear (i.e., Nugent scoring). However, this technique is subjective, requires specialized training, and is not widely available. Therefore, a highly accurate molecular assay for the diagnosis of BV would be of great utility. We analyzed 385 vaginal specimens collected prospectively from subjects who were evaluated for BV by clinical signs and Nugent scoring. We analyzed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays on DNA extracted from these specimens to quantify nine organisms associated with vaginal health or disease:Gardnerella vaginalis,Atopobium vaginae, BV-associated bacteria 2 (BVAB2, an uncultured member of the orderClostridiales),Megasphaeraphylotype 1 or 2,Lactobacillus iners,Lactobacillus crispatus,Lactobacillus gasseri, andLactobacillus jensenii We generated a logistic regression model that identifiedG. vaginalis,A. vaginae, andMegasphaeraphylotypes 1 and 2 as the organisms for which quantification provided the most accurate diagnosis of symptomatic BV, as defined by Amsel's criteria and Nugent scoring, with 92% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 94% negative predictive value. The inclusion ofLactobacillusspp. did not contribute sufficiently to the quantitative model for symptomatic BV detection. This molecular assay is a highly accurate laboratory tool to assist in the diagnosis of symptomatic BV. PMID:26818677

  20. Highly accurate prediction of emotions surrounding the attacks of September 11, 2001 over 1-, 2-, and 7-year prediction intervals.

    PubMed

    Doré, Bruce P; Meksin, Robert; Mather, Mara; Hirst, William; Ochsner, Kevin N

    2016-06-01

    In the aftermath of a national tragedy, important decisions are predicated on judgments of the emotional significance of the tragedy in the present and future. Research in affective forecasting has largely focused on ways in which people fail to make accurate predictions about the nature and duration of feelings experienced in the aftermath of an event. Here we ask a related but understudied question: can people forecast how they will feel in the future about a tragic event that has already occurred? We found that people were strikingly accurate when predicting how they would feel about the September 11 attacks over 1-, 2-, and 7-year prediction intervals. Although people slightly under- or overestimated their future feelings at times, they nonetheless showed high accuracy in forecasting (a) the overall intensity of their future negative emotion, and (b) the relative degree of different types of negative emotion (i.e., sadness, fear, or anger). Using a path model, we found that the relationship between forecasted and actual future emotion was partially mediated by current emotion and remembered emotion. These results extend theories of affective forecasting by showing that emotional responses to an event of ongoing national significance can be predicted with high accuracy, and by identifying current and remembered feelings as independent sources of this accuracy. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100309

  1. High-resolution spatial mapping of shear properties in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mark R; Bergou, Attila J; Fouchard, Jonathan; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Cohen, Itai

    2010-03-01

    Structural properties of articular cartilage such as proteoglycan content, collagen content and collagen alignment are known to vary over length scales as small as a few microns (Bullough and Goodfellow, 1968; Bi et al., 2006). Characterizing the resulting variation in mechanical properties is critical for understanding how the inhomogeneous architecture of this tissue gives rise to its function. Previous studies have measured the depth-dependent shear modulus of articular cartilage using methods such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that rely on cells and cell nuclei as fiducial markers to track tissue deformation (Buckley et al., 2008; Wong et al., 2008a). However, such techniques are limited by the density of trackable markers, which may be too low to take full advantage of optical microscopy. This limitation leads to noise in the acquired data, which is often exacerbated when the data is manipulated. In this study, we report on two techniques for increasing the accuracy of tissue deformation measurements. In the first technique, deformations were tracked in a grid that was photobleached on each tissue sample (Bruehlmann et al., 2004). In the second, a numerical technique was implemented that allowed for accurate differentiation of optical displacement measurements by minimizing the propagated experimental error while ensuring that truncation error associated with local averaging of the data remained small. To test their efficacy, we employed these techniques to compare the depth-dependent shear moduli of neonatal bovine and adult human articular cartilage. Using a photobleached grid and numerical optimization to gather and analyze data led to results consistent with those reported previously (Buckley et al., 2008; Wong et al., 2008a), but with increased spatial resolution and characteristic coefficients of variation that were reduced up to a factor of 3. This increased resolution allowed us to determine that the shear modulus of neonatal bovine and adult

  2. Mitigating Uncertainty from Vegetation Spatial Complexity with Highly Portable Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paynter, I.; Schaaf, C.; Peri, F.; Saenz, E. J.; Genest, D.; Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    To fully utilize the excellent spatial coverage and temporal resolution offered by satellite resources for estimating ecological variables, fine-scale observations are required for comparison, calibration and validation. Lidar instruments have proved effective in estimating the properties of vegetation components of ecosystems, but they are often challenged by occlusion, especially in structurally complex and spatially fragmented ecosystems such as tropical forests. Increasing the range of view angles, both horizontally and vertically, by increasing the number of scans, can mitigate occlusion. However these scans must occur within the window of temporal stability for the ecosystem and vegetation property being measured. The Compact Biomass Lidar (CBL) is a TLS optimized for portability and scanning speed, developed and operated by University of Massachusetts Boston. This 905nm wavelength scanner achieves an angular resolution of 0.25 degrees at a rate of 33 seconds per scan. The ability to acquire many scans within narrow windows of temporal stability for ecological variables has facilitated the more complete investigation of ecosystem structural characteristics, and their expression as a function of view angle. The lightweight CBL has facilitated the use of alternative deployment platforms including towers, trams and masts, allowing analysis of the vertical structure of ecosystems, even in highly enclosed environments such as the sub-canopy of tropical forests where aerial vehicles cannot currently operate. We will present results from view angle analyses of lidar surveys of tropical rainforest in La Selva, Costa Rica where the CBL was deployed at heights up to 10m in Carbono long-term research plots utilizing a portable mast, and on a 25m stationary tower; and temperate forest at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA, where the CBL has been deployed biannually at long-term research plots of hardwood and hemlock, as well as at heights of up to 25m utilizing a

  3. Strategy to attain high spatial accuracy in Forest Cover Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Vijayan, D.; Prasad, T. S.

    Forest cover and its type have primary role in the processes associated with land and global change Not only the area statistics for the different type of forest covers but also the correctness of their spatial distribution matching of classified output with GIS overlay are important for process studies As maximum likelihood ML is widely practiced classification algorithm for extracting thematic information from satellite images critical evaluation was undertaken using IRS LISS-III image of Antilova tropical moist deciduous forest bounded by 17 r 50 to 17 r 56 N in latitude and 81 r 45 to 81 r 54 E in longitude for which 100 ground information in the from of GIS overlay was available GIS overlay has 9 thematic classes i e 27 13 dense DF 25 60 Semi-evergreen SE 29 38 mixed MF 0 25 bamboo BA 5 70 teak TK forests 5 88 grassland GL 4 83 podu blank PO 1 21 Settlements SET and water 0 026 WA ML classifier in general starts with equal a priori probability for all the classes method a Availability of information on cover under each thematic class enables assigning of a priori probability to each thematic class method b Method b always gave better results as compared to method a With the goal to improve classification accuracy CA the GL and MF classes that had high standard deviation of 10 29 and 11 29 in NIR band were divided into subclasses Inclusion of sub-classes in GR improved the area statistics and spatial

  4. Spatial Distribution of Star Formation in High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnyngham, Ian; Takamiya, M.; Willmer, C.; Chun, M.; Young, M.

    2011-01-01

    Integral field unit spectroscopy taken of galaxies with redshifts between 0.6 and 0.8 utilizing Gemini Observatory’s GMOS instrument were used to investigate the spatial distribution of star-forming regions by measuring the Hβ and [OII]λ3727 emission line fluxes. These galaxies were selected based on the strength of Hβ and [OII]λ3727 as measured from slit LRIS/Keck spectra. The process of calibrating and reducing data into cubes -- possessing two spatial dimensions, and one for wavelength -- was automated via a custom batch script using the Gemini IRAF routines. Among these galaxies only the bluest sources clearly show [OII] in the IFU regardless of total galaxy luminosity. The brightest galaxies lack [OII] emission and it is posited that two different modes of star formation exist among this seemingly homogeneous group of z=0.7 star-forming galaxies. In order to increase the galaxy sample to include redshifts from 0.3 to 0.9, public Gemini IFU data are being sought. Python scripts were written to mine the Gemini Science Archive for candidate observations, cross-reference the target of these observations with information from the NASA Extragalactic Database, and then present the resultant database in sortable, searchable, cross-linked web-interface using Django to facilitate navigation. By increasing the sample, we expect to characterize these two different modes of star formation which could be high-redshift counterparts of the U/LIRGs and dwarf starburst galaxies like NGC 1569/NGC 4449. The authors acknowledge funds provided by the National Science Foundation (AST 0909240).

  5. Spatial Instabilities, Homogeneities and Proximity Effects: Highly Correlated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dynes, Robert C.

    2008-10-31

    We have developed a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope (S-STM) which is a direct and local probe of the pair wave function of superconducting materials via the Josephson effect and quasiparticle spectra via scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The novel feature of this device is a superconducting tip (Pb with an Ag capping layer) in close proximity to a superconducting sample to form a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction. The operation of this S-STM has been verified in the observation of Josephson tunneling between the tip and different sample systems including Pb films and NbSe{sub 2}. This instrument was employed in the study of High T{sub c} superconductors and spatial inhomogeneities. The major accomplishments in the current grant period are observations of c-axis Josephson tunneling between a conventional superconductor (Pb) and variously doped BSSCO samples. These observations are reported: (1) C-axis Josephson couplings between Pb and both OP and OV-BSCCO. This is surprising if BSCCO is strictly a d-wave superconductor; (2) ICRN of the OP sample seemed to be much smaller than those of OV samples; (3) ICRN inhomogeneity is correlated with the gap inhomogeneity on the length scale of ξ in the OV samples; (4) Inverse correlation between ICRN and Δ in OV samples; (5) Degradations of the superconductivity of BSCCO by high current density.

  6. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Sun B; Rota, Jennifer S; Hickman, Carole J; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M Laura; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  7. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Jennifer S.; Hickman, Carole J.; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J.; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M. Laura; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  8. Combining Theory and Experiment to Compute Highly Accurate Line Lists for Stable Molecules, and Purely AB Initio Theory to Compute Accurate Rotational and Rovibrational Line Lists for Transient Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Schwenke, David W.

    2013-06-01

    Theoretical chemists have been computing vibrational and rovibrational spectra of small molecules for more than 40 years, but over the last decade the interest in this application has grown significantly. The increased interest in computing accurate rotational and rovibrational spectra for small molecules could not come at a better time, as NASA and ESA have begun to acquire a mountain of high-resolution spectra from the Herschel mission, and soon will from the SOFIA and JWST missions. In addition, the ground-based telescope, ALMA, has begun to acquire high-resolution spectra in the same time frame. Hence the need for highly accurate line lists for many small molecules, including their minor isotopologues, will only continue to increase. I will present the latest developments from our group on using the "Best Theory + High-Resolution Experimental Data" strategy to compute highly accurate rotational and rovibrational spectra for small molecules, including NH3, CO2, and SO2. I will also present the latest work from our group in producing purely ab initio line lists and spectroscopic constants for small molecules thought to exist in various astrophysical environments, but for which there is either limited or no high-resolution experimental data available. These more limited line lists include purely rotational transitions as well as rovibrational transitions for bands up through a few combination/overtones.

  9. Monte Carlo code for high spatial resolution ocean color simulations.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Kajiyama, Tamito; Cunha, José C

    2010-09-10

    A Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations has been developed to model in-water radiometric fields of downward and upward irradiance (E(d) and E(u)), and upwelling radiance (L(u)) in a two-dimensional domain with a high spatial resolution. The efficiency of the code has been optimized by applying state-of-the-art computing solutions, while the accuracy of simulation results has been quantified through benchmark with the widely used Hydrolight code for various values of seawater inherent optical properties and different illumination conditions. Considering a seawater single scattering albedo of 0.9, as well as surface waves of 5 m width and 0.5 m height, the study has shown that the number of photons required to quantify uncertainties induced by wave focusing effects on E(d), E(u), and L(u) data products is of the order of 10(6), 10(9), and 10(10), respectively. On this basis, the effects of sea-surface geometries on radiometric quantities have been investigated for different surface gravity waves. Data products from simulated radiometric profiles have finally been analyzed as a function of the deployment speed and sampling frequency of current free-fall systems in view of providing recommendations to improve measurement protocols. PMID:20830183

  10. High spatial resolution spectrometry of rafting macroalgae (Sargassum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Marmorino, George O.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David

    2010-04-01

    Data with 0.4-m spatial resolution acquired ~2 km off the southeast Florida coast using the airborne Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light Spectroscopy (PHILLS) have been analyzed with the objective of identifying drifting surface macroalgae (Sargassum) through its spectral signature in at-sensor radiance. The observed spectral features of Sargassum include a peak at a wavelength of ~0.570 μm and a photosynthetic 'red edge' between 0.673 and 0.699 μm. Sargassum also exhibits high radiance in the reflected near-infrared but is impacted by the atmospheric absorption bands of water vapor at 0.720 μm and oxygen at 0.756 μm. The spectral signature is clearest and largest in amplitude where the Sargassum occurs as small surface aggregations, or rafts, which tend to lie at the downwind ends of narrow Sargassum windrows. The quantity of floating Sargassum was estimated within a single pixel by linearly mixing a spectrum of Sargassum-free water with varying percentages of a spectrum from a pixel assumed completely filled with floating plants. For our study site about 2.3% of the ocean area is classified as having some Sargassum coverage, with pixels completely filled with Sargassum being rare (only 0.2% of the classified Sargassum pixels) and pixels with the least-resolvable amount of Sargassum (~10% filled) being the most common.

  11. A simple, efficient, and high-order accurate curved sliding-mesh interface approach to spectral difference method on coupled rotating and stationary domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chunlei

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, and high-order accurate sliding-mesh interface approach to the spectral difference (SD) method. We demonstrate the approach by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on quadrilateral grids. This approach is an extension of the straight mortar method originally designed for stationary domains [7,8]. Our sliding method creates curved dynamic mortars on sliding-mesh interfaces to couple rotating and stationary domains. On the nonconforming sliding-mesh interfaces, the related variables are first projected from cell faces to mortars to compute common fluxes, and then the common fluxes are projected back from the mortars to the cell faces to ensure conservation. To verify the spatial order of accuracy of the sliding-mesh spectral difference (SSD) method, both inviscid and viscous flow cases are tested. It is shown that the SSD method preserves the high-order accuracy of the SD method. Meanwhile, the SSD method is found to be very efficient in terms of computational cost. This novel sliding-mesh interface method is very suitable for parallel processing with domain decomposition. It can be applied to a wide range of problems, such as the hydrodynamics of marine propellers, the aerodynamics of rotorcraft, wind turbines, and oscillating wing power generators, etc.

  12. Stable, high-order SBP-SAT finite difference operators to enable accurate simulation of compressible turbulent flows on curvilinear grids, with application to predicting turbulent jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Jaeseung; Bodony, Daniel; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Improved order-of-accuracy discretizations often require careful consideration of their numerical stability. We report on new high-order finite difference schemes using Summation-By-Parts (SBP) operators along with the Simultaneous-Approximation-Terms (SAT) boundary condition treatment for first and second-order spatial derivatives with variable coefficients. In particular, we present a highly accurate operator for SBP-SAT-based approximations of second-order derivatives with variable coefficients for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. These terms are responsible for approximating the physical dissipation of kinetic and thermal energy in a simulation, and contain grid metrics when the grid is curvilinear. Analysis using the Laplace transform method shows that strong stability is ensured with Dirichlet boundary conditions while weaker stability is obtained for Neumann boundary conditions. Furthermore, the benefits of the scheme is shown in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Mach 1.5 compressible turbulent supersonic jet using curvilinear grids and skew-symmetric discretization. Particularly, we show that the improved methods allow minimization of the numerical filter often employed in these simulations and we discuss the qualities of the simulation.

  13. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  14. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  15. Distribution of high-stability 10 GHz local oscillator over 100 km optical fiber with accurate phase-correction system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siwei; Sun, Dongning; Dong, Yi; Xie, Weilin; Shi, Hongxiao; Yi, Lilin; Hu, Weisheng

    2014-02-15

    We have developed a radio-frequency local oscillator remote distribution system, which transfers a phase-stabilized 10.03 GHz signal over 100 km optical fiber. The phase noise of the remote signal caused by temperature and mechanical stress variations on the fiber is compensated by a high-precision phase-correction system, which is achieved using a single sideband modulator to transfer the phase correction from intermediate frequency to radio frequency, thus enabling accurate phase control of the 10 GHz signal. The residual phase noise of the remote 10.03 GHz signal is measured to be -70  dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset, and long-term stability of less than 1×10⁻¹⁶ at 10,000 s averaging time is achieved. Phase error is less than ±0.03π. PMID:24562233

  16. High resolution dosimetry in monoenergetic proton beam therapy on a normoxic polymer gel: the importance of high spatial resolution for reduced Bragg-Peak-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Naumann, J.; Jaekel, O.

    2013-06-01

    Proton ion beam therapy demands for high resolution dosimetry due to the high dose gradients present in lateral confinement and final Bragg-peak. In polymer gels the reduction of the linear dose response in the area of the Bragg-peak is reported (Bragg-peak quenching), which is assumed to be mainly due to the high linear energy transfer (LET). We here investigate the impact of the spatial resolution in T2-mapping for accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based polymer gel dosimetry in the Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We implemented MR-protocols for T2-mapping at microscopic resolution on a High-Field 7T human MR-scanner using an insert gradient system and sensitive rf-coils. The best results are obtained for an optimzed polymer gel based on THPC with an optimized MR-protocol for reduced measurement time and sufficient SNR at 0,547 mm pixel size. The dose in the fine Bragg-peak could be measured correctly for a monoenergetic proton beam as confirmed by Monte Carlo dose simulations. Such high spatial resolutions at minimum are necessary for an accurate measurement of the dose in the sharp Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We demonstrate that at higher pixel size the dose levels may be underestimated due to spatial averaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.

  17. Accurate Transmittance Measurements of Thick, High-Index, High- Dispersion, IR Windows, Using a Fourier Transform IR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupferberg, Lenn C.

    1996-03-01

    Fourier transform IR [FT-IR] spectrometers have virtually replaced scanned grating IR spectrometers in the commercial market. While FTIR spectrometers have been a boon for the chemist, they present problems for the measurement of transmittance of thick, high-index, high-dispersion, IR windows. Reflection and refraction of light by the windows introduce measurement errors. The principles of the FT-IR spectrometer will be briefly reviewed. The origins of the measurement errors will be discussed. Simple modifications to the operation of commercially available instruments will be presented. These include using strategically placed apertures and the use of collimated vs. focused beams at the sample position. They are essential for removing the effects of reflected light entering the interferometer and limiting the divergence angle of light in the interferometer. The latter minimizes refractive effects and insures consistent underfilling of the detector. Data will be shown from FT-IR spectrometers made by four manufactures and compared to measurements from a dispersive spectrometer.

  18. Modern high spatial resolution approaches to crustal evolution studies - pitfalls and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Developments in analytical techniques for in situ geochronology and isotope geochemistry over the past few decades have contributed greatly to our understanding of the processes of Precambrian crustal evolution, plate tectonics, the development of Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere and conditions for the development of life on Earth. The further back in time we go, however, the more complex the geology, requiring that we unravel and/or try to see through multiple phases of disturbance. Such geological complexity complicates interpretation and can lead to conflicting viewpoints on such key questions as when plate tectonics began on Earth, when it evolved to a process essentially similar to that of today and the nature and habitability of a potentially pre-plate tectonic Earth in the Hadean. This presentation will review, with case studies, some of the crucial aspects of applying and interpreting high spatial resolution in situ methods and some of the potential pitfalls. Obtaining accurate and precise geochronology is an essential first step in any study of Precambrian geology, whether it is the primary goal or provides a supporting framework to other diverse applications. To this end, high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and laser ablation inductiively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), typically combined with relevant imaging methods such as cathode luminescence (CL) are widely used to investigate the U-Pb systematics of complex zircon. In general precision is merely an analytical hurdle that we are good (and continually getting better) at clearing, but accuracy commonly contains not just an analytical element (e.g. calibration of standards) but also a considerable subjective element in order to unravel the commonly polyphase evolution of early Precambrian zircon. Examples of such problematic interpretations from the Neoarchean Lewisian Complex of northwest Scotland and the Paleoarchean Napier Complex of Antarctica will be

  19. High-spatial-resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The principal contributions of this combined theoretical and experimental effort were to advance and demonstrate new and more accurate techniques for sounding atmospheric temperature, humidity, and precipitation profiles at millimeter wavelengths, and to improve the scientific basis for such soundings. Some of these techniques are being incorporated in both research and operational systems. Specific results include: (1) development of the MIT Microwave Temperature Sounder (MTS), a 118-GHz eight-channel imaging spectrometer plus a switched-frequency spectrometer near 53 GHz, for use on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft, (2) conduct of ER-2 MTS missions in multiple seasons and locations in combination with other instruments, mapping with unprecedented approximately 2-km lateral resolution atmospheric temperature and precipitation profiles, atmospheric transmittances (at both zenith and nadir), frontal systems, and hurricanes, (3) ground based 118-GHz 3-D spectral images of wavelike structure within clouds passing overhead, (4) development and analysis of approaches to ground- and space-based 5-mm wavelength sounding of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, which supported the planning of improvements to operational weather satellites, (5) development of improved multidimensional and adaptive retrieval methods for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, (6) development of combined nonlinear and statistical retrieval techniques for 183-GHz humidity profile retrievals, (7) development of nonlinear statistical retrieval techniques for precipitation cell-top altitudes, and (8) numerical analyses of the impact of remote sensing data on the accuracy of numerical weather predictions; a 68-km gridded model was used to study the spectral properties of error growth.

  20. Highly accurate quartic force fields, vibrational frequencies, and spectroscopic constants for cyclic and linear C3H3(+).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R; Lee, Timothy J

    2011-05-19

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C(3)H(3)(+) molecular cation, referred to as c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+). Specifically, the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit, and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants by use of both vibrational second-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C(3)H(3)(+), obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C(3)H(3)(+) and l-C(3)H(3)(+) are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species, and it is hoped that these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations. PMID:21510653

  1. Highly Accurate Quartic Force Fields, Vibrational Frequencies, and Spectroscopic Constants for Cyclic and Linear C3H3(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of theory have been used to compute quartic force fields (QFFs) for the cyclic and linear forms of the C H + molecular cation, referred to as c-C H + and I-C H +. Specifically the 33 3333 singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, CCSD(T), has been used in conjunction with extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit and corrections for scalar relativity and core correlation have been included. The QFFs have been used to compute highly accurate fundamental vibrational frequencies and other spectroscopic constants using both vibrational 2nd-order perturbation theory and variational methods to solve the nuclear Schroedinger equation. Agreement between our best computed fundamental vibrational frequencies and recent infrared photodissociation experiments is reasonable for most bands, but there are a few exceptions. Possible sources for the discrepancies are discussed. We determine the energy difference between the cyclic and linear forms of C H +, 33 obtaining 27.9 kcal/mol at 0 K, which should be the most reliable available. It is expected that the fundamental vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants presented here for c-C H + 33 and I-C H + are the most reliable available for the free gas-phase species and it is hoped that 33 these will be useful in the assignment of future high-resolution laboratory experiments or astronomical observations.

  2. Linear and non-linear high order accurate residual distribution schemes for the discretization of the steady compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, R.; De Santis, D.

    2015-02-01

    A robust and high order accurate Residual Distribution (RD) scheme for the discretization of the steady Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The proposed method is very flexible: it is formulated for unstructured grids, regardless the shape of the elements and the number of spatial dimensions. A continuous approximation of the solution is adopted and standard Lagrangian shape functions are used to construct the discrete space, as in Finite Element methods. The traditional technique for designing RD schemes is adopted: evaluate, for any element, a total residual, split it into nodal residuals sent to the degrees of freedom of the element, solve the non-linear system that has been assembled and then iterate up to convergence. The main issue addressed by the paper is that the technique relies in depth on the continuity of the normal flux across the element boundaries: this is no longer true since the gradient of the state solution appears in the flux, hence continuity is lost when using standard finite element approximations. Naive solution methods lead to very poor accuracy. To cope with the fact that the normal component of the gradient of the numerical solution is discontinuous across the faces of the elements, a continuous approximation of the gradient of the numerical solution is recovered at each degree of freedom of the grid and then interpolated with the same shape functions used for the solution, preserving the optimal accuracy of the method. Linear and non-linear schemes are constructed, and their accuracy is tested with the method of the manufactured solutions. The numerical method is also used for the discretization of smooth and shocked laminar flows in two and three spatial dimensions.

  3. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  4. Accuracy levels of land cover classified maps derived from mid and high spatial resolution remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bonnie J.

    This dissertation compares the accuracy of results of classifying data from mid-level to very high spatial resolutions (Landsat ETM+, SPOT 4, ASTER, SPOT 5, and QuickBird). Data from all of these sensors were classified for both urban and rural settings. The dissertation also examines accuracy levels between spectral and radiometric resolutions. Finally, it investigates the role that shadow plays in affecting accuracy levels from higher spatial resolution satellites. To compare as to whether there were significant differences in the accuracy levels between different sensors, each map's accuracy percentages were analyzed using Z-scores and kappa as described in the methodology section. QuickBird, with the highest spatial resolution, performed significantly more poorly in terms of providing accurate classification than any other sensor with respect to the rural environment. It also was significantly worse than Landsat ETM+ in providing accurate classification in the urban environment. In order to control for radiometric resolution, the 11-bit QuickBird data were converted to 8-bit data since QuickBird is the only sensor that does not have the same radiometric resolution. The resulting classification accuracy percentages were no better than that of random chance. When testing for accuracy in classification using only the three bands common to all sensors (green, red, and near-infrared) the result was there was essentially no difference between any of the sensors. This outcome supports the hypothesis that spectral resolution plays an important role in land cover accuracy. Using simple linear regression, the relationship between the percentage of shadow pixels and spatial resolution is examined. There is a moderate relationship between the spatial resolution of sensors and the percentages of shadow pixels where sensors with higher spatial resolution have a higher percentage of shadow pixels. These results agreed with literature from other studies in similar environments.

  5. Controlling high harmonics generation by spatial shaping of high-energy femtosecond beam.

    PubMed

    Dubrouil, A; Mairesse, Y; Fabre, B; Descamps, D; Petit, S; Mével, E; Constant, E

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate controlled high-order harmonic generation in gas using high-energy femtosecond pulses (50 fs-50 mJ on target) by performing spatial shaping of the terrawatt fundamental laser beam. We have developed a two optical paths mirror that can withstand high power and shape the pump beam into a quasi-flat-top profile (super Gaussian) near focus. We observe clear signatures of the spatial shaping on the harmonic beam in terms of profile, divergence, level of signal, and spectrum. The harmonic generation in neon with a quasi-flat-top beam results in a broadband extreme UV beam with extremely low divergence (~340 μrad). PMID:21725453

  6. High definition i-SCAN endoscopy with water immersion technique accurately reflects histological severity of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Iacucci, Marietta; Poon, Tiffany; Gui, X. Sean; Subrata, Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Severe villous atrophy can be revealed with conventional white light endoscopy (WLE), however, milder grades or patchy villous atrophy are more difficult to detect. Novel endoscopic techniques such as high definition i-SCAN endoscopy with the water immersion technique (i-SCAN-HDWI) may provide the ability to visualize duodenal villi more accurately. We aimed to determine the performance of i-SCAN-HDWI in evaluating the severity of histological damage in the duodenum of patients with celiac disease. Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed in a single tertiary academic endoscopic center. We studied 58 patients (46 women; median age 36.5 years, range 18 – 72 years) with positive anti-TTG IgA antibody. The villous pattern of the second part of the duodenum was assessed by WLE and i-SCAN-HDWI. The endoscopic grades in both techniques were correlated using Marsh histologic grades by Spearman correlation coefficient. The diagnostic accuracy of i-SCAN-HDWI for detection of patchy or complete atrophy of the villi was evaluated. Results: A significant correlation was demonstrated between endoscopic grade using i-SCAN-HDWI and Marsh histologic grade (r = 0.732; P < 0.00001). The correlation between WLE grade and Marsh histologic grade was inferior to i-SCAN-HDWI (r = 0.31; P = 0.01). The sensitivity of i-SCAN-HDWI was 96 % (95 %CI: 85 – 99 %) and the specificity was 63 % (95 %CI: 26 – 90 %) in diagnosing abnormal biopsy consistent with celiac disease. Conclusion: i-SCAN-HDWI endoscopy can reflect the histological severity of celiac disease more accurately than conventional WLE alone. This novel endoscopic imaging can improve the diagnostic yield of duodenal biopsies in celiac patients, especially for those with a patchy distribution of villous damage. PMID:27227112

  7. LiF TLD-100 as a Dosimeter in High Energy Proton Beam Therapy-Can It Yield Accurate Results?

    SciTech Connect

    Zullo, John R. Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T.

