Science.gov

Sample records for accurate initial conditions

  1. Toward accurate modelling of the non-linear matter bispectrum: standard perturbation theory and transients from initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullagh, Nuala; Jeong, Donghui; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modelling of non-linearities in the galaxy bispectrum, the Fourier transform of the galaxy three-point correlation function, is essential to fully exploit it as a cosmological probe. In this paper, we present numerical and theoretical challenges in modelling the non-linear bispectrum. First, we test the robustness of the matter bispectrum measured from N-body simulations using different initial conditions generators. We run a suite of N-body simulations using the Zel'dovich approximation and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT) at different starting redshifts, and find that transients from initial decaying modes systematically reduce the non-linearities in the matter bispectrum. To achieve 1 per cent accuracy in the matter bispectrum at z ≤ 3 on scales k < 1 h Mpc-1, 2LPT initial conditions generator with initial redshift z ≳ 100 is required. We then compare various analytical formulas and empirical fitting functions for modelling the non-linear matter bispectrum, and discuss the regimes for which each is valid. We find that the next-to-leading order (one-loop) correction from standard perturbation theory matches with N-body results on quasi-linear scales for z ≥ 1. We find that the fitting formula in Gil-Marín et al. accurately predicts the matter bispectrum for z ≤ 1 on a wide range of scales, but at higher redshifts, the fitting formula given in Scoccimarro & Couchman gives the best agreement with measurements from N-body simulations.

  2. Initial Cladding Condition

    SciTech Connect

    E. Siegmann

    2000-08-22

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  3. Quantum Measurement and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2016-03-01

    Quantum measurement finds the observed system in a collapsed state, rather than in the state predicted by the Schrödinger equation. Yet there is a relatively spread opinion that the wavefunction collapse can be explained by unitary evolution (for instance in the decoherence approach, if we take into account the environment). In this article it is proven a mathematical result which severely restricts the initial conditions for which measurements have definite outcomes, if pure unitary evolution is assumed. This no-go theorem remains true even if we take the environment into account. The result does not forbid a unitary description of the measurement process, it only shows that such a description is possible only for very restricted initial conditions. The existence of such restrictions of the initial conditions can be understood in the four-dimensional block universe perspective, as a requirement of global self-consistency of the solutions of the Schrödinger equation.

  4. New Claus catalyst tests accurately reflect process conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Maglio, A.; Schubert, P.F.

    1988-09-12

    Methods for testing Claus catalysts are developed that more accurately represent the actual operating conditions in commercial sulfur recovery units. For measuring catalyst activity, an aging method has been developed that results in more meaningful activity data after the catalyst has been aged, because all catalysts undergo rapid initial deactivation in commercial units. An activity test method has been developed where catalysts can be compared at less than equilibrium conversion. A test has also been developed to characterize abrasion loss of Claus catalysts, in contrast to the traditional method of determining physical properties by measuring crush strengths. Test results from a wide range of materials correlated well with actual pneumatic conveyance attrition. Substantial differences in Claus catalyst properties were observed as a result of using these tests.

  5. Initial conditions and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1987-01-01

    A theory of initial conditions is necessary for a complete explanation of the presently observed large scale structural features of the universe, and a quantum theory of cosmology is probably needed for its formulation. The kinematics of quantum cosmology are reviewed, and some candidates for a law of initial conditions are discussed. The proposal that the quantum state of a closed universe is the natural analog of the ground state for closed cosmologies and is specified by a Euclidean sum over histories is sketched. When implemented in simple models, this proposal is consistent with the most important large-scale observations.

  6. DICE: Disk Initial Conditions Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    DICE models initial conditions of idealized galaxies to study their secular evolution or their more complex interactions such as mergers or compact groups using N-Body/hydro codes. The code can set up a large number of components modeling distinct parts of the galaxy, and creates 3D distributions of particles using a N-try MCMC algorithm which does not require a prior knowledge of the distribution function. The gravitational potential is then computed on a multi-level Cartesian mesh by solving the Poisson equation in the Fourier space. Finally, the dynamical equilibrium of each component is computed by integrating the Jeans equations for each particles. Several galaxies can be generated in a row and be placed on Keplerian orbits to model interactions. DICE writes the initial conditions in the Gadget1 or Gadget2 (ascl:0003.001) format and is fully compatible with Ramses (ascl:1011.007).

  7. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  8. A Self-Instructional Device for Conditioning Accurate Prosody.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buiten, Roger; Lane, Harlan

    1965-01-01

    A self-instructional device for conditioning accurate prosody in second-language learning is described in this article. The Speech Auto-Instructional Device (SAID) is electro-mechanical and performs three functions: SAID (1) presents to the student tape-recorded pattern sentences that are considered standards in prosodic performance; (2) processes…

  9. Critical Conditions for Rill Initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying critical conditions of rill formation can be useful for a better understanding of soil erosion processes. Current studies lack a consensus and related rationale on how to describe these conditions. This study was based on the concepts that: (1) the flow shear stress available for erosio...

  10. Initial conditions and sampling for multifield inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C. E-mail: lpri691@aucklanduni.ac.nz

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the initial conditions problem for multifield inflation. In these scenarios the pre-inflationary dynamics can be chaotic, increasing the sensitivity of the onset of inflation to the initial data even in the homogeneous limit. To analyze physically equivalent scenarios we compare initial conditions at fixed energy. This ensures that each trajectory is counted once and only once, since the energy density decreases monotonically. We present a full analysis of hybrid inflation that reveals a greater degree of long range order in the set of ''successful'' initial conditions than was previously apparent. In addition, we explore the effective smoothing scale for the fractal set of successful initial conditions induced by the finite duration of the pre-inflationary phase. The role of the prior information used to specify the initial data is discussed in terms of Bayesian sampling.

  11. Accurate Orientation Estimation Using AHRS under Conditions of Magnetic Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nagesh; Bleakley, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Low cost, compact attitude heading reference systems (AHRS) are now being used to track human body movements in indoor environments by estimation of the 3D orientation of body segments. In many of these systems, heading estimation is achieved by monitoring the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the Earth's magnetic field can be locally distorted due to the proximity of ferrous and/or magnetic objects. Herein, we propose a novel method for accurate 3D orientation estimation using an AHRS, comprised of an accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer, under conditions of magnetic field distortion. The system performs online detection and compensation for magnetic disturbances, due to, for example, the presence of ferrous objects. The magnetic distortions are detected by exploiting variations in magnetic dip angle, relative to the gravity vector, and in magnetic strength. We investigate and show the advantages of using both magnetic strength and magnetic dip angle for detecting the presence of magnetic distortions. The correction method is based on a particle filter, which performs the correction using an adaptive cost function and by adapting the variance during particle resampling, so as to place more emphasis on the results of dead reckoning of the gyroscope measurements and less on the magnetometer readings. The proposed method was tested in an indoor environment in the presence of various magnetic distortions and under various accelerations (up to 3 g). In the experiments, the proposed algorithm achieves <2° static peak-to-peak error and <5° dynamic peak-to-peak error, significantly outperforming previous methods. PMID:25347584

  12. Novel quantum initial conditions for inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, W. J.; Lasenby, A. N.; Hobson, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel approach for setting initial conditions on the mode functions of the Mukhanov-Sasaki equation. These conditions are motivated by minimization of the renormalized stress-energy tensor and are valid for setting a vacuum state even in a context where the spacetime is changing rapidly. Moreover, these alternative conditions are potentially observationally distinguishable. We apply this to the kinetically dominated universe and compare with the more traditional approach.

  13. ZInCo: Zoomed Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaldi, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    ZInCo manipulates existing initial conditions (ICs) compatible with GADGET-2/3 (ascl:0003.001) ICs, allowing different flavors of zoom-in simulations rather then producing new ICs from scratch. The code can manipulate initial conditions with multiple types of particles, unlike the vast majority of zoom-in ICs codes available, preserving their properties and random field. This allows ZInCo to take advantage of other codes that produce ICs featuring a broad range of different cosmologies; it can be used also on existing ICs even in the unlikely case nothing is known about their properties. The code is written in C++ and parallelized using MPI.

  14. Accurate boundary conditions for exterior problems in gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Hariharan, S. I.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of exterior problems is typically accomplished by introducing an artificial, far field boundary and solving the equations on a truncated domain. For hyperbolic systems, boundary conditions at this boundary are often derived by imposing a principle of no reflection. However, waves with spherical symmetry in gas dynamics satisfy equations where incoming and outgoing Riemann variables are coupled. This suggests that natural reflections may be important. A reflecting boundary condition is proposed based on an asymptotic solution of the far field equations. Nonlinear energy estimates are obtained for the truncated problem and numerical experiments presented to validate the theory.

  15. Accurate boundary conditions for exterior problems in gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Hariharan, S. I.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of exterior problems is typically accomplished by introducing an artificial, far-field boundary and solving the equations on a truncated domain. For hyperbolic systems, boundary conditions at this boundary are often derived by imposing a principle of no reflection. However, waves with spherical symmetry in gas dynamics satisfy equations where incoming and outgoing Riemann variables are coupled. This suggests that natural reflections may be important. A reflecting boundary condition is proposed based on an asymptotic solution of the far-field equations. Nonlinear energy estimates are obtained for the truncated problem and numerical experiments presented to validate the theory.

  16. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  18. Initial models in conditionals: evidence from priming.

    PubMed

    Espino, Orlando; Santamaría, Carlos

    2008-05-01

    We examined the comprehension of different types of conditionals. We measured the reading time of sentences primed by different types of conditionals (Experiments 1 and 2). We found that the participants read not-p and not-q faster when it was primed by the conditional form p if q and they were slower to read p and q when it was primed by the conditional form p only if q. This effect disappeared in the second experiment, where the order of the elements was reversed (q and p and not-q and not-p). These results suggest that the conditional form p if q elicits an initial representation "from p to q" with two possibilities, while the conditional form p only if q elicits a reverse representation with only one possibility. The third experiment showed that there were effects of the order only for the conditional if p then q, which confirms the reverse representation hypothesis. We discuss the implications of these results for different theories of conditional comprehension. PMID:18630646

  19. On the initial condition of inflationary fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongliang; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    It is usually assumed that the inflationary fluctuations start from the Bunch-Davies (BD) vacuum and the iε prescription is used when interactions are calculated. We show that those assumptions can be verified explicitly by calculating the loop corrections to the inflationary two-point and three-point correlation functions. Those loop corrections can be resummed to exponential factors, which suppress non-BD coefficients and behave as the iε factor for the case of the BD initial condition. A new technique of loop chain diagram resummation is developed for this purpose. For the non-BD initial conditions which is setup at finite time and has not fully decayed, explicit correction to the two-point and three-point correlation functions are calculated. Especially, non-Gaussianity in the folded limit is regularized due to the interactions.

  20. Initial condition of stochastic self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jason K.; Sindi, Suzanne S.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a stable protein aggregate is regarded as the rate limiting step in the establishment of prion diseases. In these systems, once aggregates reach a critical size the growth process accelerates and thus the waiting time until the appearance of the first critically sized aggregate is a key determinant of disease onset. In addition to prion diseases, aggregation and nucleation is a central step of many physical, chemical, and biological process. Previous studies have examined the first-arrival time at a critical nucleus size during homogeneous self-assembly under the assumption that at time t =0 the system was in the all-monomer state. However, in order to compare to in vivo biological experiments where protein constituents inherited by a newly born cell likely contain intermediate aggregates, other possibilities must be considered. We consider one such possibility by conditioning the unique ergodic size distribution on subcritical aggregate sizes; this least-informed distribution is then used as an initial condition. We make the claim that this initial condition carries fewer assumptions than an all-monomer one and verify that it can yield significantly different averaged waiting times relative to the all-monomer condition under various models of assembly.

  1. Initial condition of stochastic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jason K; Sindi, Suzanne S

    2016-02-01

    The formation of a stable protein aggregate is regarded as the rate limiting step in the establishment of prion diseases. In these systems, once aggregates reach a critical size the growth process accelerates and thus the waiting time until the appearance of the first critically sized aggregate is a key determinant of disease onset. In addition to prion diseases, aggregation and nucleation is a central step of many physical, chemical, and biological process. Previous studies have examined the first-arrival time at a critical nucleus size during homogeneous self-assembly under the assumption that at time t=0 the system was in the all-monomer state. However, in order to compare to in vivo biological experiments where protein constituents inherited by a newly born cell likely contain intermediate aggregates, other possibilities must be considered. We consider one such possibility by conditioning the unique ergodic size distribution on subcritical aggregate sizes; this least-informed distribution is then used as an initial condition. We make the claim that this initial condition carries fewer assumptions than an all-monomer one and verify that it can yield significantly different averaged waiting times relative to the all-monomer condition under various models of assembly. PMID:26986290

  2. Accurate initiation by RNA polymerase II in a whole cell extract from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Woontner, M; Jaehning, J A

    1990-06-01

    We have developed a simple procedure for isolating a transcriptional extract from whole yeast cells which obviates the requirement for nuclear isolation. Detection of accurate mRNA initiation by RNA polymerase II in the extract requires the use of a sensitive assay, recently described by Kornberg and co-workers (Lue, N. F., Flanagan, P. M., Sugimoto, K., and Kornberg, R. D. (1989) Science 246, 661-664) that involves activation by a GAL4-VP16 fusion protein and a template lacking guanosine residues in the coding strand. The extract is prepared from fresh or frozen yeast cells by disruption with glass beads and fractionation of proteins by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The alpha-amanitin-sensitive transcripts synthesized in the assay were identical to those produced in a parallel assay using a yeast nuclear extract. The activity of the whole cell extract is lower per mg of protein than a nuclear extract but proportional to the volume of the nucleus relative to the whole cell. The optimal ranges for several reaction components including template, mono- and divalent cations, and nucleotide substrate concentration were determined. Under optimal conditions the whole cell extract produced a maximum of approximately 1 X 10(-2) transcripts/template molecule in 30 min. PMID:2188968

  3. Cosmological attractors and initial conditions for inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Inflationary α -attractor models in supergravity, which provide excellent fits to the latest observational data, are based on the Poincaré disk hyperbolic geometry. We refine these models by constructing Kähler potentials with built-in inflaton shift symmetry and by making a canonical choice of the Goldstino Kähler potential. The refined models are stable with respect to all scalar fields at all α ; no additional stabilization terms are required. The scalar potential V has a nearly Minkowski minimum at small values of the inflaton field φ and an infinitely long de Sitter (dS) valley of constant depth and width at large φ . Because of the infinite length of this shift-symmetric valley, the initial value of the inflaton field at the Planck density is expected to be extremely large. We show that the inflaton field φ does not change much until all fields lose their energy and fall to the bottom of the dS valley at large φ . This provides natural initial conditions for inflation driven by the inflaton field slowly rolling along the dS valley toward the minimum of the potential at small φ . A detailed description of this process is given for α -attractors in supergravity, but we believe that our general conclusions concerning naturalness of initial conditions for inflation are valid for a broad class of inflationary models with sufficiently flat potentials.

  4. Initial conditioning of the TFTR vacuum vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Owens, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    We report on the initial conditioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel prior to the initiation of first plasma discharges, and during subsequent operation with high power ohmically-heated plasmas. Following evacuation of the 86 m/sup 3/ vessel with the 10/sup 4/ 1/s high vacuum pumping system, the vessel was conditioned by a 15 A dc glow discharge in H/sub 2/ at a pressure of 5 mTorr. Rapid-pulse discharge cleaning was used subsequently to preferentially condition the graphite plasma limiters. The effectiveness of the discharge cleaning was monitored by measuring the exhaust rates of the primary discharge products (CO/C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, CH/sub 4/, and H/sub 2/O). After 175 hours of glow discharge treatment, the equivalent of 50 monolayers of C and O was removed from the vessel, and the partial pressures of impurity gases were reduced to the range of 10/sup -9/-10/sup -10/ Torr.

  5. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  6. The initial conditions of massive star evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Massive stars are some of the most energetic building blocks of galaxies. They are the progenitors of supernovae and of neutrons stars and black holes, the coallescence of which is one of the most likely detectable sources of gravitational waves. Yet their formation remains poorly understood. As a consequence, the mechanisms that set initial parameters such as rotation rates, multiplicity and orbital distributions are also ill constrained. These quantities are however critical as they affect the internal mixing, the rate and nature of the interactions, the stars final fates and their end-of-life products. In this presentation, I will review existing and new observations that allow us to better constraints these parameters, hence the initial conditions for massive star evolution.

  7. Causality, initial conditions, and inflationary magnetogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2016-05-01

    The post-inflationary evolution of inflation-produced magnetic fields, conventional or not, can change dramatically when two fundamental issues are accounted for. The first is causality, which demands that local physical processes can never affect superhorizon perturbations. The second is the nature of the transition from inflation to reheating and then to the radiation era, which determine the initial conditions at the start of these epochs. Causality implies that inflationary magnetic fields do not freeze into the matter until they have re-entered the causal horizon. The nature of the cosmological transitions and the associated initial conditions, on the other hand, determine the large-scale magnetic evolution after inflation. Put together, the two can slow down the adiabatic magnetic decay on superhorizon scales throughout the Universe's post-inflationary evolution and thus lead to considerably stronger residual magnetic fields. This is "good news" for both the conventional and the nonconventional scenarios of cosmic magnetogenesis. Mechanisms operating outside standard electromagnetism, in particular, do not need to enhance their fields too much during inflation in order to produce seeds that can feed the galactic dynamo today. In fact, even conventionally produced inflationary magnetic fields might be able to sustain the dynamo.

  8. Initial condition from the shadowed Glauber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sandeep; Singh, Sushant K.; Ghosh, Snigdha; Hasanujjaman, Md; Alam, Jane; Sarkar, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    The two component Monte-Carlo Glauber model predicts a knee-like structure in the centrality dependence of elliptic flow v2 in Uranium + Uranium collisions at √{sNN} = 193 GeV. It also produces a strong anti-correlation between v2 and dNch / dy in the case of top ZDC events. However, none of these features have been observed in data. We address these discrepancies by including the effect of nucleon shadowing to the two component Monte-Carlo Glauber model. Apart from addressing successfully the above issues, we find that the nucleon shadow suppresses the event by event fluctuation of various quantities, e.g. ε2 which is in accordance with expectation from the dynamical models of initial condition based on gluon saturation physics.

  9. MUSIC: MUlti-Scale Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom

    2013-11-01

    MUSIC generates multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological ‘zoom-in’ simulations. The code uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). MUSIC achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10-4 for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier space-induced interference ringing.