    2010-04-01

    In the region of high-dose gradients at the end of the proton range, the stopping power ratio of the protons undergoes significant changes, allowing for a broad spectrum of proton energies to be deposited within a relatively small volume. Because of the potential linear energy transfer dependence of LiF TLD-100 (thermolumescent dosimeter), dose measurements made in the distal fall-off region of a proton beam may be less accurate than those made in regions of low-dose gradients. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy and precision of dose measured using TLD-100 for a pristine Bragg peak, particularly in the distal fall-off region. All measurements were made along the central axis of an unmodulated 200-MeV proton beam from a Probeat passive beam-scattering proton accelerator (Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) at varying depths along the Bragg peak. Measurements were made using TLD-100 powder flat packs, placed in a virtual water slab phantom. The measurements were repeated using a parallel plate ionization chamber. The dose measurements using TLD-100 in a proton beam were accurate to within {+-}5.0% of the expected dose, previously seen in our past photon and electron measurements. The ionization chamber and the TLD relative dose measurements agreed well with each other. Absolute dose measurements using TLD agreed with ionization chamber measurements to within {+-} 3.0 cGy, for an exposure of 100 cGy. In our study, the differences in the dose measured by the ionization chamber and those measured by TLD-100 were minimal, indicating that the accuracy and precision of measurements made in the distal fall-off region of a pristine Bragg peak is within the expected range. Thus, the rapid change in stopping power ratios at the end of the range should not affect such measurements, and TLD-100 may be used with confidence as an in vivo dosimeter for proton beam therapy.

  8. Aptamer-Conjugated Graphene Oxide Membranes for Highly Efficient Capture and Accurate Identification of Multiple Types of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is responsible for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Though it has been well-documented over past two decades that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood can be used as a biomarker for metastatic cancer, there are enormous challenges in capturing and identifying CTCs with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Because of the heterogeneous expression of CTC markers, it is now well understood that a single CTC marker is insufficient to capture all CTCs from the blood. Driven by the clear need, this study reports for the first time highly efficient capture and accurate identification of multiple types of CTCs from infected blood using aptamer-modified porous graphene oxide membranes. The results demonstrate that dye-modified S6, A9, and YJ-1 aptamers attached to 20–40 μm porous garphene oxide membranes are capable of capturing multiple types of tumor cells (SKBR3 breast cancer cells, LNCaP prostate cancer cells, and SW-948 colon cancer cells) selectively and simultaneously from infected blood. Our result shows that the capture efficiency of graphene oxide membranes is ∼95% for multiple types of tumor cells; for each tumor concentration, 10 cells are present per milliliter of blood sample. The selectivity of our assay for capturing targeted tumor cells has been demonstrated using membranes without an antibody. Blood infected with different cells also has been used to demonstrate the targeted tumor cell capturing ability of aptamer-conjugated membranes. Our data also demonstrate that accurate analysis of multiple types of captured CTCs can be performed using multicolor fluorescence imaging. Aptamer-conjugated membranes reported here have good potential for the early diagnosis of diseases that are currently being detected by means of cell capture technologies. PMID:25565372

  9. Spatial Abilities of High-School Students in the Perception of Geologic Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir

    1996-01-01

    Characterizes specific spatial abilities required in geology studies through the examination of the performance of high school students in solving structural geology problems on the geologic spatial ability test (GeoSAT). Concludes that visual penetration ability and the ability to perceive the spatial configuration of the structure are…

  10. The Sun at high spatial resolution: The physics of small spatial structures in a magnetized medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide a perspective on the problem of spatial structuring on scales smaller than can presently be directly and regularly observed from the ground or with which current space-based instrumentation can be anticipated. There is abundant evidence from both observations and theory that such spatial structuring of the solar outer atmosphere is ubiquitous not only on the observed scales, but also on spatial scales down to (at least) the subarcsecond range. This is not to say that the results to be obtained from observations on these small scales can be anticipated: quite the opposite. What is clear instead is that many of the classic problems of coronal and chromospheric activity - involving the basic dissipative nature of magnetized plasmas - will be seen from a novel perspective at these scales, and that there are reasons for believing that dynamical processes of importance to activity on presently-resolved scales will themselves begin to be resolved on the sub-arcsecond level. Since the Sun is the only astrophysical laboratory for which there is any hope of studying these processes in any detail, this observatioinal opportunity is an exciting prospect for any student of magnetic activity in astrophysics.

  11. Hadoop-GIS: A High Performance Spatial Data Warehousing System over MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Vo, Hoang; Lee, Rubao; Liu, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel

    2013-08-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems in numerous fields, location based services, and emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. The emergence of massive scale spatial data is due to the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies, development of high resolution imaging technologies, and contribution from a large number of community users. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data to support spatial queries: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries. In this paper, we present Hadoop-GIS - a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop. Hadoop-GIS supports multiple types of spatial queries on MapReduce through spatial partitioning, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE, implicit parallel spatial query execution on MapReduce, and effective methods for amending query results through handling boundary objects. Hadoop-GIS utilizes global partition indexing and customizable on demand local spatial indexing to achieve efficient query processing. Hadoop-GIS is integrated into Hive to support declarative spatial queries with an integrated architecture. Our experiments have demonstrated the high efficiency of Hadoop-GIS on query response and high scalability to run on commodity clusters. Our comparative experiments have showed that performance of Hadoop-GIS is on par with parallel SDBMS and outperforms SDBMS for compute-intensive queries. Hadoop-GIS is available as a set of library for processing spatial queries, and as an integrated software package in Hive. PMID:24187650

  12. Hadoop-GIS: A High Performance Spatial Data Warehousing System over MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Vo, Hoang; Lee, Rubao; Liu, Qiaoling; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saltz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of spatial data becomes increasingly important in many application domains, including geospatial problems in numerous fields, location based services, and emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. The emergence of massive scale spatial data is due to the proliferation of cost effective and ubiquitous positioning technologies, development of high resolution imaging technologies, and contribution from a large number of community users. There are two major challenges for managing and querying massive spatial data to support spatial queries: the explosion of spatial data, and the high computational complexity of spatial queries. In this paper, we present Hadoop-GIS – a scalable and high performance spatial data warehousing system for running large scale spatial queries on Hadoop. Hadoop-GIS supports multiple types of spatial queries on MapReduce through spatial partitioning, customizable spatial query engine RESQUE, implicit parallel spatial query execution on MapReduce, and effective methods for amending query results through handling boundary objects. Hadoop-GIS utilizes global partition indexing and customizable on demand local spatial indexing to achieve efficient query processing. Hadoop-GIS is integrated into Hive to support declarative spatial queries with an integrated architecture. Our experiments have demonstrated the high efficiency of Hadoop-GIS on query response and high scalability to run on commodity clusters. Our comparative experiments have showed that performance of Hadoop-GIS is on par with parallel SDBMS and outperforms SDBMS for compute-intensive queries. Hadoop-GIS is available as a set of library for processing spatial queries, and as an integrated software package in Hive. PMID:24187650

  13. Highly Accurate Semi-Empirical IR Line Lists of Asymmetric SO2 Isotopologues: SO18O and SO17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Schwenke, D.; Lee, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmosphere models and simulations of Venus, Mars, and Exo-planets will greatly benefit from complete and accurate Infrared spectra data of important molecules such as SO2 and CO2. Currently, high resolution spectra data for SO2 is very limited at 296K and mainly for the primary isotopologue 626. It cannot effectively support the observed data analysis and simulations. Recently we published a semi-empirically refined potential energy surface, denoted Ames-1, and Ames-296K IR line lists for SO2 626 and a few symmetric isotopologues including 646, 636, 666 and 828. The accuracy of line positions is around 0.01 - 0.03 cm-1 for most transitions. For intensities, most deviations are less than 5-15%. Now we have carried out new potential energy surface refinements by including latest experimental data and those of isotopologues. On the newly fitted surface, for the first time we have computed 296K line lists for the two most abundant asymmetric isotopologues, SO2 628 and SO2 627. We will present the spectra simulations of SO2 628 and SO2 627, and compare it with latest high resolution experimental spectroscopy of SO2 628. A composite "natural" line list at 296K is also available with terrestial abundances. These line lists will be available to download at http://huang.seti.org.

  14. Accurate and High-Coverage Immune Repertoire Sequencing Reveals Characteristics of Antibody Repertoire Diversification in Young Children with Malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning

    Accurately measuring the immune repertoire sequence composition, diversity, and abundance is important in studying repertoire response in infections, vaccinations, and cancer immunology. Using molecular identifiers (MIDs) to tag mRNA molecules is an effective method in improving the accuracy of immune repertoire sequencing (IR-seq). However, it is still difficult to use IR-seq on small amount of clinical samples to achieve a high coverage of the repertoire diversities. This is especially challenging in studying infections and vaccinations where B cell subpopulations with fewer cells, such as memory B cells or plasmablasts, are often of great interest to study somatic mutation patterns and diversity changes. Here, we describe an approach of IR-seq based on the use of MIDs in combination with a clustering method that can reveal more than 80% of the antibody diversity in a sample and can be applied to as few as 1,000 B cells. We applied this to study the antibody repertoires of young children before and during an acute malaria infection. We discovered unexpectedly high levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in infants and revealed characteristics of antibody repertoire development in young children that would have a profound impact on immunization in children.

  15. Ion chromatography as highly suitable method for rapid and accurate determination of antibiotic fosfomycin in pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping; Xie, Xiaolin; Song, Yonghui; Liu, Ruixia; Zhu, Chaowei; Galarneau, Anne; Pic, Jean-Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A rapid and accurate ion chromatography (IC) method (limit of detection as low as 0.06 mg L(-1)) for fosfomycin concentration determination in pharmaceutical industrial wastewater was developed. This method was compared with the performance of high performance liquid chromatography determination (with a high detection limit of 96.0 mg L(-1)) and ultraviolet spectrometry after reacting with alizarin (difficult to perform in colored solutions). The accuracy of the IC method was established in the linear range of 1.0-15.0 mg L(-1) and a linear correlation was found with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The recoveries of fosfomycin from industrial pharmaceutical wastewater at spiking concentrations of 2.0, 5.0 and 8.0 mg L(-1) ranged from 81.91 to 94.74%, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) from 1 to 4%. The recoveries of effluent from a sequencing batch reactor treated fosfomycin with activated sludge at spiking concentrations of 5.0, 8.0, 10.0 mg L(-1) ranging from 98.25 to 99.91%, with a RSD from 1 to 2%. The developed IC procedure provided a rapid, reliable and sensitive method for the determination of fosfomycin concentration in industrial pharmaceutical wastewater and samples containing complex components. PMID:24845315

  16. Accurate blackbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latvakoski, Harri M.; Watson, Mike; Topham, Shane; Scott, Deron; Wojcik, Mike; Bingham, Gail

    2010-07-01

    Infrared radiometers and spectrometers generally use blackbodies for calibration, and with the high accuracy needs of upcoming missions, blackbodies capable of meeting strict accuracy requirements are needed. One such mission, the NASA climate science mission Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO), which will measure Earth's emitted spectral radiance from orbit, has an absolute accuracy requirement of 0.1 K (3σ) at 220 K over most of the thermal infrared. Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) has a blackbody design capable of meeting strict modern accuracy requirements. This design is relatively simple to build, was developed for use on the ground or onorbit, and is readily scalable for aperture size and required performance. These-high accuracy blackbodies are currently in use as a ground calibration unit and with a high-altitude balloon instrument. SDL is currently building a prototype blackbody to demonstrate the ability to achieve very high accuracy, and we expect it to have emissivity of ~0.9999 from 1.5 to 50 μm, temperature uncertainties of ~25 mK, and radiance uncertainties of ~10 mK due to temperature gradients. The high emissivity and low thermal gradient uncertainties are achieved through cavity design, while the low temperature uncertainty is attained by including phase change materials such as mercury, gallium, and water in the blackbody. Blackbody temperature sensors are calibrated at the melt points of these materials, which are determined by heating through their melt point. This allows absolute temperature calibration traceable to the SI temperature scale.

  17. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas. PMID:27122050

  18. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    the water resonance that is not present at +7.0 Hz and may be specific to white matter anatomy. Moreover, a frequency shift of 6.76 ± 0.55 Hz was measured between the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum. This shift is demonstrated in corresponding spectra; water peaks from voxels in the molecular and granular layers are consistently 2 bins apart (7.0 Hz, as dictated by the spectral resolution) from one another. Conclusions: High spectral and spatial resolution MR imaging has the potential to accurately measure the changes in the water resonance in small voxels. This information can guide optimization and interpretation of more commonly used, more rapid imaging methods that depend on image contrast produced by local susceptibility gradients. In addition, with improved sampling methods, high spectral and spatial resolution data could be acquired in reasonable run times, and used for in vivo scans to increase sensitivity to variations in local susceptibility.

  19. Spatially resolved, highly multiplexed RNA profiling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kok Hao; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Siyuan; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the expression profile and spatial landscape of the transcriptome in individual cells is essential for understanding the rich repertoire of cellular behaviors. Here we report multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a single-molecule imaging approach that allows the copy numbers and spatial localizations of thousands of RNA species to be determined in single cells. Using error-robust encoding schemes to combat single-molecule labeling and detection errors, we demonstrated the imaging of 100 – 1000 unique RNA species in hundreds of individual cells. Correlation analysis of the ~104 – 106 pairs of genes allowed us to constrain gene regulatory networks, predict novel functions for many unannotated genes, and identify distinct spatial distribution patterns of RNAs that correlate with properties of the encoded proteins. PMID:25858977

  20. Quantifying mangrove chlorophyll from high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenkenda, Muditha K.; Joyce, Karen E.; Maier, Stefan W.; de Bruin, Sytze

    2015-10-01

    Lower than expected chlorophyll concentration of a plant can directly limit photosynthetic activity, and resultant primary production. Low chlorophyll concentration may also indicate plant physiological stress. Compared to other terrestrial vegetation, mangrove chlorophyll variations are poorly understood. This study quantifies the spatial distribution of mangrove canopy chlorophyll variation using remotely sensed data and field samples over the Rapid Creek mangrove forest in Darwin, Australia. Mangrove leaf samples were collected and analyzed for chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Once the leaf area index (LAI) of sampled trees was estimated using the digital cover photography method, the canopy chlorophyll contents were calculated. Then, the nonlinear random forests regression algorithm was used to describe the relationship between canopy chlorophyll content and remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 satellite image bands and their spectral transformations), and to estimate the spatial distribution of canopy chlorophyll variation. The imagery was evaluated at full 2 m spatial resolution, as well as at decreased resampled resolutions of 5 m and 10 m. The root mean squared errors with validation samples were 0.82, 0.64 and 0.65 g/m2 for maps at 2 m, 5 m and 10 m spatial resolution respectively. The correlation coefficient was analyzed for the relationship between measured and predicted chlorophyll values. The highest correlation: 0.71 was observed at 5 m spatial resolution (R2 = 0.5). We therefore concluded that estimating mangrove chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data is possible using red, red-edge, NIR1 and NIR2 bands and their spectral transformations as predictors at 5 m spatial resolution.

  1. Learning the Structure of High-Dimensional Manifolds with Self-Organizing Maps for Accurate Information Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili

    This work aims to improve the capability of accurate information extraction from high-dimensional data, with a specific neural learning paradigm, the Self-Organizing Map (SOM). The SOM is an unsupervised learning algorithm that can faithfully sense the manifold structure and support supervised learning of relevant information from the data. Yet open problems regarding SOM learning exist. We focus on the following two issues. (1) Evaluation of topology preservation. Topology preservation is essential for SOMs in faithful representation of manifold structure. However, in reality, topology violations are not unusual, especially when the data have complicated structure. Measures capable of accurately quantifying and informatively expressing topology violations are lacking. One contribution of this work is a new measure, the Weighted Differential Topographic Function (WDTF), which differentiates an existing measure, the Topographic Function (TF), and incorporates detailed data distribution as an importance weighting of violations to distinguish severe violations from insignificant ones. Another contribution is an interactive visual tool, TopoView, which facilitates the visual inspection of violations on the SOM lattice. We show the effectiveness of the combined use of the WDTF and TopoView through a simple two-dimensional data set and two hyperspectral images. (2) Learning multiple latent variables from high-dimensional data. We use an existing two-layer SOM-hybrid supervised architecture, which captures the manifold structure in its SOM hidden layer, and then, uses its output layer to perform the supervised learning of latent variables. In the customary way, the output layer only uses the strongest output of the SOM neurons. This severely limits the learning capability. We allow multiple, k, strongest responses of the SOM neurons for the supervised learning. Moreover, the fact that different latent variables can be best learned with different values of k motivates a

  2. High-throughput spatial light modulation two-photon microscopy for fast functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Paolo; Gandolfi, Daniela; Tognolina, Marialuisa; Chirico, Giuseppe; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The optical monitoring of multiple single neuron activities requires high-throughput parallel acquisition of signals at millisecond temporal resolution. To this aim, holographic two-photon microscopy (2PM) based on spatial light modulators (SLMs) has been developed in combination with standard laser scanning microscopes. This requires complex coordinate transformations for the generation of holographic patterns illuminating the points of interest. We present a simpler and fully digital setup (SLM-2PM) which collects three-dimensional two-photon images by only exploiting the SLM. This configuration leads to an accurate placement of laser beamlets over small focal volumes, eliminating mechanically moving parts and making the system stable over long acquisition times. Fluorescence signals are diffraction limited and are acquired through a pixelated detector, setting the actual limit to the acquisition rate. High-resolution structural images were acquired by raster-scanning the sample with a regular grid of excitation focal volumes. These images allowed the selection of the structures to be further investigated through an interactive operator-guided selection process. Functional signals were collected by illuminating all the preselected points with a single hologram. This process is exemplified for high-speed (up to 1 kHz) two-photon calcium imaging on acute cerebellar slices. PMID:26157984

  3. Adaptive optimal control of highly dissipative nonlinear spatially distributed processes with neuro-dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Han-Xiong

    2015-04-01

    Highly dissipative nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) are widely employed to describe the system dynamics of industrial spatially distributed processes (SDPs). In this paper, we consider the optimal control problem of the general highly dissipative SDPs, and propose an adaptive optimal control approach based on neuro-dynamic programming (NDP). Initially, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is employed to compute empirical eigenfunctions (EEFs) of the SDP based on the method of snapshots. These EEFs together with singular perturbation technique are then used to obtain a finite-dimensional slow subsystem of ordinary differential equations that accurately describes the dominant dynamics of the PDE system. Subsequently, the optimal control problem is reformulated on the basis of the slow subsystem, which is further converted to solve a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. HJB equation is a nonlinear PDE that has proven to be impossible to solve analytically. Thus, an adaptive optimal control method is developed via NDP that solves the HJB equation online using neural network (NN) for approximating the value function; and an online NN weight tuning law is proposed without requiring an initial stabilizing control policy. Moreover, by involving the NN estimation error, we prove that the original closed-loop PDE system with the adaptive optimal control policy is semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the developed method is tested on a nonlinear diffusion-convection-reaction process and applied to a temperature cooling fin of high-speed aerospace vehicle, and the achieved results show its effectiveness. PMID:25794375

  4. Improving the quantification of land cover pressure on stream ecological status at the riparian scale using High Spatial Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormos, T.; Kosuth, P.; Durrieu, S.; Villeneuve, B.; Wasson, J. G.

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the interest of High Spatial Resolution Imagery (HSRI) and the limits of coarse land cover data such as CORINE Land Cover (CLC), for the accurate characterization of land cover structure along river corridors and of its functional links with freshwater ecological status on a large scale. For this purpose, we compared several spatial indicators built from two land cover maps of the Herault River corridor (southern France): one derived from the CLC database, the other derived from HSRI. The HSRI-derived map was obtained using a supervised object-based classification of multi-source remotely-sensed images (SPOT 5 XS-10 m and aerial photography-0.5 m) and presents an overall accuracy of 70%. The comparison between the two sets of spatial indicators highlights that the HSRI-derived map allows more accuracy in the quantification of land cover pressures near the stream: the spatial structure of the river landscape is finely resolved and the main attributes of riparian vegetation can be quantified in a reliable way. The next challenge will consist in developing an operational methodology using HSRI for large-scale mapping of river corridor land cover, for spatial indicator computation and for the development of related pressure/impact models, in order to improve the prediction of stream ecological status.

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF CATTLE ACTIVITY BASED UPON HIGH FREQUENCY SPATIAL POSITIONING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal behaviorists are interested in the spatial pattern of animals on landscapes because of their implications for species survival, resource use, and niche definition, as well as inter- nd intra -specific dominance, facilitation and competition. In the last several years it has become possible t...

  6. Spatial resolution effects on the assessment of evapotranspiration in olive orchards using high resolution thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Cristina; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo J.; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Allen, Richard G.

    2013-04-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for estimating surface energy balance and water consumption has significantly improved the characterization of the agricultural systems by determining accurate information about crop evapotranspiration and stress, mainly for extensive crops. However the use of these methodologies for woody crops has been low due to the difficulty in the accurate characterization of these crops, mainly caused by a coarse resolution of the imagery provided by the most widely used satellites (such as Landsat 5 and 7). The coarse spatial resolution provided by these satellite sensors aggregates into a single pixel the tree crown, sunlit and shaded soil components. These surfaces can each exhibit huge differences in temperature, albedo and vegetation indexes calculated in the visible, near infrared and short-wave infrared regions. Recent studies have found that the use of energy balance approaches can provide useful results for non-homogeneous crops (Santos et al., 2012) but detailed analysis is required to determine the effect of the spatial resolution and the aggregation of the scene components in these heterogeneous canopies. In this study a comparison between different spatial resolutions has been conducted using images from Landsat 7 (with thermal resolution of 60m) and from an airborne thermal (with resolution of 80 cm) flown over olive orchards at different dates coincident with the Landsat overpass. The high resolution thermal imagery was resampled at different scales to generate images with spatial resolution ranging from 0.8 m up to 120m (thermal resolution for Landsat 5 images). The selection of the study area was made to avoid those areas with missing Landsat 7 data caused by SLC-off gaps. The selected area has a total area of around 2500 ha and is located in Southern Spain, in the province of Malaga. The selected area is mainly cultivated with olive orchards with different crop practices (rainfed, irrigated, high density, young and adult

  7. FTS Studies of the 17O Enriched Isotopologues of CO_2 Toward Creating a Complete and Highly Accurate Reference Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Ben; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda; Miller, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The proliferation and increased abilities of remote sensing missions for the monitoring of planetary atmospheric gas species has spurred the need for complete and accurate spectroscopic reference standards. As a part of our ongoing effort toward creating a global carbon dioxide (CO2) frequency reference standard, we report new FTS measurements of the 17O enriched isotopologues of CO2. The first measurements were taken in the ν3 region (2200 - 2450 cm-1, 65 - 75 THz), have absolute calibration accuracies of 100 kHz (3E-6 cm-1), comparable to the uncertainties for typical sub-millimeter/THz spectroscopy. Such high absolute calibration accuracy has become regular procedure for the cases of linear molecules such as CO2 and CO for FTS measurements at JPL, and enables us to produce measured transition frequencies for entire bands with accuracies that rival those of early heterodyne measurements for individual beat notes. Additionally, by acquiring spectra of multiple carbon dioxide isotopologues simultaneously, we have begun to construct a self-consistent frequency grid based on CO2 that extends from 20 - 200 THz. These new spectroscopic reference standards are a significant step towards minimizing CO2 retrieval errors from remote sensing applications, especially those involving targets with predominantly CO2 atmospheres such as Mars, Venus and candidate terrestrial exoplanets where minor isotopologues will make significant contributions to the radiance signals.

  8. High Specificity in Circulating Tumor Cell Identification Is Required for Accurate Evaluation of Programmed Death-Ligand 1

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachery D.; Warrick, Jay W.; Guckenberger, David J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Heninger, Erika; Saeed, Anwaar; Leal, Ticiana; Mattox, Kara; Traynor, Anne M.; Campbell, Toby C.; Berry, Scott M.; Beebe, David J.; Lang, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Expression of programmed-death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is typically evaluated through invasive biopsies; however, recent advances in the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may be a less invasive method to assay tumor cells for these purposes. These liquid biopsies rely on accurate identification of CTCs from the diverse populations in the blood, where some tumor cells share characteristics with normal blood cells. While many blood cells can be excluded by their high expression of CD45, neutrophils and other immature myeloid subsets have low to absent expression of CD45 and also express PD-L1. Furthermore, cytokeratin is typically used to identify CTCs, but neutrophils may stain non-specifically for intracellular antibodies, including cytokeratin, thus preventing accurate evaluation of PD-L1 expression on tumor cells. This holds even greater significance when evaluating PD-L1 in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive and EpCAM negative CTCs (as in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)). Methods To evaluate the impact of CTC misidentification on PD-L1 evaluation, we utilized CD11b to identify myeloid cells. CTCs were isolated from patients with metastatic NSCLC using EpCAM, MUC1 or Vimentin capture antibodies and exclusion-based sample preparation (ESP) technology. Results Large populations of CD11b+CD45lo cells were identified in buffy coats and stained non-specifically for intracellular antibodies including cytokeratin. The amount of CD11b+ cells misidentified as CTCs varied among patients; accounting for 33–100% of traditionally identified CTCs. Cells captured with vimentin had a higher frequency of CD11b+ cells at 41%, compared to 20% and 18% with MUC1 or EpCAM, respectively. Cells misidentified as CTCs ultimately skewed PD-L1 expression to varying degrees across patient samples. Conclusions Interfering myeloid populations can be differentiated from true CTCs with additional staining criteria

  9. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  10. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2002-10-01

    scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles have grown to be {approx} 10 {micro}m in diameter. The next major task planned under this grant will be to perform experimental tests to determine how accurately the spatial distribution of the bubble density can be measured under the conditions expected in NIF. The bubble density will be large enough to produce significant overlap in the two-dimensional images, so that they will need to be able to measure bubbles behind bubbles. One of the goals of these tests is to determine if a simple light transmission approach is feasible. One of the concerns at very high bubble densities is that light scattered out of the path can be rescattered back into the transmitted light path by bubbles in neighboring paths.

  11. Analysis of High Temporal and Spatial Observations of Hurricane Joaquin During TCI-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasey, Robert; Elsberry, Russell L.; Velden, Chris; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bell, Michael; Hendricks, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Provide an example of why analysis of high density soundings across Hurricane Joaquin also require highly accurate center positions; Describe technique for calculating 3-D zero-wind center positions from the highly accurate GPS positions of sequences of High-Density Sounding System (HDSS) soundings as they fall from 10 km to the ocean surface; Illustrate the vertical tilt of the vortex above 4-5 km during two center passes through Hurricane Joaquin on 4 October 2015.

  12. High Fidelity Non-Gravitational Force Models for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination of TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, -Peter; Eineder, Michael; Gisinger, Christoph

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on sophisticated validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. Basically, the precise reconstruction of the satellite’s trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency receiver onboard the spacecraft. The Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for the gravitational and non-gravitational forces. Following a proper analysis of the orbit quality, systematics in the orbit products have been identified, which reflect deficits in the non-gravitational force models. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). Due to the dusk-dawn orbit configuration of TerraSAR-X, the satellite is almost constantly illuminated by the Sun. Therefore, the direct SRP has an effect on the lateral stability of the determined orbit. The indirect effect of the solar radiation principally contributes to the Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). The resulting force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface in the visible, and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed within the presentation. The presentation highlights the influence of non-gravitational force and satellite macro models on the orbit quality of TerraSAR-X.

  13. Dixon sequence with superimposed model-based bone compartment provides highly accurate PET/MR attenuation correction of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Koesters, Thomas; Friedman, Kent P.; Fenchel, Matthias; Zhan, Yiqiang; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Babb, James; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Faul, David; Boada, Fernando E.; Shepherd, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous PET/MR of the brain is a promising new technology for characterizing patients with suspected cognitive impairment or epilepsy. Unlike CT though, MR signal intensities do not provide a direct correlate to PET photon attenuation correction (AC) and inaccurate radiotracer standard uptake value (SUV) estimation could limit future PET/MR clinical applications. We tested a novel AC method that supplements standard Dixon-based tissue segmentation with a superimposed model-based bone compartment. Methods We directly compared SUV estimation for MR-based AC methods to reference CT AC in 16 patients undergoing same-day, single 18FDG dose PET/CT and PET/MR for suspected neurodegeneration. Three Dixon-based MR AC methods were compared to CT – standard Dixon 4-compartment segmentation alone, Dixon with a superimposed model-based bone compartment, and Dixon with a superimposed bone compartment and linear attenuation correction optimized specifically for brain tissue. The brain was segmented using a 3D T1-weighted volumetric MR sequence and SUV estimations compared to CT AC for whole-image, whole-brain and 91 FreeSurfer-based regions-of-interest. Results Modifying the linear AC value specifically for brain and superimposing a model-based bone compartment reduced whole-brain SUV estimation bias of Dixon-based PET/MR AC by 95% compared to reference CT AC (P < 0.05) – this resulted in a residual −0.3% whole-brain mean SUV bias. Further, brain regional analysis demonstrated only 3 frontal lobe regions with SUV estimation bias of 5% or greater (P < 0.05). These biases appeared to correlate with high individual variability in the frontal bone thickness and pneumatization. Conclusion Bone compartment and linear AC modifications result in a highly accurate MR AC method in subjects with suspected neurodegeneration. This prototype MR AC solution appears equivalent than other recently proposed solutions, and does not require additional MR sequences and scan time. These

  14. A new direct absorption measurement for high precision and accurate measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, M. R.; Sayres, D. S.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J.

    2011-12-01

    Highly accurate and precise water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are critical to understanding the climate feedbacks of water vapor and clouds in that region. However, the continued disagreement among water vapor measurements (~1 - 2 ppmv) are too large to constrain the role of different hydration and dehydration mechanisms operating in the UT/LS, with model validation dependent upon which dataset is chosen. In response to these issues, we present a new instrument for measurement of water vapor in the UT/LS that was flown during the April 2011 MACPEX mission out of Houston, TX. The dual axis instrument combines the heritage and validated accuracy of the Harvard Lyman-alpha instrument with a newly designed direct IR absorption instrument, the Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The Lyman-alpha detection axis has flown aboard NASA's WB-57 and ER2 aircraft since 1994, and provides a requisite link between the new HHH instrument and the long history of Harvard water vapor measurements. The instrument utilizes the highly sensitive Lyman-alpha photo-fragment fluorescence detection method; its accuracy has been demonstrated though rigorous laboratory calibrations and in situ diagnostic procedures. The Harvard Herriott Hygrometer employs a fiber coupled near-IR laser with state-of-the-art electronics to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a spherical Herriott cell of 10 cm length. The instrument demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1-sec, 1-sigma) at mixing ratios as low as 5 ppmv with accuracies of 10% based on careful laboratory calibrations and in-flight performance. We present a description of the measurement technique along with our methodology for calibration and details of the measurement uncertainties. The simultaneous utilization of radically different measurement techniques in a single duct in the new Harvard Water Vapor (HWV) instrument allows for the constraint of systematic errors inherent in each technique

  15. Source attribution of air pollution by spatial scale separation using high spatial density networks of low cost air quality sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, I.; Bright, V. B.; McLeod, M. W.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A. M.; Stewart, G. B.; Jones, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    To carry out detailed source attribution for air quality assessment it is necessary to distinguish pollutant contributions that arise from local emissions from those attributable to non-local or regional emission sources. Frequently this requires the use of complex models and inversion methods, prior knowledge or assumptions regarding the pollution environment. In this paper we demonstrate how high spatial density and fast response measurements from low-cost sensor networks may facilitate this separation. A purely measurement-based approach to extract underlying pollution levels (baselines) from the measurements is presented exploiting the different relative frequencies of local and background pollution variations. This paper shows that if high spatial and temporal coverage of air quality measurements are available, the different contributions to the total pollution levels, namely the regional signal as well as near and far field local sources, can be quantified. The advantage of using high spatial resolution observations, as can be provided by low-cost sensor networks, lies in the fact that no prior assumptions about pollution levels at individual deployment sites are required. The methodology we present here, utilising measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), has wide applicability, including additional gas phase species and measurements obtained using reference networks. While similar studies have been performed, this is the first study using networks at this density, or using low cost sensor networks.

  16. Low Voltage High Precision Spatial Light ModulatorsFinal Report

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A P

    2005-02-09

    The goal of this project was to make LLNL a leader in Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) by developing the technology that will be needed by the next generation of SLMs. We would use new lower voltage actuators and bond those actuators directly to controlling circuitry to break the fundamental limitations that constrain current SLM technology. This three-year project was underfunded in the first year and not funded in the second year. With the funding that was available, we produced actuators and designs for the controlling circuitry that would have been integrated in the second year. Spatial light modulators (SLMs) are arrays of tiny movable mirrors that modulate the wave-fronts of light. SLMs can correct aberrations in incoming light for adaptive optics or modulate light for beam control, optical communication and particle manipulation. MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) is a technology that utilizes the microfabrication tools developed by the semiconductor industry to fabricate a wide variety of tiny machines. The first generation of MEMS SLMs have improved the functionality of SLMs while drastically reducing per pixel cost making arrays on the order of 1000 pixels readily available. These MEMS SLMs however are limited by the nature of their designs to be very difficult to scale above 1000 pixels and have very limited positioning accuracy. By co-locating the MEMS mirrors with CMOS electronics, we will increase the scalability and positioning accuracy. To do this we will have to make substantial advances in SLM actuator design, and fabrication.

  17. How Well Can the NARCCAP Models Capture the High-Resolution Spatial Patterns of the Precipitation Field in the Western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, W.; Sellars, S.; Gao, X.; Sorooshian, S.

    2011-12-01

    In the western U.S. where complex terrains present, accurate information on high-resolution spatial distribution of precipitation is critical to many important issues, such as flood/landslide warning, reservoir operation, and water system planning. For instance, due to the highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of precipitation in California, vast manmade infrastructures, such as the Central Valley Project and California Water Project, have been built to resolve the mismatch between where precipitation falls and where water is consumed. In the face of climate variability, prudent planning and proper operation of these water infrastructures are essential to the region's sustainability. The success of planning requires accurate precipitation projection from climate models. In particular, two questions: 1) how well climate models can simulate the precipitation spatial patterns, and 2) how these patterns will change will climate, are of great interest to many researchers and managers in environmental planning and management. Our study are designed to answer these questions based on the dynamical downscaling results from the NARRCAP program and our recent findings on the high-resolution spatial patterns of the daily precipitation field in the western U.S. Using EOF analysis on the U.S. daily precipitation product of Climate Prediction Center (CPC), we revealed that there exists dominant spatial patterns in the precipitation field over the western United States. The spatial patterns are consistent at different spatial resolutions and persistent over decades. Therefore, we intend to evaluate how well climate models can capture these spatial patterns of observed precipitation in this region. EOF analysis is applied to precipitation outputs from NARRCAP, and the derived spatial patterns are compared with those of observation for the same time period. The similarity between model simulations and observation is quantified with mutual information based on Shannon entropy

  18. What's the Point of a Raster ? Advantages of 3D Point Cloud Processing over Raster Based Methods for Accurate Geomorphic Analysis of High Resolution Topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.

    2014-12-01

    High Resolution Topographic (HRT) datasets are predominantly stored and analyzed as 2D raster grids of elevations (i.e., Digital Elevation Models). Raster grid processing is common in GIS software and benefits from a large library of fast algorithms dedicated to geometrical analysis, drainage network computation and topographic change measurement. Yet, all instruments or methods currently generating HRT datasets (e.g., ALS, TLS, SFM, stereo satellite imagery) output natively 3D unstructured point clouds that are (i) non-regularly sampled, (ii) incomplete (e.g., submerged parts of river channels are rarely measured), and (iii) include 3D elements (e.g., vegetation, vertical features such as river banks or cliffs) that cannot be accurately described in a DEM. Interpolating the raw point cloud onto a 2D grid generally results in a loss of position accuracy, spatial resolution and in more or less controlled interpolation. Here I demonstrate how studying earth surface topography and processes directly on native 3D point cloud datasets offers several advantages over raster based methods: point cloud methods preserve the accuracy of the original data, can better handle the evaluation of uncertainty associated to topographic change measurements and are more suitable to study vegetation characteristics and steep features of the landscape. In this presentation, I will illustrate and compare Point Cloud based and Raster based workflows with various examples involving ALS, TLS and SFM for the analysis of bank erosion processes in bedrock and alluvial rivers, rockfall statistics (including rockfall volume estimate directly from point clouds) and the interaction of vegetation/hydraulics and sedimentation in salt marshes. These workflows use 2 recently published algorithms for point cloud classification (CANUPO) and point cloud comparison (M3C2) now implemented in the open source software CloudCompare.

  19. The Geospectral Camera: a Compact and Geometrically Precise Hyperspectral and High Spatial Resolution Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Michiels, B.; Biesemans, J.; Livens, S.; Van Achteren, T.

    2013-04-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being employed for environmental monitoring at local scale, which drives the demand for compact and lightweight spectral imagers. This paper describes the geospectral camera, which is a novel compact imager concept. The camera is built around an innovative detector which has two sensor elements on a single chip and therefore offers the functionality of two cameras within the volume of a single one. The two sensor elements allow the camera to derive both spectral information as well as geometric information (high spatial resolution imagery and a digital surface model) of the scene of interest. A first geospectral camera prototype has been developed. It uses a linear variable optical filter which is installed in front of one of the two sensors of the MEDUSA CMOS imager chip. A accompanying software approach has been developed which exploits the simultaneous information of the two sensors in order to extract an accurate spectral image product. This method has been functionally demonstrated by applying it on image data acquired during an airborne acquisition.

  20. Advanced Extraction of Spatial Information from High Resolution Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour, T.; Burian, J.; Miřijovský, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper authors processed five satellite image of five different Middle-European cities taken by five different sensors. The aim of the paper was to find methods and approaches leading to evaluation and spatial data extraction from areas of interest. For this reason, data were firstly pre-processed using image fusion, mosaicking and segmentation processes. Results going into the next step were two polygon layers; first one representing single objects and the second one representing city blocks. In the second step, polygon layers were classified and exported into Esri shapefile format. Classification was partly hierarchical expert based and partly based on the tool SEaTH used for separability distinction and thresholding. Final results along with visual previews were attached to the original thesis. Results are evaluated visually and statistically in the last part of the paper. In the discussion author described difficulties of working with data of large size, taken by different sensors and different also thematically.

  1. HIGH SPATIAL-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF TE INCLUSIONS IN CZT MATERIAL.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA, G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CARINI, G.A.; CUI, Y.; KOHMAN, K.T.; LI, L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2006-08-13

    We present new results from our studies of defects in current single-crystal CdZnTe material. Our previous measurements, carried out on thin ({approx}1 mm) and long (>12 mm) CZT detectors, indicated that small (1-20 {micro}m) Te inclusions can significantly degrade the device's energy resolution and detection efficiency. We are conducting detailed studies of the effects of Te inclusions by employing different characterization techniques with better spatial resolution, such as quantitative fluorescence mapping, X-ray micro-diffraction, and TEM. Also, IR microscopy and gamma-mapping with pulse-shape analysis with higher spatial resolution generated more accurate results in the areas surrounding the micro-defects (Te inclusions). Our results reveal how the performance of CdZnTe detectors is influenced by Te inclusions, such as their spatial distribution, concentration, and size. We also discuss a model of charge transport through areas populated with Te inclusions.

  2. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  3. The Importance of High Spatial and Appropriate Spectral Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Many diverse astronomical sources are resolved with diffraction-limited large telescopes. Application of appropriate dispersion spectroscopy unveils much information on the physics of these objects ranging from gamma ray bursters in host galaxies, star-formation regions and central engines in nearby galaxies, structures in galactic nebulae, resolved binaries with mass exchange, extended winds of massive stars, protoplanetary systems, and comets, asteroids and planets within our own solar system. Active optics and interferometers coupled with spectrographs can provide near-diffraction-limited spectroscopy from the ground but only longward of one micron. Below one micron, and certainly below 6000A, we must turn to space-based large telescopes equipped with spectrographs capable of providing spatially diffraction-limited spectroscopy of astronomical sources. Examples will be presented from the HST/STIS, ground-based and other instruments on science that has been accomplished. Suggestions will be made of what might be possible, and limitations thereof, with future large monolithic, multiple mirror or interferometric telescopes equipped with spectrographs that would be matched to the diffraction limit of the telescope.

  4. Device for high spatial resolution chemical analysis of a sample and method of high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-06

    A system and method for analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The system can include at least one pin; a sampling device configured to contact a liquid with a specimen on the at least one pin to form a testing solution; and a stepper mechanism configured to move the at least one pin and the sampling device relative to one another. The system can also include an analytical instrument for determining a chemical composition of the specimen from the testing solution. In particular, the systems and methods described herein enable chemical analysis of specimens, such as tissue, to be evaluated in a manner that the spatial-resolution is limited by the size of the pins used to obtain tissue samples, not the size of the sampling device used to solubilize the samples coupled to the pins.

  5. High spatial resolution laser cavity extinction and laser-induced incandescence in low-soot-producing flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B.; Gao, Y.; Balusamy, S.; Hochgreb, S.

    2015-09-01

    Accurate measurement techniques for in situ determination of soot are necessary to understand and monitor the process of soot particle production. One of these techniques is line-of-sight extinction, which is a fast, low-cost and quantitative method to investigate the soot volume fraction in flames. However, the extinction-based technique suffers from relatively high measurement uncertainty due to low signal-to-noise ratio, as the single-pass attenuation of the laser beam intensity is often insufficient. Multi-pass techniques can increase the sensitivity, but may suffer from low spatial resolution. To overcome this problem, we have developed a high spatial resolution laser cavity extinction technique to measure the soot volume fraction from low-soot-producing flames. A laser beam cavity is realised by placing two partially reflective concave mirrors on either side of the laminar diffusion flame under investigation. This configuration makes the beam convergent inside the cavity, allowing a spatial resolution within 200 μm, whilst increasing the absorption by an order of magnitude. Three different hydrocarbon fuels are tested: methane, propane and ethylene. The measurements of soot distribution across the flame show good agreement with results using laser-induced incandescence (LII) in the range from around 20 ppb to 15 ppm.

  6. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing H; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-01-25

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a “universal” stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion.

  7. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THERMAL EMISSION FROM DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Moerchen, Margaret M.; Telesco, Charles M.; Packham, Christopher

    2010-11-10

    We have obtained subarcsecond mid-IR images of a sample of debris disks within 100 pc. For our sample of 19 A-type debris disk candidates chosen for their IR excess, we have resolved, for the first time, five sources plus the previously resolved disk around HD 141569. Two other sources in our sample have been ruled out as debris disks since the time of sample selection. Three of the six resolved sources have inferred radii of 1-4 AU (HD 38678, HD 71155, and HD 181869), and one source has an inferred radius {approx}10-30 AU (HD 141569). Among the resolved sources with detections of excess IR emission, HD 71155 appears to be comparable in size (r {approx} 2 AU) to the solar system's asteroid belt, thus joining {zeta} Lep (HD 38678, reported previously) to comprise the only two resolved sources of that class. Two additional sources (HD 95418 and HD 139006) show spatial extents that imply disk radii of {approx}1-3 AU, although the excess IR fluxes are not formally detected with better than 2{sigma} significance. For the unresolved sources, the upper limits on the maximum radii of mid-IR disk emission are in the range {approx}1-20 AU, four of which are comparable in radius to the asteroid belt. We have compared the global color temperatures of the dust to that expected for the dust in radiative equilibrium at the distances corresponding to the observed sizes or limits on the sizes. In most cases, the temperatures estimated via these two methods are comparable, and therefore, we see a generally consistent picture of the inferred morphology and the global mid-IR emission. Finally, while our sample size is not statistically significant, we note that the older sources (>200 Myr) host much warmer dust (T {approx}> 400 K) than younger sources (in the tens of Myr).

  8. Development of an Objective High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.; White, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drought detection, analysis, and mitigation has become a key challenge for a diverse set of decision makers, including but not limited to operational weather forecasters, climatologists, agricultural interests, and water resource management. One tool that is heavily used is the United States Drought Monitor (USDM), which is derived from a complex blend of objective data and subjective analysis on a state-by-state basis using a variety of modeled and observed precipitation, soil moisture, hydrologic, and vegetation and crop health data. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center currently runs a real-time configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The LIS-Noah is run at 3-km resolution for local numerical weather prediction (NWP) and situational awareness applications at select NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices over the Continental U.S. (CONUS). To enhance the practicality of the LIS-Noah output for drought monitoring and assessing flood potential, a 30+-year soil moisture climatology has been developed in an attempt to place near real-time soil moisture values in historical context at county- and/or watershed-scale resolutions. This LIS-Noah soil moisture climatology and accompanying anomalies is intended to complement the current suite of operational products, such as the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2), which are generated on a coarser-resolution grid that may not capture localized, yet important soil moisture features. Daily soil moisture histograms are used to identify the real-time soil moisture percentiles at each grid point according to the county or watershed in which the grid point resides. Spatial plots are then produced that map the percentiles as proxies to the different USDM categories. This presentation will highlight recent developments of this gridded, objective soil moisture index, comparison to subjective

  9. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  10. A liquid radiation detector with high spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L.

    1972-01-01

    Detector, using point anode, minimizes problem of oblique tracks by permitting construction of very thin counter. Detector is useful in cosmic ray and high energy physics research and X-ray and neutron diffraction technology.

  11. High spatial range velocity measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, C. M.; Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Atkinson, C.; Buchmann, N. A.; Hutchins, N.; Soria, J.; Marusic, I.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we detail and analyse a multi-resolution particle image velocity measurement that resolves the wide range of scales prevalent in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers (up to Reτ ≈ 20 000). A unique configuration is utilised, where an array of eight high resolution cameras at two magnification levels are used simultaneously to obtain a large field of view, while still resolving the smaller scales prevalent in the flow. Additionally, a highly magnified field of view targeted at the near wall region is employed to capture the viscous sublayer and logarithmic region, with a spatial resolution of a few viscous length scales. Flow statistics from these measurements show good agreement with prior, well resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements. Analysis shows that the instantaneous wall shear stress can be reliably computed, which is historically known to be challenging in boundary layers. A statistical assessment of the wall shear stress shows good agreement with existing correlations, prior experimental and direct numerical simulation data, extending this view to much higher Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, conditional analysis using multiple magnification levels is detailed, to study near-wall events associated with high skin friction fluctuations and their associated overlaying structures in the log region. Results definitively show that the passage of very large-scale positive (or negative) velocity fluctuations are associated with increased (or reduced) small-scale variance in wall shear stress fluctuations.

  12. Quantitative modulated imaging of turbid media in the high spatial frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weihao; Cao, Zili; Zeng, Bixin; Xu, M.

    2016-03-01

    The Spatial-frequency dependence of turbid media reflectance encodes both optical properties and depth information. The high spatial frequency domain imaging (HSFDI) can, in particular, extract key characteristics of the phase function of the scattering medium which carries the ultimate structural information of the medium. We first outline the principle of HSFDI and then present here a compact optical configuration integrating the modulated illumination and imaging systems, facilitating quantitative wide-field optical properties mapping at high spatial frequencies. The performance of HSFDI is assessed on both tissue phantoms and in vivo.

  13. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  14. Role of high-order aberrations in senescent changes in spatial vision

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, S; Choi, S S; Doble, N; Hardy, J L; Evans, J W; Werner, J S

    2009-01-06

    The contributions of optical and neural factors to age-related losses in spatial vision are not fully understood. We used closed-loop adaptive optics to test the visual benefit of correcting monochromatic high-order aberrations (HOAs) on spatial vision for observers ranging in age from 18-81 years. Contrast sensitivity was measured monocularly using a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure for sinusoidal gratings over 6 mm and 3 mm pupil diameters. Visual acuity was measured using a spatial 4AFC procedure. Over a 6 mm pupil, young observers showed a large benefit of AO at high spatial frequencies, whereas older observers exhibited the greatest benefit at middle spatial frequencies, plus a significantly larger increase in visual acuity. When age-related miosis is controlled, young and old observers exhibited a similar benefit of AO for spatial vision. An increase in HOAs cannot account for the complete senescent decline in spatial vision. These results may indicate a larger role of additional optical factors when the impact of HOAs is removed, but also lend support for the importance of neural factors in age-related changes in spatial vision.

  15. From high spatial resolution imagery to spatial indicators : Application for hydromorphy follow-up on Bourgneuf wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, J. S.; Puech, C.; Lukac, F.; Massé, J.

    2003-04-01

    On Atlantic coastal wetlands, the understanding of hydrological processes may refer to hydraulic surface structures characterization as small ditches or channels networks, permanent and temporary water bodies. Moreover to improve the understanding, this characerization should be realized regarding different seasons and different spatial scales: elementary parcel, managment unit and whole wetland scales. In complement to usual observations on a few local ground points, high spatial resolution remote sensing may be a good information support for extraction and characterization on elementary objects, especially water bodies, permanents or temporary ones and ditches. To carry out a floow-up on wetlands, a seasonal image acquisition rate, reachable from most of satelite systems, is in that case informative for hydrological needs. In this work, georeferencing methods on openfield wetlands have been handled with care in order to use diachronic images or combined geographical data; lack of relief, short vegetation and well structured landscape make this preprocess easier in comparison to other landscape situations. In this presentation we focus on spatial hydromorphy parameters constructed from images with specific processes. Especially, hydromorphy indicators for parcels or managment units have been developped using an IRC winter-spring-summer metric resolution set of images: these descriptors are based on water areas evolution or hydrophyl vegetations presence traducing hydrodynamic submersion behaviour in temporary water bodies. An other example presents a surface water network circulation indicator elaborated on IRC aerial photography combined with vectorized geographic database. This indicator is based on ditches width and vegetation presence : a specific process uses vectorized geo data set to define transects across ditches on which classified image analysis is carried out (supervised classification). These first results proposing hydromorphy descriptors from very

  16. Application of a cell microarray chip system for accurate, highly sensitive, and rapid diagnosis for malaria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamamoto, Takeki; Yamamura, Shohei; Abe, Kaori; Obana, Eriko; Nogami, Takahiro; Hayashi, Takuya; Sesei, Takashi; Oka, Hiroaki; Okello-Onen, Joseph; Odongo-Aginya, Emmanuel I.; Alai, Mary Auma; Olia, Alex; Anywar, Dennis; Sakurai, Miki; Palacpac, Nirianne MQ; Mita, Toshihiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Accurate, sensitive, rapid, and easy operative diagnosis is necessary to prevent the spread of malaria. A cell microarray chip system including a push column for the recovery of erythrocytes and a fluorescence detector was employed for malaria diagnosis in Uganda. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm width and 50 μm depth) was made of polystyrene. For the analysis, 6 μl of whole blood was employed, and leukocytes were practically removed by filtration through SiO2-nano-fibers in a column. Regular formation of an erythrocyte monolayer in each microchamber was observed following dispersion of an erythrocyte suspension in a nuclear staining dye, SYTO 21, onto the chip surface and washing. About 500,000 erythrocytes were analyzed in a total of 4675 microchambers, and malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes could be detected in 5 min by using the fluorescence detector. The percentage of infected erythrocytes in each of 41 patients was determined. Accurate and quantitative detection of the parasites could be performed. A good correlation between examinations via optical microscopy and by our chip system was demonstrated over the parasitemia range of 0.0039–2.3438% by linear regression analysis (R2 = 0.9945). Thus, we showed the potential of this chip system for the diagnosis of malaria. PMID:27445125

  17. Application of a cell microarray chip system for accurate, highly sensitive, and rapid diagnosis for malaria in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamamoto, Takeki; Yamamura, Shohei; Abe, Kaori; Obana, Eriko; Nogami, Takahiro; Hayashi, Takuya; Sesei, Takashi; Oka, Hiroaki; Okello-Onen, Joseph; Odongo-Aginya, Emmanuel I; Alai, Mary Auma; Olia, Alex; Anywar, Dennis; Sakurai, Miki; Palacpac, Nirianne Mq; Mita, Toshihiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Accurate, sensitive, rapid, and easy operative diagnosis is necessary to prevent the spread of malaria. A cell microarray chip system including a push column for the recovery of erythrocytes and a fluorescence detector was employed for malaria diagnosis in Uganda. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm width and 50 μm depth) was made of polystyrene. For the analysis, 6 μl of whole blood was employed, and leukocytes were practically removed by filtration through SiO2-nano-fibers in a column. Regular formation of an erythrocyte monolayer in each microchamber was observed following dispersion of an erythrocyte suspension in a nuclear staining dye, SYTO 21, onto the chip surface and washing. About 500,000 erythrocytes were analyzed in a total of 4675 microchambers, and malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes could be detected in 5 min by using the fluorescence detector. The percentage of infected erythrocytes in each of 41 patients was determined. Accurate and quantitative detection of the parasites could be performed. A good correlation between examinations via optical microscopy and by our chip system was demonstrated over the parasitemia range of 0.0039-2.3438% by linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.9945). Thus, we showed the potential of this chip system for the diagnosis of malaria. PMID:27445125

  18. Spatial patterning of the neonatal EEG suggests a need for a high number of electrodes.

    PubMed

    Odabaee, Maryam; Freeman, Walter J; Colditz, Paul B; Ramon, Ceon; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for source analysis of neonatal EEG, but currently there is inadequate knowledge about i) the spatial patterning of neonatal scalp EEG and hence ii) the number of electrodes needed to capture neonatal EEG in full spatial detail. This study addresses these issues by using a very high density (2.5mm interelectrode spacing) linear electrode array to assess the spatial power spectrum, by using a high density (64 electrodes) EEG cap to assess the spatial extent of the common oscillatory bouts in the neonatal EEG and by using a neonatal size spherical head model to assess the effects of source depth and skull conductivities on the spatial frequency spectrum. The linear array recordings show that the spatial power spectrum decays rapidly until about 0.5-0.8 cycles per centimeter. The dense array EEG recordings show that the amplitude of oscillatory events decays within 4-6 cm to the level of global background activity, and that the higher frequencies (12-20 Hz) show the most rapid spatial decline in amplitude. Simulation with spherical head model showed that realistic variation in skull conductivity and source depths can both introduce orders of magnitude difference in the spatial frequency of the scalp EEG. Calculation of spatial Nyquist frequencies from the spatial power spectra suggests that an interelectrode distance of about 6-10mm would suffice to capture the full spatial texture of the raw EEG signal at the neonatal scalp without spatial aliasing or under-sampling. The spatial decay of oscillatory events suggests that a full representation of their spatial characteristics requires an interelectrode distance of 10-20mm. The findings show that the conventional way of recording neonatal EEG with about 10 electrodes ignores most spatial EEG content, that increasing the electrode density is necessary to improve neonatal EEG source localization and information extraction, and that prospective source models will need to carefully consider the

  19. Melt-rock reaction in the asthenospheric mantle: Perspectives from high-order accurate numerical simulations in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupathi, S.; Schiemenz, A. R.; Liang, Y.; Parmentier, E.; Hesthaven, J.

    2013-12-01

    The style and mode of melt migration in the mantle are important to the interpretation of basalts erupted on the surface. Both grain-scale diffuse porous flow and channelized melt migration have been proposed. To better understand the mechanisms and consequences of melt migration in a heterogeneous mantle, we have undertaken a numerical study of reactive dissolution in an upwelling and viscously deformable mantle where solubility of pyroxene increases upwards. Our setup is similar to that described in [1], except we use a larger domain size in 2D and 3D and a new numerical method. To enable efficient simulations in 3D through parallel computing, we developed a high-order accurate numerical method for the magma dynamics problem using discontinuous Galerkin methods and constructed the problem using the numerical library deal.II [2]. Linear stability analyses of the reactive dissolution problem reveal three dynamically distinct regimes [3] and the simulations reported in this study were run in the stable regime and the unstable wave regime where small perturbations in porosity grows periodically. The wave regime is more relevant to melt migration beneath the mid-ocean ridges but computationally more challenging. Extending the 2D simulations in the stable regime in [1] to 3D using various combinations of sustained perturbations in porosity at the base of the upwelling column (which may result from a viened mantle), we show the geometry and distribution of dunite channel and high-porosity melt channels are highly correlated with inflow perturbation through superposition. Strong nonlinear interactions among compaction, dissolution, and upwelling give rise to porosity waves and high-porosity melt channels in the wave regime. These compaction-dissolution waves have well organized but time-dependent structures in the lower part of the simulation domain. High-porosity melt channels nucleate along nodal lines of the porosity waves, growing downwards. The wavelength scales

  20. Edge technique lidar for high accuracy, high spatial resolution wind measurement in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Army Research Office (ARO) Geosciences Program is to measure the three dimensional wind field in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a measurement volume with a 50 meter spatial resolution and with measurement accuracies of the order of 20 cm/sec. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a high vertical resolution lidar experiment using the edge technique for high accuracy measurement of the atmospheric wind field to meet the ARO requirements. This experiment allows the powerful capabilities of the edge technique to be quantitatively evaluated. In the edge technique, a laser is located on the steep slope of a high resolution spectral filter. This produces large changes in measured signal for small Doppler shifts. A differential frequency technique renders the Doppler shift measurement insensitive to both laser and filter frequency jitter and drift. The measurement is also relatively insensitive to the laser spectral width for widths less than the width of the edge filter. Thus, the goal is to develop a system which will yield a substantial improvement in the state of the art of wind profile measurement in terms of both vertical resolution and accuracy and which will provide a unique capability for atmospheric wind studies.

  1. Geocoding large population-level administrative datasets at highly resolved spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Sharon E.; Strauss, Benjamin; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Using geographic information systems to link administrative databases with demographic, social, and environmental data allows researchers to use spatial approaches to explore relationships between exposures and health. Traditionally, spatial analysis in public health has focused on the county, zip code, or tract level because of limitations to geocoding at highly resolved scales. Using 2005 birth and death data from North Carolina, we examine our ability to geocode population-level datasets at three spatial resolutions – zip code, street, and parcel. We achieve high geocoding rates at all three resolutions, with statewide street geocoding rates of 88.0% for births and 93.2% for deaths. We observe differences in geocoding rates across demographics and health outcomes, with lower geocoding rates in disadvantaged populations and the most dramatic differences occurring across the urban-rural spectrum. Our results suggest highly resolved spatial data architectures for population-level datasets are viable through geocoding individual street addresses. We recommend routinely geocoding administrative datasets to the highest spatial resolution feasible, allowing public health researchers to choose the spatial resolution used in analysis based on an understanding of the spatial dimensions of the health outcomes and exposures being investigated. Such research, however, must acknowledge how disparate geocoding success across subpopulations may affect findings. PMID:25383017

  2. Accurate dipole moment curve and non-adiabatic effects on the high resolution spectroscopic properties of the LiH molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, Leonardo G.; Kirnosov, Nikita; Alijah, Alexander; Mohallem, José R.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-04-01

    A very accurate dipole moment curve (DMC) for the ground X1Σ+ electronic state of the 7LiH molecule is reported. It is calculated with the use of all-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers. The DMC - the most accurate to our knowledge - and the corresponding highly accurate potential energy curve are used to calculate the transition energies, the transition dipole moments, and the Einstein coefficients for the rovibrational transitions with ΔJ = - 1 and Δv ⩽ 5 . The importance of the non-adiabatic effects in determining these properties is evaluated using the model of a vibrational R-dependent effective reduced mass in the rovibrational calculations introduced earlier (Diniz et al., 2015). The results of the present calculations are used to assess the quality of the two complete linelists of 7LiH available in the literature.