  10. Accurate label-free reaction kinetics determination using initial rate heat measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Jacobs, Denise; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate label-free methods or assays to obtain the initial reaction rates have significant importance in fundamental studies of enzymes and in application-oriented high throughput screening of enzyme activity. Here we introduce a label-free approach for obtaining initial rates of enzyme activity from heat measurements, which we name initial rate calorimetry (IrCal). This approach is based on our new finding that the data recorded by isothermal titration calorimetry for the early stages of a reaction, which have been widely ignored, are correlated to the initial rates. Application of the IrCal approach to various enzymes led to accurate enzyme kinetics parameters as compared to spectroscopic methods and enabled enzyme kinetic studies with natural substrate, e.g. proteases with protein substrates. Because heat is a label-free property of almost all reactions, the IrCal approach holds promise in fundamental studies of various enzymes and in use of calorimetry for high throughput screening of enzyme activity. PMID:26574737

  11. The problem of initial conditions in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, A. O.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu.

    2009-05-01

    The creation of a quantum Universe is described by a density matrix which yields an ensemble of universes with the cosmological constant limited to a bounded range Λmin<=Λ<=Λmax. The domain Λ<Λmin is ruled out by a cosmological bootstrap requirement (the self-consistent back reaction of hot matter). The upper cutoff results from the quantum effects of vacuum energy and the conformal anomaly mediated by a special ghost-avoidance renormalization. The cutoff Λmax establishes a new quantum scale-the accumulation point of an infinite sequence of garland-type instantons. The Euclidean path integral formalism used for the construction of the fundamental density matrix for a mixed state of the Universe is justified by proving its correspondence to the microcanonical ensemble in quantum cosmology. The cosmological evolution starting with these initial conditions also have some new features: the stage of cosmic acceleration can be followed by a big boost singularity-a rapid growth up to infinity of the scale factor acceleration parameter. From the developed approach it follows that the notion of the density matrix plays a more fundamental role than that was traditionally prescribed to it.

  12. Initial Conditions in the Averaging Cognitive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noventa, S.; Massidda, D.; Vidotto, G.

    2010-01-01

    The initial state parameters s[subscript 0] and w[subscript 0] are intricate issues of the averaging cognitive models in Information Integration Theory. Usually they are defined as a measure of prior information (Anderson, 1981; 1982) but there are no general rules to deal with them. In fact, there is no agreement as to their treatment except in…

  13. Experiments on initial and boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of three different models for the treatment of subsonic boundary conditions, applied to the problem of flow in a channel with a bump, are discussed. A preliminary discussion of the numerical treatment of the corners is presented.

  14. Initial conditions in high-energy collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreska, Elena

    This thesis is focused on the initial stages of high-energy collisions in the saturation regime. We start by extending the McLerran-Venugopalan distribution of color sources in the initial wave-function of nuclei in heavy-ion collisions. We derive a fourth-order operator in the action and discuss its relevance for the description of color charge distributions in protons in high-energy experiments. We calculate the dipole scattering amplitude in proton-proton collisions with the quartic action and find an agreement with experimental data. We also obtain a modification to the fluctuation parameter of the negative binomial distribution of particle multiplicities in proton-proton experiments. The result implies an advancement of the fourth-order action towards Gaussian when the energy is increased. Finally, we calculate perturbatively the expectation value of the magnetic Wilson loop operator in the first moments of heavy-ion collisions. For the magnetic flux we obtain a first non-trivial term that is proportional to the square of the area of the loop. The result is close to numerical calculations for small area loops.

  15. Bi-fluorescence imaging for estimating accurately the nuclear condition of Rhizoctonia spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To simplify the determination of the nuclear condition of the pathogenic Rhizoctonia, which currently needs to be performed either using two fluorescent dyes, thus is more costly and time-consuming, or using only one fluorescent dye, and thus less accurate. Methods and Results: A red primary ...

  16. Temporal variability of the initial threshold for motion - initial bed conditions and morphological trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Roy, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    set with a bed activity survey. We surveyed the presence/absence of tags inserted every meter into the bed surface layer upstream of the cross sections where the bedload traps were installed. The initial threshold for motion at Béard Creek is strongly dependant on the initial bed conditions such as the bed roughness and the local bed slope but also on the morphological trajectory of the sections, i.e. the mean elevation changes and the area over which the bed sediments were mobilised. For example, if the bed was mobilised over an extensive area, the initial threshold for motion decreases, which is probably due to the low level of organisation of freshly mobilised particles. These results show that the study of the temporal variations of the initial threshold for motion allows us to link bedload processes to morphological changes but also stresses the importance of past and current bed conditions in determining future morphological changes. Using initial conditions and previous changes, it could be possible to estimate more accurate value of the local initial threshold for motion at a specific time for a reach and probably increase the performance of bedload transport predictions.

  17. Tropical cyclone track forecasts using JMA model with ECMWF and JMA initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Munehiko; Nakazawa, Tetsuo; Aonashi, Kazumasa

    2012-05-01

    The JMA's Global Spectral Model (JMA/GSM) was run from the initial conditions of ECMWF, which are available in the YOTC data set, to distinguish between TC track prediction errors attributable to the initial conditions and those attributable to the NWP model. The average position error was reduced by about 10% by replacing the initial conditions, and in some cases, the predictions were significantly improved. In these cases, the low wavenumber component of the ECMWF analysis was found to account for most of the improvement. In addition, the observed tracks were captured by the JMA Typhoon Ensemble Prediction System (TEPS), which deals with initial condition uncertainties. In some cases, however, the replacement of the initial conditions did not improve the prediction even when the ECMWF forecast was accurate. In these cases, TEPS could not capture the observed track either, implying the need for dealing with uncertainties associated with the NWP model.

  18. Influence of initial conditions on compressible vorticity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, D.; Hussain, F.

    1993-11-01

    Prompted by the lack of a unique choice of pressure ( P) and density (ρ) fields for a compressible free vortex and by the observed dependence of turbulence dynamics on initial P and ρ in compressible simulations, we address the effects of initial conditions on the evolution of a single vortex, on the prototypical phenomenon of vortex reconnection, and on two-dimensional turbulence. Two previous choices of initial conditions used for numerical simulations of compressible turbulence have been: (i) both P and ρ uniform (constant initial conditions, CIC), and (ii) uniform ρ with P determined from the Poisson equation (constant density initial conditions, CDIC). We find these initial conditions to be inappropriate for compressible vorticity dynamics studies. Specifically, in compressible reconnection, the effects of baroclinic vorticity generation and shocklet formation cancel each other during early evolution for CDIC, thus leading to almost incompressible behavior. Although CIC captures compressibility effects, it incorrectly changes the initial vorticity distribution by introducing strong acoustic transients, thereby significantly altering the evolving dynamics. Here, a new initial condition, called polytropic initial condition (PIC), is proposed, for which the Poisson equation is solved for initially polytropically related P and ρ fields. PIC provides P and ρ distributions within vortices which are consistent with those observed in shock-wedge interaction experiment and also leads to compressible solutions with no acoustic transients. At low Mach number ( M), we show that the effects of all these three initial conditions can be predicted by low- M asymptotic theories of the Navier-Stokes equations. At high M, it is shown here that inappropriate initial conditions may alter the evolutionary dynamics and, hence, lead to wrong conclusions regarding compressibility effects. We argue that PIC is a more appropriate choice.

  19. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF HOT JUPITERS: INSENSITIVITY TO INITIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Beibei; Showman, Adam P.

    2013-06-10

    The ongoing characterization of hot Jupiters has motivated a variety of circulation models of their atmospheres. Such models must be integrated starting from an assumed initial state, which is typically taken to be a wind-free, rest state. Here, we investigate the sensitivity of hot-Jupiter atmospheric circulation to initial conditions with shallow-water models and full three-dimensional models. Those models are initialized with zonal jets, and we explore a variety of different initial jet profiles. We demonstrate that, in both classes of models, the final, equilibrated state is independent of initial condition-as long as frictional drag near the bottom of the domain and/or interaction with a specified planetary interior are included so that the atmosphere can adjust angular momentum over time relative to the interior. When such mechanisms are included, otherwise identical models initialized with vastly different initial conditions all converge to the same statistical steady state. In some cases, the models exhibit modest time variability; this variability results in random fluctuations about the statistical steady state, but we emphasize that, even in these cases, the statistical steady state itself does not depend on initial conditions. Although the outcome of hot-Jupiter circulation models depend on details of the radiative forcing and frictional drag, aspects of which remain uncertain, we conclude that the specification of initial conditions is not a source of uncertainty, at least over the parameter range explored in most current models.

  20. Consistent Initial Conditions for the DNS of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Relationships between diverse thermodynamic quantities appropriate to weakly compressible turbulence are derived. It is shown that for turbulence of a finite turbulent Mach number there is a finite element of compressibility. A methodology for generating initial conditions for the fluctuating pressure, density and dilatational velocity is given which is consistent with finite Mach number effects. Use of these initial conditions gives rise to a smooth development of the flow, in contrast to cases in which these fields are specified arbitrarily or set to zero. Comparisons of the effect of different types of initial conditions are made using direct numerical simulation of decaying isotropic turbulence.

  1. Accurate and robust registration of high-speed railway viaduct point clouds using closing conditions and external geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zheng; Song, Mengxiao; Guan, Haiyan; Yu, Yongtao

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes an automatic method for registering multiple laser scans without a control network. The proposed registration method first uses artificial targets to pair-wise register adjacent scans for initial transformation estimates; the proposed registration method then employs combined adjustments with closing conditions and external triangle constraints to globally register all scans along a long-range, high-speed railway corridor. The proposed registration method uses (1) closing conditions to eliminate registration errors that gradually accumulate as the length of a corridor (the number of scan stations) increases, and (2) external geometric constraints to ensure the shape correctness of an elongated high-speed railway. A 640-m high-speed railway viaduct with twenty-one piers is used to conduct experiments using our proposed registration method. A group of comparative experiments is undertaken to evaluate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed registration method to accurately register long-range corridors.

  2. Time Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at a Wind Tunnel Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, Bil; Streett, Craig L; Glass, Christopher E.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics code, an unsteady, time-accurate flow field about a Space Launch System configuration was simulated at a transonic wind tunnel condition (Mach = 0.9). Delayed detached eddy simulation combined with Reynolds Averaged Naiver-Stokes and a Spallart-Almaras turbulence model were employed for the simulation. Second order accurate time evolution scheme was used to simulate the flow field, with a minimum of 0.2 seconds of simulated time to as much as 1.4 seconds. Data was collected at 480 pressure taps at locations, 139 of which matched a 3% wind tunnel model, tested in the Transonic Dynamic Tunnel (TDT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed agreement within 5% in terms of location for peak RMS levels, and 20% for frequency and magnitude of power spectral densities. Grid resolution and time step sensitivity studies were performed to identify methods for improved accuracy comparisons to wind tunnel data. With limited computational resources, accurate trends for reduced vibratory loads on the vehicle were observed. Exploratory methods such as determining minimized computed errors based on CFL number and sub-iterations, as well as evaluating frequency content of the unsteady pressures and evaluation of oscillatory shock structures were used in this study to enhance computational efficiency and solution accuracy. These techniques enabled development of a set of best practices, for the evaluation of future flight vehicle designs in terms of vibratory loads.

  3. Sensitivity of a Simulated Derecho Event to Model Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003, the MMM division at NCAR has been experimenting cloud-permitting scale weather forecasting using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Over the years, we've tested different model physics, and tried different initial and boundary conditions. Not surprisingly, we found that the model's forecasts are more sensitive to the initial conditions than model physics. In 2012 real-time experiment, WRF-DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) at 15 km was employed to produce initial conditions for twice-a-day forecast at 3 km. On June 29, this forecast system captured one of the most destructive derecho event on record. In this presentation, we will examine forecast sensitivity to different model initial conditions, and try to understand the important features that may contribute to the success of the forecast.

  4. Initial capacity conditioning on electrochemical nickel hydroxide electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Conditioning is the initial cycling where cell capacity is usually unstable. The causes of the initial capacity build were examined. Gridless electrodes were fabricated to ensure mechanical homogeneity, so that a strain measured in one direction would be typical of a strain measured in the other directions. Plate hardness was also determined. These two parameters stabilize together.

  5. Impacts of initial conditions on monsoon intraseasonal forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiouhua; Wang, Bin; Bao, Qing; Liu, Ping; Lee, June-Yi

    2009-04-01

    Sensitivity of monsoon intraseasonal forecasting to different initial conditions is examined with the University of Hawaii Hybrid Coupled Model (UH_HCM). The target period is May to September 2004. We found that in the NCEP reanalysis the amplitudes of the convective activities associated with monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO) are smaller than the observed counterparts by a factor of two to three. Motivated by this fact, we carried out a suite of forecasting experiments to explore the impacts of initial conditions on intraseasonal forecast skills. Our results reveal that with the original NCEP reanalysis as initial conditions the monsoon intraseasonal forecast skills of 850-hPa zonal winds and rainfall are only about a week over the global tropics (30°S-30°N) and Southeast Asia (10°N-30°N, 60°E-120°E). The predictability increases steadily with increased amplitudes of MISO in the initial conditions. When the MISO signals in initial conditions are recovered to a level similar to that in the observations, monsoon intraseasonal forecast skills reach 25 days for 850-hPa zonal winds and 15 days for rainfall over both the global tropics and Southeast Asia. It is also found that high-frequency weather in initial conditions generally extends rainfall predictability by about 5 days.

  6. Can phenological models predict tree phenology accurately under climate change conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuine, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean Michel; García de Cortázar-Atauri, Inaki; Charrier, Guillaume; Lacointe, André; Améglio, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The onset of the growing season of trees has been globally earlier by 2.3 days/decade during the last 50 years because of global warming and this trend is predicted to continue according to climate forecast. The effect of temperature on plant phenology is however not linear because temperature has a dual effect on bud development. On one hand, low temperatures are necessary to break bud dormancy, and on the other hand higher temperatures are necessary to promote bud cells growth afterwards. Increasing phenological changes in temperate woody species have strong impacts on forest trees distribution and productivity, as well as crops cultivation areas. Accurate predictions of trees phenology are therefore a prerequisite to understand and foresee the impacts of climate change on forests and agrosystems. Different process-based models have been developed in the last two decades to predict the date of budburst or flowering of woody species. They are two main families: (1) one-phase models which consider only the ecodormancy phase and make the assumption that endodormancy is always broken before adequate climatic conditions for cell growth occur; and (2) two-phase models which consider both the endodormancy and ecodormancy phases and predict a date of dormancy break which varies from year to year. So far, one-phase models have been able to predict accurately tree bud break and flowering under historical climate. However, because they do not consider what happens prior to ecodormancy, and especially the possible negative effect of winter temperature warming on dormancy break, it seems unlikely that they can provide accurate predictions in future climate conditions. It is indeed well known that a lack of low temperature results in abnormal pattern of bud break and development in temperate fruit trees. An accurate modelling of the dormancy break date has thus become a major issue in phenology modelling. Two-phases phenological models predict that global warming should delay

  7. Accurate determination of fiber water-retaining capability at process conditions by headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; He, Liang

    2016-09-16

    This work reports on a method for the accurate determination of fiber water-retaining capability at process conditions by headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method. The method was based the HS-GC measurement of water vapor on a set closed vials containing in a given amount pulp with different amounts of water addition, from under-saturation to over-saturation. By plotting the equilibrated water vapor signal vs. the amount of water added in pulp, two different trend lines can be observed, in which the transition of the lines corresponds to fiber water-retaining capability. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good measurement precision (much better than the reference method) and good accuracy. The present method can be also used for determining pulp fiber water-retaining capability at the process temperatures in both laboratory research and mill applications. PMID:27554029

  8. Analysis of the effect of initial conditions on the initial development of a turbulent jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soong KI; Chung, Myung Kyoon; Cho, Ji Ryong

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the initial condition at the jet exit on the downstream evolution, particularly within the potential core length, were numerically investigated as well as with available experimental data. In order to select the most dependable computational model for the present numerical experiment, a comparative study has been performed with different turbulence models at k-epsilon level, and it was found that the k-epsilon-gammma model yields superior prediction accuracy over other conventional models. The calculated results show that the potential core length and the spreading rate the initial mixing layer are dependent on the initial length scale as well as the turbulent kinetic energy at the jet exit. Such effect of the initial length scale increases with higher initial turbulence level. An empirical parameter has been devised to collapse the calculated data of the potential core length and the spreading rate with various initial conditions onto a single curve.

  9. Possibilistic-clustering-based MR brain image segmentation with accurate initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qingmin; Deng, Yingying; Dou, Weibei; Ruan, Su; Bloyet, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance image analysis by computer is useful to aid diagnosis of malady. We present in this paper a automatic segmentation method for principal brain tissues. It is based on the possibilistic clustering approach, which is an improved fuzzy c-means clustering method. In order to improve the efficiency of clustering process, the initial value problem is discussed and solved by combining with a histogram analysis method. Our method can automatically determine number of classes to cluster and the initial values for each class. It has been tested on a set of forty MR brain images with or without the presence of tumor. The experimental results showed that it is simple, rapid and robust to segment the principal brain tissues.

  10. Third-order accurate entropy-stable schemes for initial-boundary-value conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svärd, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    We consider initial-boundary-value conservation laws with the objective to obtain high-order approximations. We study two different approaches to obtain third-order accuracy, local entropy stability and a global bound on the entropy. The results are applicable to, for example the Euler equations of gas dynamics, for which we present numerical results demonstrating the robustness and accuracy of the scheme.

  11. Initial conditions and Korteweg-de Vries solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Redekopp, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of rectangular initial data on the evolution of solitons governed by the Korteweg-de Vries equation is studied. Both isolated and separated disturbances are considered, providing some general insight into how the nature of the initial condition influences the appearance of solitons in the asymptotic state. The analytic approach is based on the inverse scattering transform which relates the initial condition to Schroedinger's equation. The results are used to model the initial shallow-water disturbances, and the results can be summarized by stating that the number of evolved solitons depends on the strength of each rectangular disturbance, the relative amplitudes of the rectangular disturbances, and the relative proximity of the disturbances.

  12. Fluctuating Glasma Initial Conditions and Flow in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2012-06-01

    We compute initial conditions in heavy ion collisions within the color glass condensate framework by combining the impact parameter dependent saturation model with the classical Yang-Mills description of initial Glasma fields. In addition to fluctuations of nucleon positions, this impact parameter dependent Glasma description includes quantum fluctuations of color charges on the length scale determined by the inverse nuclear saturation scale Qs. The model naturally produces initial energy fluctuations that are described by a negative binomial distribution. The ratio of triangularity to eccentricity ɛ3/ɛ2 is close to that in a model tuned to reproduce experimental flow data. We compare transverse momentum spectra and v2,3,4(pT) of pions from different models of initial conditions using relativistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution.