  3. The intelligence of observation: improving high school students' spatial ability by means of intervention unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patkin, Dorit; Dayan, Ester

    2013-03-01

    This case study of one class versus a control group focused on the impact of an intervention unit, which is not part of the regular curriculum, on the improvement of spatial ability of high school students (forty-six 12th-graders, aged 17-18, both boys and girls) in general as well as from a gender perspective. The study explored three sub-abilities: mental rotation (MR), spatial visualization (VS) and spatial orientation (SO). Findings indicated that the spatial orientation of the experimental group students had considerably improved. The findings also illustrated a significant gender-based advantage in favour of the boys in some of the spatial abilities even before the implementation of the intervention unit. The hypothesis relating to the reduction of the gender differences was not corroborated.

  4. High Spatial Resolution Analysis of Carbonates by In Situ Excimer Laser Ablation MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, S.; Lloyd, N.; Douthitt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Speleothems are important climate archives. The time resolution of the paleochlimate proxies depends on the growth rates and the precision limitation of the analytical instrumentation [1]. As a consequence, for speleothems, better analytical precision combined with better spatial resolution will always be the goal, driven by a need to probe the timing and duration of climate events [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity for heavy elements. An ion yield of >3 % has previously been reported for uranium solutions introduced by desolvating nebulizer[2]. For laser ablation Hf, the Jet Interface with N2 addition significantly improved sensitivity, which allowed precise and accurate 176Hf/177Hf ratios to be calculated using a spot size of just 25 μm diameter [3]. A Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus with Jet Interface option was coupled with a Photon Machines excimer laser ablation system. This system features a short pulse width (4ns) 193 nm excimer laser and the HELEX 2 volume sample cell. The 193nm wavelength has been shown to reduce the particle size distribution of the aerosol produced by the laser ablation process [4] and this in turn has been shown to help minimize the effects of fractionation by ensuring that particles are in a size range so as to avoid incomplete vaporization and ionization in the plasma [5]. In this work we investigate U-Th dating of carbonates. Accurate LA U-Th isotope measurements on carbonates with U concentrations smaller than 1 μg/g are difficult due to small ion beams [1]. Hoffman et. al. [1] noted individual LA U-Th ratio precisions of about 2% (2 sigma) on a 134 ka sample with 134 μg/g U concentration. In this work we apply a combination of the high sampling efficiency two volume cell plus mixed gas plasmas to further enhance the capability. [1] Hoffman, D.L., et al. (2009). Chemical Geology. 259 253-261 [2] Bouman, C., et al. (2009). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 73

  5. Limited rotational and rovibrational line lists computed with highly accurate quartic force fields and ab initio dipole surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fortenberry, Ryan C; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2014-02-01

    In this work, computational procedures are employed to compute the rotational and rovibrational spectra and line lists for H2O, CO2, and SO2. Building on the established use of quartic force fields, MP2 and CCSD(T) Dipole Moment Surfaces (DMSs) are computed for each system of study in order to produce line intensities as well as the transition energies. The computed results exhibit a clear correlation to reference data available in the HITRAN database. Additionally, even though CCSD(T) DMSs produce more accurate intensities as compared to experiment, the use of MP2 DMSs results in reliable line lists that are still comparable to experiment. The use of the less computationally costly MP2 method is beneficial in the study of larger systems where use of CCSD(T) would be more costly. PMID:23692860

  6. A new approach based on embedding Green's functions into fixed-point iterations for highly accurate solution to Troesch's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafri, H. Q.; Khuri, S. A.; Sayfy, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel approach is introduced for the solution of the non-linear Troesch's boundary value problem. The underlying strategy is based on Green's functions and fixed-point iterations, including Picard's and Krasnoselskii-Mann's schemes. The resulting numerical solutions are compared with both the analytical solutions and numerical solutions that exist in the literature. Convergence of the iterative schemes is proved via manipulation of the contraction principle. It is observed that the method handles the boundary layer very efficiently, reduces lengthy calculations, provides rapid convergence, and yields accurate results particularly for large eigenvalues. Indeed, to our knowledge, this is the first time that this problem is solved successfully for very large eigenvalues, actually the rate of convergence increases as the magnitude of the eigenvalues increases.

  7. TIMP2•IGFBP7 biomarker panel accurately predicts acute kidney injury in high-risk surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Gunnerson, Kyle J.; Shaw, Andrew D.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Bihorac, Azra; Al-Khafaji, Ali; Kashani, Kianoush; Lissauer, Matthew; Shi, Jing; Walker, Michael G.; Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important complication in surgical patients. Existing biomarkers and clinical prediction models underestimate the risk for developing AKI. We recently reported data from two trials of 728 and 408 critically ill adult patients in whom urinary TIMP2•IGFBP7 (NephroCheck, Astute Medical) was used to identify patients at risk of developing AKI. Here we report a preplanned analysis of surgical patients from both trials to assess whether urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor–binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) accurately identify surgical patients at risk of developing AKI. STUDY DESIGN We enrolled adult surgical patients at risk for AKI who were admitted to one of 39 intensive care units across Europe and North America. The primary end point was moderate-severe AKI (equivalent to KDIGO [Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes] stages 2–3) within 12 hours of enrollment. Biomarker performance was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, integrated discrimination improvement, and category-free net reclassification improvement. RESULTS A total of 375 patients were included in the final analysis of whom 35 (9%) developed moderate-severe AKI within 12 hours. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] alone was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.90; p < 0.0001). Biomarker performance was robust in sensitivity analysis across predefined subgroups (urgency and type of surgery). CONCLUSION For postoperative surgical intensive care unit patients, a single urinary TIMP2•IGFBP7 test accurately identified patients at risk for developing AKI within the ensuing 12 hours and its inclusion in clinical risk prediction models significantly enhances their performance. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Prognostic study, level I. PMID:26816218

  8. High Prevalence and Spatial Distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in Rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Forrer, Armelle; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Duong, Socheat; Vounatsou, Penelope; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. Methods From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. Principal Findings Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6%) were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7%) were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4–2.0; P<0.001). Participants who defecated in latrines were infected significantly less than those who did not (OR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4–0.8; P = 0.001). Strongyloidiasis cases would be reduced by 39% if all participants defecated in latrines. Incidence of S. stercoralis infections did not show a strong tendency toward spatial clustering in this province. The risk of infection significantly decreased with increasing rainfall and soil organic carbon content, and increased in areas with rice fields. Conclusions/Significance Prevalence of S. stercoralis in rural Cambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the most at

  9. Spatial light modulators for high-brightness projection displays.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, K; Fujii, T; Kikuchi, H; Fujikake, H; Kawakita, M; Hirano, Y; Sato, F

    1999-09-10

    We fabricated polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal light valves (PDLCLV's) consisting of a 30-microm-thick hydrogenated amorphous-silicon film and a 10-microm-thick polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) film composed of nematic liquid-crystal (LC) microdroplets surrounded by polymer. The device can modulate high-power reading light, because the PDLC becomes transparent or opalescent independent of the polarization state of the reading light when either sufficient or no writing light is incident on the PDLCLV. This device has a limiting resolution of 50 lp/mm (lp indicates line pairs), a reading light efficiency of 60%, a ratio of intensity of light incident on the PDLC layer to intensity of light radiated from the layer, and an extinction ratio of 130:1. The optically addressed video projection system with three PDLCLV's, LC panels of 1048 x 480 pixels as input image sources, a 1-kW Xe lamp, and a schlieren optical system projected television (TV) pictures of 600 and 450 TV lines in the horizontal and the vertical directions on a screen with a diagonal length of 100 in. The total output flux of this system was 1500 lm. PMID:18324076

  10. Towards Building a High Performance Spatial Query System for Large Scale Medical Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Ablimit; Wang, Fusheng; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Support of high performance queries on large volumes of scientific spatial data is becoming increasingly important in many applications. This growth is driven by not only geospatial problems in numerous fields, but also emerging scientific applications that are increasingly data- and compute-intensive. For example, digital pathology imaging has become an emerging field during the past decade, where examination of high resolution images of human tissue specimens enables more effective diagnosis, prediction and treatment of diseases. Systematic analysis of large-scale pathology images generates tremendous amounts of spatially derived quantifications of micro-anatomic objects, such as nuclei, blood vessels, and tissue regions. Analytical pathology imaging provides high potential to support image based computer aided diagnosis. One major requirement for this is effective querying of such enormous amount of data with fast response, which is faced with two major challenges: the “big data” challenge and the high computation complexity. In this paper, we present our work towards building a high performance spatial query system for querying massive spatial data on MapReduce. Our framework takes an on demand index building approach for processing spatial queries and a partition-merge approach for building parallel spatial query pipelines, which fits nicely with the computing model of MapReduce. We demonstrate our framework on supporting multi-way spatial joins for algorithm evaluation and nearest neighbor queries for microanatomic objects. To reduce query response time, we propose cost based query optimization to mitigate the effect of data skew. Our experiments show that the framework can efficiently support complex analytical spatial queries on MapReduce. PMID:24501719

  11. Narrow-linear and small-area forest disturbance detection and mapping from high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuhong; Franklin, Steven E.; Guo, Xuling; Stenhouse, Gordon B.

    2009-12-01

    Widespread disturbance has brought a large amount of narrow-linear and small-area disturbance features (e.g., trails, seismic lines, forest roads, well sites, and cut blocks) to forest areas throughout the past decade. This issue has prompted research into finding the appropriate data and methods for mapping these narrow-linear and small-area disturbance features in order to examine their impacts on wildlife habitat. In this paper, we first described the characteristics of small forest disturbances and presented the nature of problem. We then presented a framework for detecting and extracting narrow-linear and small-area forest disturbance features. Using a SPOT 5 high spatial detail image and existing GIS databases, we applied the framework to map narrow-linear and small-area forest disturbance features in a Bear Management area (BMA) in the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta, Canada. The results indicated that the proposed framework produced accurate disturbance maps for cut blocks, and forest roads & trails. The high errors of omission in the cut lines map were attributed to inconsistent geometric and radiometric patterns in the 'rarely-used' or 'old' cut lines. The study confirmed the feasibility of rapidly updating incomplete GIS data with linear and small-area disturbance features extracted from high spatial detail SPOT imagery. Future work will be directed towards improvement of the framework and the extraction strategy to remove a large amount of spurious features and to increase accuracy for cut lines mapping.

  12. High-speed limnology: using advanced sensors to investigate spatial variability in biogeochemistry and hydrology.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John T; Loken, Luke C; Casson, Nora J; Smith, Colin; Stone, Amanda G; Winslow, Luke A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced sensor technology is widely used in aquatic monitoring and research. Most applications focus on temporal variability, whereas spatial variability has been challenging to document. We assess the capability of water chemistry sensors embedded in a high-speed water intake system to document spatial variability. This new sensor platform continuously samples surface water at a range of speeds (0 to >45 km h(-1)) resulting in high-density, mesoscale spatial data. These novel observations reveal previously unknown variability in physical, chemical, and biological factors in streams, rivers, and lakes. By combining multiple sensors into one platform, we were able to detect terrestrial-aquatic hydrologic connections in a small dystrophic lake, to infer the role of main-channel vs backwater nutrient processing in a large river and to detect sharp chemical changes across aquatic ecosystem boundaries in a stream/lake complex. Spatial sensor data were verified in our examples by comparing with standard lab-based measurements of selected variables. Spatial fDOM data showed strong correlation with wet chemistry measurements of DOC, and optical NO3 concentrations were highly correlated with lab-based measurements. High-frequency spatial data similar to our examples could be used to further understand aquatic biogeochemical fluxes, ecological patterns, and ecosystem processes, and will both inform and benefit from fixed-site data. PMID:25406073

  13. Systematic Neighborhood Observations at High Spatial Resolution: Methodology and Assessment of Potential Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Tammy C. M.; Caughy, Margaret O'Brien; Mays, Judith K.; Murdoch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of public health research documenting how characteristics of neighborhoods are associated with differences in the health status of residents. However, little is known about how the spatial resolution of neighborhood observational data or community audits affects the identification of neighborhood differences in health. We developed a systematic neighborhood observation instrument for collecting data at very high spatial resolution (we observe each parcel independently) and used it to collect data in a low-income minority neighborhood in Dallas, TX. In addition, we collected data on the health status of individuals residing in this neighborhood. We then assessed the inter-rater reliability of the instrument and compared the costs and benefits of using data at this high spatial resolution. Our instrument provides a reliable and cost-effect method for collecting neighborhood observational data at high spatial resolution, which then allows researchers to explore the impact of varying geographic aggregations. Furthermore, these data facilitate a demonstration of the predictive accuracy of self-reported health status. We find that ordered logit models of health status using observational data at different spatial resolution produce different results. This implies a need to analyze the variation in correlative relationships at different geographic resolutions when there is no solid theoretical rational for choosing a particular resolution. We argue that neighborhood data at high spatial resolution greatly facilitates the evaluation of alternative geographic specifications in studies of neighborhood and health. PMID:21673983

  14. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  15. The Role of Low and High Spatial Frequencies in Exogenous Attention to Biologically Salient Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Carretié, Luis; Ríos, Marcos; Periáñez, José A.; Kessel, Dominique; Álvarez-Linera, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous attention can be understood as an adaptive tool that permits the detection and processing of biologically salient events even when the individual is engaged in a resource-consuming task. Indirect data suggest that the spatial frequency of stimulation may be a crucial element in this process. Behavioral and neural data (both functional and structural) were analyzed for 36 participants engaged in a digit categorization task in which distracters were presented. Distracters were biologically salient or anodyne images, and had three spatial frequency formats: intact, low spatial frequencies only, and high spatial frequencies only. Behavior confirmed enhanced exogenous attention to biologically salient distracters. The activity in the right and left intraparietal sulci and the right middle frontal gyrus was associated with this behavioral pattern and was greater in response to salient than to neutral distracters, the three areas presenting strong correlations to each other. Importantly, the enhanced response of this network to biologically salient distracters with respect to neutral distracters relied on low spatial frequencies to a significantly greater extent than on high spatial frequencies. Structural analyses suggested the involvement of internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus and corpus callosum in this network. Results confirm that exogenous attention is preferentially captured by biologically salient information, and suggest that the architecture and function underlying this process are low spatial frequency-biased. PMID:22590649

  16. Combining high temporal and high spatial resolution thermal infrared datasets to detect volcanic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Dehn, J.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Most volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. In certain cases, the precursors can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Furthermore, subtle changes in this activity can be used to determine the style of an eruption at volcanoes known for differing eruption types. This study focuses on the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) spaceborne sensors to track volcanic precursors from thermal changes at the summit of volcanoes using data from both the ASTER and AVHRR sensors by focusing on the Kamchatka (Russia) region. At Bezymianny volcano, a clear increase in activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. In other cases, such as the Tolbachik eruption in 2012, no precursors were detected before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes do not fall into these extremes, as is the case with Kliuchevskoi volcano. Three large eruptions (e.g., 2005, 2007, 2009) have occurred at Kliuchevskoi in the past decade. Before each of these eruptions, AVHRR and ASTER detected thermal anomalies (pixels with radiant energy significantly above the background). High temporal but low spatial resolution (i.e., hours; 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting high energy events occurring over short time periods. In contrast, high spatial but low temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks; 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower levels of activity. These smaller thermal anomalies are more commonly associated with the longer time scale pre-eruptive phase at Kliuchevskoi. The problem occurs where attempting to detect patterns in these anomalies over time. Only volcanic activity that produces a large amount of radiant energy can be seen with the relatively poor spatial resolution of AVHRR, and ASTER will commonly miss shorter duration activity. In this study, we use ASTER data to track low-level anomalies months prior

  17. A HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION STUDY OF THE {lambda} = 3 mm CONTINUUM OF ORION-KL

    SciTech Connect

    Friedel, D. N.; Widicus Weaver, S. L. E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.edu

    2011-12-01

    Recent interferometric observations have called into question the traditional view of the Orion-KL region, which displays one of the most well-defined cases of chemical differentiation in a star-forming region. Previous lower-resolution images of Orion-KL show emission signatures for oxygen-bearing organic molecules toward the Orion Compact Ridge and emission for nitrogen-bearing organic molecules toward the Orion Hot Core. However, more recent observations at higher spatial resolution indicate that the bulk of the molecular emission arises from many smaller, compact clumps that are spatially distinct from the traditional Hot Core and Compact Ridge sources. It is this type of observational information that is critical for guiding astrochemical models, as the spatial distribution of molecules and their relation to energetic sources will govern the chemical mechanisms at play in star-forming regions. We have conducted millimeter-imaging studies of Orion-KL with various beam sizes using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy in order to investigate the continuum structure. These {lambda} = 3 mm observations have synthesized beam sizes of {approx}0.''5-5.''0. These observations reveal the complex continuum structure of this region, which stands in sharp contrast to the previous structural models assumed for Orion-KL based on lower spatial resolution images. The new results indicate that the spatial scaling previously used in determination of molecular abundances for this region are in need of complete revision. Here we present the results of the continuum observations, discuss the sizes and structures of the detected sources, and suggest an observational strategy for determining the proper spatial scaling to accurately determine molecular abundances in the Orion-KL region.

  18. An Accurate Timing Alignment Method with Time-to-Digital Converter Linearity Calibration for High-Resolution TOF PET

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; An, Shaohui; Lu, Xingyu; Dong, Yun; Liu, Shitao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate PET system timing alignment minimizes the coincidence time window and therefore reduces random events and improves image quality. It is also critical for time-of-flight (TOF) image reconstruction. Here, we use a thin annular cylinder (shell) phantom filled with a radioactive source and located axially and centrally in a PET camera for the timing alignment of a TOF PET system. This timing alignment method involves measuring the time differences between the selected coincidence detector pairs, calibrating the differential and integral nonlinearity of the time-to-digital converter (TDC) with the same raw data and deriving the intrinsic time biases for each detector using an iterative algorithm. The raw time bias for each detector is downloaded to the front-end electronics and the residual fine time bias can be applied during the TOF list-mode reconstruction. Our results showed that a timing alignment accuracy of better than ±25 ps can be achieved, and a preliminary timing resolution of 473 ps (full width at half maximum) was measured in our prototype TOF PET/CT system. PMID:26543243

  19. Accurate prediction of polarised high order electrostatic interactions for hydrogen bonded complexes using the machine learning method kriging.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy J; Kandathil, Shaun M; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-02-01

    As intermolecular interactions such as the hydrogen bond are electrostatic in origin, rigorous treatment of this term within force field methodologies should be mandatory. We present a method able of accurately reproducing such interactions for seven van der Waals complexes. It uses atomic multipole moments up to hexadecupole moment mapped to the positions of the nuclear coordinates by the machine learning method kriging. Models were built at three levels of theory: HF/6-31G(**), B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ. The quality of the kriging models was measured by their ability to predict the electrostatic interaction energy between atoms in external test examples for which the true energies are known. At all levels of theory, >90% of test cases for small van der Waals complexes were predicted within 1 kJ mol(-1), decreasing to 60-70% of test cases for larger base pair complexes. Models built on moments obtained at B3LYP and M06-2X level generally outperformed those at HF level. For all systems the individual interactions were predicted with a mean unsigned error of less than 1 kJ mol(-1). PMID:24274986

  20. Scalable implementations of accurate excited-state coupled cluster theories: application of high-level methods to porphyrin based systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Karol; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Olson, Ryan M.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Apra, Edoardo

    2011-11-30

    The development of reliable tools for excited-state simulations is emerging as an extremely powerful computational chemistry tool for understanding complex processes in the broad class of light harvesting systems and optoelectronic devices. Over the last years we have been developing equation of motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) methods capable of tackling these problems. In this paper we discuss the parallel performance of EOMCC codes which provide accurate description of the excited-state correlation effects. Two aspects are discuss in details: (1) a new algorithm for the iterative EOMCC methods based on the novel task scheduling algorithms, and (2) parallel algorithms for the non-iterative methods describing the effect of triply excited configurations. We demonstrate that the most computationally intensive non-iterative part can take advantage of 210,000 cores of the Cray XT5 system at OLCF. In particular, we demonstrate the importance of non-iterative many-body methods for achieving experimental level of accuracy for several porphyrin-based system.

  1. High-Resolution Image Classification Integrating Spectral-Spatial-Location Cues by Conditional Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ji; Zhong, Yanfei; Shu, Hong; Zhang, Liangpei

    2016-09-01

    With the increase in the availability of high-resolution remote sensing imagery, classification is becoming an increasingly useful technique for providing a large area of detailed land-cover information by the use of these high-resolution images. High-resolution images have the characteristics of abundant geometric and detail information, which are beneficial to detailed classification. In order to make full use of these characteristics, a classification algorithm based on conditional random fields (CRFs) is presented in this paper. The proposed algorithm integrates spectral, spatial contextual, and spatial location cues by modeling the probabilistic potentials. The spectral cues modeled by the unary potentials can provide basic information for discriminating the various land-cover classes. The pairwise potentials consider the spatial contextual information by establishing the neighboring interactions between pixels to favor spatial smoothing. The spatial location cues are explicitly encoded in the higher order potentials. The higher order potentials consider the nonlocal range of the spatial location interactions between the target pixel and its nearest training samples. This can provide useful information for the classes that are easily confused with other land-cover types in the spectral appearance. The proposed algorithm integrates spectral, spatial contextual, and spatial location cues within a CRF framework to provide complementary information from varying perspectives, so that it can address the common problem of spectral variability in remote sensing images, which is directly reflected in the accuracy of each class and the average accuracy. The experimental results with three high-resolution images show the validity of the algorithm, compared with the other state-of-the-art classification algorithms. PMID:27295673

  2. High temporal and high spatial resolution MR angiography (4D-MRA).

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh, D R; Marx, C; Gieseke, J; Schild, H H; Willinek, W A

    2014-09-01

    In the first decade of the twenty-first century, whole-body magnetic resonance scanners with high field strengths (and thus potentially better signal-to-noise ratios) were developed. At the same time, parallel imaging and "echo-sharing" techniques were refined to allow for increasingly high spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic magnetic resonance angiography ("time-resolved" = TR-MRA). This technological progress facilitated tracking the passage of intra-venously administered contrast agent boluses as well as the acquisition of volume data sets at high image refresh rates ("4D-MRA"). This opened doors for many new applications in non-invasive vascular imaging, including simultaneous anatomic and functional analysis of many vascular pathologies including arterio-venous malformations. Different methods were established to acquire 4D-MRA using various strategies to acquire k-space trajectories over time in order to optimize imaging according to clinical needs. These include "keyhole"-based techniques (e. g. 4D-TRAK), TRICKS - both with and without projection - and HYPR-reconstruction, TREAT, and TWIST. Some of these techniques were first introduced in the 1980 s and 1990 s, were later enhanced and modified, and finally implemented in the products of major vendors. In the last decade, a large number of studies on the clinical applications of TR-MRA was published. This manuscript provides an overview of the development of TR-MRA methods and the 4D-MRA techniques as they are currently used in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of vascular diseases in various parts of the body. PMID:24955647

  3. Spatially resolved measurement of high doses in microbeam radiation therapy using samarium doped fluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Go; Morrell, Brian; Koughia, Cyril; Kasap, Safa; Edgar, Andy; Varoy, Chris; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2011-09-19

    The measurement of spatially resolved high doses in microbeam radiation therapy has always been a challenging task, where a combination of high dose response and high spatial resolution (microns) is required for synchrotron radiation peaked around 50 keV. The x-ray induced Sm{sup 3+}{yields} Sm{sup 2+} valence conversion in Sm{sup 3+} doped fluorophosphates glasses has been tested for use in x-ray dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy. The conversion efficiency depends almost linearly on the dose of irradiation up to {approx}5 Gy and saturates at doses exceeding {approx}80 Gy. The conversion shows strong correlation with x-ray induced absorbance of the glass which is related to the formation of phosphorus-oxygen hole centers. When irradiated through a microslit collimator, a good spatial resolution and high ''peak-to-valley'' contrast have been observed by means of confocal photoluminescence microscopy.

  4. Highly Accurate Antibody Assays for Early and Rapid Detection of Tuberculosis in African and Asian Elephants ▿

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Rena; Lyashchenko, Olena; Esfandiari, Javan; Miller, Michele; Mikota, Susan; Olsen, John H.; Ball, Ray; Dumonceaux, Genevieve; Schmitt, Dennis; Moller, Torsten; Payeur, Janet B.; Harris, Beth; Sofranko, Denise; Waters, W. Ray; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants is a reemerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current methods for screening and diagnosis rely on trunk wash culture, which has serious limitations due to low test sensitivity, slow turnaround time, and variable sample quality. Innovative and more efficient diagnostic tools are urgently needed. We describe three novel serologic techniques, the ElephantTB Stat-Pak kit, multiantigen print immunoassay, and dual-path platform VetTB test, for rapid antibody detection in elephants. The study was performed with serum samples from 236 captive African and Asian elephants from 53 different locations in the United States and Europe. The elephants were divided into three groups based on disease status and history of exposure: (i) 26 animals with culture-confirmed TB due to M. tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis, (ii) 63 exposed elephants from known-infected herds that had never produced a culture-positive result from trunk wash samples, and (iii) 147 elephants without clinical symptoms suggestive of TB, with consistently negative trunk wash culture results, and with no history of potential exposure to TB in the past 5 years. Elephants with culture-confirmed TB and a proportion of exposed but trunk wash culture-negative elephants produced robust antibody responses to multiple antigens of M. tuberculosis, with seroconversions detectable years before TB-positive cultures were obtained from trunk wash specimens. ESAT-6 and CFP10 proteins were immunodominant antigens recognized by elephant antibodies during disease. The serologic assays demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 95 to 100% specificity. Rapid and accurate antibody tests to identify infected elephants will likely allow earlier and more efficient treatment, thus limiting transmission of infection to other susceptible animals and to humans. PMID:19261770

  5. Automated and quantitative headspace in-tube extraction for the accurate determination of highly volatile compounds from wines and beers.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Julián; Mateo-Vivaracho, Laura; Lopez, Ricardo; Ferreira, Vicente

    2012-03-23

    An automatic headspace in-tube extraction (ITEX) method for the accurate determination of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, diacetyl and other volatile compounds from wine and beer has been developed and validated. Method accuracy is based on the nearly quantitative transference of volatile compounds from the sample to the ITEX trap. For achieving that goal most methodological aspects and parameters have been carefully examined. The vial and sample sizes and the trapping materials were found to be critical due to the pernicious saturation effects of ethanol. Small 2 mL vials containing very small amounts of sample (20 μL of 1:10 diluted sample) and a trap filled with 22 mg of Bond Elut ENV resins could guarantee a complete trapping of sample vapors. The complete extraction requires 100 × 0.5 mL pumping strokes at 60 °C and takes 24 min. Analytes are further desorbed at 240 °C into the GC injector under a 1:5 split ratio. The proportion of analytes finally transferred to the trap ranged from 85 to 99%. The validation of the method showed satisfactory figures of merit. Determination coefficients were better than 0.995 in all cases and good repeatability was also obtained (better than 7% in all cases). Reproducibility was better than 8.3% except for acetaldehyde (13.1%). Detection limits were below the odor detection thresholds of these target compounds in wine and beer and well below the normal ranges of occurrence. Recoveries were not significantly different to 100%, except in the case of acetaldehyde. In such a case it could be determined that the method is not able to break some of the adducts that this compound forms with sulfites. However, such problem was avoided after incubating the sample with glyoxal. The method can constitute a general and reliable alternative for the analysis of very volatile compounds in other difficult matrixes. PMID:22340891

  6. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  7. A robust MRI-compatible system to facilitate highly accurate stereotactic administration of therapeutic agents to targets within the brain of a large animal model

    PubMed Central

    White, E.; Woolley, M.; Bienemann, A.; Johnson, D.E.; Wyatt, M.; Murray, G.; Taylor, H.; Gill, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Achieving accurate intracranial electrode or catheter placement is critical in clinical practice in order to maximise the efficacy of deep brain stimulation and drug delivery respectively as well as to minimise side-effects. We have developed a highly accurate and robust method for MRI-guided, stereotactic delivery of catheters and electrodes to deep target structures in the brain of pigs. This study outlines the development of this equipment and animal model. Specifically this system enables reliable head immobilisation, acquisition of high-resolution MR images, precise co-registration of MRI and stereotactic spaces and overall rigidity to facilitate accurate burr hole-generation and catheter implantation. To demonstrate the utility of this system, in this study a total of twelve catheters were implanted into the putamen of six Large White Landrace pigs. All implants were accurately placed into the putamen. Target accuracy had a mean Euclidean distance of 0.623 mm (standard deviation of 0.33 mm). This method has allowed us to accurately insert fine cannulae, suitable for the administration of therapeutic agents by convection-enhanced delivery (CED), into the brain of pigs. This study provides summary evidence of a robust system for catheter implantation into the brain of a large animal model. We are currently using this stereotactic system, implantation procedure and animal model to develop catheter-based drug delivery systems that will be translated into human clinical trials, as well as to model the distribution of therapeutic agents administered by CED over large volumes of brain. PMID:21074564

  8. Behavior Problem Indices: The Differential Effects of Spatial Density on Low and High Scorers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Chalsa M.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the differential effects of spatial density of five-year-old children. Generally, normal children motorically adjusted to a high-density condition to a greater degree than children with behavior problems. Anxious and impulsive children were especially distressed by a high-density condition, compared to normals. (Author/MA)

  9. The Relationship between Utilization of Computer Games and Spatial Abilities among High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motamedi, Vahid; Yaghoubi, Razeyah Mohagheghyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the relationship between computer game use and spatial abilities among high school students. The sample consisted of 300 high school male students selected through multi-stage cluster sampling. Data gathering tools consisted of a researcher made questionnaire (to collect information on computer game usage) and the…

  10. High spatial resolution NO2 tropospheric slant columns retrieved from OMI spatial-zoom spectra using an earthshine reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Jasdeep S.; Leigh, Roland J.; Monks, Paul S.