  13. Fluctuating glasma initial conditions and flow in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2012-06-22

    We compute initial conditions in heavy ion collisions within the color glass condensate framework by combining the impact parameter dependent saturation model with the classical Yang-Mills description of initial Glasma fields. In addition to fluctuations of nucleon positions, this impact parameter dependent Glasma description includes quantum fluctuations of color charges on the length scale determined by the inverse nuclear saturation scale Q(s). The model naturally produces initial energy fluctuations that are described by a negative binomial distribution. The ratio of triangularity to eccentricity ε(3)/ε(2) is close to that in a model tuned to reproduce experimental flow data. We compare transverse momentum spectra and v(2,3,4)(p(T)) of pions from different models of initial conditions using relativistic viscous hydrodynamic evolution. PMID:23004589

  14. On specification of initial conditions in turbulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Rollin, Bertrand; Andrews, Malcolm J

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that initial conditions have a significant influence on the evolution of a flow towards turbulence. This important finding offers a unique opportunity for turbulence control, but also raises the question of how to properly specify initial conditions in turbulence models. We study this problem in the context of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an interfacial fluid instability that leads to turbulence and turbulent mixing. It occurs when a light fluid is accelerated in to a heavy fluid because of misalignment between density and pressure gradients. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a key role in a wide variety of natural and man-made flows ranging from supernovae to the implosion phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Our approach consists of providing the turbulence models with a predicted profile of its key variables at the appropriate time in accordance to the initial conditions of the problem.

  15. Collapses of stellar protogalaxies from aspheric initial conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical experimens are presented which were intended to verify the independence of bar formation in rotating galaxy models from special initial conditions. Three-dimensional n-body programs were run starting from aspherical initial conditions characterized by particle rotational and peculiar velocities and offsets from sphericity for a set of 100,000 particles. All the initial configurations examined are observed to collapse to a thin form, overshoot, collapse again and again overshoot, with diameters and central densities similar to those observed under spheric initial conditions. Every aspheric collapse is also found to result in bar formation within two rotation periods, which is even sooner than in initially spherical conditions. In the intermediate stages of collapse, transient sheet patterns are found to be destroyed at asymmetries of 2-3%, while transient rings survived asymmetries of 6-7% but not 15-18%. It is noted that the results may be applicable to galaxy formation in the early universe, and possible mechanisms for the arresting of protogalactic collapse are indicated.

  16. HBT Effect with Fluctuating Initial Conditions and Continuous Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Y.; Grassi, F.; Socolowski, O., Jr.; Kodama, T.

    2005-02-01

    We study effects of the event-by-event fluctuation of the initial conditions and the continuous pion emission during the whole development of the hot and dense matter formed in high-energy collisions on the two-pion interferometry. Important deviations occur, from the standard version of hydrodynamics with smooth initial conditions and a sudden freeze-out on a T=Tfo hypersurface. Comparison with data at RHIC shows that this description can give account of the mT dependence of RL and Rs and significantly improves Ro with respect to the usual version.

  17. Accurate and Fast Convergent Initial-Value Belief Propagation for Stereo Matching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yiguang

    2015-01-01

    The belief propagation (BP) algorithm has some limitations, including ambiguous edges and textureless regions, and slow convergence speed. To address these problems, we present a novel algorithm that intrinsically improves both the accuracy and the convergence speed of BP. First, traditional BP generally consumes time due to numerous iterations. To reduce the number of iterations, inspired by the crucial importance of the initial value in nonlinear problems, a novel initial-value belief propagation (IVBP) algorithm is presented, which can greatly improve both convergence speed and accuracy. Second, .the majority of the existing research on BP concentrates on the smoothness term or other energy terms, neglecting the significance of the data term. In this study, a self-adapting dissimilarity data term (SDDT) is presented to improve the accuracy of the data term, which incorporates an additional gradient-based measure into the traditional data term, with the weight determined by the robust measure-based control function. Finally, this study explores the effective combination of local methods and global methods. The experimental results have demonstrated that our method performs well compared with the state-of-the-art BP and simultaneously holds better edge-preserving smoothing effects with fast convergence speed in the Middlebury and new 2014 Middlebury datasets. PMID:26349063

  18. Successional stage of biological soil crusts: an accurate indicator of ecohydrological condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Wilcox, Bradford P.; Van Scoyoc, Matthew V.; Phillips, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are a key component of many dryland ecosystems. Following disturbance, biological soil crusts will recover in stages. Recently, a simple classification of these stages has been developed, largely on the basis of external features of the crusts, which reflects their level of development (LOD). The classification system has six LOD classes, from low (1) to high (6). To determine whether the LOD of a crust is related to its ecohydrological function, we used rainfall simulation to evaluate differences in infiltration, runoff, and erosion among crusts in the various LODs, across a range of soil depths and with different wetting pre-treatments. We found large differences between the lowest and highest LODs, with runoff and erosion being greatest from the lowest LOD. Under dry antecedent conditions, about 50% of the water applied ran off the lowest LOD plots, whereas less than 10% ran off the plots of the two highest LODs. Similarly, sediment loss was 400 g m-2 from the lowest LOD and almost zero from the higher LODs. We scaled up the results from these simulations using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model. Modelling results indicate that erosion increases dramatically as slope length and gradient increase, especially beyond the threshold values of 10 m for slope length and 10% for slope gradient. Our findings confirm that the LOD classification is a quick, easy, nondestructive, and accurate index of hydrological condition and should be incorporated in field and modelling assessments of ecosystem health.

  19. Nurse initiated thrombolysis in the accident and emergency department: safe, accurate, and faster than fast track

    PubMed Central

    Heath, S; Bain, R; Andrews, A; Chida, S; Kitchen, S; Walters, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the time between arrival at hospital of a patient with acute myocardial infarction and administration of thrombolytic therapy (door to needle time) by the introduction of nurse initiated thrombolysis in the accident and emergency department. Methods: Two acute chest pain nurse specialists (ACPNS) based in A&E for 62.5 hours of the week were responsible for initiating thrombolysis in the A&E department. The service reverts to a "fast track" system outside of these hours, with the on call medical team prescribing thrombolysis on the coronary care unit. Prospectively gathered data were analysed for a nine month period and a head to head comparison made between the mean and median door to needle times for both systems of thrombolysis delivery. Results: Data from 91 patients were analysed; 43 (47%) were thrombolysed in A&E by the ACPNS and 48 (53%) were thrombolysed in the coronary care unit by the on call medical team. The ACPNS achieved a median door to needle time of 23 minutes (IQR=17 to 32) compared with 56 minutes (IQR=34 to 79.5) for the fast track. The proportion of patients thrombolysed in 30 minutes by the ACPNS and fast track system was 72% (31 of 43) and 21% (10 of 48) respectively (difference=51%, 95% confidence intervals 34% to 69%, p<0.05). Conclusion: Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction and administration of thrombolysis by experienced cardiology nurses in A&E is a safe and effective strategy for reducing door to needle times, even when compared with a conventional fast track system. PMID:12954678

  20. zeldovich-PLT: Zel'dovich approximation initial conditions generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstein, Daniel; Garrison, Lehman

    2016-05-01

    zeldovich-PLT generates Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) initial conditions (i.e. first-order Lagrangian perturbation theory) for cosmological N-body simulations, optionally applying particle linear theory (PLT) corrections. The code uses double precision internally, but output format can be set to single or double precision.

  1. Definition of boundary and initial conditions in the analysis of saturated ground-water flow systems; an introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O.L.; Reilly, T.E.; Bennett, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate definition of boundary and initial conditions is an essential part of conceptualizing and modeling ground-water flow systems. This report explains the properties of the seven most common boundary conditions encountered in ground-water systems and discusses major aspects of their application. It also discusses the significance and specification of initial conditions and evaluates some common errors in applying this concept to ground-water system models. (USGS)

  2. Time-Accurate Unsteady Pressure Loads Simulated for the Space Launch System at Wind Tunnel Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Kleb, William L.; Glass, Christopher E.; Streett, Craig L.; Schuster, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A transonic flow field about a Space Launch System (SLS) configuration was simulated with the Fully Unstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code at wind tunnel conditions. Unsteady, time-accurate computations were performed using second-order Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) for up to 1.5 physical seconds. The surface pressure time history was collected at 619 locations, 169 of which matched locations on a 2.5 percent wind tunnel model that was tested in the 11 ft. x 11 ft. test section of the NASA Ames Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between computation and experiment showed that the peak surface pressure RMS level occurs behind the forward attach hardware, and good agreement for frequency and power was obtained in this region. Computational domain, grid resolution, and time step sensitivity studies were performed. These included an investigation of pseudo-time sub-iteration convergence. Using these sensitivity studies and experimental data comparisons, a set of best practices to date have been established for FUN3D simulations for SLS launch vehicle analysis. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time DDES has been used in a systematic approach and establish simulation time needed, to analyze unsteady pressure loads on a space launch vehicle such as the NASA SLS.

  3. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-03-11

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni. PMID:25539927

  4. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback–Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni. PMID:25539927

  5. Generalized CMB initial conditions with pre-equality magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2008-06-15

    The most general initial conditions of cosmic microwave background anisotropies, compatible with the presence of pre-equality magnetic fields, are derived. When the plasma is composed of photons, baryons, electrons, cold dark matter particles and neutrinos, the initial data of the truncated Einstein-Boltzmann hierarchy contemplate one magnetized adiabatic mode and four (magnetized) nonadiabatic modes. After obtaining the analytical form of the various solutions, the Einstein-Boltzmann hierarchy is numerically integrated for the corresponding sets of initial data. The TT, TE and EE angular power spectra are illustrated and discussed for the magnetized generalization of the cold dark matter-radiation mode, of the baryon-radiation mode and of the nonadiabatic mode of the neutrino sector. Mixtures of initial conditions are examined by requiring that the magnetized adiabatic mode dominates over the remaining nonadiabatic contributions. In the latter case, possible degeneracies between complementary sets of initial data might be avoided through the combined analysis of the TT, TE and EE angular power spectra at high multipoles (i.e. l>1000)

  6. Initial conditions of inhomogeneous universe and the cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, Tomonori

    2016-06-01

    Deriving the Einstein field equations (EFE) with matter fluid from the action principle is not straightforward, because mass conservation must be added as an additional constraint to make rest-frame mass density variable in reaction to metric variation. This can be avoided by introducing a constraint 0δ(√‑g) = to metric variations δ gμν, and then the cosmological constant Λ emerges as an integration constant. This is a removal of one of the four constraints on initial conditions forced by EFE at the birth of the universe, and it may imply that EFE are unnecessarily restrictive about initial conditions. I then adopt a principle that the theory of gravity should be able to solve time evolution starting from arbitrary inhomogeneous initial conditions about spacetime and matter. The equations of gravitational fields satisfying this principle are obtained, by setting four auxiliary constraints on δ gμν to extract six degrees of freedom for gravity. The cost of achieving this is a loss of general covariance, but these equations constitute a consistent theory if they hold in the special coordinate systems that can be uniquely specified with respect to the initial space-like hypersurface when the universe was born. This theory predicts that gravity is described by EFE with non-zero Λ in a homogeneous patch of the universe created by inflation, but Λ changes continuously across different patches. Then both the smallness and coincidence problems of the cosmological constant are solved by the anthropic argument. This is just a result of inhomogeneous initial conditions, not requiring any change of the fundamental physical laws in different patches.

  7. Accurate First-Principles Spectra Predictions for Planetological and Astrophysical Applications at Various T-Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, M.; Nikitin, A. V.; Tyuterev, V.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of near infrared intensities of rovibrational transitions of polyatomic molecules is essential for the modeling of various planetary atmospheres, brown dwarfs and for other astrophysical applications 1,2,3. For example, to analyze exoplanets, atmospheric models have been developed, thus making the need to provide accurate spectroscopic data. Consequently, the spectral characterization of such planetary objects relies on the necessity of having adequate and reliable molecular data in extreme conditions (temperature, optical path length, pressure). On the other hand, in the modeling of astrophysical opacities, millions of lines are generally involved and the line-by-line extraction is clearly not feasible in laboratory measurements. It is thus suggested that this large amount of data could be interpreted only by reliable theoretical predictions. There exists essentially two theoretical approaches for the computation and prediction of spectra. The first one is based on empirically-fitted effective spectroscopic models. Another way for computing energies, line positions and intensities is based on global variational calculations using ab initio surfaces. They do not yet reach the spectroscopic accuracy stricto sensu but implicitly account for all intramolecular interactions including resonance couplings in a wide spectral range. The final aim of this work is to provide reliable predictions which could be quantitatively accurate with respect to the precision of available observations and as complete as possible. All this thus requires extensive first-principles quantum mechanical calculations essentially based on three necessary ingredients which are (i) accurate intramolecular potential energy surface and dipole moment surface components well-defined in a large range of vibrational displacements and (ii) efficient computational methods combined with suitable choices of coordinates to account for molecular symmetry properties and to achieve a good numerical

  8. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. The Initial Physical Conditions of Kepler-36 b and c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.; Morton, Timothy. D.

    2016-03-01

    The Kepler-36 planetary system consists of two exoplanets at similar separations (0.115 and 0.128 au), which have dramatically different densities. The inner planet has a density consistent with an Earth-like composition, while the outer planet is extremely low density, such that it must contain a voluminous H/He envelope. Such a density difference would pose a problem for any formation mechanism if their current densities were representative of their composition at formation. However, both planets are at close enough separations to have undergone significant evaporation in the past. We constrain the core mass, core composition, initial envelope mass, and initial cooling time of each planet using evaporation models conditioned on their present-day masses and radii, as inferred from Kepler photometry and transit timing analysis. The inner planet is consistent with being an evaporatively stripped core, while the outer planet has retained some of its initial envelope due to its higher core mass. Therefore, both planets could have had a similar formation pathway, with the inner planet having an initial envelope-mass fraction of ≲10% and core mass of ˜4.4 M⊕, while the outer had an initial envelope-mass fraction of the order of 15%-30% and core mass ˜7.3 M⊕. Finally, our results indicate that the outer planet had a long (≳30 Myr) initial cooling time, much longer than would naively be predicted from simple timescale arguments. The long initial cooling time could be evidence for a dramatic early cooling episode such as the recently proposed “boil-off” process.

  10. Can Impacts of Climate Change and Agricultural Adaptation Strategies Be Accurately Quantified if Crop Models Are Annually Re-Initialized?

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Bruno; Hyndman, David W.; Kendall, Anthony D.; Grace, Peter R.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of climate change impacts on global food production are generally based on statistical or process-based models. Process-based models can provide robust predictions of agricultural yield responses to changing climate and management. However, applications of these models often suffer from bias due to the common practice of re-initializing soil conditions to the same state for each year of the forecast period. If simulations neglect to include year-to-year changes in initial soil conditions and water content related to agronomic management, adaptation and mitigation strategies designed to maintain stable yields under climate change cannot be properly evaluated. We apply a process-based crop system model that avoids re-initialization bias to demonstrate the importance of simulating both year-to-year and cumulative changes in pre-season soil carbon, nutrient, and water availability. Results are contrasted with simulations using annual re-initialization, and differences are striking. We then demonstrate the potential for the most likely adaptation strategy to offset climate change impacts on yields using continuous simulations through the end of the 21st century. Simulations that annually re-initialize pre-season soil carbon and water contents introduce an inappropriate yield bias that obscures the potential for agricultural management to ameliorate the deleterious effects of rising temperatures and greater rainfall variability. PMID:26043188

  11. Definition of boundary and initial conditions in the analysis of saturated ground-water flow systems - An introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O. Lehn; Reilly, Thomas E.; Bennett, Gordon D.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate definition of boundary and initial conditions is an essential part of conceptualizing and modeling ground-water flow systems. This report describes the properties of the seven most common boundary conditions encountered in ground-water systems and discusses major aspects of their application. It also discusses the significance and specification of initial conditions and evaluates some common errors in applying this concept to ground-water-system models. An appendix is included that discusses what the solution of a differential equation represents and how the solution relates to the boundary conditions defining the specific problem. This report considers only boundary conditions that apply to saturated ground-water systems.

  12. Hydrological ensemble forecasting in mesoscale catchments: Sensitivity to initial conditions and value of reforecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundel, Felix; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2011-09-01

    Hydrological forecasts can benefit from model climatologies compiled from long, consistent, retrospective forecasts (reforecasts). Typical areas of application include the estimation of return periods for extreme events, the detection of model deficiencies, such as systematic errors or the calibration of current forecasts using the reforecasts, and suitable observations. One difficulty when creating long reforecasts is the availability of good states for the model initialization, as a sufficiently dense network of meteorological observations is rarely available in most catchments for a long period. With this study, the creation of forecast and reforecasts in such catchments is motivated by considering two aspects: first, a comparison where it is shown that hydrological forecasts benefit most from high-quality initial conditions on the basis of local observations, however, less accurate initial conditions using ERA-interim reanalysis are also sufficient to provide skillful hydrological forecasts useful for many users. Second, we demonstrate that hydrological reforecasts compiled without long-term meteorological observations have an additional value, e.g., they allow for more skillful runoff forecasts. Utilizing those reforecasts can compensate for forecast errors induced by less accurate initializations. For this study, hourly hydrological reforecasts, based on the PREcipitation-Runoff-EVApotranspiration HRU Model (PREVAH) were used, with an 18 year long, five-member global ensemble reforecast data set from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Variable Resolution Ensemble Prediction System (VarEPS) as forcing for lead times up to 10 days. Three mesoscale catchments of different characteristics in the Swiss Alps were analyzed.

  13. The microlocal spectrum condition, initial value formulations, and background independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottmeister, Alexander; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We analyze implications of the microlocal spectrum/Hadamard condition for states in a (linear) quantum field theory on a globally hyperbolic spacetime M in the context of a (distributional) initial value formulation. More specifically, we work in 3+1-split M ≅ ℝ × Σ and give a bound, independent of the spacetime metric, on the wave front sets of the initial data for a quasi-free Hadamard state in a quantum field theory defined by a normally hyperbolic differential operator P acting in a vector bundle E → π M . This aims at a possible way to apply the concept of Hadamard states within approaches to quantum field theory/gravity relying on a Hamiltonian formulation, potentially without a (classical) background metric g.

  14. Stochastic bias from non-Gaussian initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Ferraro, Simone; Smith, Kendrick M.; Green, Daniel E-mail: sferraro@princeton.edu E-mail: kmsmith@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we show that a stochastic form of scale-dependent halo bias arises in multi-source inflationary models, where multiple fields determine the initial curvature perturbation. We derive this effect for general non-Gaussian initial conditions and study various examples, such as curvaton models and quasi-single field inflation. We present a general formula for both the stochastic and the non-stochastic parts of the halo bias, in terms of the N-point cumulants of the curvature perturbation at the end of inflation. At lowest order, the stochasticity arises if the collapsed limit of the four-point function is boosted relative to the square of the three-point function in the squeezed limit. We derive all our results in two ways, using the barrier crossing formalism and the peak-background split method. In a companion paper [1], we prove that these two approaches are mathematically equivalent.

  15. Generating Optimal Initial Conditions for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C. L.; Riethmiller, D.; Statler, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    We review existing smoothed particle hydrodynamics setup methods and outline their advantages, limitations, and drawbacks. We present a new method for constructing initial conditions for smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations, and demonstrate this method on a number of applications. This new method is inspired by adaptive binning techniques using weighted Voronoi tessellations. Particles are placed and iteratively moved based on their proximity to neighbouring particles and the desired spatial resolution. This new method can satisfy arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements.

  16. Sensitivity of a Wave Structure to Initial Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Duval, Walter M. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity experiments aimed at quantifying effects of gentler via controlled sinusoidal forcing transmitted on the interface between two miscible liquids have shown the evolution of a quasi -stationary four-mode wave structure oriented vertically. The sensitivity of the wave structure to phase angle variation is investigated computationally. We show that a slight variation of the phase angle is sufficient to cause a bifurcation to a two-mode structure. The dependence of phase angle on wave structure is attributed to sensitivity on initial conditions due to the strong nonlinearity of the coupled field equations for the parametric space of interest.

  17. Liquefaction Potential of Unsaturated Nevada Sand at Different Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiting

    It has been tacitly assumed that liquefaction does not occur in unsaturated soils during seismic events, because pore air behaves as a cushion and excess pore water pressure is difficult to accumulate. During recent earthquakes, some slopes composed of unsaturated soils experienced large deformation similar to fluid flow. One explanation for this phenomenon is that the unsaturated slopes completely lost their effective stress and reached a state of liquefaction. The field observation shows controversial phenomenon against current understanding on soil liquefaction. This work was motivated to solve this controversy by experimentally studying the following two questions: 1) are unsaturated soils liquefiable? and 2) how do the initial conditions, including relative density, effective confining pressure, and degree of saturation affect the liquefaction potential of unsaturated soils? To answer the above questions, a series of strain-controlled undrained cyclic loading triaxial tests on saturated and unsaturated Nevada sand were conducted. The index properties studied included particle size distribution, maximum and minimum void ratios, and specific gravity. To provide data for future numerical modeling on unsaturated Nevada sand, hysteretic soil water characteristics curves under different relative densities were also measured. For triaxial tests on saturated Nevada sand, the effects of initial relative density (i.e. Dr=30%, 50%, and 70%) and effective confining pressure (i.e. s'c0 =50 kPa, 100 kPa, and 200 kPa) on soil liquefaction were studied. For unsaturated soil tests, besides initial relative density (Dr=50%) and effective confining pressure ( s'c0 =100 kPa), the effects of initial degree of saturation (S r0=90%, 95%) on liquefaction were also investigated. For saturated Nevada sand, the liquefaction potential decreased with an increase of relative density and effective confining pressure. When the other initial conditions were the same, the cycles needed to make

  18. Analyzing the sensitivity of drought recovery forecasts to land surface initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeChant, Caleb M.; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2015-07-01

    Droughts are complex hydro-meteorological phenomena, which are challenging to both quantify and predict. From the perspective of drought quantification, knowledge of the land surface conditions is vital for determining the impacts a drought event is having on both the environment and society. Although such land surface information is essential for quantifying drought in real-time, the precise effect of land surface moisture deficits on future drought conditions is unknown. Forecasting of recovery from drought events is undoubtedly reliant on its intensity, yet the lead time at which a drought can be expected to recover is poorly understood. Due to this gap in knowledge, this study attempts to quantify the expected lead time for drought recovery, and the rate of drought recovery, by examining the loss of sensitivity to initial conditions within a climatological forecast. From this perspective, the expected recovery time from a specific drought event is quantified, based on a case study in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Southwestern USA for two initialization dates in years 2003 through 2008. This study has ramifications for understanding the time of drought recovery, and highlights the importance of accurate land surface state estimation. With respect to recent studies, the experiments presented here suggest that forecasts can be sensitive to initial conditions at greater lead-times, and therefore drought conditions are potentially more persistent than previously thought.

  19. Automatic pose initialization for accurate 2D/3D registration applied to abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Shun; Lucas, Joseph; Liao, Rui

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) stenting can be greatly facilitated by overlaying the preoperative 3-D model of the abdominal aorta onto the intra-operative 2-D X-ray images. Accurate 2-D/3-D registration in 3-D space makes the 2-D/3-D overlay robust to the change of C-Arm angulations. By far, the 2-D/3-D registration methods based on simulated X-ray projection images using multiple image planes have been shown to be able to provide satisfactory 3-D registration accuracy. However, one drawback of the intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration methods is that the similarity measure is usually highly non-convex and hence the optimizer can easily be trapped into local minima. User interaction therefore is often needed in the initialization of the position of the 3-D model in order to get a successful 2-D/3-D registration. In this paper, a novel 3-D pose initialization technique is proposed, as an extension of our previously proposed bi-plane 2-D/3-D registration method for AAA intervention [4]. The proposed method detects vessel bifurcation points and spine centerline in both 2-D and 3-D images, and utilizes landmark information to bring the 3-D volume into a 15mm capture range. The proposed landmark detection method was validated on real dataset, and is shown to be able to provide a good initialization for 2-D/3-D registration in [4], thus making the workflow fully automatic.

  20. Spectator field dynamics in de Sitter and curvaton initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders E-mail: rose.lerner@helsinki.fi E-mail: antranbe@nbi.dk

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the stochastic behaviour of long wavelength modes of light spectator scalar fields during inflation. When starting from a classical field value, the probability distribution for the spectator both spreads out and moves towards an equilibrium distribution. We study the timescales for a mixed quadratic and quartic potential. The timescale of equilibration depends on the parameters of the model, and can be surprisingly large, more than thousands of e-folds for the majority of light spectators. These results imply that the initial conditions for spectator fields are not automatically erased during inflation. These general results can be used to determine the probability of the value of the zero-mode inside a Universe-sized patch, which is relevant for observations. As an example, we apply the results to the curvaton model to calculate the probability distribution of the curvature perturbation and discuss 'typical' Universes.

  1. Mean maps for cosmic web structures in cosmological initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, Han; Cohn, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Haloes, filaments, sheets and voids in the cosmic web can be defined in terms of the eigenvalues of the smoothed shear tensor and a threshold λth. Using analytic methods, we construct mean maps centred on these types of structures for Gaussian random fields corresponding to cosmological initial conditions. Each map also requires a choice of shear at the origin; we consider three possibilities. We find characteristic sizes, shapes and other properties of the central objects in these mean maps and explore how these properties change with varying the threshold and smoothing scale, i.e. varying the separation of the cosmic web into different kinds of components. The mean maps become increasingly complex as the threshold λth decreases to zero. We also describe scatter around these mean maps, subtleties which can arise in their construction, and some comparisons between haloes in the maps and collapsed haloes at final times.

  2. Longitudinal hydrodynamics from event-by-event Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read, Kenneth; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-02-02

    Here we investigate three-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of θ (20%-30%) expected at freeze-out for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, hydrodynamics where boost invariance holds at midrapidity is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. We conclude by arguing that developing experimental probes of boost invariance is necessary, and suggest some promising directions in this regard.

  3. Longitudinal hydrodynamics from event-by-event Landau initial conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read, Kenneth; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-02-02

    Here we investigate three-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of θ (20%-30%) expected at freeze-out for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, hydrodynamics where boost invariance holds at midrapidity ismore » inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. We conclude by arguing that developing experimental probes of boost invariance is necessary, and suggest some promising directions in this regard.« less

  4. Initial conditions for anisotropic extended-type inflationary universes

    SciTech Connect

    del Campo, S. )

    1992-05-15

    Recently, extended-type inflationary universe models have been proposed as an appealing approach for solving most of the cosmological puzzles'' that, in contrast with previous models, do not require a fine-tuning'' for the microphysical parameters present in the effective potential. These scenarios rest on a Brans-Dicke-type theory, where a nonminimal coupling of the form {ital f}({ital cphi}){ital R} is assumed, and it may or may not include a potential for the Brans-Dicke field. In its classical description, different extended inflationary universe scenarios are described, where anisotropy is taken into account. By using the Hartle-Hawking and the Vilenkin boundary conditions for the wave function of the Universe, the probability distributions for the initial states of these extended models in the case of a small anisotropy are determined and discussed.

  5. Predictability in France : atmospheric forcing or land surface initial conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, S.; Martin, E.; Céron, J.-P.; Regimbeau, F.

    2010-09-01

    A first study of a hydrological forecasting suite has already been done at seasonal time scales over France (Céron and al., 2010) in a context of adaptation for water resources management. The results showed the feasibility of hydrological seasonal forecasts by forcing the hydrometeorological model Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) with seasonal atmospheric forecasts from the DEMETER project. Scores were better for hydrological variables than for atmospheric variables for four river catchments for the spring season. The purpose of the present study is to quantify the sources of predictability of the hydrometeorological system. Two experiences were conducted in order to address this issue. The first experience consisted in testing the impact of the land surface initial conditions. We used realistic land surface initial state produced by the operational SIM model for the specific year and 9 random years of Safran atmospheric analyses (temperature and precipitation) from 1971 to 2001, in a consistent way with the previous study (Céron et al, 2010). The other atmospheric parameters (wind, specific humidity, long wave and short wave radiation and cloudiness) come from the SAFRAN climatology over the same period. The second experience was designed to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric forcing with 9 random years, chosen for the land surface initial state. The atmospheric forcing (temperature and precipitation) comes from the Safran analysis system for the corresponding year. Some results of this study will be presented on soil wetness index (SWI) forecasts and river flows forecasts for all stations in France. We will compare deterministic and probabilistic scores of the two experiences with those of the hydrological forecasting suite built with the seasonal forecasts from the DEMETER project. Perspectives for the downscaling of seasonal forecasts will be discussed in a last part. Céron J-P, Tanguy G, Franchistéguy L, Martin E, Regimbeau F and Vidal J-P, 2010. Hydrological

  6. THE SIGNATURE OF INITIAL CONDITIONS ON MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, V.; Alexakis, A. E-mail: alexakis@lps.ens.fr

    2014-06-20

    We demonstrate that the initial correlation between velocity and current density fluctuations can lead to the formation of enormous current sheets in freely evolving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. These coherent structures are observed at the peak of the energy dissipation rate and are the carriers of long-range correlations despite all of the nonlinear interactions during the formation of turbulence. The size of these structures spans our computational domain, dominating the scaling of the energy spectrum, which follows a E∝k {sup –2} power law. As the Reynolds number increases, the curling of the current sheets due to Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instabilities and reconnection modifies the scaling of the energy spectrum from k {sup –2} toward k {sup –5/3}. This transition occurs due to the decorrelation of the velocity and the current density which is proportional to Re{sub λ}{sup −3/2}. Finite Reynolds number behavior is observed without reaching a finite asymptote for the energy dissipation rate even for a simulation of Re{sub λ} ≅ 440 with 2048{sup 3} grid points. This behavior demonstrates that even state-of-the-art numerical simulations of the highest Reynolds numbers can be influenced by the choice of initial conditions and consequently they are inadequate to deduce unequivocally the fate of universality in MHD turbulence. Implications for astrophysical observations are discussed.

  7. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower. PMID:26457898

  8. Modeling the initial conditions of interacting galaxy pairs using Identikit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, S. Alireza; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Barnes, Joshua E.; Snyder, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    We develop and test an automated technique to model the dynamics of interacting galaxy pairs. We use Identikit as a tool for modelling and matching the morphology and kinematics of the interacting pairs of equal-mass galaxies. In order to reduce the effect of subjective human judgement, we automate the selection of phase space regions used to match simulations to data, and we explore how selection of these regions affects the random uncertainties of parameters in the best-fitting model. In this work, we use an independent set of GADGET SPH simulations as input data to determine the systematic bias in the measured encounter parameters based on the known initial conditions of these simulations. We test both cold gas and young stellar components in the GADGET simulations to explore the effect of choosing H I versus H α as the line-of-sight velocity tracer. We find that we can group the results into tests with good, fair, and poor convergence based on the distribution of parameters of models close to the best-fitting model. For tests with good and fair convergence, we rule out large fractions of parameter space and recover merger stage, eccentricity, pericentric distance, viewing angle, and initial disc orientations within 3σ of the correct value. All of tests on prograde-prograde systems have either good or fair convergence. The results of tests on edge-on discs are less biased than face-on tests. Retrograde and polar systems do not converge and may require constraints from regions other than the tidal tails and bridges.

  9. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  10. Ultrasound Fetal Weight Estimation: How Accurate Are We Now Under Emergency Conditions?

    PubMed

    Dimassi, Kaouther; Douik, Fatma; Ajroudi, Mariem; Triki, Amel; Gara, Mohamed Faouzi

    2015-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of sonographic estimation of fetal weight when performed at due date by first-line sonographers. This was a prospective study including 500 singleton pregnancies. Ultrasound examinations were performed by residents on delivery day. Estimated fetal weights (EFWs) were calculated and compared with the corresponding birth weights. The median absolute difference between EFW and birth weight was 200 g (100-330). This difference was within ±10% in 75.2% of the cases. The median absolute percentage error was 5.53% (2.70%-10.03%). Linear regression analysis revealed a good correlation between EFW and birth weight (r = 0.79, p < 0.0001). According to Bland-Altman analysis, bias was -85.06 g (95% limits of agreement: -663.33 to 494.21). In conclusion, EFWs calculated by residents were as accurate as those calculated by experienced sonographers. Nevertheless, predictive performance remains limited, with a low sensitivity in the diagnosis of macrosomia. PMID:26164286

  11. Implicit spectrally-accurate method for moving boundary problems using immersed boundary conditions concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, S. Z.; Floryan, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    A fully implicit, spectral algorithm for the analysis of moving boundary problem is described. The algorithm is based on the concept of immersed boundary conditions (IBC), i.e., the computational domain is fixed while the time dependent physical domain is submerged inside the computational domain, and is described in the context of the diffusion-type problems. The physical conditions along the edges of the physical domain are treated as internal constraints. The method eliminates the need for adaptive grid generation that follows evolution of the physical domain and provides sharp resolution of the location of the boundary. Various tests confirm the spectral accuracy in space and the first- and second-order accuracy in time. The computational cost advantage of the IBC method as compared with the more traditional algorithm based on the mapping concept is demonstrated.

  12. Star formation in mergers with cosmologically motivated initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, Wouter; Macciò, Andrea V.; Kannan, Rahul; Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-09-01

    We use semi-analytic models and cosmological merger trees to provide the initial conditions for multimerger numerical hydrodynamic simulations, and exploit these simulations to explore the effect of galaxy interaction and merging on star formation (SF). We compute numerical realizations of 12 merger trees from z = 1.5 to 0. We include the effects of the large hot gaseous halo around all galaxies, following recent observations and predictions of galaxy formation models. We find that including the hot gaseous halo has a number of important effects. First, as expected, the star formation rate on long time-scales is increased due to cooling of the hot halo and refuelling of the cold gas reservoir. Secondly, we find that interactions do not always increase the SF in the long term. This is partially due to the orbiting galaxies transferring gravitational energy to the hot gaseous haloes and raising their temperature. Finally, we find that the relative size of the starburst, when including the hot halo, is much smaller than previous studies showed. Our simulations also show that the order and timing of interactions are important for the evolution of a galaxy. When multiple galaxies interact at the same time, the SF enhancement is less than when galaxies interact in series. All these effects show the importance of including hot gas and cosmologically motivated merger trees in galaxy evolution models.

  13. The relationship between initial errorless learning conditions and subsequent performance.

    PubMed

    Poolton, J M; Masters, R S W; Maxwell, J P

    2005-06-01

    This experiment explores a suggestion by [Maxwell, J.P., Masters, R.S.W., Kerr, E., Weedon, E. (2001). The implicit benefit of learning without errors. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A 54, 1049-1068] that an initial bout of implicit motor learning confers beneficial performance characteristics, such as robustness under secondary task loading, despite subsequent explicit learning. Participants acquired a complex motor skill (golf putting) over 400 trials. The environment was constrained early in learning to minimize performance error. It was predicted that in the absence of explicit instruction, reducing error would prevent hypothesis testing strategies and the concomitant accrual of declarative (explicit) knowledge, thereby reducing dependence on working memory resources. The effect of an additional cognitive task on putting performance was used to assess reliance on working memory. Putting performance of participants in the Implicit-Explicit condition was unaffected by the additional cognitive load, whereas the performance of Explicit participants deteriorated. The relationship between error correction and episodic verbal reports suggested that the explicit group were involved in more hypothesis testing behaviours than the Implicit-Explicit group early in learning. It was concluded that a constrained, uninstructed, environment early in learning, results in procedurally based motor output unencumbered by disadvantages associated with working memory control. PMID:16087262

  14. Classical initial conditions for ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.

    2001-09-01

    We construct an analytical expression for the distribution of gluons in the state immediately following a heavy ion collision in the quasi-classical limit of QCD given by the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The resulting gluon number distribution function includes the effects of all multiple rescatterings of gluons with the nucleons of both colliding nuclei. The typical transverse momentum k ⊥ of the produced gluons is shown to be of the order of the saturation scale of the nuclei Q s, as predicted by Mueller. We analyze the properties of the obtained distribution and demonstrate that due to multiple rescatterings it remains finite (up to logarithms of k ⊥) in the soft transverse momentum limit of k ⊥≪Q s, unlike the usual perturbative initial conditions given by collinear factorization. We calculate the total number of produced gluons and show that it is proportional to the total number of gluons inside the nuclear wave function before the collision with the proportionality coefficient c≈2 ln2 .

  15. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas. PMID:27122050

  16. Effect of initial conditions on turbulent reattachment downstream of a backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Johnston, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The reattachment of a fully turbulent, two-dimentional shear layer downstream of a backward-facing step has been studied experimentally. The work examines the effect of variations in inlet conditions on the process of reattachment. A series of experiments was conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel using specialized instrumentation suited to the highly turbulent reversing flow near reattachment. Accurate characterization of the time-mean features of the reattaching flows was possible. Assuming linear scaling normalized on distance from reattachment, distributions of normalized pressure coefficient and forward flow fraction, and time-averaged skin friction coefficient appear universal for two-dimensional reattachment, independent of initial conditions and step height, for given duct geometry (area ratio) and for high step-height Reyolds numbers with thin separating boundary layers. The results suggest universal flow structure in the reattachment zone.