    2014-08-01

    Future satellite instruments measuring urban NO2 will need to have high spatio-temporal resolution in order to improve air quality model forecasts. However, the likely cost and data telemetry requirements for such instruments will be high with current techniques. In this work we propose a new retrieval algorithm for deriving tropospheric NO2 slant column densities (SCDs) by DOAS fitting an earthshine reference spectrum measured over the Pacific to account for stratospheric NO2, which would eliminate the need for a solar reference and simplify instrument and retrieval design. The retrieval is tested by fitting earthshine radiance spectra measured by the Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) during its spatial-zoom mode (nadir pixel size: 13 x 12 km2) and super-zoom mode (nadir pixel size: 13 x 3 km2) using a Pacific reference spectrum. Transects taken over urban areas showed that the retrieval appears to retrieve tropospheric NO2 SCDs with good agreement with the operational L2 DOMINO product over regions with high NOx emissions. The retrieval also appeared to supress across-track striping without the need for a posteriori correction and showed sensitivity to absorption due to sand and liquid water over deserts and oceans. Comparisons with operational-scale retrievals also showed improved SCD precision, if random noise is expected to be the cause of retrieval uncertainty.

  11. Spatial shaping of intense femtosecond beams for the generation of high-energy attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, E.; Dubrouil, A.; Hort, O.; Petit, S.; Descamps, D.; Mével, E.

    2012-04-01

    We generate high-order harmonics with a spatially shaped TW laser beam. We present and analyse in detail a new approach for shaping an intense laser field to a flat-top intensity profile near focus. We show that this approach is well adapted for high harmonic generation with high-energy fundamental pulses and highlight the possibilities for generating high-energy attosecond pulses.

  12. High-Speed Incoming Infrared Target Detection by Fusion of Spatial and Temporal Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting high-speed incoming targets by the fusion of spatial and temporal detectors to achieve a high detection rate for an active protection system (APS). The incoming targets have different image velocities according to the target-camera geometry. Therefore, single-target detector-based approaches, such as a 1D temporal filter, 2D spatial filter and 3D matched filter, cannot provide a high detection rate with moderate false alarms. The target speed variation was analyzed according to the incoming angle and target velocity. The speed of the distant target at the firing time is almost stationary and increases slowly. The speed varying targets are detected stably by fusing the spatial and temporal filters. The stationary target detector is activated by an almost zero temporal contrast filter (TCF) and identifies targets using a spatial filter called the modified mean subtraction filter (M-MSF). A small motion (sub-pixel velocity) target detector is activated by a small TCF value and finds targets using the same spatial filter. A large motion (pixel-velocity) target detector works when the TCF value is high. The final target detection is terminated by fusing the three detectors based on the threat priority. The experimental results of the various target sequences show that the proposed fusion-based target detector produces the highest detection rate with an acceptable false alarm rate. PMID:25815448

  13. Two-photon imaging of spatially extended neuronal network dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Kyle P.; Eng, Alfred; White, John A.; Mertz, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple two-photon fluorescence imaging strategy, called targeted path scanning (TPS), to monitor the dynamics of spatially extended neuronal networks with high spatiotemporal resolution. Our strategy combines the advantages of mirror-based scanning, minimized dead time, ease of implementation, and compatibility with high-resolution low-magnification objectives. To demonstrate the performance of TPS, we monitor the calcium dynamics distributed across an entire juvenile rat hippocampus (>1.5mm), at scan rates of 100Hz, with single cell resolution and single action potential sensitivity. Our strategy for fast, efficient two-photon microscopy over spatially extended regions provides a particularly attractive solution for monitoring neuronal population activity in thick tissue, without sacrificing the signal to noise ratio or high spatial resolution associated with standard two-photon microscopy. Finally, we provide the code to make our technique generally available. PMID:18539336

  14. The variable stellar wind of Rigel probed at high spatial and spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, O.; Kaufer, A.; Stahl, O.; Colvinter, C.; Spang, A.; Dessart, L.; Prinja, R.; Chini, R.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Luminous BA-type supergiants are the brightest stars in the visible that can be observed in distant galaxies and are potentially accurate distance indicators. The impact of the variability of the stellar winds on the distance determination remains poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to probe the inhomogeneous structures in the stellar wind using spectro-interferometric monitoring. Methods: We present a spatially resolved, high-spectral resolution (R = 12 000) K-band temporal monitoring of the bright supergiant β Orionis (Rigel, B8 Iab) using AMBER at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Rigel was observed in the Brγ line and its nearby continuum once per month over 3 months in 2006-2007, and 5 months in 2009-2010. These unprecedented observations were complemented by contemporaneous optical high-resolution spectroscopy. We analyse the near-IR spectra and visibilities with the 1D non-LTE radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. The differential and closure phase signals are evidence of asymmetries that are interpreted as perturbations of the wind. Results: A systematic visibility decrease is observed across the Brγ line indicating that at a radius of about 1.25 R∗ the photospheric absorption is filled by emission from the wind. During the 2006-2007 period the Brγ and likely the continuum forming regions were larger than in the 2009-2010 epoch. Using CMFGEN we infer a mass-loss rate change of about 20% between the two epochs. We also find time variations in the differential visibilities and phases. The 2006-2007 period is characterised by noticeable variations in the differential visibilities in Doppler position and width and by weak variations in differential and closure phase. The 2009-2010 period is much quieter with virtually no detectable variations in the dispersed visibilities but a strong S-shaped signal is observed in differential phase coinciding with a strong ejection event discernible in the optical spectra. The differential phase signal

  15. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class. PMID:23902112

  16. An accurate online calibration system based on combined clamp-shape coil for high voltage electronic current transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhen-hua; Li, Hong-bin; Zhang, Zhi

    2013-07-15

    Electronic transformers are widely used in power systems because of their wide bandwidth and good transient performance. However, as an emerging technology, the failure rate of electronic transformers is higher than that of traditional transformers. As a result, the calibration period needs to be shortened. Traditional calibration methods require the power of transmission line be cut off, which results in complicated operation and power off loss. This paper proposes an online calibration system which can calibrate electronic current transformers without power off. In this work, the high accuracy standard current transformer and online operation method are the key techniques. Based on the clamp-shape iron-core coil and clamp-shape air-core coil, a combined clamp-shape coil is designed as the standard current transformer. By analyzing the output characteristics of the two coils, the combined clamp-shape coil can achieve verification of the accuracy. So the accuracy of the online calibration system can be guaranteed. Moreover, by employing the earth potential working method and using two insulating rods to connect the combined clamp-shape coil to the high voltage bus, the operation becomes simple and safe. Tests in China National Center for High Voltage Measurement and field experiments show that the proposed system has a high accuracy of up to 0.05 class.

  17. Neither Fair nor Accurate: Research-Based Reasons Why High-Stakes Tests Should Not Be Used to Evaluate Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Current and former leaders of many major urban school districts, including Washington, D.C.'s Michelle Rhee and New Orleans' Paul Vallas, have sought to use tests to evaluate teachers. In fact, the use of high-stakes standardized tests to evaluate teacher performance in the manner of value-added measurement (VAM) has become one of the cornerstones…

  18. High-order-harmonic generation driven by pulses with angular spatial chirp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, Carlos; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Becker, Andreas; Durfee, Charles G.

    2016-02-01

    We present and analyze a technique to drive high-order harmonics by laser pulses with an angular spatial chirp. Results of our numerical simulations show that each harmonic is emitted with an angular chirp which scales inversely with the harmonic order and leads to additional control of the spatial and temporal resolution of the spectrum. In particular, the use of angular chirp leads to separation of the harmonics in two dimensions where (i) high spectral resolution can be achieved and (ii) the temporal periodicity of the harmonic pulse trains can be controlled. We show that this technique does not require carrier-envelope-phase stabilization when using few-cycle laser pulses.

  19. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-07-11

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ≤ 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. The computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  20. Accurate high-throughput identification of parallel G-quadruplex topology by a new tetraaryl-substituted imidazole.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Hao; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zeng, You-Mei; Ou, Tian-Miao; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Tan, Jia-Heng

    2016-09-15

    G-quadruplex nucleic acids are four-stranded DNA or RNA secondary structures that are formed in guanine-rich sequences. These structures exhibit extensive structural polymorphism and play a pivotal role in the control of a variety of cellular processes. To date, diverse approaches for high-throughput identification of G-quadruplex structures have been successfully developed, but high-throughput methods for further characterization of their topologies are still lacking. In this study, we report a new tetra-arylimidazole probe psIZCM-1, which was found to display significant and distinctive changes in both the absorption and the fluorescence spectra in the presence of parallel G-quadruplexes but show insignificant changes upon interactions with anti-parallel G-quadruplexes or other non-quadruplex oligonucleotides. In view of this dual-output feature, we used psIZCM-1 to identify the parallel G-quadruplexes from a large set of 314 oligonucleotides (including 300 G-quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides and 14 non-quadruplex oligonucleotides) via a microplate reader and accordingly established a high-throughput method for the characterization of parallel G-quadruplex topologies. The accuracy of this method was greater than 95%, which was much higher than that of the commercial probe NMM. To make the approach more practical, we further combined psIZCM-1 with another G-quadruplex probe IZCM-7 to realize the high-throughput classification of parallel, anti-parallel G-quadruplexes and non-quadruplex structures. PMID:27104587

  1. A High-Resolution Spatially Explicit Monte-Carlo Simulation Approach to Commercial and Residential Electricity and Water Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, April M; McManamay, Ryan A; Nagle, Nicholas N; Piburn, Jesse O; Stewart, Robert N; Surendran Nair, Sujithkumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As urban areas continue to grow and evolve in a world of increasing environmental awareness, the need for high resolution spatially explicit estimates for energy and water demand has become increasingly important. Though current modeling efforts mark significant progress in the effort to better understand the spatial distribution of energy and water consumption, many are provided at a course spatial resolution or rely on techniques which depend on detailed region-specific data sources that are not publicly available for many parts of the U.S. Furthermore, many existing methods do not account for errors in input data sources and may therefore not accurately reflect inherent uncertainties in model outputs. We propose an alternative and more flexible Monte-Carlo simulation approach to high-resolution residential and commercial electricity and water consumption modeling that relies primarily on publicly available data sources. The method s flexible data requirement and statistical framework ensure that the model is both applicable to a wide range of regions and reflective of uncertainties in model results. Key words: Energy Modeling, Water Modeling, Monte-Carlo Simulation, Uncertainty Quantification Acknowledgment This manuscript has been authored by employees of UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Accordingly, the United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  2. A high-throughput screening strategy for accurate quantification of menaquinone based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Xue, Zheng-Lian; Chen, Shao-Peng; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Wei-Liang; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-06-01

    To enhance the screening efficiency and accuracy of a high-yield menaquinone (vitamin K2, MK) bacterial strain, a novel, quantitative method by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was developed. The staining technique was optimized to maximize the differences in fluorescence signals between spontaneous and MK-accumulating cells. The fluorescence carrier rhodamine 123 (Rh123), with its ability to reflect membrane potential, proved to be an appropriate fluorescent dye to connect the MK content with fluorescence signal quantitatively. To promote adequate access of the fluorescent molecule to the target and maintain higher cell survival rates, staining and incubation conditions were optimized. The results showed that 10 % sucrose facilitated uptake of Rh123, while maintaining a certain level of cell viability. The pre-treatment of cells with MgCl2 before staining with Rh123 also improved cell viability. Using FACS, 50 thousands cells can easily be assayed in less than 1 h. The optimized staining protocol yielded a linear response for the mean fluorescence against high performance liquid chromatography-measured MK content. We have developed a novel and useful staining protocol in the high-throughput evaluation of Flavobacterium sp. mutant libraries, using FACS to identify mutants with increased MK-accumulating properties. This study also provides reference for the screening of other industrial microbial strains. PMID:27001261

  3. Accurate electro-optical characterization of high power density GaAs-based laser diodes for screening strategies improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Pamela; Deshayes, Y.; Joly, Simon; Bettiati, M.; Laruelle, F.; Béchou, L.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we report on a methodology based on reverse and forward current-voltage curves (I-V) and on Degree of Polarization (DoP) of electroluminescence measurements on 980 nm laser diodes chip-on-submount (CoS) for the improvement of screening tests. Current-voltage curves are performed at reverse bias up to breakdown voltage (VBR) using both a high current accuracy (< 1 pA) and high voltage resolution (< 10 mV) at different submount-temperatures (20-50°C). The DoP of luminescence of such devices, related to strains in materials and effect of shear strain on the birefringence, is calculated from the simultaneous measurement of TE (LTE) and TM (LTM) polarized light emissions. We observe that application of high reverse voltages occasionally produces significant micro-plasma (MP) pre-breakdown on reverse I-V characteristics as recently observed in InGaN/GaN LEDs and assumed to be a response of electrically active defects. Comparisons between breakdown voltages and number of MP, and changes of leakage current at low forward voltage (< 0.1 V) are considered. DoP measurements are also analyzed versus temperature. Finally the usefulness of these measurements for effective screening of devices is discussed.

  4. Fully automated E-field measurement setup using pigtailed electro-optic sensors for accurate, vectorial, and reliable remote measurement of high-power microwave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, M.; Warzecha, A.; Duvillaret, L.; Lasserre, J.-L.; Paupert, A.

    2008-10-01

    The EO probe developed, offers an accurate evaluation of only one component of either continuous or single shot electric signal as long as the electric field to be measured is strong enough. Since those probes are also non intrusive, very small (tens of microns width) and have a flat response over a very large bandwidth (more than seven decades), they are competitive candidates for accurate vectorial measurement of either radiated or guided high power microwave electric field in the far- and near-field region. Unfortunately what makes them so versatile is also their Achilles' heel: the strong temporal instability of their response. Therefore, we present, in this paper, a fully-automated electro-optic probe developed to stabilise the transducer.

  5. High Incidence of Breast Cancer in Light-Polluted Areas with Spatial Effects in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Eunil; Choi, Jae Wook

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a high prevalence of breast cancer in light-polluted areas in Korea. However, it is necessary to analyze the spatial effects of light polluted areas on breast cancer because light pollution levels are correlated with region proximity to central urbanized areas in studied cities. In this study, we applied a spatial regression method (an intrinsic conditional autoregressive [iCAR] model) to analyze the relationship between the incidence of breast cancer and artificial light at night (ALAN) levels in 25 regions including central city, urbanized, and rural areas. By Poisson regression analysis, there was a significant correlation between ALAN, alcohol consumption rates, and the incidence of breast cancer. We also found significant spatial effects between ALAN and the incidence of breast cancer, with an increase in the deviance information criterion (DIC) from 374.3 to 348.6 and an increase in R2 from 0.574 to 0.667. Therefore, spatial analysis (an iCAR model) is more appropriate for assessing ALAN effects on breast cancer. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show spatial effects of light pollution on breast cancer, despite the limitations of an ecological study. We suggest that a decrease in ALAN could reduce breast cancer more than expected because of spatial effects. PMID:26838238

  6. IAS15: a fast, adaptive, high-order integrator for gravitational dynamics, accurate to machine precision over a billion orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno; Spiegel, David S.

    2015-01-01

    We present IAS15, a 15th-order integrator to simulate gravitational dynamics. The integrator is based on a Gauß-Radau quadrature and can handle conservative as well as non-conservative forces. We develop a step-size control that can automatically choose an optimal timestep. The algorithm can handle close encounters and high-eccentricity orbits. The systematic errors are kept well below machine precision, and long-term orbit integrations over 109 orbits show that IAS15 is optimal in the sense that it follows Brouwer's law, i.e. the energy error behaves like a random walk. Our tests show that IAS15 is superior to a mixed-variable symplectic integrator and other popular integrators, including high-order ones, in both speed and accuracy. In fact, IAS15 preserves the symplecticity of Hamiltonian systems better than the commonly used nominally symplectic integrators to which we compared it. We provide an open-source implementation of IAS15. The package comes with several easy-to-extend examples involving resonant planetary systems, Kozai-Lidov cycles, close encounters, radiation pressure, quadrupole moment and generic damping functions that can, among other things, be used to simulate planet-disc interactions. Other non-conservative forces can be added easily.

  7. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, A. R.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach. Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis, and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results. Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance. Most published BMI studies that use electrocorticographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  8. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, A R.; Taylor, D M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis (PCA), and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance Most published BMI studies that use electrocortographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  9. Spatial and numerical processing in children with high and low visuospatial abilities.

    PubMed

    Crollen, Virginie; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2015-04-01

    In the literature on numerical cognition, a strong association between numbers and space has been repeatedly demonstrated. However, only a few recent studies have been devoted to examine the consequences of low visuospatial abilities on calculation processing. In this study, we wanted to investigate whether visuospatial weakness may affect pure spatial processing as well as basic numerical reasoning. To do so, the performances of children with high and low visuospatial abilities were directly compared on different spatial tasks (the line bisection and Simon tasks) and numerical tasks (the number bisection, number-to-position, and numerical comparison tasks). Children from the low visuospatial group presented the classic Simon and SNARC (spatial numerical association of response codes) effects but showed larger deviation errors as compared with the high visuospatial group. Our results, therefore, demonstrated that low visuospatial abilities did not change the nature of the mental number line but rather led to a decrease in its accuracy. PMID:25618380

  10. In-air ion beam analysis with high spatial resolution proton microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, M.; Chokheli, D.; Fazinić, S.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Sudić, I.; Tadić, T.; Antičić, T.

    2016-03-01

    One of the possible ways to maintain the micrometre spatial resolution while performing ion beam analysis in the air is to increase the energy of ions. In order to explore capabilities and limitations of this approach, we have tested a range of proton beam energies (2-6 MeV) using in-air STIM (Scanning Ion Transmission Microscopy) setup. Measurements of the spatial resolution dependence on proton energy have been compared with SRIM simulation and modelling of proton multiple scattering by different approaches. Results were used to select experimental conditions in which 1 micrometre spatial resolution could be obtained. High resolution in-air microbeam could be applied for IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) tests of large detectors used in nuclear and high energy physics that otherwise cannot be tested in relatively small microbeam vacuum chambers.

  11. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David T; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N; Hooker, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation. PMID:27465654

  12. Using High Spatial Resolution to Improve BOLD fMRI Detection at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Claise, Béatrice; Jean, Betty

    2015-01-01

    For different functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, the acquisition of T2*-weighted scans at a high spatial resolution may be advantageous in terms of time-course signal-to-noise ratio and of BOLD sensitivity when the regions are prone to susceptibility artifacts. In this study, we explore this solution by examining how spatial resolution influences activations elicited when appetizing food pictures are viewed. Twenty subjects were imaged at 3 T with two different voxel volumes, 3.4 μl and 27 μl. Despite the diminution of brain coverage, we found that high-resolution acquisition led to a better detection of activations. Though known to suffer to different degrees from susceptibility artifacts, the activations detected by high spatial resolution were notably consistent with those reported in published activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, corresponding to taste-responsive regions. Furthermore, these regions were found activated bilaterally, in contrast with previous findings. Both the reduction of partial volume effect, which improves BOLD contrast, and the mitigation of susceptibility artifact, which boosts the signal to noise ratio in certain regions, explained the better detection noted with high resolution. The present study provides further evidences that high spatial resolution is a valuable solution for human BOLD fMRI, especially for studying food-related stimuli. PMID:26550990

  13. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David T.; O’Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N.; Hooker, Simon M.

    2016-07-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation.

  14. Pigeons can learn to make visual category discriminations using either low or high spatial frequency information.

    PubMed

    Lea, Stephen E G; Poser-Richet, Victoire; Meier, Christina

    2015-03-01

    Pigeons were trained to discriminate photographs of cat faces from dog faces, using either high- or low-pass spatial frequency filtered stimuli. Each pigeon was trained with multiple exemplars of the categories, but only with either high-pass or low-pass filtered stimuli. Not all pigeons reached the discrimination criterion. Successful pigeons were exposed in probe trials to test stimuli: cat and dog faces that had been subjected to the opposite kind of filtering from their training stimuli; the unfiltered original stimuli from which their training stimuli had been derived; and new exemplars of the cat- and dog-face categories, with the same filtering as was used in training. There was no transfer of discrimination to the stimuli with the opposite filtering from those used in training. Discrimination transferred, with some decrement, to the original unfiltered stimuli and to new exemplars with the same type of filtering as used in training. These results provide further evidence that both high and low spatial frequency information can be sufficient for pigeons to make category discriminations, and that there is no clear advantage for high spatial frequency information. They also confirm that high-pass and low-pass spatial frequency filtering produce images that have effectively no information in common. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall. PMID:25447512

  15. Gaussian-Schell analysis of the transverse spatial properties of high-harmonic beams

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David T.; O’Keeffe, Kevin; Anderson, Patrick N.; Hooker, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is an established means of producing coherent, short wavelength, ultrafast pulses from a compact set-up. Table-top high-harmonic sources are increasingly being used to image physical and biological systems using emerging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography. These novel imaging methods require coherent illumination, and it is therefore important to both characterize the spatial coherence of high-harmonic beams and understand the processes which limit this property. Here we investigate the near- and far-field spatial properties of high-harmonic radiation generated in a gas cell. The variation with harmonic order of the intensity profile, wavefront curvature, and complex coherence factor is measured in the far-field by the SCIMITAR technique. Using the Gaussian-Schell model, the properties of the harmonic beam in the plane of generation are deduced. Our results show that the order-dependence of the harmonic spatial coherence is consistent with partial coherence induced by both variation of the intensity-dependent dipole phase as well as finite spatial coherence of the driving radiation. These findings are used to suggest ways in which the coherence of harmonic beams could be increased further, which would have direct benefits to imaging with high-harmonic radiation. PMID:27465654

  16. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags based upon High-Throughput Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry for Global Proteomic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-30

    In this review, we describe the technological basis and progress towards a new global proteomics strategy that uses peptide accurate mass measurements augmented by information from separations (e.g. LC retention times) to provide large improvements in sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput. The use of ?accurate mass and time? (AMT) tags serves to eliminate the need for routine MS/MS measurements [#4109]. As the case study, we use our own research efforts to illustrate the role of AMTs within the broader context of a state-of-the-art proteomics effort. Our strategy exploits high-resolution capillary LC separations combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR). AMTs represent peptide biomarkers and can be used to confidently identify proteins based on the high mass measurement accuracy provided by FTICR combined with LC elution times. Once identified using MS/MS, these biomarkers provide the foundation for subsequent high throughput studies using only AMT tags to identify and quantify the proteins expressed within a cell system. Key attractions of this approach include the feasibility of completely automated high confidence protein identifications, extensive proteome coverage, and the capability for exploiting stable-isotope labeling methods for high precision abundance measurements [#4019]. Additional developments described in this review include methods for more effective coverage of membrane proteins [#4184], for dynamic range expansion of proteome measurements [#4012], and for multi-stage separations that promise to enable more focused analyses, further extend the quality of measurements, and also extend measurements to more complex proteomes.

  17. Encoding negative events under stress: high subjective arousal is related to accurate emotional memory despite misinformation exposure.

    PubMed

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; LaBar, Kevin S; Ryan, Lee; Jacobs, W Jake; Nadel, Lynn

    2014-07-01

    Stress at encoding affects memory processes, typically enhancing, or preserving, memory for emotional information. These effects have interesting implications for eyewitness accounts, which in real-world contexts typically involve encoding an aversive event under stressful conditions followed by potential exposure to misinformation. The present study investigated memory for a negative event encoded under stress and subsequent misinformation endorsement. Healthy young adults participated in a between-groups design with three experimental sessions conducted 48 h apart. Session one consisted of a psychosocial stress induction (or control task) followed by incidental encoding of a negative slideshow. During session two, participants were asked questions about the slideshow, during which a random subgroup was exposed to misinformation. Memory for the slideshow was tested during the third session. Assessment of memory accuracy across stress and no-stress groups revealed that stress induced just prior to encoding led to significantly better memory for the slideshow overall. The classic misinformation effect was also observed - participants exposed to misinformation were significantly more likely to endorse false information during memory testing. In the stress group, however, memory accuracy and misinformation effects were moderated by arousal experienced during encoding of the negative event. Misinformed-stress group participants who reported that the negative slideshow elicited high arousal during encoding were less likely to endorse misinformation for the most aversive phase of the story. Furthermore, these individuals showed better memory for components of the aversive slideshow phase that had been directly misinformed. Results from the current study provide evidence that stress and high subjective arousal elicited by a negative event act concomitantly during encoding to enhance emotional memory such that the most aversive aspects of the event are well remembered and

  18. Highly Accurate Infrared Line Lists of SO2 Isotopologues Computed for Atmospheric Modeling on Venus and Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Schwenke, D.; Lee, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Last year we reported a semi-empirical 32S16O2 spectroscopic line list (denoted Ames-296K) for its atmospheric characterization in Venus and other Exoplanetary environments. In order to facilitate the Sulfur isotopic ratio and Sulfur chemistry model determination, now we present Ames-296K line lists for both 626 (upgraded) and other 4 symmetric isotopologues: 636, 646, 666 and 828. The line lists are computed on an ab initio potential energy surface refined with most reliable high resolution experimental data, using a high quality CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV(Q+d)Z dipole moment surface. The most valuable part of our approach is to provide "truly reliable" predictions (and alternatives) for those unknown or hard-to-measure/analyze spectra. This strategy has guaranteed the lists are the best available alternative for those wide spectra region missing from spectroscopic databases such as HITRAN and GEISA, where only very limited data exist for 626/646 and no Infrared data at all for 636/666 or other minor isotopologues. Our general line position accuracy up to 5000 cm-1 is 0.01 - 0.02 cm-1 or better. Most transition intensity deviations are less than 5%, compare to experimentally measured quantities. Note that we have solved a convergence issue and further improved the quality and completeness of the main isotopologue 626 list at 296K. We will compare the lists to available models in CDMS/JPL/HITRAN and discuss the future mutually beneficial interactions between theoretical and experimental efforts.

  19. Development of an accurate and high-throughput methodology for structural comprehension of chlorophylls derivatives. (II) Dephytylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kewei; Ríos, José Julián; Roca, María; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2015-09-18

    Dephytylated chlorophylls (chlorophyllides and pheophorbides) are the starting point of the chlorophyll catabolism in green tissues, components of the chlorophyll pattern in storage/processed food vegetables, as well as the favoured structural arrangement for chlorophyll absorption. In addition, dephytylated native chlorophylls are prone to several modifications of their structure yielding pyro-, 13(2)-hydroxy- and 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone derivatives. Despite of these outstanding remarks only few of them have been analysed by MS(n). Besides new protocols for obtaining standards, we have developed a new high throughput methodology able to determine the fragmentation pathway of 16 dephytylated chlorophyll derivatives, elucidating the structures of the new product ions and new mechanisms of fragmentation. The new methodology combines, by first time, high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and powerful post-processing software. Native chlorophyllides and pheophorbides mainly exhibit product ions that involve the fragmentation of D ring, as well as additional exclusive product ions. The introduction of an oxygenated function at E ring enhances the progress of fragmentation reactions through the β-keto ester group, developing also exclusive product ions for 13(2)-hydroxy derivatives and for 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone ones. Consequently, while MS(2)-based reactions of phytylated chlorophyll derivatives point to fragmentations at the phytyl and propionic chains, dephytylated chlorophyll derivatives behave different as the absence of phytyl makes β-keto ester group and E ring more prone to fragmentation. Proposals of the key reaction mechanisms underlying the origin of new product ions have been made. PMID:26277027

  20. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  1. Accurate Cytotoxicity and Proliferation Determination: Advantages of a High-Throughput Phenotypic Approach Over ATP Luminescence Assays.

    PubMed

    Hammerstein, Anne F; Wylie, Paul G

    2016-09-01

    Cell viability and proliferation assays are a fundamental tool in the drug discovery process and are used to evaluate both the antiproliferative potency and toxicity of compounds. Some lead discovery groups generate cell viability data for up to two million compounds per screen, so any method used to assess these parameters needs to deliver not only on data quality but also on throughput and assay cost per well. Most methods used to determine cell viability cannot deliver on all three of these requirements, so compromises have to be made. Here we show the development and implementation of a cost-effective, no-wash phenotypic assay to simultaneously report the number of cells, percentage of live cells, and cell cycle phase distribution as markers of proliferation and viability. We demonstrate that this assay can be applied to high-density plate formats and be imaged and analyzed in 8 min per plate on a laser scanning imaging cytometer. By comparing the drug-responses of several well-characterized anticancer drugs on HeLa cells, we highlight the key differences between the phenotypic assay and a commercial ATP luminescence detection system. PMID:27504922

  2. A simple method for the accurate determination of the Henry's law constant for highly sorptive, semivolatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is developed to determine the Henry's law constants (HLCs) of seven volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with significantly high solubility using a combined application of thermal desorber/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). In light of the strong sorptive properties of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), their HLCs were determined by properly evaluating the fraction lost on the surface of the materials used to induce equilibrium (vial, gas-tight syringe, and sorption tube). To this end, a total of nine repeated experiments were conducted in a closed (static) system at three different gas/liquid volume ratios. The best estimates for HLCs (M/atm) were thus 7,200 (propionic acid), 4,700 (i-butyric acid), 4,400 (n-butyric acid), 2,700 (i-valeric acid), 2,400 (n-valeric acid), 1,000 (hexanoic acid), and 1,500 (heptanoic acid). The differences in the HLC values between this study and previous studies, if assessed in terms of the percent difference, ranged from 9.2% (n-valeric acid) to 55.7% (i-valeric acid). We overcame the main cause of errors encountered in previous studies by performing the proper correction of the sorptive losses of the SVOCs that inevitably took place, particularly on the walls of the equilibration systems (mainly the headspace vial and/or the glass tight syringe). PMID:26577086

  3. Development of an accurate and high-throughput methodology for structural comprehension of chlorophylls derivatives. (I) Phytylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kewei; Ríos, José Julián; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio; Roca, María

    2015-08-01

    Phytylated chlorophyll derivatives undergo specific oxidative reactions through the natural metabolism or during food processing or storage, and consequently pyro-, 13(2)-hydroxy-, 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone chlorophylls, and pheophytins (a and b) are originated. New analytical procedures have been developed here to reproduce controlled oxidation reactions that specifically, and in reasonable amounts, produce those natural target standards. At the same time and under the same conditions, 16 natural chlorophyll derivatives have been analyzed by APCI-HPLC-hrMS(2) and most of them by the first time. The combination of the high-resolution MS mode with powerful post-processing software has allowed the identification of new fragmentation patterns, characterizing specific product ions for some particular standards. In addition, new hypotheses and reaction mechanisms for the established MS(2)-based reactions have been proposed. As a general rule, the main product ions involve the phytyl and the propionic chains but the introduction of oxygenated functional groups at the isocyclic ring produces new and specific productions and at the same time inhibits some particular fragmentations. It is noteworthy that all b derivatives, except 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone compounds, undergo specific CO losses. We propose a new reaction mechanism based in the structural configuration of a and b chlorophyll derivatives that explain the exclusive CO fragmentation in all b series except for 15(1)-hydroxy-lactone b and all a series compounds. PMID:26091781

  4. Three-dimensional digital holographic aperture synthesis for rapid and highly-accurate large-volume metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Stephen; Kaylor, Brant M.; Barber, Zeb W.; Reibel, Randy R.