  17. On the accurate long-time solution of the wave equation in exterior domains: Asymptotic expansions and corrected boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the solution of scattering problems for the wave equation using approximate boundary conditions at artificial boundaries. These conditions are explicitly viewed as approximations to an exact boundary condition satisfied by the solution on the unbounded domain. We study the short and long term behavior of the error. It is provided that, in two space dimensions, no local in time, constant coefficient boundary operator can lead to accurate results uniformly in time for the class of problems we consider. A variable coefficient operator is developed which attains better accuracy (uniformly in time) than is possible with constant coefficient approximations. The theory is illustrated by numerical examples. We also analyze the proposed boundary conditions using energy methods, leading to asymptotically correct error bounds.

  18. Experimental study of infrared filaments under different initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirell, Daniel Joseph

    field that gives birth to multiphoton and avalanche ionization), (b) conical emission/supercontinuum generation, and (c) emitted THz radiation. The aim of all of this research is to gain a better understanding of filamentation so that we may learn how to control them for the applications of: (a) laser-induced lightning, (b) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, (c) LIDAR, (d) medical imaging and many more. In this dissertation we will focus on an experimental study of filamentation in air produced by 780 nm radiation, pulsewidths of 200 fs, and energies pulse of 9 mJ/pulse. We have used an aerodynamic window + vacuum system to study the difference between focusing filament forming pulses down initially in vacuum conditions to that where it is allowed to focus in atmosphere. Described herein is a new way to use an off-the-shelf, inexpensive and robust 1064 nm mirror to observe the beam profile and its evolution in the filament as well as the filaments spectral properties. In addition, experiments to test for the plasma have been conducted. The results of these experiments indicate filament sizes of 200mum, in contrast to the commonly reported value of 100pm. Filaments of this size exist over a length of approximately a meter which is 8 times longer than the associated Rayleigh range for such a spot size with a clear enhancement in filament persistence with the use of the aerodynamic window. In addition the appearance of newly generated "bluer" frequencies that is present under atmospheric focusing is ail but eliminated through an initial focusing of the beam in vacuum conditions. Plasma densities of 1016 e -/cm3 were measured using plasma interferometry.

  19. On initial conditions for the hot big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Bezrukov, F.; Gorbunov, D.; Shaposhnikov, M. E-mail: gorby@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2009-06-01

    We analyse the process of reheating the Universe in the electroweak theory where the Higgs field plays a role of the inflaton. We estimate the maximal temperature of the Universe and fix the initial conditions for radiation-dominated phase of the Universe expansion in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) and of the νMSM—the minimal extension of the SM by three right-handed singlet fermions. We show that the inflationary epoch is followed by a matter dominated stage related to the Higgs field oscillations. We investigate the energy transfer from Higgs-inflaton to the SM particles and show that the radiation dominated phase of the Universe expansion starts at temperature T{sub r} ≅ (3−15) × 10{sup 13} GeV, where the upper bound depends on the Higgs boson mass. We estimate the production rate of singlet fermions at preheating and find that their concentrations at T{sub r} are negligibly small. This suggests that the sterile neutrino Dark Matter (DM) production and baryogenesis in the νMSM with Higgs-driven inflation are low energy phenomena, having nothing to do with inflation. We study then a modification of the νMSM, adding to its Lagrangian higher dimensional operators suppressed by the Planck scale. The role of these operators in Higgs-driven inflation is clarified. We find that these operators do not contribute to the production of Warm Dark Matter (WDM) and to baryogenesis. We also demonstrate that the sterile neutrino with mass exceeding 100 keV (a Cold Dark Matter (CDM) candidate) can be created during the reheating stage of the Universe in necessary amounts. We argue that the mass of DM sterile neutrino should not exceed few MeV in order not to overclose the Universe.

  20. Accurately measuring sea level change from space: an ESA climate change initiative for MSL closure budget studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeais, JeanFrancois; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    Sea level is a very sensitive index of climate change and variability. Sea level integrates the ocean warming, mountain glaciers and ice sheet melting. Understanding the sea level variability and changes implies an accurate monitoring of the sea level variable at climate scales, in addition to understanding the ocean variability and the exchanges between ocean, land, cryosphere, and atmosphere. That is why Sea Level is one of the Essential Climate Variables (ECV) selected in the frame of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) program. It aims at providing long-term monitoring of the sea level ECV with regular updates, as required for climate studies. The program is now in its second phase of 3 year (following phase I during 2011-2013). The objectives are firstly to involve the climate research community, to refine their needs and collect their feedbacks on product quality. And secondly to develop, test and select the best algorithms and standards to generate an updated climate time series and to produce and validate the Sea Level ECV product. This will better answer the climate user needs by improving the quality of the Sea Level products and maintain a sustain service for an up-to-date production. This has led to the production of a first version of the Sea Level ECV which has benefited from yearly extensions and now covers the period 1993-2014. Within phase II, new altimeter standards have been developed and tested in order to reprocess the dataset with the best standards for climate studies. The reprocessed ECV will be released in summer 2016. We will present the main achievements of the ESA CCI Sea Level Project. On the one hand, the major steps required to produce the 22 years climate time series are briefly described: collect and refine the user requirements, development of adapted algorithms for climate applications and specification of the production system. On the other hand, the product characteristics are described as well as the results from product

  1. Accurately measuring sea level change from space: an ESA Climate Change Initiative for MSL closure budget studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeais, JeanFrancois; Cazenave, Anny; Ablain, Michael; Larnicol, Gilles; Benveniste, Jerome; Johannessen, Johnny; Timms, Gary; Andersen, Ole; Cipollini, Paolo; Roca, Monica; Rudenko, Sergei; Fernandes, Joana; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Quartly, Graham; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Meyssignac, Benoit; Scharffenberg, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sea level is a very sensitive index of climate change and variability. Sea level integrates the ocean warming, mountain glaciers and ice sheet melting. Understanding the sea level variability and changes implies an accurate monitoring of the sea level variable at climate scales, in addition to understanding the ocean variability and the exchanges between ocean, land, cryosphere, and atmosphere. That is why Sea Level is one of the Essential Climate Variables (ECV) selected in the frame of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) program. It aims at providing long-term monitoring of the sea level ECV with regular updates, as required for climate studies. The program is now in its second phase of 3 year (following phase I during 2011-2013). The objectives are firstly to involve the climate research community, to refine their needs and collect their feedbacks on product quality. And secondly to develop, test and select the best algorithms and standards to generate an updated climate time series and to produce and validate the Sea Level ECV product. This will better answer the climate user needs by improving the quality of the Sea Level products and maintain a sustain service for an up-to-date production. This has led to the production of the Sea Level ECV which has benefited from yearly extensions and now covers the period 1993-2014. We will firstly present the main achievements of the ESA CCI Sea Level Project. On the one hand, the major steps required to produce the 22 years climate time series are briefly described: collect and refine the user requirements, development of adapted algorithms for climate applications and specification of the production system. On the other hand, the product characteristics are described as well as the results from product validation, performed by several groups of the ocean and climate modeling community. At last, new altimeter standards have been developed and the best one have been recently selected in order to produce a full

  2. Effects of the inlet conditions and blood models on accurate prediction of hemodynamics in the stented coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Wanhua

    2015-05-01

    Hemodynamics altered by stent implantation is well-known to be closely related to in-stent restenosis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been used to investigate the hemodynamics in stented arteries in detail and help to analyze the performances of stents. In this study, blood models with Newtonian or non-Newtonian properties were numerically investigated for the hemodynamics at steady or pulsatile inlet conditions respectively employing CFD based on the finite volume method. The results showed that the blood model with non-Newtonian property decreased the area of low wall shear stress (WSS) compared with the blood model with Newtonian property and the magnitude of WSS varied with the magnitude and waveform of the inlet velocity. The study indicates that the inlet conditions and blood models are all important for accurately predicting the hemodynamics. This will be beneficial to estimate the performances of stents and also help clinicians to select the proper stents for the patients.

  3. Experiments using new initial soil moisture conditions and soil map in the Eta model over La Plata Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Moira E.; Tomasella, Javier; Rodriguez, Daniel A.; Chou, Sin Chan

    2013-08-01

    An effort towards a more accurate representation of soil moisture and its impact on the modeling of weather systems is presented. Sensitivity tests of precipitation to soil type and soil moisture changes are carried out using the atmospheric Eta model for the numerical simulation of the development of a mesoscale convective system over northern Argentina. Modified initial soil moisture conditions were obtained from a hydrological balance model developed and running operationally at INPE. A new soil map was elaborated using the available soil profile information from Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina and depicts 18 different soil types. Results indicate that more accurate initial soil moisture conditions and incorporating a new soil map with hydraulic parameters, more representative of South American soils, improve daily total precipitation forecasts both in quantitative and spatial representations.

  4. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy (≲0.4 kB nucleon-1) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy (≳6 kB nucleon-1) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy (˜4 × 1050 erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  5. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein (1990) to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy ($\\lesssim 0.4\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy ($\\gtrsim 6\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy ($\\sim 4\\times 10^{50}$ erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  6. Cross-Modal Transfer of Conditioned Suppression in Rats: Effects of US Intensity and Extinction of the Initial Conditioning Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Nobutaka; Nakajima, Sadahiko; Tamai, Noriko

    2004-01-01

    In conditioned suppression of water licking behavior by rats, we obtained data indicating general transfer of fear conditioning. A series of experiments resulted in two major findings. First, pairing of a neutral stimulus with a shock in the initial conditioning task facilitated acquisition of subsequent fear conditioning to another neutral…

  7. Classification of Initial conditions required for Substorm prediction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Spencer, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate different classes of substorms that occur as a result of various drivers such as the conditions in the solar wind and the internal state of the magnetosphere ionosphere system during the geomagnetic activity. In performing our study, we develop and use our low order physics based nonlinear model of the magnetosphere called WINDMI to establish the global energy exchange between the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere by constraining the model results to satellite and ground measurements. On the other hand, we make quantitative and qualitative comparisons between our low order model with available MHD, multi-fluid and ring current simulations in terms of the energy transfer between the geomagnetic tail, plasma sheet, field aligned currents, ionospheric currents and ring current, during isolated substorms, storm time substorms, and sawtooth events. We use high resolution solar wind data from the ACE satellite, measurements from the CLUSTER and THEMIS missions satellites, and ground based magnetometer measurements from SUPERMAG and WDC Kyoto, to further develop our low order physics based model. Finally, we attempt to answer the following questions: 1) What conditions in the solar wind influence the type of substorm event. This includes the IMF strength and orientation, the particle densities, velocities and temperatures, and the timing of changes such as shocks, southward turnings or northward turnings of the IMF. 2) What is the state of the magnetosphere ionosphere system before an event begins. These are the steady state conditions prior to an event, if they exist, which produce the satellite and ground based measurements matched to the WINDMI model. 3) How does the prior state of the magnetosphere influence the transition into a particular mode of behavior under solar wind forcing. 4) Is it possible to classify the states of the magnetosphere into distinct categories depending on pre-conditioning, and solar wind forcing conditions? 5) Can we

  8. Recovery methods of the dragonfly from irregular initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melfi, James; Leonardo, Anthony; Wang, Jane

    We release dragonflies from a magnetic tether in a wide range of initial orientations, which results in them utilizing multiple methods to regain their typical flight orientation. Special focus is placed on dropping them while upside down, as the recovery method used is a purely rolling motion. Filming this stereotypical motion with a trio of high speed cameras at 4000 fps, we capture detailed body and wing kinematics data to determine how the dragonfly generates this motion. By replaying the flights within a computer simulation, we can isolate the significant changes to wing kinematics, and find that it is an asymmetry in the wing pitch which generates the roll. Further investigation demonstrates that this choice is highly dependent upon the state of the dragonfly, and as such our results indicate the dragonfly both tracks its current state, and changes its mid-flight control mechanisms accordingly.

  9. Spin-up behavior and effects of initial conditions for an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, Alimatou; Welty, Claire; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2015-04-01

    Initial conditions have been shown to have a strong effect on outputs of surface water models, but their impact on integrated hydrologic models is not well documented. We investigated the effects of initial conditions on an integrated hydrologic model of a 5632 km2 domain in the northeastern U.S. Simulations were run for the year 1980 using four initial conditions spanning a range of average depth to water table, including 1 m ("wet"), 3m, 5m, and 7 m ("dry") below land surface. Model outputs showed significant effects of initial conditions on basin-averaged variables such as subsurface storage, surface storage, and surface runoff, with the greatest impact observed on surface storage and runoff. Effects of initial conditions were related to meteorological conditions, with precipitation reducing the effects of initial conditions on surface storage and runoff. Additionally, feedbacks between soil moisture and land-energy fluxes affected the impacts of initial conditions: higher temperatures magnified the differences in storage, recharge, and discharge among the four initial-condition scenarios. Ten year recursive runs were conducted for the wet and dry scenarios. Spin-up times varied by model components and were considerably smaller for land-surface states and fluxes. Spin-up for dry initial conditions was slower than for wet initial conditions, indicating longer system memory for dry initial conditions. These variations in persistence of initial conditions should be taken into consideration when designing model initialization approaches. More broadly, this behavior is indicative of increased persistence of the effects of dry years as opposed to wet years in hydrologic systems.

  10. Validation of the criteria for initiating the cleaning of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) ductwork under real conditions.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Jacques; Marchand, Geneviève; Cloutier, Yves; Lavoué, Jérôme

    2011-08-01

    Dust accumulation in the components of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is a potential source of contaminants. To date, very little information is available on recognized methods for assessing dust buildup in these systems. The few existing methods are either objective in nature, involving numerical values, or subjective in nature, based on experts' judgments. An earlier project aimed at assessing different methods of sampling dust in ducts was carried out in the laboratories of the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST). This laboratory study showed that all the sampling methods were practicable, provided that a specific surface-dust cleaning initiation criterion was used for each method. However, these conclusions were reached on the basis of ideal conditions in a laboratory using a reference dust. The objective of this present study was to validate these laboratory results in the field. To this end, the laboratory sampling templates were replicated in real ducts and the three sampling methods (the IRSST method, the method of the U.S. organization National Air Duct Cleaner Association [NADCA] and that of the French organization Association pour la Prévention et l'Étude de la Contamination [ASPEC]) were used simultaneously in a statistically representative number of systems. The air return and supply ducts were also compared. Cleaning initiation criteria under real conditions were found to be 6.0 mg/100 cm(2) using the IRSST method, 2.0 mg/100 cm(2) using the NADCA method, and 23 mg/100 cm(2) using the ASPEC method. In the laboratory study, the criteria using the same methods were 6.0 for the IRSST method, 2.0 for the NADCA method, and 3.0 for the ASPEC method. The laboratory criteria for the IRSST and NADCA methods were therefore validated in the field. The ASPEC criterion was the only one to change. The ASPEC method therefore allows for the most accurate evaluation of dust accumulation in HVAC

  11. Impact of initial and boundary conditions on preferential flow.

    PubMed

    Hincapié, Ingrid; Germann, Peter F

    2009-02-16

    Preferential flow in soil is approached by a water-content wave, WCW, that proceeds downward from the ground surface. WCWs were obtained from sprinkler experiments with infiltration rates varying from 5 to 40 mm h(-1). TDR-probes and tensiometers measured volumetric water contents theta(z,t) at seven depths, and capillary heads, h(z,t) at six depths in a column of an undisturbed soil. The wave is characterized by the velocity of the wetting front, c(W), the amplitude, w(S), and the final water content, theta*. We tested with uni-variate and bi-variate linear regressions the impacts of initial volumetric water contents, theta(ini), and input rates, q(S), on c(W), w(S) and theta*. The test showed that theta(ini) influenced theta* and w(S) and q(S) effected c(W). The expected proportionality of w(S) approximately = qs(1/3) was weak and c(W) approximately = qs(2/3) was strong. PMID:19012995

  12. An accurately preorganized IRES RNA structure enables eIF4G capture for initiation of viral translation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shunsuke; Kumar, Parimal; Hellen, Christopher U T; D'Souza, Victoria M; Wagner, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    Many viruses bypass canonical cap-dependent translation in host cells by using internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) in their transcripts; IRESs hijack initiation factors for the assembly of initiation complexes. However, it is currently unknown how IRES RNAs recognize initiation factors that have no endogenous RNA binding partners; in a prominent example, the IRES of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) interacts with the HEAT-1 domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). Here we report the solution structure of the J-K region of this IRES and show that its stems are precisely organized to position protein-recognition bulges. This multisite interaction mechanism operates on an all-or-nothing principle in which all domains are required. This preorganization is accomplished by an 'adjuster module': a pentaloop motif that acts as a dual-sided docking station for base-pair receptors. Because subtle changes in the orientation abrogate protein capture, our study highlights how a viral RNA acquires affinity for a target protein. PMID:27525590

  13. Effects of initial conditions on a single jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of jet inlet flow conditions has been conducted for the isothermal mixing of a single jet injected into a crossflow. Jet penetration and mixing was studied using planar Mie scattering to measure time-averaged jet mixture fraction distributions. The effects of 'passive' control methods such as jet 'tabs' and jet swirl are reported. Mixing effectiveness, determined using a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of the mean jet concentration distributions, was compared to a baseline case of a round jet injected into a uniform crossflow. All results are compared at a jet-to-mainstream momentum-flux ratio of 8.5. In the near-field, the mixing rates are similar to, or less than, the baseline configuration using this measure of mixedness. None of the tested configurations appear to significantly augment mixing within a downstream distance of 3 diameters of an equivalent-area round orifice.

  14. Modeling thermal ignition and the initial conditions for internal burning in PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Bryan

    2009-06-01

    Work has been ongoing in our group for several years to produce a thermal ignition model for HMX based plastic bonded explosives valid over the entire temperature range of energetic response. We have made considerable progress recently, resulting in both the first broadly accurate model of this type and the possible identification of a crucial component of the chemical mechanism responsible for thermal ignition and decomposition. I will present a new model of thermal ignition for HMX formulations that is based on this recent progress. The model is similar in kind, but very different in detail from previous models produced by us and others. As has been the case for our previous models it is based entirely on known processes in the decomposition of HMX and is highly constrained by independent measurements. We have applied the model in simple calculations of ignition time over the full temperature range of energetic response for HMX, including directly observed ignition induced by fast shear and compression. I will also present new calculations relevant to the initial conditions for internal burning subsequent to ignition in low boundary temperature thermal explosion experiments. Simplified gas phase chemistry relevant to both dark and bright zone burning in HMX has been included and leads to a second, high temperature and pressure ignition zone in this environment. I will discuss experimental support for these calculations and the ramifications for internal pressures at ignition responsible for driving initial subsonic burning subsequent to ignition.

  15. 42 CFR 418.54 - Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive assessment of the patient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Initial and... Conditions of Participation: Patient Care § 418.54 Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive... needs of the patient's family and other individuals focusing on the social, spiritual, and...

  16. 42 CFR 418.54 - Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive assessment of the patient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Initial and... Conditions of Participation: Patient Care § 418.54 Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive... needs of the patient's family and other individuals focusing on the social, spiritual, and...