    2015-09-01

    Currently large volume, high accuracy three-dimensional (3D) metrology is dominated by laser trackers, which typically utilize a laser scanner and cooperative reflector to estimate points on a given surface. The dependency upon the placement of cooperative targets dramatically inhibits the speed at which metrology can be conducted. To increase speed, laser scanners or structured illumination systems can be used directly on the surface of interest. Both approaches are restricted in their axial and lateral resolution at longer stand-off distances due to the diffraction limit of the optics used. Holographic aperture ladar (HAL) and synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) can enhance the lateral resolution of an imaging system by synthesizing much larger apertures by digitally combining measurements from multiple smaller apertures. Both of these approaches only produce two-dimensional imagery and are therefore not suitable for large volume 3D metrology. We combined the SAL and HAL approaches to create a swept frequency digital holographic 3D imaging system that provides rapid measurement speed for surface coverage with unprecedented axial and lateral resolution at longer standoff ranges. The technique yields a "data cube" of Fourier domain data, which can be processed with a 3D Fourier transform to reveal a 3D estimate of the surface. In this paper, we provide the theoretical background for the technique and show experimental results based on an ultra-wideband frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) chirped heterodyne ranging system showing ~100 micron lateral and axial precisions at >2 m standoff distances.

  5. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  6. Highly precise and accurate terahertz polarization measurements based on electro-optic sampling with polarization modulation of probe pulses.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Natsuki; Higuchi, Takuya; Kanda, Natsuki; Konishi, Kuniaki; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2014-07-28

    We have developed an electro-optic (EO) sampling method with polarization modulation of probe pulses; this method allows us to measure the direction of a terahertz (THz) electric-field vector with a precision of 0.1 mrad in a data acquisition time of 660 ms using a 14.0-kHz repetition rate pulsed light source. Through combination with a THz time-domain spectroscopy technique, a time-dependent two-dimensional THz electric field was obtained. We used a photoelastic modulator for probe-polarization modulation and a (111)-oriented zincblende crystal as the EO crystal. Using the tilted pulse front excitation method with stable regeneratively amplified pulses, we prepared stable and intense THz pulses and performed pulse-by-pulse analog-to-digital conversion of the signals. These techniques significantly reduced statistical errors and enabled sub-mrad THz polarization measurements. We examined the performance of this method by measuring a wire-grid polarizer as a sample. The present method will open a new frontier of high-precision THz polarization sensitive measurements. PMID:25089412

  7. Assessment of a sponge layer as a non-reflective boundary treatment with highly accurate gust–airfoil interaction results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellini, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the numerical performance of a sponge layer as a non-reflective boundary condition. This technique is well known and widely adopted, but only recently have the reasons for a sponge failure been recognised, in analysis by Mani. For multidimensional problems, the ineffectiveness of the method is due to the self-reflections of the sponge occurring when it interacts with an oblique acoustic wave. Based on his theoretical investigations, Mani gives some useful guidelines for implementing effective sponge layers. However, in our opinion, some practical indications are still missing from the current literature. Here, an extensive numerical study of the performance of this technique is presented. Moreover, we analyse a reduced sponge implementation characterised by undamped partial differential equations for the velocity components. The main aim of this paper relies on the determination of the minimal width of the layer, as well as of the corresponding strength, required to obtain a reflection error of no more than a few per cent of that observed when solving the same problem on the same grid, but without employing the sponge layer term. For this purpose, a test case of computational aeroacoustics, the single airfoil gust response problem, has been addressed in several configurations. As a direct consequence of our investigation, we present a well documented and highly validated reference solution for the far-field acoustic intensity, a result that is not well established in the literature. Lastly, the proof of the accuracy of an algorithm for coupling sub-domains solved by the linear and non-liner Euler governing equations is given. This result is here exploited to adopt a linear-based sponge layer even in a non-linear computation.

  8. A comparative study of multi-sensor data fusion methods for highly accurate assessment of manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Ammar; Kohler, Sophie; Lallement, Alex; Hirsch, Ernest

    2015-04-01

    3D modeling of scene contents takes an increasing importance for many computer vision based applications. In particular, industrial applications of computer vision require efficient tools for the computation of this 3D information. Routinely, stereo-vision is a powerful technique to obtain the 3D outline of imaged objects from the corresponding 2D images. As a consequence, this approach provides only a poor and partial description of the scene contents. On another hand, for structured light based reconstruction techniques, 3D surfaces of imaged objects can often be computed with high accuracy. However, the resulting active range data in this case lacks to provide data enabling to characterize the object edges. Thus, in order to benefit from the positive points of various acquisition techniques, we introduce in this paper promising approaches, enabling to compute complete 3D reconstruction based on the cooperation of two complementary acquisition and processing techniques, in our case stereoscopic and structured light based methods, providing two 3D data sets describing respectively the outlines and surfaces of the imaged objects. We present, accordingly, the principles of three fusion techniques and their comparison based on evaluation criterions related to the nature of the workpiece and also the type of the tackled application. The proposed fusion methods are relying on geometric characteristics of the workpiece, which favour the quality of the registration. Further, the results obtained demonstrate that the developed approaches are well adapted for 3D modeling of manufactured parts including free-form surfaces and, consequently quality control applications using these 3D reconstructions.

  9. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  10. A system for optically controlling neural circuits with very high spatial and temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Pandarinath, Chethan; Carlson, Eric T.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics offers a powerful new approach for controlling neural circuits. It has a vast array of applications in both basic and clinical science. For basic science, it opens the door to unraveling circuit operations, since one can perturb specific circuit components with high spatial (single cell) and high temporal (millisecond) resolution. For clinical applications, it allows new kinds of selective treatments, because it provides a method to inactivate or activate specific components in a malfunctioning circuit and bring it back into a normal operating range [1–3]. To harness the power of optogenetics, though, one needs stimulating tools that work with the same high spatial and temporal resolution as the molecules themselves, the channelrhodopsins. To date, most stimulating tools require a tradeoff between spatial and temporal precision and are prohibitively expensive to integrate into a stimulating/recording setup in a laboratory or a device in a clinical setting [4, 5]. Here we describe a Digital Light Processing (DLP)-based system capable of extremely high temporal resolution (sub-millisecond), without sacrificing spatial resolution. Furthermore, it is constructed using off-the-shelf components, making it feasible for a broad range of biology and bioengineering labs. Using transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrate the system’s capability for stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons in tissue with single cell and sub-millisecond precision. PMID:25699292

  11. High Spatial Resolution Isotope Ratio Imaging and 3D Reconstruction of Presolar SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Henkel, T.; Clarke, A.

    2015-07-01

    Presolar SiC grains have been analysed with a new NanoSIMS for isotope ratio measurements of C, N and Si. High spatial resolution imaging suggests that nitrogen isotope heterogeneity within the grains may lead to anomalous results in the literature.

  12. Spatially Resolved Thermal Analysis of High Power LEDs Using Thermoreflectance Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hexuan; Al-Hemyari, Kadhair; Yan, Susu; Summers, Joseph; Hudgings, Janice

    2012-02-01

    The efficiency, reliability, and lifetime of high power light emitting diodes (LEDs) depend critically on their operating temperature. The lateral temperature distribution is of particular importance with large area, high power LEDs as defects related to overheating in high power LEDs usually occur at a high rate at the surface. In this work, we present the use of lock-in thermoreflectance imaging to measure the spatially resolved surface thermal distribution of operating LEDs. This non-invasive thermography technique offers high spatial and thermal resolutions. We show that results of thermoreflectance surface temperature are quantitatively consistent with temperature measurements obtained using forward voltage bias and wavelength shift techniques. We demonstrate the power of spatially resolved thermoreflectance by imaging the highly non-uniform surface temperature distribution of an operating LED at high electrical bias power. We conclude that the non-uniform surface temperature distribution is resulted from non-uniformly distributed inject current and overheating at the contacts. We also investigate the thermal impact of encapsulating commercial LEDs with a plastic lens and silicone epoxy.

  13. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-02-01

    Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to identify the spatial resolution limitations and assess the minimal detectable mass restrictions in laser-ablation based chemical analysis. The atomic emission of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) dopants in transparent dielectric Mica matrices was studied, to find that both these elements could be detected from 450 nm diameter ablation craters, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Under optimal conditions, mass as low as 220 ag was measured, demonstrating the feasibility of using laser-ablation based chemical analysis to achieve high spatial resolution elemental analysis in real-time and at atmospheric pressure conditions.

  14. Characterization of a High Efficiency, Ultrashort Pulse Shaper Incorporating a Reflective 4096-Element Spatial Light Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Planchon, Thomas A.; Amir, Wafa; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate pulse shaping via arbitrary phase modulation with a reflective, 1×4096 element, liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The unique construction of this device provides a very high efficiency when the device is used for phase modulation only in a prism based pulse shaper, namely 85%. We also present a single shot characterization of the SLM in the spatial domain and a single shot characterization of the pulse shaper in the spectral domain. These characterization methods provide a detailed picture of how the SLM modifies the spectral phase of an ultrashort pulse. PMID:19562096

  15. Characterization of a high efficiency, ultrashort pulse shaper incorporating a reflective 4096-element spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Jeffrey J.; Planchon, Thomas A.; Amir, Wafa; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate pulse shaping via arbitrary phase modulation with a reflective, 1 × 4096 element, liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The unique construction of this device provides a very high efficiency when the device is used for phase modulation only in a prism based pulse shaper, namely 85%. We also present a single shot characterization of the SLM in the spatial domain and a single shot characterization of the pulse shaper in the spectral domain. These characterization methods provide a detailed picture of how the SLM modifies the spectral phase of an ultrashort pulse.

  16. Quantitative phase imaging of biological cells using spatially low and temporally high coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Azeem; Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Singh, Veena; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of biological samples, such as human red blood cells (RBCs) and onion cells using narrow temporal frequency and wide angular frequency spectrum light source. This type of light source was synthesized by the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity of speckle reduction technique. The importance of using low spatial and high temporal coherence light source over the broad band and narrow band light source is that it does not require any dispersion compensation mechanism for biological samples. Further, it avoids the formation of speckle or spurious fringes which arises while using narrow band light source. PMID:27192285

  17. Transverse free vibrations of right triangular thin plates with combinations of clamped and simply supported boundary conditions: a highly accurate simplified solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, H. T.

    1995-06-01

    The practical engineering problem of right angled triangular plates with combinations of clamped and simply supported boundary conditions is dealt with in this paper. A highly accurate, economical and practical solution is used for the transverse free vibration analysis of these plates. The solution is based on a modified superposition method. The accuracy of the solution is discussed. Numerical results are compared with previously published reliable data. The advantages of the solution used in the paper over previously published solutions are discussed. Eigenvalues, mode shapes and contour plots are provided for a large number of plates.

  18. High-resolution wavefront control using liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Brase, J M; Brown, C G; Cooke, J B; Kartz, M W; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M; Silva, D A

    1999-07-20

    Liquid crystal spatial light modulator technology appropriate for high-resolution wavefront control has recently become commercially available. Some of these devices have several hundred thousand controllable degrees of freedom, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the largest conventional deformable mirror. We will present results of experiments to characterize the optical properties of these devices and to utilize them to correct aberrations in an optical system. We will also present application scenarios for these devices in high-power laser systems.

  19. Spatial correlation of high-energy grain boundaries in two-dimensional simulated polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton DeW. Van Siclen

    2007-02-01

    A polycrystal undergoes microstructural changes to reach a lower energy state. In particular, the system evolves so as to reduce the total grain boundary energy. A simple two-dimensional model of a polycrystal comprised of randomly oriented crystalline grains suggests that energy minimization reduces or eliminates any spatial correlation among high-energy grain boundaries. Thus grain boundary engineering not only reduces the density of high-energy boundaries, but it prevents their organization into a coarse, albeit discontinuous, network.

  20. Effects of high-pass and low-pass spatial filtering on face identification.

    PubMed

    Costen, N P; Parker, D M; Craw, I

    1996-05-01

    If face images are degraded by block averaging, there is a nonlinear decline in recognition accuracy as block size increases, suggesting that identification requires a critical minimum range of object spatial frequencies. The identification of faces was measured with equivalent Fourier low-pass filtering and block averaging preserving the same information and with high-pass transformations. In Experiment 1, accuracy declined and response time increased in a significant nonlinear manner in all cases as the spatial-frequency range was reduced. However, it did so at a faster rate for the quantized and high-passed images. A second experiment controlled for the differences in the contrast of the high-pass faces and found a reduced but significant and nonlinear decline in performance as the spatial-frequency range was reduced. These data suggest that face identification is preferentially supported by a band of spatial frequencies of approximately 8-16 cycles per face; contrast or line-based explanations were found to be inadequate. The data are discussed in terms of current models of face identification. PMID:8934690

  1. High Resolution Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Traffic-Related Air Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Ganguly, Rajiv; Harbin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle traffic is one of the most significant emission sources of air pollutants in urban areas. While the influence of mobile source emissions is felt throughout an urban area, concentrations from mobile emissions can be highest near major roadways. At present, information regarding the spatial and temporal patterns and the share of pollution attributable to traffic-related air pollutants is limited, in part due to concentrations that fall sharply with distance from roadways, as well as the few monitoring sites available in cities. This study uses a newly developed dispersion model (RLINE) and a spatially and temporally resolved emissions inventory to predict hourly PM2.5 and NOx concentrations across Detroit (MI, USA) at very high spatial resolution. Results for annual averages and high pollution days show contrasting patterns, the need for spatially resolved analyses, and the limitations of surrogate metrics like proximity or distance to roads. Data requirements, computational and modeling issues are discussed. High resolution pollutant data enable the identification of pollutant “hotspots”, “project-level” analyses of transportation options, development of exposure measures for epidemiology studies, delineation of vulnerable and susceptible populations, policy analyses examining risks and benefits of mitigation options, and the development of sustainability indicators integrating environmental, social, economic and health information. PMID:25837345

  2. High cognitive reserve is associated with a reduced age-related deficit in spatial conflict resolution

    PubMed Central

    Puccioni, Olga; Vallesi, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Several studies support the existence of a specific age-related difficulty in suppressing potentially distracting information. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether spatial conflict resolution is selectively affected by aging. The way aging affects individuals could be modulated by many factors determined by the socieconomic status: we investigated whether factors such as cognitive reserve (CR) and years of education may play a compensatory role against age-related deficits in the spatial domain. A spatial Stroop task with no feature repetitions was administered to a sample of 17 non-demented older adults (69–79 years-old) and 18 younger controls (18–34 years-old) matched for gender and years of education. The two age groups were also administered with measures of intelligence and CR. The overall spatial Stroop effect did not differ according to age, neither for speed nor for accuracy. The two age groups equally showed sequential effects for congruent trials: reduced response times (RTs) if another congruent trial preceded them, and accuracy at ceiling. For incongruent trials, older adults, but not younger controls, were influenced by congruency of trialn−1, since RTs increased with preceding congruent trials. Interestingly, such an age-related modulation negatively correlated with CR. These findings suggest that spatial conflict resolution in aging is predominantly affected by general slowing, rather than by a more specific deficit. However, a high level of CR seems to play a compensatory role for both factors. PMID:23248595

  3. Classification of high resolution satellite images using spatial constraints-based fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pankaj Pratap; Garg, Rahul Dev

    2014-01-01

    A spatial constraints-based fuzzy clustering technique is introduced in the paper and the target application is classification of high resolution multispectral satellite images. This fuzzy-C-means (FCM) technique enhances the classification results with the help of a weighted membership function (Wmf). Initially, spatial fuzzy clustering (FC) is used to segment the targeted vegetation areas with the surrounding low vegetation areas, which include the information of spatial constraints (SCs). The performance of the FCM image segmentation is subject to appropriate initialization of Wmf and SC. It is able to evolve directly from the initial segmentation by spatial fuzzy clustering. The controlling parameters in fuzziness of the FCM approach, Wmf and SC, help to estimate the segmented road results, then the Stentiford thinning algorithm is used to estimate the road network from the classified results. Such improvements facilitate FCM method manipulation and lead to segmentation that is more robust. The results confirm its effectiveness for satellite image classification, which extracts useful information in suburban and urban areas. The proposed approach, spatial constraint-based fuzzy clustering with a weighted membership function (SCFCWmf), has been used to extract the information of healthy trees with vegetation and shadows showing elevated features in satellite images. The performance values of quality assessment parameters show a good degree of accuracy for segmented roads using the proposed hybrid SCFCWmf-MO (morphological operations) approach which also occluded nonroad parts.

  4. Spatial drought reconstructions for central High Asia based on tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Keyan; Davi, Nicole; Gou, Xiaohua; Chen, Fahu; Cook, Edward; Li, Jinbao; D'Arrigo, Rosanne

    2010-11-01

    Spatial reconstructions of drought for central High Asia based on a tree-ring network are presented. Drought patterns for central High Asia are classified into western and eastern modes of variability. Tree-ring based reconstructions of the Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) are presented for both the western central High Asia drought mode (1587-2005), and for the eastern central High Asia mode (1660-2005). Both reconstructions, generated using a principal component regression method, show an increased variability in recent decades. The wettest epoch for both reconstructions occurred from the 1940s to the 1950s. The most extreme reconstructed drought for western central High Asia was from the 1640s to the 1650s, coinciding with the collapse of the Chinese Ming Dynasty. The eastern central High Asia reconstruction has shown a distinct tendency towards drier conditions since the 1980s. Our spatial reconstructions agree well with previous reconstructions that fall within each mode, while there is no significant correlation between the two spatial reconstructions.

  5. High-Resolution Spatial Distribution and Estimation of Access to Improved Sanitation in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng; Anderson, John D.; Leitner, Michael; Rheingans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to sanitation facilities is imperative in reducing the risk of multiple adverse health outcomes. A distinct disparity in sanitation exists among different wealth levels in many low-income countries, which may hinder the progress across each of the Millennium Development Goals. Methods The surveyed households in 397 clusters from 2008–2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Surveys were divided into five wealth quintiles based on their national asset scores. A series of spatial analysis methods including excess risk, local spatial autocorrelation, and spatial interpolation were applied to observe disparities in coverage of improved sanitation among different wealth categories. The total number of the population with improved sanitation was estimated by interpolating, time-adjusting, and multiplying the surveyed coverage rates by high-resolution population grids. A comparison was then made with the annual estimates from United Nations Population Division and World Health Organization /United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Program for Water Supply and Sanitation. Results The Empirical Bayesian Kriging interpolation produced minimal root mean squared error for all clusters and five quintiles while predicting the raw and spatial coverage rates of improved sanitation. The coverage in southern regions was generally higher than in the north and east, and the coverage in the south decreased from Nairobi in all directions, while Nyanza and North Eastern Province had relatively poor coverage. The general clustering trend of high and low sanitation improvement among surveyed clusters was confirmed after spatial smoothing. Conclusions There exists an apparent disparity in sanitation among different wealth categories across Kenya and spatially smoothed coverage rates resulted in a closer estimation of the available statistics than raw coverage rates. Future intervention activities need to be tailored for both different wealth categories and nationally

  6. Development of a portable deflectometry system for high spatial resolution surface measurements.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Alejandro V; Su, Peng; Burge, James H

    2014-06-20

    The Slope-Measuring Portable Optical Test System (SPOTS) is a new, portable, high-resolution, deflectometry device that achieves mid to high (20 to 1000 cyc/m) spatial frequency optical surface metrology with very little filtering and very little noise. Using a proof of concept system, we achieved 1 nm RMS surface accuracy for mid to high spatial frequencies, and 300 nrad RMS slope precision. SPOTS offers a turnkey solution for measuring errors on a wide variety of optical surfaces including the large mirrors fabricated at The University of Arizona. This paper defines and discusses SPOTS, including the principles of operation, measurement modes, design, performance, error analysis, and experimental results. PMID:24979436

  7. Detection of Local Anomalies in High Resolution Hyperspectral Imagery Using Geostatistical Filtering and Local Spatial Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goovaerts, P.; Jacquez, G. M.; Marcus, A. W.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial data are periodically collected and processed to monitor, analyze and interpret developments in our changing environment. Remote sensing is a modern way of data collecting and has seen an enormous growth since launching of modern satellites and development of airborne sensors. In particular, the recent availability of high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery (spatial resolution of less than 5 meters and including data collected over 64 or more bands of electromagnetic radiation for each pixel offers a great potential to significantly enhance environmental mapping and our ability to model spatial systems. High spatial resolution imagery contains a remarkable quantity of information that could be used to analyze spatial breaks (boundaries), areas of similarity (clusters), and spatial autocorrelation (associations) across the landscape. This paper addresses the specific issue of soil disturbance detection, which could indicate the presence of land mines or recent movements of troop and heavy equipment. A challenge presented by soil detection is to retain the measurement of fine-scale features (i.e. mineral soil changes, organic content changes, vegetation disturbance related changes, aspect changes) while still covering proportionally large spatial areas. An additional difficulty is that no ground data might be available for the calibration of spectral signatures, and little might be known about the size of patches of disturbed soils to be detected. This paper describes a new technique for automatic target detection which capitalizes on both spatial and across spectral bands correlation, does not require any a priori information on the target spectral signature but does not allow discrimination between targets. This approach involves successively a multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis) of all spectral bands, a geostatistical filtering of noise and regional background in the first principal components using factorial kriging, and

  8. Super-smooth optical fabrication controlling high-spatial frequency surface irregularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo, Javier; Kim, Dae Wook; Burge, James H.

    2013-09-01

    Modern advanced optical systems often require challenging high spatial frequency surface error control during their optical fabrication processes. While the large scale surface figure error can be controlled by directed material removal processes such as small tool figuring, surface finish (<<1mm scales) is controlled with the polishing process. For large aspheric optical systems, surface shape irregularities of a few millimeters in scale may cause serious performance degradation in terms of scattered light background noise and high contrast imaging capability. The conventional surface micro roughness concept in Root Mean Square (RMS) over a very high spatial frequency range (e.g. RMS of 0.5 by 0.5 mm local surface map with 500 by 500 pixels) is not sufficient to describe or specify these surface characteristics. For various experimental polishing conditions, we investigate the process control for high frequency surface errors with periods up to ~2-3mm. The Power Spectral Density of the finished optical surfaces has been measured and analyzed to relate various computer controlled optical surfacing parameters (e.g. polishing interface materials) with the high spatial frequency errors on the surface. The experiment-based optimal polishing conditions and processes producing a super smooth optical surface while controlling surface irregularity at the millimeter range are presented.

  9. Lipid Suppression in CSI with Spatial Priors and Highly Undersampled Peripheral k-space

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Berkin; Gagoski, Borjan; Kok, Trina; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2012-01-01

    Mapping 1H brain metabolites using chemical shift imaging (CSI) is hampered by the presence of subcutaneous lipid signals, which contaminate the metabolites by ringing due to limited spatial resolution. Even though CSI at spatial resolution high enough to mitigate the lipid artifacts is infeasible due to signal-to-noise (SNR) constraints on the metabolites, the lipid signals have orders of magnitude higher concentration, which enables the collection of high-resolution lipid maps with adequate SNR. The previously proposed dual-density approach exploits this high-SNR property of the lipid layer to suppress truncation artifacts using high-resolution lipid maps. Another recent approach for lipid suppression makes use of the fact that metabolite and lipid spectra are approximately orthogonal, and seeks sparse metabolite spectra when projected onto lipid-basis functions. The present work combines and extends the dual-density approach and the lipid-basis penalty, while estimating the high-resolution lipid image from 2-average k-space data to incur minimal increase on the scan time. Further, we exploit the spectral-spatial sparsity of the lipid ring and propose to estimate it from substantially undersampled (acceleration R = 10 in the peripheral k-space) 2-average in vivo data using compressed sensing, and still obtain improved lipid suppression relative to using dual-density or lipid-basis penalty alone. PMID:22807147

  10. Multi-resolution analysis of high density spatial and temporal cloud inhomogeneity fields from HOPE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Madhavan, Bomidi; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Clouds are the most complex structures in both spatial and temporal scales of the Earth's atmosphere that effect the downward surface reaching fluxes and thus contribute to large uncertainty in the global radiation budget. Within the framework of High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), a high density network of 99 pyranometer stations was set up around Jülich, Germany (~ 10 × 12 km2 area) during April to July 2013 to capture the small-scale variability in cloud induced radiation fields at the surface. In this study, we perform multi-resolution analysis of the downward solar irradiance variability at the surface from the pyranometer network to investigate the dependence of temporal and spatial averaging scales on the variance and spatial correlation for different cloud regimes. Preliminary results indicate that correlation is strongly scale-dependent where as the variance is dependent on the length of averaging period. Implications of our findings will be useful for quantifying the effect of spatial collocation while validating the satellite inferred solar irradiance estimates, and also to explore the link between cloud structure and radiation. We will present the details of our analysis and results.

  11. Repeatable, accurate, and high speed multi-level programming of memristor 1T1R arrays for power efficient analog computing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle J.; Dávila, Noraica; Ge, Ning; Williams, R. Stanley; Strachan, John Paul

    2016-09-01

    Beyond use as high density non-volatile memories, memristors have potential as synaptic components of neuromorphic systems. We investigated the suitability of tantalum oxide (TaO x ) transistor-memristor (1T1R) arrays for such applications, particularly the ability to accurately, repeatedly, and rapidly reach arbitrary conductance states. Programming is performed by applying an adaptive pulsed algorithm that utilizes the transistor gate voltage to control the SET switching operation and increase programming speed of the 1T1R cells. We show the capability of programming 64 conductance levels with <0.5% average accuracy using 100 ns pulses and studied the trade-offs between programming speed and programming error. The algorithm is also utilized to program 16 conductance levels on a population of cells in the 1T1R array showing robustness to cell-to-cell variability. In general, the proposed algorithm results in approximately 10× improvement in programming speed over standard algorithms that do not use the transistor gate to control memristor switching. In addition, after only two programming pulses (an initialization pulse followed by a programming pulse), the resulting conductance values are within 12% of the target values in all cases. Finally, endurance of more than 106 cycles is shown through open-loop (single pulses) programming across multiple conductance levels using the optimized gate voltage of the transistor. These results are relevant for applications that require high speed, accurate, and repeatable programming of the cells such as in neural networks and analog data processing.

  12. Repeatable, accurate, and high speed multi-level programming of memristor 1T1R arrays for power efficient analog computing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle J.; Dávila, Noraica; Ge, Ning; Williams, R. Stanley; Strachan, John Paul

    2016-09-01

    Beyond use as high density non-volatile memories, memristors have potential as synaptic components of neuromorphic systems. We investigated the suitability of tantalum oxide (TaOx) transistor-memristor (1T1R) arrays for such applications, particularly the ability to accurately, repeatedly, and rapidly reach arbitrary conductance states. Programming is performed by applying an adaptive pulsed algorithm that utilizes the transistor gate voltage to control the SET switching operation and increase programming speed of the 1T1R cells. We show the capability of programming 64 conductance levels with <0.5% average accuracy using 100 ns pulses and studied the trade-offs between programming speed and programming error. The algorithm is also utilized to program 16 conductance levels on a population of cells in the 1T1R array showing robustness to cell-to-cell variability. In general, the proposed algorithm results in approximately 10× improvement in programming speed over standard algorithms that do not use the transistor gate to control memristor switching. In addition, after only two programming pulses (an initialization pulse followed by a programming pulse), the resulting conductance values are within 12% of the target values in all cases. Finally, endurance of more than 106 cycles is shown through open-loop (single pulses) programming across multiple conductance levels using the optimized gate voltage of the transistor. These results are relevant for applications that require high speed, accurate, and repeatable programming of the cells such as in neural networks and analog data processing.

  13. Improving High-resolution Spatial Estimates of Precipitation in the Equatorial Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdin, A.; Rajagopalan, B.; Funk, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Drought and flood management practices require accurate estimates of precipitation in space and time. However, data is sparse in regions with complicated terrain (such as the Equatorial Americas), often in valleys (where people farm), and of poor quality. Consequently, extreme precipitation events are poorly represented. Satellite-derived rainfall data is an attractive alternative in such regions and is being widely used, though it too suffers from problems such as underestimation of extreme events (due to its dependency on retrieval algorithms) and the indirect relationship between satellite radiation observations and precipitation intensities. Thus, it seems appropriate to blend satellite-derived rainfall data of extensive spatial coverage with rain gauge data in order to provide a more robust estimate of precipitation. To this end, in this research we offer three techniques to blend rain gauge data and the Climate Hazards group InfraRed Precipitation (CHIRP) satellite-derived precipitation estimate for Central America and Colombia. In the first two methods, the gauge data is assigned to the closest CHIRP grid point, where the error is defined as r = Yobs - Ysat. The spatial structure of r is then modeled using physiographic information (Easting, Northing, and Elevation) by two methods (i) a traditional Cokriging approach whose variogram is calculated in Euclidean space and (ii) a nonparametric method based on local polynomial functional estimation. The models are used to estimate r at all grid points, which is then added to the CHIRP, thus creating an improved satellite estimate. We demonstrate these methods by applying them to pentadal and monthly total precipitation fields during 2009. The models' predictive abilities and their ability to capture extremes are investigated. These blending methods significantly improve upon the satellite-derived estimates and are also competitive in their ability to capture extreme precipitation. The above methods assume

  14. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  15. High dimensional spatial modeling of extremes with applications to United States Rainfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie

    2007-12-01

    Spatial statistical models are used to predict unobserved variables based on observed variables and to estimate unknown model parameters. Extreme value theory(EVT) is used to study large or small observations from a random phenomenon. Both spatial statistics and extreme value theory have been studied in a lot of areas such as agriculture, finance, industry and environmental science. This dissertation proposes two spatial statistical models which concentrate on non-Gaussian probability densities with general spatial covariance structures. The two models are also applied in analyzing United States Rainfalls and especially, rainfall extremes. When the data set is not too large, the first model is used. The model constructs a generalized linear mixed model(GLMM) which can be considered as an extension of Diggle's model-based geostatistical approach(Diggle et al. 1998). The approach improves conventional kriging with a form of generalized linear mixed structure. As for high dimensional problems, two different methods are established to improve the computational efficiency of Markov Chain Monte Carlo(MCMC) implementation. The first method is based on spectral representation of spatial dependence structures which provides good approximations on each MCMC iteration. The other method embeds high dimensional covariance matrices in matrices with block circulant structures. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of block circulant matrices can be calculated exactly by Fast Fourier Transforms(FFT). The computational efficiency is gained by transforming the posterior matrices into lower dimensional matrices. This method gives us exact update on each MCMC iteration. Future predictions are also made by keeping spatial dependence structures fixed and using the relationship between present days and future days provided by some Global Climate Model(GCM). The predictions are refined by sampling techniques. Both ways of handling high dimensional covariance matrices are novel to analyze large

  16. An Accurate Quartic Force Field, Fundamental Frequencies, and Binding Energy for the High Energy Density Material T(d)N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CCSD(T) method has been used to compute a highly accurate quartic force field and fundamental frequencies for all N-14 and N-15 isotopomers of the high energy density material T(sub d)N(sub 4). The computed fundamental frequencies show beyond doubt that the bands observed in a matrix isolation experiment by Radziszewski and coworkers are not due to different isotopomers of T(sub d)N(sub 4). The most sophisticated thermochemical calculations to date yield a N(sub 4) -> 2N(sub 2) heat of reaction of 182.22 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol at 0 K (180.64 +/- 0.5 at 298 K). It is hoped that the data reported herein will aid in the ultimate detection of T(sub d)N(sub 4).

  17. Improving spatial-resolution in high cone-angle micro-CT by source deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heyang; Kingston, Andrew; Myers, Glenn; Recur, Benoit; Turner, Michael; Sheppard, Andrian

    2014-09-01

    Micro scale computed tomography (CT) can resolve many features in cellular structures, bone formations, minerals properties and composite materials not seen at lower spatial-resolution. Those features enable us to build a more comprehensive model for the object of interest. CT resolution is limited by a fundamental trade off between source size and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given acquisition time. There is a limit on the X-ray flux that can be emitted from a certain source size, and fewer photons cause a lower SNR. A large source size creates penumbral blurring in the radiograph, limiting the effective spatial-resolution in the reconstruction. High cone-angle CT improves SNR by increasing the X-ray solid angle that passes through the sample. In the high cone-angle regime current source deblurring methods break down due to incomplete modelling of the physical process. This paper presents high cone-angle source de-blurring models. We implement these models using a novel multi-slice Richardson-Lucy (M-RL) and 3D Conjugate Gradient deconvolution on experimental high cone-angle data to improve the spatial-resolution of the reconstructed volume. In M-RL, we slice the back projection volume into subsets which can be considered to have a relative uniform convolution kernel. We compare these results to those obtained from standard reconstruction techniques and current source deblurring methods (i.e. 2D Richardson-Lucy in the radiograph and the volume respectively).

  18. Feasibility study for reconstructing the spatial-temporal structure of TIDs from high-resolution backscatter ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickisch, L. J.; Fridman, Sergey; Hausman, Mark; San Antonio, Geoffrey S.

    2016-05-01

    Over-the-horizon radar (OTHR) utilizes the reflective "sky wave" property of the ionosphere for high-frequency radiowaves to illuminate targets at ranges extending to several thousand kilometers. However, the ionospheric "mirror" is not static but exhibits geographic, diurnal, seasonal, and solar cycle variations. NorthWest Research Associates has developed an ionospheric data assimilation capability called Global Positioning Satellite Ionospheric Inversion (GPSII; pronounced "gypsy") that allows real-time modeling of the ionospheric structure for the purpose of accurate coordinate registration (CR; OTHR geolocation). However, the ionosphere is routinely subjected to traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), and the deflection of HF sky wave signals by unmodeled TIDs remains a troubling source of CR errors (tens of kilometers). Traditional OTHR tools for ionospheric sounding (vertical and backscatter ionograms) do not resolve the fine spatial structure associated with TIDs. The collection of backscatter ionograms using the full aperture of the OTHR was recently demonstrated, thus providing enhanced resolution in radar azimuth in comparison with conventional OTHR backscatter soundings that utilize only a fraction of the OTHR receiver array. Leading edges of such backscatter ionograms demonstrate prominent spatial features associated with TIDs. We investigate the feasibility of recovering TID perturbations of ionospheric electron density from high-resolution backscatter ionograms. We incorporated a model of naturally occurring TIDs into a numerical ray tracing code that allows the generation of synthetic OTHR data. We augmented GPSII to assimilate time series of full-aperture backscatter ionogram leading edge data. Results of the simulation show that GPSII is able to reproduce the TID structure used to generate the backscatter ionograms reasonably well.

  19. Diffraction efficiency improvement in high spatial frequency holographic gratings stored in PVA/AA photopolymers: several ACPA concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Elena; Fuentes, Rosa; Ortuño, Manuel; Beléndez, Augusto; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    High spatial frequency in holographic gratings is difficult to obtain due to limitations of the recording material. In this paper, the results obtained after storing holographic transmission gratings with a spatial frequency of 2656 lines/mm in a material based on polyvinyl alcohol and acrylamide (PVA/AA) are presented. A chain transfer agent, 4, 4‧-azobis (4-cyanopentanoic acid) (ACPA) was incorporated in the composition of the material to improve the response of the material at a high spatial frequency. Different concentrations of ACPA were used in order to find the optimal concentration giving maximum diffraction efficiency for high spatial frequencies.

  20. Directional RNA-seq reveals highly complex condition-dependent transcriptomes in E. coli K12 through accurate full-length transcripts assembling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although prokaryotic gene transcription has been studied over decades, many aspects of the process remain poorly understood. Particularly, recent studies have revealed that transcriptomes in many prokaryotes are far more complex than previously thought. Genes in an operon are often alternatively and dynamically transcribed under different conditions, and a large portion of genes and intergenic regions have antisense RNA (asRNA) and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts, respectively. Ironically, similar studies have not been conducted in the model bacterium E coli K12, thus it is unknown whether or not the bacterium possesses similar complex transcriptomes. Furthermore, although RNA-seq becomes the major method for analyzing the complexity of prokaryotic transcriptome, it is still a challenging task to accurately assemble full length transcripts using short RNA-seq reads. Results To fill these gaps, we have profiled the transcriptomes of E. coli K12 under different culture conditions and growth phases using a highly specific directional RNA-seq technique that can capture various types of transcripts in the bacterial cells, combined with a highly accurate and robust algorithm and tool TruHMM (http://bioinfolab.uncc.edu/TruHmm_package/) for assembling full length transcripts. We found that 46.9 ~ 63.4% of expressed operons were utilized in their putative alternative forms, 72.23 ~ 89.54% genes had putative asRNA transcripts and 51.37 ~ 72.74% intergenic regions had putative ncRNA transcripts under different culture conditions and growth phases. Conclusions As has been demonstrated in many other prokaryotes, E. coli K12 also has a highly complex and dynamic transcriptomes under different culture conditions and growth phases. Such complex and dynamic transcriptomes might play important roles in the physiology of the bacterium. TruHMM is a highly accurate and robust algorithm for assembling full-length transcripts in prokaryotes using directional RNA

  1. Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of High-Resolution Animal Networks: What Can We Learn from Domestic Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi; Ilany, Amiyaal; White, Brad J.; Sanderson, Michael W.; Lanzas, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Animal social network is the key to understand many ecological and epidemiological processes. We used real-time location system (RTLS) to accurately track cattle position, analyze their proximity networks, and tested the hypothesis of temporal stationarity and spatial homogeneity in these networks during different daily time periods and in different areas of the pen. The network structure was analyzed using global network characteristics (network density), subgroup clustering (modularity), triadic property (transitivity), and dyadic interactions (correlation coefficient from a quadratic assignment procedure) at hourly level. We demonstrated substantial spatial-temporal heterogeneity in these networks and potential link between indirect animal-environment contact and direct animal-animal contact. But such heterogeneity diminished if data were collected at lower spatial (aggregated at entire pen level) or temporal (aggregated at daily level) resolution. The network structure (described by the characteristics such as density, modularity, transitivity, etc.) also changed substantially at different time and locations. There were certain time (feeding) and location (hay) that the proximity network structures were more consistent based on the dyadic interaction analysis. These results reveal new insights for animal network structure and spatial-temporal dynamics, provide more accurate descriptions of animal social networks, and allow more accurate modeling of multiple (both direct and indirect) disease transmission pathways. PMID:26107251

  2. Measurement of residual stresses on ceramic materials with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Ruud, C.O.; Fitting, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    A fast x-ray diffraction technique has been developed for measuring the residual stresses with high spatial resolution in ceramic materials. This resolution is limited by the mean size of grains and the radiation type. The effective diffraction elastic constants were experimentally determined for alumina as (E/l+{nu})){sub (1016)} = 200 GPa. The accuracy of XRD measurement of residual stresses with the spatial resolution of 170 {mu}m and precision {plus_minus} 15 MPa was verified experimentally by strain gauge measurements. The stress field around a singular Kovar pin brazed to alumina was asymmetric with high tangential stresses in the vicinity of the pin decreasing with the distance from the pin.

  3. Measurement Sets and Sites Commonly Used for High Spatial Resolution Image Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Scientists within NASA's Applied Sciences Directorate have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site has enabled the in-flight characterization of satellite high spatial resolution remote sensing system products form Space Imaging IKONOS, Digital Globe QuickBird, and ORBIMAGE OrbView, as well as advanced multispectral airborne digital camera products. SSC utilizes engineered geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment and their Instrument Validation Laboratory to characterize high spatial resolution remote sensing data products. This presentation describes the SSC characterization capabilities and techniques in the visible through near infrared spectrum and examples of calibration results.

  4. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  5. Proteohistography--direct analysis of tissue with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution using ProteinChip technology.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Günther; Melle, Christian; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    On the proteomic level, all tissues, tissue constituents, or even single cells are heterogeneous, but the biological relevance of this cannot be adequately investigated with any currently available technique. The analysis of proteins of small tissue areas by any proteomic approach is limited by the number of required cells. Increasing the number of cells only serves to lower the spatial resolution of expressed proteins. To enhance sensitivity and spatial resolution we developed Proteohistography. Laser microdissection was used to mark special areas of interest on tissue sections attached to glass slides. These areas were positioned under microscopic control directly on an affinity chromatographic ProteinChip Array so that cells were lysed and their released proteins bound on a spatially defined point. The ProteinChip System, surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS), allows the laser to be steered to up to 215 distinct positions across the surface of the spot, enabling a high spatial resolution of measured protein profiles for the analyzed tissue area. Protein profiles of the single positions were visually plotted over the used tissue section to visualize distribution proteohistologically. Results show that the spatial distribution of detectable proteins could be used as a Proteohistogram for a given tissue area. Consequently, this procedure can provide additional information to both a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-based approach and immunohistochemistry, as it is more sensitive, highly quantitative, and no specific antibody is needed. Hence, proteomic heterogeneity can be visualized even if proteins are not known or identified. PMID:16148310

  6. Mapping spatially inhomogeneous electrochemical reactions in battery electrodes using high energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-06-14

    The spatial distribution of a reaction through a lithium-ion battery electrode has been resolved using micro-beam high-energy X-ray scattering measurements coupled with Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis. The electrochemical reaction was most advanced at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte-soaked separator, with linear variation in reaction progress with distance from this interface. PMID:23598687

  7. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurt; Leisso, Nathan; Buchanan, John

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of commercial high spatial resolution sensors. The topics include: 1) Reflectance-based approach; 2) U of A test sites; 3) Test Site Selection; 4) Resort Living; 5) Aerosol parameters; 6) Surface reflectance retrieval; 7) Accuracy/precision; 8) Data sets; 9) June 23, 2005 for Ikonos; 10) QuickBird Results; 11) Ikonos results; 12) Orbview results; 13) Ikonos redux; and 14) Overall results.

  8. High-Q polymer resonators with spatially controlled photo-functionalization for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Torsten; Mai, Martin; Grossmann, Tobias; Wienhold, Tobias; Hauser, Mario; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of polymeric whispering gallery mode resonators fabricated on silicon as biosensors. Optical measurements on the passive resonators in the visible spectral range yield Q-factors as high as 1.3×107. Local, covalent surface functionalization, is achieved by spatially controlled UV-exposure of a derivative of the photoreactive crosslinker benzophenone. Protein detection is shown using the specific binding of the biotin-streptavidin system.

  9. A comparative analysis of two highly spatially resolved European atmospheric emission inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.; Tchepel, O.; Schaap, M.; Miranda, A. I.; Borrego, C.

    2013-08-01

    A reliable emissions inventory is highly important for air quality modelling applications, especially at regional or local scales, which require high resolutions. Consequently, higher resolution emission inventories have been developed that are suitable for regional air quality modelling. This research performs an inter-comparative analysis of different spatial disaggregation methodologies of atmospheric emission inventories. This study is based on two different European emission inventories with different spatial resolutions: 1) the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) inventory and 2) an emission inventory developed by the TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research). These two emission inventories were converted into three distinct gridded emission datasets as follows: (i) the EMEP emission inventory was disaggregated by area (EMEParea) and (ii) following a more complex methodology (HERMES-DIS - High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emissions System - DISaggregation module) to understand and evaluate the influence of different disaggregation methods; and (iii) the TNO gridded emissions, which are based on different emission data sources and different disaggregation methods. A predefined common grid with a spatial resolution of 12 × 12 km2 was used to compare the three datasets spatially. The inter-comparative analysis was performed by source sector (SNAP - Selected Nomenclature for Air Pollution) with emission totals for selected pollutants. It included the computation of difference maps (to focus on the spatial variability of emission differences) and a linear regression analysis to calculate the coefficients of determination and to quantitatively measure differences. From the spatial analysis, greater differences were found for residential/commercial combustion (SNAP02), solvent use (SNAP06) and road transport (SNAP07). These findings were related to the different spatial disaggregation that was conducted by the TNO and HERMES

  10. Spatial Working Memory Ability in Individuals at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Goghari, Vina M.; Brett, Caroline; Tabraham, Paul; Johns, Louise; Valmaggia, Lucia; Broome, Matthew; Woolley, James; Bramon, Elvira; Howes, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to clarify the nature of spatial working memory difficulties in individuals at ultra high risk (UHR) for psychosis. We evaluated spatial working memory and intelligence in 96 individuals at UHR for psychosis, 28 patients with first episode psychosis (FEP), and 23 healthy controls. Fourteen UHR individuals developed a psychotic disorder during follow-up. Compared to controls, the UHR group was impaired in both the short-term maintenance of material and in the effective use of strategy, but not more immediate memory. These impairments were not as severe as those in the FEP group, as the UHR group performed better than the FEP group. A similar pattern of results was found for the intelligence measures. Discriminant function analyses demonstrated short-term maintenance of material significantly differentiated the UHR and healthy control groups even when accounting for full scale intelligence quotient (IQ); whereas full scale IQ significantly differentiated the UHR and FEP groups and FEP and control groups. Notably, within the UHR group, impaired spatial working memory performance was associated with lower global functioning, but not full scale IQ. The subgroup of UHR individuals who later developed psychosis was not significantly more impaired on any aspect of working memory performance than the group of UHR individuals who did not develop psychosis. Given, the relationship between spatial working memory deficits and functional outcome, these results indicate that cognitive remediation could be useful in individuals at UHR for psychosis to potentially improve functioning. PMID:24398256

  11. Low-Cost Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Mapping of Intertidal Rock Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, M.; Johnson-Roberson, M.; Murphy, R.

    2012-07-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time which could compliment field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at relatively course, sub-meter resolutions or with limited temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecology studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric pipeline that was developed for constructing highresolution, 3D, photo-realistic terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing pipeline uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine colour and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an area of approximately 100m, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rock platform at Cape Banks, Sydney, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  12. Improvement of the temporal and spatial contrast of high-brightness laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmári, S.; Dajka, R.; Barna, A.; Gilicze, B.; Földes, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    A novel method is suggested for temporal and spatial cleaning of high-brightness laser pulses, which seems more energy-scalable than that based on crossed polarizers and offers better contrast improvement compared to the plasma mirror technique. The suggested arrangement utilizes nonlinear modulation of the beam in the Fourier-plane leading both to directional and to temporal modulation. By the use of a ‘conjugate’ aperture arrangement before and after the nonlinear spatial selector, intensity dependent transmission is obtained; simultaneous temporal and spatial filtering can be realized both for amplitude and phase modulation. In the case of phase modulation introduced by plasma generation in noble gases the experimental observations are in good agreement with the theory; demonstrating  >103 improvement in the temporal contrast, ~40% throughput, associated with effective spatial filtering. Due to the broad spectral and power durability of the optical arrangement used here, the method is widely applicable for energetic beams even of UV wavelengths, where most of the former techniques have limited throughput.

  13. Geostatistics for high resolution geomorphometry: from spatial continuity to surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    This presentation introduces the use of geostatistics in the context of high-resolution geomorphometry. The application of geostatistics to geomorphometry permits a shift in perspective, moving our attention more toward spatial continuity description than toward the inference of a spatial continuity model. This change in perspective opens interesting directions in the application of geostatistical methods in geomorphometry. Geostatistical methodologies have been extensively applied and adapted in the context of remote sensing, leading to many interesting applications aimed at the analysis of the complex patterns characterizing imagery. Among these applications the analysis of image texture has to be mentioned. In fact, the analysis of image texture reverts to the analysis of surface texture when the analyzed image is a raster representation of a digital terrain model. The main idea is to use spatial-continuity indices as multiscale and directional descriptors of surface texture, including the important aspect related to surface roughness. In this context we introduce some examples regarding the application of geostatistics for image analysis and surface texture characterization. We also show as in presence of complex morphological settings there is the need to use alternative indices of spatial continuity, less sensitive to hotspots and to non-stationarity that often characterize surface morphology. This introduction is mainly dedicated to univariate geostatistics; however the same concepts could be exploited by means of multivariate as well as multipoint geostatistics.

  14. Calibrating the High Density Magnetic Port within Tissue Expanders to Achieve more Accurate Dose Calculations for Postmastectomy Patients with Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jasmine; Zhang, Rui; Heins, David; Castle, Katherine

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy, an increasing number of patients have tissue expanders inserted subpectorally when receiving immediate breast reconstruction. These tissue expanders are composed of silicone and are inflated with saline through an internal metallic port; this serves the purpose of stretching the muscle and skin tissue over time, in order to house a permanent implant. The issue with administering radiation therapy in the presence of a tissue expander is that the port's magnetic core can potentially perturb the dose delivered to the Planning Target Volume, causing significant artifacts in CT images. Several studies have explored this problem, and suggest that density corrections must be accounted for in treatment planning. However, very few studies accurately calibrated commercial TP systems for the high density material used in the port, and no studies employed fusion imaging to yield a more accurate contour of the port in treatment planning. We compared depth dose values in the water phantom between measurement and TPS calculations, and we were able to overcome some of the inhomogeneities presented by the image artifact by fusing the KVCT and MVCT images of the tissue expander together, resulting in a more precise comparison of dose calculations at discrete locations. We expect this method to be pivotal in the quantification of dose distribution in the PTV. Research funded by the LS-AMP Award.

  15. Design and performance of a high spatial resolution, time-of-flight PET detector

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Srilalan; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Werner, Matthew E.; Kaul, Madhuri; Newcomer, F. M.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a high spatial resolution PET detector with time-of-flight capabilities. With an emphasis on high spatial resolution and sensitivity, we initially evaluated the performance of several 1.5 × 1.5 and 2.0 × 2.0 mm2 and 12–15 mm long LYSO crystals read out by several appropriately sized PMTs. Experiments to evaluate the impact of reflector on detector performance were performed and the final detector consisted of a 32 × 32 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 LYSO crystals packed with a diffuse reflector and read out by a single Hamamatsu 64 channel multi-anode PMT. Such a design made it compact, modular and offered a cost-effective solution to obtaining excellent energy and timing resolution. To minimize the number of readout signals, a compact front-end readout electronics that summed anode signals along each of the orthogonal directions was also developed. Experimental evaluation of detector performance demonstrates clear discrimination of the crystals within the detector. An average energy resolution (FWHM) of 12.7 ± 2.6% and average coincidence timing resolution (FWHM) of 348 ps was measured, demonstrating suitability for use in the development of a high spatial resolution time-of-flight scanner for dedicated breast PET imaging. PMID:25246711

  16. Spatial filter with volume gratings for high-peak-power multistage laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi-zhou; Yang, Yi-sheng; Zheng, Guang-wei; Shen, Ben-jian; Pan, Heng-yue; Liu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The regular spatial filters comprised of lens and pinhole are essential component in high power laser systems, such as lasers for inertial confinement fusion, nonlinear optical technology and directed-energy weapon. On the other hand the pinhole is treated as a bottleneck of high power laser due to harmful plasma created by the focusing beam. In this paper we present a spatial filter based on angular selectivity of Bragg diffraction grating to avoid the harmful focusing effect in the traditional pinhole filter. A spatial filter consisted of volume phase gratings in two-pass amplifier cavity were reported. Two-dimensional filter was proposed by using single Pi-phase-shifted Bragg grating, numerical simulation results shown that its angular spectrum bandwidth can be less than 160urad. The angular selectivity of photo-thermorefractive glass and RUGATE film filters, construction stability, thermal stability and the effects of misalignments of gratings on the diffraction efficiencies under high-pulse-energy laser operating condition are discussed.

  17. Assessing spatial heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-burden country.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Helen E; Plesca, Valeriu; Ciobanu, Anisoara; Crudu, Valeriu; Galusca, Irina; Soltan, Viorel; Serbulenco, Aliona; Zignol, Matteo; Dadu, Andrei; Dara, Masoud; Cohen, Ted

    2013-11-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major concern in countries of the former Soviet Union. The reported risk of resistance among tuberculosis (TB) cases in the Republic of Moldova is among the highest in the world. We aimed to produce high-resolution spatial maps of MDR-TB risk and burden in this setting. We analysed national TB surveillance data collected between 2007 and 2010 in Moldova. High drug susceptibility testing coverage and detailed location data permitted identification of subregional areas of higher MDR-TB risk. We investigated whether the distribution of cases with MDR-TB risk factors could explain this observed spatial variation in MDR-TB. 3447 MDR-TB cases were notified during this period; 24% of new and 62% of previously treated patients had MDR-TB. Nationally, the estimated annual MDR-TB incidence was 54 cases per 100 000 persons and >1000 cases per 100 000 persons within penitentiaries. We identified substantial geographical variation in MDR-TB burden and hotspots of MDR-TB. Locations with a higher percentage of previously incarcerated TB cases were at greater risk of being MDR-TB hotspots. Spatial analyses revealed striking geographical heterogeneity of MDR-TB. Methods to identify locations of high MDR-TB risk and burden should allow for better resource allocation and more appropriate targeting of studies to understand local mechanisms driving resistance. PMID:23100496

  18. Minimizing high spatial frequency residual error in active space telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Thomas L.; Smith, Matthew W.; Cohan, Lucy E.; Miller, David W.

    2009-08-01

    The trend in future space telescopes is towards larger apertures, which provide increased sensitivity and improved angular resolution. Lightweight, segmented, rib-stiffened, actively controlled primary mirrors are an enabling technology, permitting large aperture telescopes to meet the mass and volume restrictions imposed by launch vehicles. Such mirrors, however, are limited in the extent to which their discrete surface-parallel electrostrictive actuators can command global prescription changes. Inevitably some amount of high spatial frequency residual error is added to the wavefront due to the discrete nature of the actuators. A parameterized finite element mirror model is used to simulate this phenomenon and determine designs that mitigate high spatial frequency residual errors in the mirror surface figure. Two predominant residual components are considered: dimpling induced by embedded actuators and print-through induced by facesheet polishing. A gradient descent algorithm is combined with the parameterized mirror model to allow rapid trade space navigation and optimization of the mirror design, yielding advanced design heuristics formulated in terms of minimum machinable rib thickness. These relationships produce mirrors that satisfy manufacturing constraints and minimize uncorrectable high spatial frequency error.

  19. High resolution/accurate mass (HRMS) detection of anatoxin-a in lake water using LDTD-APCI coupled to a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A new innovative analytical method combining ultra-fast analysis time with high resolution/accurate mass detection was developed to eliminate the misidentification of anatoxin-a (ANA-a), a cyanobacterial toxin, from the natural amino acid phenylalanine (PHE). This was achieved by using the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to the Q-Exactive, a high resolution/accurate mass spectrometer (HRMS). This novel combination, the LDTD-APCI-HRMS, allowed for an ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s/sample). A comparison of two different acquisition modes (full scan and targeted ion fragmentation) was made to determine the most rigorous analytical method using the LDTD-APCI interface. Method development focused toward selectivity and sensitivity improvement to reduce the possibility of false positives and to lower detection limits. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer operates with resolving powers between 17500 and 140000 FWHM (m/z 200). Nevertheless, a resolution of 17500FWHM is enough to dissociate ANA-a and PHE signals. Mass accuracy was satisfactory with values below 1 ppm reaching precision to the fourth decimal. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the isotopically-labeled (D5) phenylalanine with good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Enhancement of signal to noise ratios relative to a standard triple-quadrupole method was demonstrated with lower detection and quantification limit values of 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L using the Q-Exactive. Accuracy and interday/intraday relative standard deviations were below 15%. The new method was applied to 8 different lake water samples with signs of cyanobacterial blooms. This work demonstrates the possibility of using an ultra-fast LDTD-APCI sample introduction system with an HRMS hybrid instrument for quantitative purposes with high selectivity in complex environmental matrices. PMID:25476385

  20. Reconciling nature conservation and traditional farming practices: a spatially explicit framework to assess the extent of High Nature Value farmlands in the European countryside.