  17. Do initial conditions matter? A comparison of model climatologies generated from different initial states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.; Cohen, C.; Wu, P.

    1981-01-01

    A coarse mesh (8 by 10) 7 layer global climate model was used to compute 15 months of meteorological history in two perpetual January experiments on a water planet (without continents) with a zonally symmetric climatological January sea surface temperature field. In the first of the two water planet experiments the initial atmospheric state was a set of zonal mean values of specific humidity, temperature, and wind at each latitude. In the second experiment the model was initialized with globally uniform mean values of specific humidity and temperature on each sigma level surface, constant surface pressure (1010 mb), and zero wind everywhere. A comparison was made of the mean January climatic states generated by the two water planet experiments. The first two months of each 15 January run were discarded, and 13 month averages were computed from months 3 through 15.

  18. Initiation of clement surface conditions on the earliest Earth

    PubMed Central

    Sleep, N. H.; Zahnle, K.; Neuhoff, P. S.

    2001-01-01

    In the beginning the surface of the Earth was extremely hot, because the Earth as we know it is the product of a collision between two planets, a collision that also created the Moon. Most of the heat within the very young Earth was lost quickly to space while the surface was still quite hot. As it cooled, the Earth's surface passed monotonically through every temperature regime between silicate vapor to liquid water and perhaps even to ice, eventually reaching an equilibrium with sunlight. Inevitably the surface passed through a time when the temperature was around 100°C at which modern thermophile organisms live. How long this warm epoch lasted depends on how long a thick greenhouse atmosphere can be maintained by heat flow from the Earth's interior, either directly as a supplement to insolation, or indirectly through its influence on the nascent carbonate cycle. In both cases, the duration of the warm epoch would have been controlled by processes within the Earth's interior where buffering by surface conditions played little part. A potentially evolutionarily significant warm period of between 105 and 107 years seems likely, which nonetheless was brief compared to the vast expanse of geological time. PMID:11259665

  19. Initiation of clement surface conditions on the earliest Earth.

    PubMed

    Sleep, N H; Zahnle, K; Neuhoff, P S

    2001-03-27

    In the beginning the surface of the Earth was extremely hot, because the Earth as we know it is the product of a collision between two planets, a collision that also created the Moon. Most of the heat within the very young Earth was lost quickly to space while the surface was still quite hot. As it cooled, the Earth's surface passed monotonically through every temperature regime between silicate vapor to liquid water and perhaps even to ice, eventually reaching an equilibrium with sunlight. Inevitably the surface passed through a time when the temperature was around 100 degrees C at which modern thermophile organisms live. How long this warm epoch lasted depends on how long a thick greenhouse atmosphere can be maintained by heat flow from the Earth's interior, either directly as a supplement to insolation, or indirectly through its influence on the nascent carbonate cycle. In both cases, the duration of the warm epoch would have been controlled by processes within the Earth's interior where buffering by surface conditions played little part. A potentially evolutionarily significant warm period of between 10(5) and 10(7) years seems likely, which nonetheless was brief compared to the vast expanse of geological time. PMID:11259665

  20. Accurate initiation of mRNA synthesis in extracts from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Woontner, M; Jaehning, J A

    1993-12-01

    We demonstrate the successful adaptation to other yeast species of a protocol previously described for production of transcriptionally active whole cell extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Woontner and Jaehning, 1990, J. Biol. Chem. 265, 8979-8982). Extracts prepared from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata were all capable of initiating transcription from a template containing the S. cerevisiae CYC1 TATA box fused to a G-less cassette. Transcription in all of the extracts was sensitive to inhibition by alpha-amanitin, indicating that it was catalysed by RNA polymerase II, and was dramatically stimulated by the chimeric activator GAL4/VP16. The different extracts used different subsets of a group of three initiation sites. PMID:8154183

  1. Cl atom initiated oxidation of 1-alkenes under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walavalkar, M.; Sharma, A.; Alwe, H. D.; Pushpa, K. K.; Dhanya, S.; Naik, P. D.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2013-03-01

    In view of the importance of the oxidation pathways of alkenes in the troposphere, and the significance of Cl atom as an oxidant in marine boundary layer (MBL) and polluted industrial atmosphere, the reactions of four 1-alkenes (C6-C9) with Cl atoms are investigated. The rate coefficients at 298 K are measured to be (4.0 ± 0.5), (4.4 ± 0.7), (5.5 ± 0.9) and (5.9 ± 1.7) × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for 1-hexene, 1-heptene, 1-octene and 1-nonene, respectively. The quoted errors include the experimental 2σ, along with the error in the reference rate coefficients. From the systematic increase in the rate coefficients with the number of carbon atoms, an approximate value for the average rate coefficient for hydrogen abstraction per CH2 group in alkenes is estimated to be (4.9 ± 0.3) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Based on these rate coefficients, the contribution of Cl atom reactions towards the degradation of these molecules is found to be comparable to that of OH radical reactions, under MBL conditions. The products identified in gas phase indicate that Cl atom addition occurs mainly at the terminal carbon, leading to the formation of 1-chloro-2-ketones and 1-chloro-2-ols. The major gas phase products from the alkenyl radicals (formed by H atom abstraction) are different positional isomers of long chain enols and enones. A preference for dissociation leading to an allyl radical, resulting in aldehydes, lower by three carbon atoms, is indicated. The observed relative yields suggest that in general, the increased contribution of the reactions of Cl atoms towards degradation of 1-alkenes in NOx free air does not result in an increase in the generation of small aldehydes (carbon number < 4), including chloroethanal, as compared to that in the reaction of 1-butene.

  2. Remediation of pollution in a river by unsteady aeration with arbitrary initial and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, F. N.; Dimian, M. F.; Wadi, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    The most important parameter controlling the water quality is the dissolved oxygen Y(x, t) because it is very essential for aquatic life. An analytic solution is presented for unsteady equation representing the concentration of the dissolved oxygen Y(x, t) along a river at any time t. The solution is obtained by using Laplace transformation technique. Adjoin solution techniques are used as boundary conditions to solve the equations. The variations of Y(x, t) with time t from t = 0 up to t → ∞ (the steady state case) and with the parameters of the flow are taken into account in our study. It is shown that Y(x, t) increases as t increases, keeping the other parameters constant, but Y(x, t) decreases as the added pollutant rate along the river q increases. The adjoin solution techniques used in this work are effective and accurate for solving the equations representing the concentration of the dissolved oxygen Y(x, t) when arbitrary initial and boundary conditions are given. The details are demonstrated in graphs.

  3. Rescattering effects on intensity interferometry and initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang

    The properties of the quark-gluon plasma are being thoroughly studied by utilizing relativistic heavy ion collisions. After its invention in astronomy in the 1950s, intensity interferometry was found to be a robust method to probe the spatial and temporal information of the nuclear collisions also. Although rescattering effects are negligible in elementary particle collisions, it may be very important for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and in the future LHC. Rescattering after production will modify the measured correlation function and make it harder to extract the dynamical information from data. To better understand the data which are dimmed by this final state process, we derive a general formula for intensity interferometry which can calculate rescattering effects easily. The formula can be used both non-relativistically and relativistically. Numerically, we found that rescattering effects on kaon interferometry for RHIC experiments can modify the measured ratio of the outward radius to the sideward radius, which is a sensitive probe to the equation of state, by as large as 15%. It is a nontrivial contribution which should be included to understand the data more accurately. The second part of this thesis is on the initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Although relativistic hydrodynamics is successful in explaining many aspects of the data, it is only valid after some finite time after nuclear contact. The results depend on the choice of initial conditions which, so far, have been very uncertain. I describe a formula based on the McLerran-Venugopalan model to compute the initial energy density. The soft gluon fields produced immediately after the overlap of the nuclei can be expanded as a power series of the proper time t. Solving Yang-Mills equations with color current conservation can give us the analytical formulas for the fields. The local color charges on the transverse plane are stochastic variables and have to be taken care of by random

  4. ON THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION AND THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2011-04-10

    Density probability distribution functions (PDFs) for turbulent self-gravitating clouds should be convolutions of the local log-normal PDF, which depends on the local average density {rho}{sub ave} and Mach number M, and the PDFs for {rho}{sub ave} and M, which depend on the overall cloud structure. When self-gravity drives a cloud to increased central density, the total PDF develops an extended tail. If there is a critical density or column density for star formation, then the fraction of the local mass exceeding this threshold becomes higher near the cloud center. These elements of cloud structure should be in place before significant star formation begins. Then the efficiency is high so that bound clusters form rapidly, and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) has an imprint in the gas before destructive radiation from young stars can erase it. The IMF could arise from a power-law distribution of mass for cloud structure. These structures should form stars down to the thermal Jeans mass M{sub J} at each density in excess of a threshold. The high-density tail of the PDF, combined with additional fragmentation in each star-forming core, extends the IMF into the brown dwarf regime. The core fragmentation process is distinct from the cloud structuring process and introduces an independent core fragmentation mass function (CFMF). The CFMF would show up primarily below the IMF peak.

  5. 42 CFR 433.130 - Waiver of conditions of initial operation and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waiver of conditions of initial operation and... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval Systems § 433.130 Waiver of conditions of initial...

  6. Influence of changes in initial conditions for the simulation of dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2015-03-10

    Chaos theory is a field of study in mathematics, with applications in several disciplines including meteorology, sociology, physics, engineering, economics, biology, and philosophy. Chaos theory studies the behavior of dynamical systems that are highly sensitive to initial conditions—a paradigm popularly referred to as the butterfly effect. Small differences in initial conditions field widely diverging outcomes for such dynamical systems, rendering long-term prediction impossible in general. This happens even though these systems are deterministic, meaning that their future behavior is fully determined by their initial conditions, with no random elements involved. In this paperinfluence of changes in initial conditions will be presented for the simulation of Lorenz system.

  7. Terrestrial planet formation in low-mass disks: dependence with initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.

    2014-07-01

    In general, most of the studies of terrestrial-type planet formation typically use ad hoc initial conditions. In this work we improved the initial conditions described in Ronco & de Elía (2014) starting with a semi-analytical model wich simulates the evolution of the protoplanetary disk during the gas phase. The results of the semi-analytical model are then used as initial conditions for the N-body simulations. We show that the planetary systems considered are not sensitive to the particular initial distribution of embryos and planetesimals and thus, the results are globally similar to those found in the previous work.

  8. Hydrological modelling for flood forecasting: Calibrating the post-fire initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanasiou, C.; Makropoulos, C.; Mimikou, M.

    2015-10-01

    Floods and forest fires are two of the most devastating natural hazards with severe socioeconomic, environmental as well as aesthetic impacts on the affected areas. Traditionally, these hazards are examined from different perspectives and are thus investigated through different, independent systems, overlooking the fact that they are tightly interrelated phenomena. In fact, the same flood event is more severe, i.e. associated with increased runoff discharge and peak flow and decreased time to peak, if it occurs over a burnt area than that occurring over a land not affected by fire. Mediterranean periurban areas, where forests covered with flammable vegetation coexist with agricultural land and urban zones, are typical areas particularly prone to the combined impact of floods and forest fires. Hence, the accurate assessment and effective management of post-fire flood risk becomes an issue of priority. The research presented in this paper aims to develop a robust methodological framework, using state of art tools and modern technologies to support the estimation of the change in time of five representative hydrological parameters for post-fire conditions. The proposed methodology considers both longer- and short-term initial conditions in order to assess the dynamic evolution of the selected parameters. The research focuses on typical Mediterranean periurban areas that are subjected to both hazards and concludes with a set of equations that associate post-fire and pre-fire conditions for five Fire Severity (FS) classes and three soil moisture states. The methodology has been tested for several flood events on the Rafina catchment, a periurban catchment in Eastern Attica (Greece). In order to validate the methodology, simulated hydrographs were produced and compared against available observed data. Results indicate a close convergence of observed and simulated flows. The proposed methodology is particularly flexible and thus easily adaptable to catchments with similar

  9. Centrality and initial formation time dependence of the emission of thermal photons from fluctuating initial conditions at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Holopainen, Hannu; Renk, Thorsten; Eskola, Kari J.

    2013-08-01

    Event-by-event fluctuating initial conditions (IC) in the ideal hydrodynamic calculation are known to enhance the production of thermal photons significantly compared to a smooth initial state averaged profile in the range pT > 1GeV / c for 200A GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC and 2.76A TeV Pb + Pb collisions at LHC. The 'hotspots' or the over-dense regions in the fluctuating IC produce more high pT photons compared to the smooth IC due to the strong temperature dependent emission of the thermal radiation. This enhancement is expected to be more pronounced for peripheral collisions, for lower beam energies, and for larger values of plasma formation time. A suitably normalized ratio of central to peripheral yield of thermal photons (Rcpγ) is a potential probe to study the density fluctuations and their size in the initial conditions.

  10. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  11. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, Cécile; Gavioso, Roberto M; Benedetto, Giuliana; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas. PMID:19655971

  12. Necessary Conditions for Accurate, Transient Hot-Wire Measurements of the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids are Seldom Satisfied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Tertsinidou, Georgia J.; Assael, Marc J.; Wakeham, William A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper considers the conditions that are necessary to secure accurate measurement of the apparent thermal conductivity of two-phase systems comprising nanoscale particles of one material suspended in a fluid phase of a different material. It is shown that instruments operating according to the transient hot-wire technique can, indeed, produce excellent measurements when a finite element method (FEM) is employed to describe the instrument for the exact geometry of the hot wire. Furthermore, it is shown that an approximate analytic solution can be employed with equal success, over the time range of 0.1 s to 1 s, provided that (a) two wires are employed, so that end effects are canceled, (b) each wire is very thin, less than 30 \\upmu m diameter, so that the line source model and the corresponding corrections are valid, (c) low values of the temperature rise, less than 4 K, are employed in order to minimize the effect of convection on the heat transfer in the time of measurement of 1 s, and (d) insulated wires are employed for measurements in electrically conducting or polar liquids to avoid current leakage or other electrical distortions. According to these criteria, a transient hot-wire instrument has been designed, constructed, and employed for the measurement of the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of water when TiO2 or multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are added. These new results, together with a critical evaluation of other measurements, demonstrate the importance of proper implementation of the technique.

  13. Interrogating Commonly Applied Initial Condition Assumptions in Geospeedometry using NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C. B.; Boyce, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    The geologically short (days to centuries) timescales associated with thermochemical changes in magma chambers during the prelude to eruption are typically beyond the resolution of long-lived radioisotopic geochronometers but can be resolved by "geospeedometry" that quantifies the relatively rapid diffusional relaxation of compositional zoning in igneous phenocrysts. When combined with absolute dating, geospeedometry can reveal long-term chronologies of compositional and thermal oscillations in magma chambers. The ability to accurately constrain timescales via geospeedometry is limited in part by the spatial resolution of commonly used analytical techniques and the derivative chemical profiles, especially in the case of very short timescales or very slow diffusing elements, where the chemical profile is often approximated as a step-function. We present geospeedometry of chemical profiles collected with the NanoSIMS ion microprobe in multi-collection mode with sub-micron resolution (e.g., 0.3 micron spacing). This data facilitates a comparison of how well the timescales calculated with the different experimentally-determined diffusivities and collected along the same profile agree and an interrogation of commonly made model assumptions in geospeedometry. For example, electron probe profiles across internal sanidine zone boundaries from a ca. 250 ka rhyolite lava from Yellowstone Caldera reveal a step function in anorthite content at 10 micron spacing and evidence for earlier dissolution prior to new zone growth, yet we find no observable difference in the width of Ba, Sr and Mg diffusion profiles collected via NanoSIMS for the same profile. These observations support the hypothesis that very little to no diffusive relaxation has affected the initial concentration profile that was produced by crystal growth during magma mixing. Our results highlight the need to quantitatively constrain initial conditions when applying geospeedometry to intermediate to silicic

  14. Skewness in large-scale structure and non-Gaussian initial conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, J. N.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    We compute the skewness of the galaxy distribution arising from the nonlinear evolution of arbitrary non-Gaussian intial conditions to second order in perturbation theory including the effects of nonlinear biasing. The result contains a term identical to that for a Gaussian initial distribution plus terms which depend on the skewness and kurtosis of the initial conditions. The results are model dependent; we present calculations for several toy models. At late times, the leading contribution from the initial skewness decays away relative to the other terms and becomes increasingly unimportant, but the contribution from initial kurtosis, previously overlooked, has the same time dependence as the Gaussian terms. Observations of a linear dependence of the normalized skewness on the rms density fluctuation therefore do not necessarily rule out initially non-Gaussian models. We also show that with non-Gaussian initial conditions the first correction to linear theory for the mean square density fluctuation is larger than for Gaussian models.

  15. Relative Influence of Initial Surface and Atmospheric Conditions on Seasonal Water and Energy Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and analyzed wet and dry soil moisture composites for the mid-latitude GCIP region of the central US using long climate model simulations made with the NCAR CCM3 and reanalysis products from NCEP. Using the diagnostic composites as a guide, we have completed a series of predictability experiments in which we imposed soil water initial conditions in CCM3 for the GCIP region for June 1 from anomalously wet and dry years, with atmospheric initial conditions taken from June 1 of a year with 'near-normal' soil water, and initial soil water from the near-normal year and atmospheric initial conditions from the wet and dry years. Preliminary results indicate that the initial state of the atmosphere is more important than the initial state of soil water determining the subsequent late spring and summer evolution of sod water over the GCIP region. Surprisingly, neither the composites or the predictability experiments yielded a strong influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere. To explore this further, we have made runs with extreme dry soil moisture initial anomalies imposed over the GCIP region (the soil close to being completely dry). These runs did yield a very strong effect on the atmosphere that persisted for at least three months. We conclude that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly is crucial, at least in CCM3, and are currently investigating whether a threshold exists, below which little impact is seen. In a complementary study, we compared the impact of the initial condition of snow cover versus the initial atmospheric state over the western US (corresponding to the westward extension of the GAPP program follow-on to GCIP). In this case, the initial prescription of snow cover is far more important than the initial atmospheric state in determining the subsequent evolution of snow cover. We are currently working to understand the very different soil water and snow cover results.

  16. Initial condition for efficient mapping of level set algorithms on many-core architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornai, Gábor János; Cserey, György

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of adding more small curves to the initial condition which determines the required number of iterations of a fast level set (LS) evolution. As a result, we discovered two new theorems and developed a proof on the worst case of the required number of iterations. Furthermore, we found that these kinds of initial conditions fit well to many-core architectures. To show this, we have included two case studies which are presented on different platforms. One runs on a graphical processing unit (GPU) and the other is executed on a cellular nonlinear network universal machine (CNN-UM). With the new initial conditions, the steady-state solutions of the LS are reached in less than eight iterations depending on the granularity of the initial condition. These dense iterations can be calculated very quickly on many-core platforms according to the two case studies. In the case of the proposed dense initial condition on GPU, there is a significant speedup compared to the sparse initial condition in all cases since our dense initial condition together with the algorithm utilizes the properties of the underlying architecture. Therefore, greater performance gain can be achieved (up to 18 times speedup compared to the sparse initial condition on GPU). Additionally, we have validated our concept against numerically approximated LS evolution of standard flows (mean curvature, Chan-Vese, geodesic active regions). The dice indexes between the fast LS evolutions and the evolutions of the numerically approximated partial differential equations are in the range of 0.99±0.003.

  17. The Use of Graphs in Specific Situations of the Initial Conditions of Linear Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buendía, Gabriela; Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a discussion on the role of graphs and its significance in the relation between the number of initial conditions and the order of a linear differential equation, which is known as the initial value problem. We propose to make a functional framework for the use of graphs that intends to broaden the explanations of the…

  18. Initial conditioning of polymer eelectrolyte membrane fuel cell by temperature and potential cycling.

    PubMed

    Bezmalinović, Dario; Radošević, Jagoda; Barbir, Frano

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells need initial conditioning, activation or break-in the first time they are operated after being assembled. During this period performance of the fuel cell improves until it reaches its nominal performance. The exact mechanism of this initial conditioning is not completely understood, but it is assumed that during the conditioning process the polymer membrane, as well as the polymer in the catalyst layer, get humidified, and the number of active catalyst sites increases. Activation procedure proposed here consists of temperature and potential cycling. Temperature cycling is a new approach for the conditioning and the idea is to rapidly cool the running cell at some point to allow the membrane to equilibrate with condensed water which should result in higher intake of water within the membrane. The results show that proposed procedure is better or at least comparable to some conventional procedures for the initial conditioning. PMID:25830963

  19. Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

    2003-08-20

    The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

  20. Impact of in-consistency between the climate model and its initial conditions on climate prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueyuan; Köhl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef; Masuda, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Mochizuki, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the influence of dynamical in-consistency of initial conditions on the predictive skill of decadal climate predictions. The investigation builds on the fully coupled global model "Coupled GCM for Earth Simulator" (CFES). In two separate experiments, the ocean component of the coupled model is full-field initialized with two different initial fields from either the same coupled model CFES or the GECCO2 Ocean Synthesis while the atmosphere is initialized from CFES in both cases. Differences between both experiments show that higher SST forecast skill is obtained when initializing with coupled data assimilation initial conditions (CIH) instead of those from GECCO2 (GIH), with the most significant difference in skill obtained over the tropical Pacific at lead year one. High predictive skill of SST over the tropical Pacific seen in CIH reflects the good reproduction of El Niño events at lead year one. In contrast, GIH produces additional erroneous El Niño events. The tropical Pacific skill differences between both runs can be rationalized in terms of the zonal momentum balance between the wind stress and pressure gradient force, which characterizes the upper equatorial Pacific. In GIH, the differences between the oceanic and atmospheric state at initial time leads to imbalance between the zonal wind stress and pressure gradient force over the equatorial Pacific, which leads to the additional pseudo El Niño events and explains reduced predictive skill. The balance can be reestablished if anomaly initialization strategy is applied with GECCO2 initial conditions and improved predictive skill in the tropical Pacific is observed at lead year one. However, initializing the coupled model with self-consistent initial conditions leads to the highest skill of climate prediction in the tropical Pacific by preserving the momentum balance between zonal wind stress and pressure gradient force along the equatorial Pacific.

  1. The Effect of Spray Initial Conditions on Heat Release and Emissions in LDI CFD Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Liu, Nan-Suey; Davoudzadeh, Farhad

    2008-01-01

    The mass and velocity distribution of liquid spray has a primary effect on the combustion heat release process. This heat release process then affects emissions like nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO). Computational Fluid Dynamics gives the engineer insight into these processes, but various setup options exist (number of droplet groups, and initial droplet temperature) for spray initial conditions. This paper studies these spray initial condition options using the National Combustion Code (NCC) on a single swirler lean direct injection (LDI) flame tube. Using laminar finite rate chemistry, comparisons are made against experimental data for velocity measurements, temperature, and emissions (NOx, CO).

  2. Dynamical fine-tuning of initial conditions for small field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Satoshi; Kohri, Kazunori; Shimada, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Small-field inflation (SFI) is widely considered to be unnatural because an extreme fine-tuning of the initial condition is necessary for sufficiently large e -folding. In this paper, we show that the unnaturally looking initial condition can be dynamically realized without any fine-tuning if the SFI occurs after rapid oscillations of the inflaton field and particle creations by preheating. In fact, if the inflaton field ϕ is coupled to another scalar field χ through the interaction g2χ2ϕ2 and the vacuum energy during the small field inflation is given by λ M4, the initial value can be dynamically set at (√{λ }/g )M2/Mpl, which is much smaller than the typical scale of the potential M . This solves the initial condition problem in the new inflation model or some classes of the hilltop inflation models.

  3. A no hair theorem and the problem of initial conditions. [in cosmological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Lars Gerhard; Stein-Schabes, Jaime A.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that under very general conditions, any inhomogeneous cosmological model with a positive cosmological constant that can be described in a synchronous reference system will tend asymptotically in time towards the de Sitter solution. This renders the problem of initial conditions less severe.

  4. 42 CFR 418.54 - Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive assessment of the patient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive assessment of the patient. 418.54 Section 418.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care § 418.54...

  5. The influence of initial and surface boundary conditions on a model-generated January climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. F.; Spar, J.

    1981-01-01

    The influence on a model-generated January climate of various surface boundary conditions, as well as initial conditions, was studied by using the GISS coarse-mesh climate model. Four experiments - two with water planets, one with flat continents, and one with mountains - were used to investigate the effects of initial conditions, and the thermal and dynamical effects of the surface on the model generated-climate. However, climatological mean zonal-symmetric sea surface temperature is used in all four runs over the model oceans. Moreover, zero ground wetness and uniform ground albedo except for snow are used in the last experiments.

  6. Correcting the initialization of models with fractional derivatives via history-dependent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Maolin; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-04-01

    Fractional differential equations are more and more used in modeling memory (history-dependent, non-local, or hereditary) phenomena. Conventional initial values of fractional differential equations are defined at a point, while recent works define initial conditions over histories. We prove that the conventional initialization of fractional differential equations with a Riemann-Liouville derivative is wrong with a simple counter-example. The initial values were assumed to be arbitrarily given for a typical fractional differential equation, but we find one of these values can only be zero. We show that fractional differential equations are of infinite dimensions, and the initial conditions, initial histories, are defined as functions over intervals. We obtain the equivalent integral equation for Caputo case. With a simple fractional model of materials, we illustrate that the recovery behavior is correct with the initial creep history, but is wrong with initial values at the starting point of the recovery. We demonstrate the application of initial history by solving a forced fractional Lorenz system numerically.

  7. Correcting the initialization of models with fractional derivatives via history-dependent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Maolin; Wang, Zaihua

    2015-08-01

    Fractional differential equations are more and more used in modeling memory (history-dependent, non-local, or hereditary) phenomena. Conventional initial values of fractional differential equations are defined at a point, while recent works define initial conditions over histories. We prove that the conventional initialization of fractional differential equations with a Riemann-Liouville derivative is wrong with a simple counter-example. The initial values were assumed to be arbitrarily given for a typical fractional differential equation, but we find one of these values can only be zero. We show that fractional differential equations are of infinite dimensions, and the initial conditions, initial histories, are defined as functions over intervals. We obtain the equivalent integral equation for Caputo case. With a simple fractional model of materials, we illustrate that the recovery behavior is correct with the initial creep history, but is wrong with initial values at the starting point of the recovery. We demonstrate the application of initial history by solving a forced fractional Lorenz system numerically.

  8. Accurate coarse-grained models for mixtures of colloids and linear polymers under good-solvent conditions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Adamo, Giuseppe; Pelissetto, Andrea; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2014-12-28

    A coarse-graining strategy, previously developed for polymer solutions, is extended here to mixtures of linear polymers and hard-sphere colloids. In this approach, groups of monomers are mapped onto a single pseudoatom (a blob) and the effective blob-blob interactions are obtained by requiring the model to reproduce some large-scale structural properties in the zero-density limit. We show that an accurate parametrization of the polymer-colloid interactions is obtained by simply introducing pair potentials between blobs and colloids. For the coarse-grained (CG) model in which polymers are modelled as four-blob chains (tetramers), the pair potentials are determined by means of the iterative Boltzmann inversion scheme, taking full-monomer (FM) pair correlation functions at zero-density as targets. For a larger number n of blobs, pair potentials are determined by using a simple transferability assumption based on the polymer self-similarity. We validate the model by comparing its predictions with full-monomer results for the interfacial properties of polymer solutions in the presence of a single colloid and for thermodynamic and structural properties in the homogeneous phase at finite polymer and colloid density. The tetramer model is quite accurate for q ≲ 1 (q=R{sup ^}{sub g}/R{sub c}, where R{sup ^}{sub g} is the zero-density polymer radius of gyration and R{sub c} is the colloid radius) and reasonably good also for q = 2. For q = 2, an accurate coarse-grained description is obtained by using the n = 10 blob model. We also compare our results with those obtained by using single-blob models with state-dependent potentials.

  9. Sensitivity of soil moisture initialization for decadal predictions under different regional climatic conditions in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, S.; Sehlinger, A.; Feldmann, H.; Kottmeier, C.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of soil initialization is investigated through perturbation simulations with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The focus of the investigation is to assess the sensitivity of simulated extreme periods, dry and wet, to soil moisture initialization in different climatic regions over Europe and to establish the necessary spin up time within the framework of decadal predictions for these regions. Sensitivity experiments consisted of a reference simulation from 1968 to 1999 and 5 simulations from 1972 to 1983. The Effective Drought Index (EDI) is used to select and quantify drought status in the reference run to establish the simulation time period for the sensitivity experiments. Different soil initialization procedures are investigated. The sensitivity of the decadal predictions to soil moisture initial conditions is investigated through the analysis of water cycle components' (WCC) variability. In an episodic time scale the local effects of soil moisture on the boundary-layer and the propagated effects on the large-scale dynamics are analysed. The results show: (a) COSMO-CLM reproduces the observed features of the drought index. (b) Soil moisture initialization exerts a relevant impact on WCC, e.g., precipitation distribution and intensity. (c) Regional characteristics strongly impact the response of the WCC. Precipitation and evapotranspiration deviations are larger for humid regions. (d) The initial soil conditions (wet/dry), the regional characteristics (humid/dry) and the annual period (wet/dry) play a key role in the time that soil needs to restore quasi-equilibrium and the impact on the atmospheric conditions. Humid areas, and for all regions, a humid initialization, exhibit shorter spin up times, also soil reacts more sensitive when initialised during dry periods. (e) The initial soil perturbation may markedly modify atmospheric pressure field, wind circulation systems and atmospheric water vapour distribution affecting atmospheric stability

  10. Use of an Accurate DNS Particulate Flow Method to Supply and Validate Boundary Conditions for the MFIX Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Gang Feng

    2012-05-31

    The simulation of particulate flows for industrial applications often requires the use of two-fluid models, where the solid particles are considered as a separate continuous phase. One of the underlining uncertainties in the use of the two-fluid models in multiphase computations comes from the boundary condition of the solid phase. Typically, the gas or liquid fluid boundary condition at a solid wall is the so called no-slip condition, which has been widely accepted to be valid for single-phase fluid dynamics provided that the Knudsen number is low. However, the boundary condition for the solid phase is not well understood. The no-slip condition at a solid boundary is not a valid assumption for the solid phase. Instead, several researchers advocate a slip condition as a more appropriate boundary condition. However, the question on the selection of an exact slip length or a slip velocity coefficient is still unanswered. Experimental or numerical simulation data are needed in order to determinate the slip boundary condition that is applicable to a two-fluid model. The goal of this project is to improve the performance and accuracy of the boundary conditions used in two-fluid models such as the MFIX code, which is frequently used in multiphase flow simulations. The specific objectives of the project are to use first principles embedded in a validated Direct Numerical Simulation particulate flow numerical program, which uses the Immersed Boundary method (DNS-IB) and the Direct Forcing scheme in order to establish, modify and validate needed energy and momentum boundary conditions for the MFIX code. To achieve these objectives, we have developed a highly efficient DNS code and conducted numerical simulations to investigate the particle-wall and particle-particle interactions in particulate flows. Most of our research findings have been reported in major conferences and archived journals, which are listed in Section 7 of this report. In this report, we will present a

  11. Controlling Chaos Via Knowledge of Initial Condition for a Curved Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear response of a flexible curved panel exhibiting bifurcation to fully developed chaos is demonstrated along with the sensitivity to small perturbation from the initial conditions. The response is determined from the measured time series at two fixed points. The panel is forced by an external nonharmonic multifrequency and monofrequency sound field. Using a low power time-continuous feedback control, carefully tuned at each initial condition, produces large long-term effects on the dynamics toward taming chaos. Without the knowledge of the initial conditions, control may be achieved by destructive interference. In this case, the control power is proportional to the loading power. Calculation of the correlation dimension and the estimation of positive Lyapunov exponents, in practice, are the proof of chaotic response.

  12. An Investigation of the Influence of Initial Conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O

    2004-10-04

    Experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) have been performed to examine the effects of initial conditions on the dynamics of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable mixing layer. Experiments were performed on a water channel facility to measure the interfacial and velocity perturbations initially present at the two-fluid interface in a small Atwood number mixing layer. The experimental measurements have been parameterized for use in numerical simulations of the experiment. Two- and three-dimensional DNS of the experiment have been performed using the parameterized initial conditions. It is shown that simulations implemented with initial velocity and density perturbations, rather than density perturbations alone, are required to match experimentally-measured statistics and spectra. Data acquired from both the experiment and numerical simulations are used to examine the role of initial conditions on the evolution of integral-scale, turbulence, and mixing statistics. Early-time turbulence and mixing statistics are shown to be strongly-dependent upon the early-time transition of the initial perturbation from a weakly-nonlinear to a strongly-nonlinear flow.

  13. Effect of initial conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor mixing: modal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhatla, S.; Ranjan, D.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental investigation of the interaction of different modes of the initial conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor mixing was performed using the Water Channel facility at Texas A&M University. Hot and cold water (with a temperature difference of ˜7-8 °C) selected as working fluids were unstably stratified using a splitter plate resulting in a low Atwood number of the order of 10-3. Interaction of multiple (up to 3) modes of the initial condition was studied by varying the wavelengths and phase angles that were generated at the interface of these fluids. Using a servo controlled flapper system, wavelengths were varied between 2 and 8 cm and phase angles within 0-180°, and the dependence of ensemble averaged mixing width in the early stages of growth on initial conditions is studied. High-resolution images of the flowfield indicate that changing the phase angle results in the leaning phenomenon, i.e. the leaning of bubbles and spikes with respect to gravitational acceleration and relative to each other. For the experiments with the binary-mode initial condition with a fixed wavelength ratio, λ1/λ2, of 4.0, variation of the phase angle does not significantly affect the ensemble-averaged mixing width. Mixing rate data from ensemble averaging indicates greater dissipation rates at the initial times that taper off logarithmically to the order of mean kinematic viscosity at later times.

  14. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  15. ICBC Version 3. 1: TMI-2 (Three Mile Island) Initial and Boundary Conditions data base

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, R W; Fackrell, L J; Golden, D W; Harris, M L; Olaveson, C L

    1988-01-01

    The TMI-2 initial and boundary conditions data base is a micro computer data base which provides the required initial and boundary conditions to simulate the TMI-2 accident. Additionally, other time series plant measurements related to the accident are included in the data base. Major features of the data base are the ability to plot, manipulate and list data as well as to enter user supplied data (e.g. results of simulations). The user guide provides the instructions for installation and operation of the data base. 10 refs., 21 figs.

  16. Multi-initial-conditions and Multi-physics Ensembles in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model to Improve Coastal Stratocumulus Forecasts for Solar Power Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.

    2015-12-01

    In coastal Southern California, variation in solar energy production is predominantly due to the presence of stratocumulus clouds (Sc), as they greatly attenuate surface solar irradiance and cover most distributed photovoltaic systems on summer mornings. Correct prediction of the spatial coverage and lifetime of coastal Sc is therefore vital to the accuracy of solar energy forecasts in California. In Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations, underprediction of Sc inherent in the initial conditions directly leads to an underprediction of Sc in the resulting forecasts. Hence, preprocessing methods were developed to create initial conditions more consistent with observational data and reduce spin-up time requirements. Mathiesen et al. (2014) previously developed a cloud data assimilation system to force WRF initial conditions to contain cloud liquid water based on CIMSS GOES Sounder cloud cover. The Well-mixed Preprocessor and Cloud Data Assimilation (WEMPPDA) package merges an initial guess of cloud liquid water content obtained from mixed-layer theory with assimilated CIMSS GOES Sounder cloud cover to more accurately represent the spatial coverage of Sc at initialization. The extent of Sc inland penetration is often constrained topographically; therefore, the low inversion base height (IBH) bias in NAM initial conditions decreases Sc inland penetration. The Inversion Base Height (IBH) package perturbs the initial IBH by the difference between model IBH and the 12Z radiosonde measurement. The performance of these multi-initial-condition configurations was evaluated over June, 2013 against SolarAnywhere satellite-derived surface irradiance data. Four configurations were run: 1) NAM initial conditions, 2) RAP initial conditions, 3) WEMPPDA applied to NAM, and 4) IBH applied to NAM. Both preprocessing methods showed significant improvement in the prediction of both spatial coverage and lifetime of coastal Sc. The best performing configuration was then

  17. Effect of initial conditions and Mach number on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in ICF like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pooja; She, Dan; Lim, Hyunkyung; Glimm, James

    2015-11-01

    The qualitative and quantitative effect of initial conditions (linear and non-linear) and high Mach number (1.3 and 1.45) is studied on the turbulent mixing induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in idealized ICF conditions. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability seeds Rayleigh-taylor instabilities in ICF experiments and is one of the factors that contributes to reduced performance of ICF experiments. Its also found in collapsing cores of stars and supersonic combustion. We use the Stony Brook University code, FronTier, which is verified via a code comparison study against the AMR multiphysics code FLASH, and validated against vertical shock tube experiments done by the LANL Extreme Fluids Team. These simulations are designed as a step towards simulating more realistic ICF conditions and quantifying the detrimental effects of mixing on the yield.

  18. Appropriate solid-body models as initial conditions for SPH-based numerical collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, C.; Maindl, T. I.; Dvorak, R.; Schäfer, C.; Speith, R.