    PubMed

    Lomba, Angela; Alves, Paulo; Jongman, Rob H G; McCracken, David I

    2015-03-01

    Agriculture constitutes a dominant land cover worldwide, and rural landscapes under extensive farming practices acknowledged due to high biodiversity levels. The High Nature Value farmland (HNVf) concept has been highlighted in the EU environmental and rural policies due to their inherent potential to help characterize and direct financial support to European landscapes where high nature and/or conservation value is dependent on the continuation of specific low-intensity farming systems. Assessing the extent of HNV farmland by necessity relies on the availability of both ecological and farming systems' data, and difficulties associated with making such assessments have been widely described across Europe. A spatially explicit framework of data collection, building out from local administrative units, has recently been suggested as a means of addressing such difficulties. This manuscript tests the relevance of the proposed approach, describes the spatially explicit framework in a case study area in northern Portugal, and discusses the potential of the approach to help better inform the implementation of conservation and rural development policies. Synthesis and applications: The potential of a novel approach (combining land use/cover, farming and environmental data) to provide more accurate and efficient mapping and monitoring of HNV farmlands is tested at the local level in northern Portugal. The approach is considered to constitute a step forward toward a more precise targeting of landscapes for agri-environment schemes, as it allowed a more accurate discrimination of areas within the case study landscape that have a higher value for nature conservation. PMID:25798221

  1. High spatial resolution remote sensing imagery improves GPP predictions in disturbed, semi-arid woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Eitel, J.; Vierling, L. A.; Schulthess, U.; Litvak, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate across the globe is changing and consequently the productivity of terrestrial vegetation is changing with it. Gross primary productivity (GPP) is an integral part of the carbon cycle, yet challenging to measure everywhere, all the time. Efforts to estimate GPP in the context of climate change are becoming continually more salient of the need for models sensitive to the heterogeneous nature of drought and pest induced disturbance. Given the increased availability of high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, their use in ecosystem scale GPP estimation is becoming increasingly viable. We used a simple linear model with inputs derived from RapidEye time series data (5 meter spatial resolution) as compared to MODIS inputs (250 meter spatial resolution) to estimate GPP in intact and girdled PJ woodland to simulate drought and pest induced disturbance. An area equal to the MODIS pixels measured was aggregated using RapidEye data centered on the flux towers for comparison purposes. We generated four model runs, two using only MODIS or RapidEye spectral vegetation indices (VIs) and two using MODIS and RapidEye VIs combined at both the control and disturbed tower site. Our results suggest that for undisturbed regions, MODIS derived VIs perform better than the higher spatial resolution RapidEye VIs when a moisture sensitive index is incorporated into the model (RMSE of 17.51for MODIS vs. 22.71 for RapidEye). Modeling GPP in disturbed regions however benefits from the inclusion of high spatial resolution data (RMSE of 14.83 for MODIS vs. 14.70 for RapidEye). This discrepancy may have to do with the disparate scale of a MODIS pixel and the size of the tower fetch. Our results suggest that the best source of VI's for the modeling GPP in semi-arid woodlands depends on the level of disturbance in the landscape. Given that the rate and extent of drought and insect induced mortality events in terrestrial forests are projected to increase with our changing climate

  2. An object-based approach to delineate wetlands across landscapes of varied disturbance with high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Amy; He, Yuhong; Weng, Qihao

    2015-11-01

    Mapping wetlands across both natural and human-altered landscapes is important for the management of these ecosystems. Though they are considered important landscape elements providing both ecological and socioeconomic benefits, accurate wetland inventories do not exist in many areas. In this study, a multi-scale geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) approach was employed to segment three high spatial resolution images acquired over landscapes of varying heterogeneity due to human-disturbance to determine the robustness of this method to changing scene variability. Multispectral layers, a digital elevation layer, normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI) layer, and a first-order texture layer were used to segment images across three segmentation scales with a focus on accurate delineation of wetland boundaries and wetland components. Each ancillary input layer contributed to improving segmentation at different scales. Wetlands were classified using a nearest neighbor approach across a relatively undisturbed park site and an agricultural site using GeoEye1 imagery, and an urban site using WorldView2 data. Successful wetland classification was achieved across all study sites with an accuracy above 80%, though results suggest that overall a higher degree of landscape heterogeneity may negatively affect both segmentation and classification. The agricultural site suffered from the greatest amount of over and under segmentation, and lowest map accuracy (kappa: 0.78) which was partially attributed to confusion among a greater proportion of mixed vegetated classes from both wetlands and uplands. Accuracy of individual wetland classes based on the Canadian Wetland Classification system varied between each site, with kappa values ranging from 0.64 for the swamp class and 0.89 for the marsh class. This research developed a unique approach to mapping wetlands of various degrees of disturbance using GEOBIA, which can be applied to study other wetlands of similar

  3. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kesby, James P.; Kim, Jane J.; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Achim, Cristian L.; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  4. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Kim, Jane J; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Jeste, Dilip V; Achim, Cristian L; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  5. Monitoring of Antarctic moss ecosystems using a high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenovsky, Zbynek; Lucieer, Arko; Robinson, Sharon; Harwin, Stephen; Turner, Darren; Veness, Tony

    2013-04-01

    The most abundant photosynthetically active plants growing along the rocky Antarctic shore are mosses of three species: Schistidium antarctici, Ceratodon purpureus, and Bryum pseudotriquetrum. Even though mosses are well adapted to the extreme climate conditions, their existence in Antarctica depends strongly on availability of liquid water from snowmelt during the short summer season. Recent changes in temperature, wind speed and stratospheric ozone are stimulating faster evaporation, which in turn influences moss growing rate, health state and abundance. This makes them an ideal bio-indicator of the Antarctic climate change. Very short growing season, lasting only about three months, requires a time efficient, easily deployable and spatially resolved method for monitoring the Antarctic moss beds. Ground and/or low-altitude airborne imaging spectroscopy (called also hyperspectral remote sensing) offers a fast and spatially explicit approach to investigate an actual spatial extent and physiological state of moss turfs. A dataset of ground-based spectral images was acquired with a mini-Hyperspec imaging spectrometer (Headwall Inc., the USA) during the Antarctic summer 2012 in the surroundings of the Australian Antarctic station Casey (Windmill Islands). The collection of high spatial resolution spectral images, with pixels about 2 cm in size containing from 162 up to 324 narrow spectral bands of wavelengths between 399 and 998 nm, was accompanied with point moss reflectance measurements recorded with the ASD HandHeld-2 spectroradiometer (Analytical Spectral Devices Inc., the USA). The first spectral analysis indicates significant differences in red-edge and near-infrared reflectance of differently watered moss patches. Contrary to high plants, where the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) represents an estimate of green biomass, NDVI of mosses indicates mainly the actual water content. Similarly to high plants, reflectance of visible wavelengths is

  6. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest. PMID:25953490

  7. Building accurate sequence-to-affinity models from high-throughput in vitro protein-DNA binding data using FeatureREDUCE.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd R; Lazarovici, Allan; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are crucial regulators of gene expression. Accurate quantitative definition of their intrinsic DNA binding preferences is critical to understanding their biological function. High-throughput in vitro technology has recently been used to deeply probe the DNA binding specificity of hundreds of eukaryotic transcription factors, yet algorithms for analyzing such data have not yet fully matured. Here, we present a general framework (FeatureREDUCE) for building sequence-to-affinity models based on a biophysically interpretable and extensible model of protein-DNA interaction that can account for dependencies between nucleotides within the binding interface or multiple modes of binding. When training on protein binding microarray (PBM) data, we use robust regression and modeling of technology-specific biases to infer specificity models of unprecedented accuracy and precision. We provide quantitative validation of our results by comparing to gold-standard data when available. PMID:26701911

  8. Practical method for highly accurate large-scale surface calculations. [of linearized muffin-tin orbital technique for chemisorption and magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernando, G. W.; Cooper, B. R.; Ramana, M. V.; Krakauer, H.; Ma, C. Q.

    1986-01-01

    An accurate and efficient film linearized muffin-tin orbital (FLMTO) technique for surface electronic-structure calculations is presented which uses only 60-70 basis functions, as opposed to the 300 functions used in the linear augmented plane-wave method. Calculations for three different (3d and 4d) transition-metal films resulted in high quality results for five-layer slabs of Cu(001), Fe(001), and Ru(001), in addition to good results for the work functions and projected density of states. By retaining the LMTO small basis size, computer time and memory are reduced, making practical the study of systems with a larger number of atoms in the two-dimensional unit cell.

  9. A simple, accurate, time-saving and green method for the determination of 15 sulfonamides and metabolites in serum samples by ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Wei-E; Li, Shao-Hui; Ren, Zhi-Qin; Li, Wei-Qing; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Xue-Song; Wu, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    An analytical method based on ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography (UHPSFC) with photo-diode array detection (PDA) has been developed to quantify 15 sulfonamides and their N4-acetylation metabolites in serum. Under the optimized gradient elution conditions, it took only 7min to separate all 15 sulfonamides and the critical pairs of each parent drug and metabolite were completely separated. Variables affecting the UHPSFC were optimized to get a better separation. The performance of the developed method was evaluated. The UHPSFC method allowed the baseline separation and determination of 15 sulfonamides and metabolites with limit of detection ranging from 0.15 to 0.35μg/mL. Recoveries between 90.1 and 102.2% were obtained with satisfactory precision since relative standard deviations were always below 3%. The proposed method is simple, accurate, time-saving and green, it is applicable to a variety of sulfonamides detection in serum samples. PMID:26780846

  10. Accurate Monte Carlo simulations on FCC and HCP Lennard-Jones solids at very low temperatures and high reduced densities up to 1.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adidharma, Hertanto; Tan, Sugata P.

    2016-07-01

    Canonical Monte Carlo simulations on face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal closed packed (HCP) Lennard-Jones (LJ) solids are conducted at very low temperatures (0.10 ≤ T∗ ≤ 1.20) and high densities (0.96 ≤ ρ∗ ≤ 1.30). A simple and robust method is introduced to determine whether or not the cutoff distance used in the simulation is large enough to provide accurate thermodynamic properties, which enables us to distinguish the properties of FCC from that of HCP LJ solids with confidence, despite their close similarities. Free-energy expressions derived from the simulation results are also proposed, not only to describe the properties of those individual structures but also the FCC-liquid, FCC-vapor, and FCC-HCP solid phase equilibria.

  11. Accurate mass analysis of ethanesulfonic acid degradates of acetochlor and alachlor using high-performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Parry, R.

    2002-01-01

    Degradates of acetochlor and alachlor (ethanesulfonic acids, ESAs) were analyzed in both standards and in a groundwater sample using high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The negative pseudomolecular ion of the secondary amide of acetochlor ESA and alachlor ESA gave average masses of 256.0750??0.0049 amu and 270.0786??0.0064 amu respectively. Acetochlor and alachlor ESA gave similar masses of 314.1098??0.0061 amu and 314.1153??0.0048 amu; however, they could not be distinguished by accurate mass because they have the same empirical formula. On the other hand, they may be distinguished using positive-ion electrospray because of different fragmentation spectra, which did not occur using negative-ion electrospray.

  12. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W.; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  13. High IFIT1 expression predicts improved clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Chen, Yao; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Tang, Wen-Long; Huang, Jian-Huang; Chen, Jin-Shou; Wang, Xing-Fu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (IFIT1) plays a key role in growth suppression and apoptosis promotion in cancer cells. Interferon was reported to induce the expression of IFIT1 and inhibit the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT).This study aimed to investigate the expression of IFIT1, the correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT, and their impact on the clinical outcome in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The expression of IFIT1 and MGMT and their correlation were investigated in the tumor tissues from 70 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The effects on progression-free survival and overall survival were evaluated. Of 70 cases, 57 (81.4%) tissue samples showed high expression of IFIT1 by immunostaining. The χ(2) test indicated that the expression of IFIT1 and MGMT was negatively correlated (r = -0.288, P = .016). Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed high IFIT1 expression as a favorable prognostic indicator for progression-free survival (P = .005 and .017) and overall survival (P = .001 and .001), respectively. Patients with 2 favorable factors (high IFIT1 and low MGMT) had an improved prognosis as compared with others. The results demonstrated significantly increased expression of IFIT1 in newly diagnosed glioblastoma tissue. The negative correlation between IFIT1 and MGMT expression may be triggered by interferon. High IFIT1 can be a predictive biomarker of favorable clinical outcome, and IFIT1 along with MGMT more accurately predicts prognosis in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. PMID:26980050

  14. Moving Toward Integrating Gene Expression Profiling Into High-Throughput Testing: A Gene Expression Biomarker Accurately Predicts Estrogen Receptor α Modulation in a Microarray Compendium.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Natalia; Chorley, Brian; Tice, Raymond R; Judson, Richard; Corton, J Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Microarray profiling of chemical-induced effects is being increasingly used in medium- and high-throughput formats. Computational methods are described here to identify molecular targets from whole-genome microarray data using as an example the estrogen receptor α (ERα), often modulated by potential endocrine disrupting chemicals. ERα biomarker genes were identified by their consistent expression after exposure to 7 structurally diverse ERα agonists and 3 ERα antagonists in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells. Most of the biomarker genes were shown to be directly regulated by ERα as determined by ESR1 gene knockdown using siRNA as well as through chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with DNA sequencing analysis of ERα-DNA interactions. The biomarker was evaluated as a predictive tool using the fold-change rank-based Running Fisher algorithm by comparison to annotated gene expression datasets from experiments using MCF-7 cells, including those evaluating the transcriptional effects of hormones and chemicals. Using 141 comparisons from chemical- and hormone-treated cells, the biomarker gave a balanced accuracy for prediction of ERα activation or suppression of 94% and 93%, respectively. The biomarker was able to correctly classify 18 out of 21 (86%) ER reference chemicals including "very weak" agonists. Importantly, the biomarker predictions accurately replicated predictions based on 18 in vitro high-throughput screening assays that queried different steps in ERα signaling. For 114 chemicals, the balanced accuracies were 95% and 98% for activation or suppression, respectively. These results demonstrate that the ERα gene expression biomarker can accurately identify ERα modulators in large collections of microarray data derived from MCF-7 cells. PMID:26865669

  15. Repeatable, accurate, and high speed multi-level programming of memristor 1T1R arrays for power efficient analog computing applications.

    PubMed

    Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle J; Dávila, Noraica; Ge, Ning; Williams, R Stanley; Strachan, John Paul

    2016-09-01

    Beyond use as high density non-volatile memories, memristors have potential as synaptic components of neuromorphic systems. We investigated the suitability of tantalum oxide (TaOx) transistor-memristor (1T1R) arrays for such applications, particularly the ability to accurately, repeatedly, and rapidly reach arbitrary conductance states. Programming is performed by applying an adaptive pulsed algorithm that utilizes the transistor gate voltage to control the SET switching operation and increase programming speed of the 1T1R cells. We show the capability of programming 64 conductance levels with <0.5% average accuracy using 100 ns pulses and studied the trade-offs between programming speed and programming error. The algorithm is also utilized to program 16 conductance levels on a population of cells in the 1T1R array showing robustness to cell-to-cell variability. In general, the proposed algorithm results in approximately 10× improvement in programming speed over standard algorithms that do not use the transistor gate to control memristor switching. In addition, after only two programming pulses (an initialization pulse followed by a programming pulse), the resulting conductance values are within 12% of the target values in all cases. Finally, endurance of more than 10(6) cycles is shown through open-loop (single pulses) programming across multiple conductance levels using the optimized gate voltage of the transistor. These results are relevant for applications that require high speed, accurate, and repeatable programming of the cells such as in neural networks and analog data processing. PMID:27479054

  16. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2013-06-15

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

  17. High spatial and temporal resolution 4D FEM simulation of the thoracic bioimpedance using MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Mark; Marleaux, Bastian; Mühlsteff, Jens; Schoth, Felix; Koos, Ralf; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a finite element model was created using MRI scans of the main author to analyze sources of the dynamic thoracic bioimpedance. This model can be used to identify limitations of impedance cardiography (ICG) in practice. Heart beat (8.3 ms temporal resolution) and aortic wave propagation (2.6 ms temporal resolution) were implemented. The static volume contains all major organs of the thorax in high spatial resolution. Simulations were successfully conducted and a high correlation (r = 0.9) between the simulated aortic ICG signal and a measured signal of the same subject was obtained.

  18. High-Spatial-Resolution Imaging Combining High-Order Adaptive Optics, Frame Selection, and Speckle Masking Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Carsten; Mascarinas, Dulce; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Yang, Guo; Wang, Haimin; Goode, Philip R.; Rimmele, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    We present, for the first time, high-spatial-resolution observations combining high-order adaptive optics (AO), frame selection, and post-facto image correction via speckle masking. The data analysis is based on observations of solar active region NOAA 10486 taken with the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) at the Sacramento Peak Observatory (SPO) of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on 29 October 2003. The high Strehl ratio encountered in AO corrected short-exposure images provides highly improved signal-to-noise ratios leading to a superior recovery of the object’s Fourier phases. This allows reliable detection of small-scale solar features near the diffraction limit of the telescope. Speckle masking imaging provides access to high-order wavefront aberrations, which predominantly originate at high atmospheric layers and are only partially corrected by the AO system. In addition, the observations provided qualitative measures of the image correction away from the lock point of the AO system. We further present a brief inspection of the underlying imaging theory discussing the limitations and prospects of this multi-faceted image reconstruction approach in terms of the recovery of spatial information, photometric accuracy, and spectroscopic applications.

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPATIAL MODELING OF DAILY WEATHER ELEMENTS FOR A CATCHMENT IN THE OREGON CASCADE MOUNTAINS, UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-quality, daily meteorological data at high spatial resolution are essential for a variety of hydrologic and ecological modeling applications that support environmental risk assessments and decision making. This paper describes the development, application, and assessment of ...

  20. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak.

    PubMed

    Truong, D D; Austin, M E

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels' IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters' center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a "zoomed-in" analysis of a ∼2-4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented. PMID:25430227

  1. Spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectroscopy for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Marmar, E. S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Gu, M. F.; Eikenberry, E.; Broennimann, Ch.; Lee, S. G.

    2008-10-15

    The use of high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometers to diagnose fusion plasmas has been limited by the poor spatial localization associated with chord integrated measurements. Taking advantage of a new x-ray imaging spectrometer concept [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3660 (2004)], and improvements in x-ray detector technology [Ch. Broennimann et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 13, 120 (2006)], a spatially resolving high resolution x-ray spectrometer has been built and installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This instrument utilizes a spherically bent quartz crystal and a set of two dimensional x-ray detectors arranged in the Johann configuration [H. H. Johann, Z. Phys. 69, 185 (1931)] to image the entire plasma cross section with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm. The spectrometer was designed to measure line emission from H-like and He-like argon in the wavelength range 3.7 and 4.0 A with a resolving power of approximately 10 000 at frame rates up to 200 Hz. Using spectral tomographic techniques [I. Condrea, Phys. Plasmas 11, 2427 (2004)] the line integrated spectra can be inverted to infer profiles of impurity emissivity, velocity, and temperature. From these quantities it is then possible to calculate impurity density and electron temperature profiles. An overview of the instrument, analysis techniques, and example profiles are presented.

  2. Delineation of river bed-surface patches by clustering high-resolution spatial grain size data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter A.; Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The beds of gravel-bed rivers commonly display distinct sorting patterns, which at length scales of ~ 0.1 - 1 channel widths appear to form an organization of patches or facies. This paper explores alternatives to traditional visual facies mapping by investigating methods of patch delineation in which clustering analysis is applied to a high-resolution grid of spatial grain-size distributions (GSDs) collected during a flume experiment. Specifically, we examine four clustering techniques: 1) partitional clustering of grain-size distributions with the k-means algorithm (assigning each GSD to a type of patch based solely on its distribution characteristics), 2) spatially-constrained agglomerative clustering ("growing" patches by merging adjacent GSDs, thus generating a hierarchical structure of patchiness), 3) spectral clustering using Normalized Cuts (using the spatial distance between GSDs and the distribution characteristics to generate a matrix describing the similarity between all GSDs, and using the eigenvalues of this matrix to divide the bed into patches), and 4) fuzzy clustering with the fuzzy c-means algorithm (assigning each GSD a membership probability to every patch type). For each clustering method, we calculate metrics describing how well-separated cluster-average GSDs are and how patches are arranged in space. We use these metrics to compute optimal clustering parameters, to compare the clustering methods against each other, and to compare clustering results with patches mapped visually during the flume experiment.All clustering methods produced better-separated patch GSDs than the visually-delineated patches. Although they do not produce crisp cluster assignment, fuzzy algorithms provide useful information that can characterize the uncertainty of a location on the bed belonging to any particular type of patch, and they can be used to characterize zones of transition from one patch to another. The extent to which spatial information influences

  3. High-fidelity spatially resolved multiphoton counting for quantum imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Chrapkiewicz, Radosław; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Banaszek, Konrad

    2014-09-01

    We present a method for spatially resolved multiphoton counting based on an intensified camera with the retrieval of multimode photon statistics fully accounting for nonlinearities in the detection process. The scheme relies on one-time quantum tomographic calibration of the detector. Faithful, high-fidelity reconstruction of single- and two-mode statistics of multiphoton states is demonstrated for coherent states and their statistical mixtures. The results consistently exhibit classical values of the Mandel parameter and the noise reduction factor in contrast to raw statistics of camera photo-events. Detector operation is reliable for illumination levels up to the average of one detected photon per an event area-substantially higher than in previous approaches to characterize quantum statistical properties of light with spatial resolution. PMID:25166081

  4. Spatial and spectral coherence in propagating high-intensity twin beams

    PubMed Central

    Haderka, Ondřej; Machulka, Radek; Peřina, Jan; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and spectral coherence of high-intensity twin-beam states propagating from the near-field to the far-field configurations is experimentally investigated by measuring intensity auto- and cross-correlation functions. The experimental setup includes a moving crystal and an iCCD camera placed at the output plane of an imaging spectrometer. Evolution from the tight near-field spatial position cross-correlations to the far-field momentum cross-correlations, accompanied by changeless spectral cross-correlations, is observed. Intensity autocorrelation functions and beam profiles are also monitored as they provide the number of degrees of freedom constituting the down-converted beams. The strength of intensity cross-correlations as an alternative quantity for the determination of the number of degrees of freedom is also measured. The relation between the beam coherence and the number of degrees of freedom is discussed. PMID:26403609

  5. High Spatial Resolution Spectral Analysis of the SW Limb in RCW 86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantseg, Thomas; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Butterfield, Natalie; Savage, Allison H.

    2014-08-01

    Despite intensive study in recent years, the nature of the progenitor system and explosion type of the galactic supernova remnant RCW 86 remains uncertain. We present preliminary results from a high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopic analysis of archival Chandra data of the southwestern limb of RCW 86. We report the detection of a small, previously undiscovered knot of ejecta with super-solar abundances of O, Mg, Ne, and Si, and present maps detailing the variation of temperature and abundance on small spatial scales in this limb. Based on elemental abundances within the ejecta knot and physical conditions at the limb, we suggest that RCW 86 is the result of a core-collapse supernova, with a progenitor of around 18 solar masses, and that the southwestern shock is encountering a dense, clumpy cavity wall.

  6. High Spatial Resolution STXM at 6.2 keV Photon Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, Joan; Dierolf, Martin; Kewish, Cameron M.; Thibault, Pierre; Pilvi, Tero; Färm, Elina; Guzenko, Vitaliy; Gorelick, Sergey; Menzel, Andreas; Bunk, Oliver; Ritala, Mikko; Pfeiffer, Franz; David, Christian

    2010-04-01

    We report on a zone-doubling technique that bypasses the electron-beam lithography limitations for the production of X-ray diffractive optics and enables the fabrication of Fresnel zone plates with smaller outermost zone widths than other well-established approaches. We have applied this method to manufacture hard X-ray Fresnel zone plates with outermost zone widths of 25 and 20 nm. These lenses have been tested in scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at energies up to 6.2 keV, producing images of test structures that demonstrate a spatial resolution of 25 nm. High spatial resolution STXM images of several biological specimens have been acquired in transmission, dark-field and differential phase contrast modes.

  7. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DIMENSIONS OF NEIGHBORHOOD EFFECTS ON HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Kyle; South, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the effects of neighborhood characteristics on children’s behavior has burgeoned in recent years, but these studies have generally adopted a limited conceptualization of the spatial and temporal dimensions of neighborhood effects. We use longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and techniques of spatial data analysis to examine how both the socioeconomic characteristics of extralocal neighborhoods—neighborhoods surrounding the immediate neighborhood of residence—and the duration of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods throughout the childhood life course influence the likelihood of graduating from high school. Among blacks and whites, socioeconomic advantage in the immediate neighborhood increases the likelihood of completing high school, but among whites higher levels of socioeconomic advantage in extralocal neighborhoods decrease high school graduation rates. Extralocal neighborhood advantage suppresses the influence of advantage in the immediate neighborhood so that controlling for extralocal conditions provides stronger support for the neighborhood effects hypothesis than has previously been observed. Exposure to advantaged neighborhoods over the childhood life course exerts a stronger effect than point-in-time measures on high school graduation, and racial differences in exposure to advantaged neighbors over the childhood life course help to suppress a net black advantage in the likelihood of completing high school. PMID:21180398

  8. An adaptive spectral estimation technique to detect cavitation in HIFU with high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Probert Smith, Penny; Mayia, Fares; Ye, Guoliang

    2011-07-01

    In ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the changes observed on tissue are subtle during treatment; some ultrasound-guided HIFU protocols rely on the observation of significant brightness changes as the indicator of tissue lesions. The occurrence of a distinct hyperechogenic region ("bright-up") around the focus is often associated with acoustic cavitation resulting in microbubble formation, but it may indicate different physical events such as larger bubbles from boiling (known to alter acoustic impedance) or sometimes lesion formation. A reliable method to distinguish and spatially localize these causes within the tissue would assist the control of HIFU delivery, which is the subject of this paper. Spectral analysis of the radio frequency (RF) signal underlying the B-mode image provides more information on the physical cause, but the usual techniques that are methods on the Fourier transform require a long series for good spectral resolution and so they give poor spatial resolution. This paper introduces an active spectral cavitation detection method to attain high spatial resolution (0.15 × 0.15 mm per pixel) through a parametric statistical method (ARMA modeling) used on finite-length data sets, which enables local changes to be identified more easily. This technique uses the characteristics of the signal itself to optimize the model parameters and structure. Its performance is assessed using synthesized cavitation RF data, and it is then demonstrated in ex vivo bovine liver during and after HIFU exposure. The results suggest that good spatial and spectral resolution can be obtained by the design of suitable algorithms. In ultrasound-guided HIFU, the technique provides a useful supplement to B-mode analysis, with no additional time penalty in data acquisition. PMID:21684454

  9. In-duct identification of fluid-borne source with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yong-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon; Bodén, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Source identification of acoustic characteristics of in-duct fluid machinery is required for coping with the fluid-borne noise. By knowing the acoustic pressure and particle velocity field at the source plane in detail, the sound generation mechanism of a fluid machine can be understood. The identified spatial distribution of the strength of major radiators would be useful for the low noise design. Conventional methods for measuring the source in a wide duct have not been very helpful in investigating the source properties in detail because their spatial resolution is improper for the design purpose. In this work, an inverse method to estimate the source parameters with a high spatial resolution is studied. The theoretical formulation including the evanescent modes and near-field measurement data is given for a wide duct. After validating the proposed method to a duct excited by an acoustic driver, an experiment on a duct system driven by an air blower is conducted in the presence of flow. A convergence test for the evanescent modes is performed to find the necessary number of modes to regenerate the measured pressure field precisely. By using the converged modal amplitudes, very-close near-field pressure to the source is regenerated and compared with the measured pressure, and the maximum error was -16.3 dB. The source parameters are restored from the converged modal amplitudes. Then, the distribution of source parameters on the driver and the blower is clearly revealed with a high spatial resolution for kR<1.84 in which range only plane waves can propagate to far field in a duct. Measurement using a flush mounted sensor array is discussed, and the removal of pure radial modes in the modeling is suggested.

  10. COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES AT HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION TOWARD ORION-KL. II. KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedel, D. N.; Widicus Weaver, S. L. E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.edu

    2012-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that chemical processing can shape the spatial distributions of complex molecules in the Orion-KL region and leads to the nitrogen-oxygen 'chemical differentiation' seen in previous observations of this source. Orion-KL is a very dynamic region, and it is therefore also possible that physical conditions can shape the molecular distributions in this source. Only high spatial resolution observations can provide the information needed to disentangle these effects. Here, we present millimeter imaging studies of Orion-KL at various beam sizes using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We compare molecular images with high spatial resolution images that trace the temperature, density, and kinematics of the source in order to investigate the effects of physical conditions on molecular distributions. These observations were conducted at {lambda} = 3 mm and included transitions of ethyl cyanide [C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN], methyl formate [HCOOCH{sub 3}], formic acid [HCOOH], acetone [(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO], SiO, and methanol [CH{sub 3}OH]. We find differences in the molecular distributions as a function of each of the aforementioned physical factors. These results indicate that acetone may be produced by chemical processing and is robust to large changes in physical conditions, while formic acid is readily destroyed by gas-phase processing in warm and dense regions. We also find that while the spatial distributions of ethyl cyanide and methyl formate are not distinct as is suggested by the concept of 'chemical differentiation', local physical conditions shape the small-scale emission structure for these species.

  11. Acute stress differentially affects spatial configuration learning in high and low cortisol-responding healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Thomas; Smeets, Tom; Giesbrecht, Timo; Quaedflieg, Conny W. E. M.; Merckelbach, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Background Stress and stress hormones modulate memory formation in various ways that are relevant to our understanding of stress-related psychopathology, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Particular relevance is attributed to efficient memory formation sustained by the hippocampus and parahippocampus. This process is thought to reduce the occurrence of intrusions and flashbacks following trauma, but may be negatively affected by acute stress. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that the efficiency of visuo-spatial processing and learning based on the hippocampal area is related to PTSD symptoms. Objective The current study investigated the effect of acute stress on spatial configuration learning using a spatial contextual cueing task (SCCT) known to heavily rely on structures in the parahippocampus. Method Acute stress was induced by subjecting participants (N = 34) to the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST). Following a counterbalanced within-subject approach, the effects of stress and the ensuing hormonal (i.e., cortisol) activity on subsequent SCCT performance were compared to SCCT performance following a no-stress control condition. Results Acute stress did not impact SCCT learning overall, but opposing effects emerged for high versus low cortisol responders to the MAST. Learning scores following stress were reduced in low cortisol responders, while high cortisol-responding participants showed improved learning. Conclusions The effects of stress on spatial configuration learning were moderated by the magnitude of endogenous cortisol secretion. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which cortisol responses serve an adaptive function during stress and trauma, and this may prove to be a promising route for future research in this area. PMID:23671762

  12. Color calibration and fusion of lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-resolution and accurate color reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy can achieve wide-field imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable setup, making it a promising technique for point-of-care and telepathology applications. However, due to relatively narrow-band sources used in holographic microscopy, conventional colorization methods that use images reconstructed at discrete wavelengths, corresponding to e.g., red (R), green (G) and blue (B) channels, are subject to color artifacts. Furthermore, these existing RGB colorization methods do not match the chromatic perception of human vision. Here we present a high-color-fidelity and high-resolution imaging method, termed “digital color fusion microscopy” (DCFM), which fuses a holographic image acquired at a single wavelength with a color-calibrated image taken by a low-magnification lens-based microscope using a wavelet transform-based