    2016-02-01

    Providing the simulation algorithm with suitable initial conditions is a crucial first step in almost all numerical computations, except for the most trivial cases. Even the most sophisticated simulation program will not produce meaningful results if not started with an appropriate initial configuration, satisfying demands like isotropy, a low level of noise and physical accuracy. Some of these requirements are unique to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) - the numerical method considered here - others are of fundamental relevance, independent of the chosen numerical technique. The main focus of this work lies on considerations concerning initial conditions for subsequent SPH simulation runs. The geometrical arrangement of an initial SPH particle setup is discussed, particularly w.r.t. regular lattice configurations and associated symmetry effects. In order to avoid unphysical behavior the initial particle configuration has to be in a relaxed (i.e. equilibrated) state where necessary. This is of particular importance for simulations of giant collisions, where the involved bodies naturally exhibit a hydrostatic internal structure. Beyond the common numerical procedure, a semi-analytical approach for relaxation is introduced and validated, practically eliminating the need for spending significant amounts of valuable computing time solely for the production of a relaxed initial state in a lot of situations. Finally the basic relevance of relaxation itself is studied, focusing on collision simulations in different mass ranges important in the context of planet formation and the transport of water.

  19. Initial Conditions Effects in the Population Dynamics of a Driven Semiconductor Quantum Well Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Voutsinas, Evangelos; Boviatsis, John

    2007-12-26

    We study Rabi oscillations between two subbands of a symmetric double quantum well that is coupled by a strong electromagnetic field. We use the effective nonlinear Bloch equations for the description of the system dynamics and present numerical results for different initial conditions of the system.

  20. 40 CFR 300.130 - Determinations to initiate response and special conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determinations to initiate response and special conditions. 300.130 Section 300.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  1. 40 CFR 300.130 - Determinations to initiate response and special conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determinations to initiate response and special conditions. 300.130 Section 300.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  2. 42 CFR 418.54 - Condition of participation: Initial and comprehensive assessment of the patient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... palliation and management of the terminal illness and related conditions. (a) Standard: Initial assessment... calendar days after the election of hospice care in accordance with § 418.24. (c) Standard: Content of the... need for referrals and further evaluation by appropriate health professionals. (d) Standard: Update...

  3. Experimental study of initial condition dependence on mixing in Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Prestridge, Katherine P; Orlicz, Gregory C; Balasubramaniam, Balakumar J

    2010-11-18

    Recent work has shown that buoyancy-driven turbulence can be affected at late time by initial conditions, thus presenting an opportunity to predict and design late-time turbulent mixing, with transformative impact on our understanding and prediction of Inertial Confinement Fusion and general fluid mixing processes. In this communication, we report results on the initial condition parameters, amplitude ({delta}) and wavelength ({lambda}) of perturbation, that impact the material mixing and transition to turbulence in shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Experiments were conducted using a stable, membrane-free, heavy gas varicose curtain (air-SF{sub 6}-air) at shock Mach number, Ma = 1.2. The velocity and density field of our initial conditions was quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar-Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively. Quantitative measurements on the temporal and spatial evolution of developing structures after first shock and subsequent re-shock at different times obtained using PLlF aid us in understating the importance of the initial conditions on transition to turbulence and mixing.

  4. Model forecast skill and sensitivity to initial conditions in the seasonal Sea Ice Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Cullather, R. I.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    We explore the skill of predictions of September Arctic sea ice extent from dynamical models participating in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO). Forecasts submitted in August, at roughly 2 month lead times, are skillful. However, skill is lower in forecasts submitted to SIO, which began in 2008, than in hindcasts (retrospective forecasts) of the last few decades. The multimodel mean SIO predictions offer slightly higher skill than the single-model SIO predictions, but neither beats a damped persistence forecast at longer than 2 month lead times. The models are largely unsuccessful at predicting each other, indicating a large difference in model physics and/or initial conditions. Motivated by this, we perform an initial condition sensitivity experiment with four SIO models, applying a fixed -1 m perturbation to the initial sea ice thickness. The significant range of the response among the models suggests that different model physics make a significant contribution to forecast uncertainty.

  5. Model Forecast Skill and Sensitivity to Initial Conditions in the Seasonal Sea Ice Outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Cullather, R. I.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the skill of predictions of September Arctic sea ice extent from dynamical models participating in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO). Forecasts submitted in August, at roughly 2 month lead times, are skillful. However, skill is lower in forecasts submitted to SIO, which began in 2008, than in hindcasts (retrospective forecasts) of the last few decades. The multimodel mean SIO predictions offer slightly higher skill than the single-model SIO predictions, but neither beats a damped persistence forecast at longer than 2 month lead times. The models are largely unsuccessful at predicting each other, indicating a large difference in model physics and/or initial conditions. Motivated by this, we perform an initial condition sensitivity experiment with four SIO models, applying a fixed -1 m perturbation to the initial sea ice thickness. The significant range of the response among the models suggests that different model physics make a significant contribution to forecast uncertainty.

  6. Conditions for Circumstellar Disc Formation II: Effects of Initial Cloud Stability and Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate onto the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brake the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with nonuniform densities.

  7. Dark energy with non-adiabatic sound speed: initial conditions and detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2010-10-01

    Assuming that the universe contains a dark energy fluid with a constant linear equation of state and a constant sound speed, we study the prospects of detecting dark energy perturbations using CMB data from Planck, cross-correlated with galaxy distribution maps from a survey like LSST. We update previous estimates by carrying a full exploration of the mock data likelihood for key fiducial models. We find that it will only be possible to exclude values of the sound speed very close to zero, while Planck data alone is not powerful enough for achieving any detection, even with lensing extraction. We also discuss the issue of initial conditions for dark energy perturbations in the radiation and matter epochs, generalizing the usual adiabatic conditions to include the sound speed effect. However, for most purposes, the existence of attractor solutions renders the perturbation evolution nearly independent of these initial conditions.

  8. A numerical method for computing initial conditions of Lagrangian invariant tori using the frequency map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Alejandro; Villanueva, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    We present a numerical method for computing initial conditions of Lagrangian quasi-periodic invariant tori of Hamiltonian systems and symplectic maps. Such initial conditions are found by solving, using the Newton method, a nonlinear system obtained by imposing suitable conditions on the frequency map. The basic tool is a newly developed methodology to perform the frequency analysis of a discrete quasi-periodic signal, allowing to compute frequencies and their derivatives with respect to parameters. Roughly speaking, this method consists in computing suitable weighted averages of the iterates of the signal and using the Richardson extrapolation method. The proposed approach performs with high accuracy at a moderate computational cost. We illustrate the method by considering a discrete FPU model and the vicinity of the point L4 in a RTBP.

  9. Kovalevskaya exponents and the space of initial conditions of a quasi-homogeneous vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Hayato

    2015-12-01

    Formal series solutions and the Kovalevskaya exponents of a quasi-homogeneous polynomial system of differential equations are studied by means of a weighted projective space and dynamical systems theory. A necessary and sufficient condition for the series solution to be a convergent Laurent series is given, which improves the well-known Painlevé test. In particular, if a given system has the Painlevé property, an algorithm to construct Okamoto's space of initial conditions is given. The space of initial conditions is obtained by weighted blow-ups of the weighted projective space, where the weights for the blow-ups are determined by the Kovalevskaya exponents. The results are applied to the first Painlevé hierarchy (2m-th order first Painlevé equation).

  10. Effects of Initial Conditions on Compressible Mixing in Supernova-Relevant Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J

    2004-04-30

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this paper, we summarize recent results from our computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. For planar multimode systems, compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. Initial conditions predicted by some recent stellar calculations are incompatible with self-similarity.

  11. EARLY DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM: PINNING DOWN THE INITIAL CONDITIONS OF THE NICE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.

    2010-06-20

    In the recent years, the 'Nice' model of solar system formation has attained an unprecedented level of success in reproducing much of the observed orbital architecture of the solar system by evolving the planets to their current locations from a more compact configuration. Within the context of this model, the formation of the classical Kuiper Belt requires a phase during which the ice giants have a high eccentricity. An outstanding question of this model is the initial configuration from which the solar system started out. Recent work has shown that multi-resonant initial conditions can serve as good candidates, as they naturally prevent vigorous type-II migration. In this paper, we use analytical arguments, as well as self-consistent numerical N-body simulations to identify fully resonant initial conditions, whose dynamical evolution is characterized by an eccentric phase of the ice giants, as well as planetary scattering. We find a total of eight such initial conditions. Four of these primordial states are compatible with the canonical 'Nice' model, while the others imply slightly different evolutions. The results presented here should prove useful in further development of a comprehensive model for solar system formation.

  12. Centrifuge model tests of rainfall-induced slope failures for the investigation of the initiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matziaris, Vasileios; Marshall, Alec; Yu, Hai-Sui

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are very common natural disasters which cause damage to properties and infrastructure and may result in the loss of human lives. These phenomena often take place in unsaturated soil slopes and are triggered by the saturation of the soil profile, due to rain infiltration, which leads to a loss of shear strength. The aim of this study is to determine rainfall thresholds for the initiation of landslides under different initial conditions. Model tests of rainfall-induced landslides are conducted in the Nottingham Centre for Geomechanics 50g-T geotechnical centrifuge. Initially unsaturated plane-strain slope models made with fine silica sand are prepared at varying densities at 1g and accommodated within a climatic chamber which provides controlled environmental conditions. During the centrifuge flight at 60g, rainfall events of varying intensity and duration are applied to the slope models causing the initiation of slope failure. The impact of soil state properties and rainfall characteristics on the landslide initiation process are discussed. The variation of pore water pressures within the slope before, during and after simulated rainfall events is recorded using miniature pore pressure transducers buried in the soil model. Slope deformation is determined by using a high-speed camera and digital image analysis techniques.

  13. Experimental study of initial condition dependence on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the presence of reshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Orlicz, G. C.; Prestridge, K. P.; Balakumar, B. J.

    2012-03-01

    We present an experimental study on the dependence of initial condition parameters, namely, the amplitude δ and wavenumber κ (κ = 2π/λ, where λ is the wavelength) of perturbations, on turbulence and mixing in shock-accelerated Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) unstable fluid layers. A single mode, membrane-free varicose heavy gas curtain (air-SF6-air) at a shock Mach number M = 1.2 was used in our experiments. The density (concentration) and velocity fields for this initial configuration were measured using planar laser -induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). In order to understand the effects of multi-mode initial conditions on shock-accelerated mixing, the evolving fluid interface formed during the incident shock (M = 1.2) was shocked again by a reflected shock wave at various times using a movable wall, thus enabling us to change both δ and κ simultaneously. A dimensionless length-scale defined as η = κδ is proposed to parametrically link the initial condition dependence to late-time mixing. It was observed experimentally that high wavenumber (short wavelength) modes enhance the mixing and transition to turbulence in these flows. Statistics such as power spectral density, density self-correlation, turbulent kinetic energy, and the rms of velocity fluctuations were measured using simultaneous PLIF-PIV to quantify the amount of mixing for varying values of η. The results indicate a dependence of initial condition parameters on mixing at late times. The results of this study present an opportunity to predict and "design" late-time turbulent mixing that has applications in inertial confinement fusion and general fluid mixing processes.

  14. ACCURATE TIME-DEPENDENT WAVE PACKET STUDY OF THE H{sup +}+LiH REACTION AT EARLY UNIVERSE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, E.; Bulut, N.; Castillo, J. F.; Banares, L.; Aoiz, F. J.; Roncero, O.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the H{sup +} + LiH reaction have been studied using a quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel quantum mechanical method on an ab initio potential energy surface at conditions of the early universe. The total reaction probabilities for the H{sup +} + LiH(v = 0, j = 0) {yields} H{sup +} {sub 2} + Li process have been calculated from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 110. Using a Langevin model, integral cross sections have been calculated in that range of collision energies and extrapolated for energies below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV. The calculated rate constants are found to be nearly independent of temperature in the 10-1000 K interval with a value of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with estimates used in evolutionary models of the early universe lithium chemistry.

  15. Initial Conditions with Flow from a McLerran Venugopalan model with Transverse Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangyao; Fries, Rainer J.

    2013-09-01

    Using a recursive solution of the Yang-Mills equation, we calculate analytic expressions for the gluon fields created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at small times τ. We have worked out explicit solutions for the fields and the energy momentum tensor up to 4th order in an expansion in τ. We generalize the McLerran-Venugopalan model to allow for a systematic treatment of averaged charge densities μ2 that vary as a function of transverse coordinates. This allows us to calculate radial, elliptic and directed flow of gluon fields. Our results can serve as initial conditions for hydrodynamic simulations of nuclear collisions that include initial flow.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of initial conditions on transients in PUMA

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-07-01

    Major differences between the SBWR and the currently operating BWRs include the use of passive gravity-driven systems in the SBWR for emergency cooling of the vessel and containment. In order to investigate the phenomena expected during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), NRC has sponsored an integral scaled-test facility, called Purdue, University Multidimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). The facility models all the major safety-related components of SBWR. Two PUMA initialization calculations were performed to assist the Purdue University in establishing test initialization procedures. Both calculations were based on the initial conditions obtained from SBWR LOCA simulation. In the base case, a complete separation between vapor and liquid was assumed, with all the water in the lower part of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and all the vapor above it. In the sensitivity case, the water inventory was distributed in the vessel in the same way as in the SBWR at 1.034 MPa, which is the initial pressure for PUMA facility. Purdue University plans to initialize the PUMA tests as in the base case. The sensitivity calculation is performed to provide assurance that this mode of initialization is adequate. It also provides information on possible differences in the progress of transients. The conditions outside of the vessel were identical for both cases prior to initiation of the accident. The paper will discuss the differences in the early part of the transient. The conclusion from this study will also apply to many integral facilities which simulate the reactor transients from the middle of the transient.

  17. Effect of Initial Conditions on Compressible Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Transition to Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M; Greenough, J A

    2004-01-07

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, we present the first results from a computational study of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility. Using the multiphysics, AMR, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor, we consider the late nonlinear instability evolution for multiple amplitude and phase realizations of a variety of multimode spectral types. We show that compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. The initial conditions are shown to have a strong affect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime.

  18. Identification of suitable reference genes in buffalo grass for accurate transcript normalization under various abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Qian, Yong-Qiang; Han, Lei; Liu, Jun-Xiang; Sun, Zhen-Yuan

    2014-08-15

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a sensitive technique for normalization of the gene expression level of target genes. Buffalograss (Buchloe dactyloides), a warm-season turfgrass with strong abiotic stress resistance, is widely used in North China. Up to now, no work was performed to evaluate the reference genes in buffalograss. In this study, the expression profiles of ten potential reference genes were examined by qRT-PCR in 24 buffalograss samples, which were subjected to a different treatment (salt, osmotic, cold and heat). Three qRT-PCR analysis methods (GeNorm, NormFinder, and Bestkeeper) were used to evaluate the stability of gene expression. The results indicated that DNAJ and β-ACTIN were the optimal reference genes for salt-treated leaves, and the combination of PP2A and GAPDH was better reference genes for PEG-treated leaves. Under cold stress, DNAJ and β-ACTIN showed less variety of expression level in leaves. DNAJ and GAPDH exhibited the most stable expression in heat-treated samples. To sum up, glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), β-ACTIN, DNAJ-like protein (DNAJ) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were selected as the most stable reference gene among all tested samples. To further validate the suitability of these reference genes, the expression levels of DREB2 (homologs of AtDREB2) were analyzed in parallel. Our results show that the best reference genes differed across different experimental conditions, and these results should enable better normalization and quantification of transcript levels in buffalograss in the future. PMID:24914494

  19. Accurate initiation of human epsilon-globin RNA synthesis by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in isolated nuclei of K562 erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, R S; Allan, M; Paul, J

    1984-01-01

    The human epsilon-globin gene was transcribed in vitro in isolated K562 cell nuclei by using exogenous Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6). Newly formed RNA transcripts were distinguished from nuclear RNA molecules by (i) incorporating mercurated UTP into RNA under conditions in which the endogenous polymerase II is inactive and (ii) subsequently isolating the mercurated RNA by affinity chromatography on thiolated Sepharose. A specific 5'-end-labeled probe spanning the epsilon-globin gene cap site was used in nuclease S1 mapping studies to examine the in vitro initiation site of the isolated transcripts. It was found that transcription occurred from the coding strand only and originated almost entirely from a point that was identical to that of the major cap site for epsilon-globin mRNA in vivo. Images PMID:6330734

  20. Dynamical ejections of massive stars from young star clusters under diverse initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungkyung; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects that initial conditions of star clusters and their massive star population have on dynamical ejections of massive stars from star clusters up to an age of 3 Myr. We use a large set of direct N-body calculations for moderately massive star clusters (Mecl ≈ 103.5 M⊙). We vary the initial conditions of the calculations, such as the initial half-mass radius of the clusters, initial binary populations for massive stars and initial mass segregation. We find that the initial density is the most influential parameter for the ejection fraction of the massive systems. The clusters with an initial half-mass radius rh(0) of 0.1 (0.3) pc can eject up to 50% (30)% of their O-star systems on average, while initially larger (rh(0) = 0.8 pc) clusters, that is, lower density clusters, eject hardly any OB stars (at most ≈ 4.5%). When the binaries are composed of two stars of similar mass, the ejections are most effective. Most of the models show that the average ejection fraction decreases with decreasing stellar mass. For clusters that are efficient at ejecting O stars, the mass function of the ejected stars is top-heavy compared to the given initial mass function (IMF), while the mass function of stars that remain in the cluster becomes slightly steeper (top-light) than the IMF. The top-light mass functions of stars in 3 Myr old clusters in our N-body models agree well with the mean mass function of young intermediate-mass clusters in M 31, as reported previously. This implies that the IMF of the observed young clusters is the canonical IMF. We show that the multiplicity fraction of the ejected massive stars can be as high as ≈ 60%, that massive high-order multiple systems can be dynamically ejected, and that high-order multiples become common especially in the cluster. We also discuss binary populations of the ejected massive systems. Clusters that are initially not mass-segregated begin ejecting massive stars after a time delay that is caused by mass

  1. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Initial 230TH/232TH in Sumatran Corals and its Influence on the Accurate Dating of Young Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, H.; Shen, C.; Meltzner, A. J.; Philibosian, B.; WU, C.; Sieh, K. E.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate and precise determination of initial 230Th/232Th (230Th/232Th0) is important in dating young fossil corals, and it can significantly influence our understanding of paleoclimate, paleoceanographic and paleoseismic histories. A total of 47 unpublished and published isochrons (Shen et al., 2008; Meltzner et al., 2010, 2012; Philibosian et al., 2012), covering most of the Sumatran outer-arc islands, provide a more robust estimate of the 230Th/232Th0 variability in the region. The weighted average of 230Th/232Th0 atomic values is 4.7 (+5.5/-4.7) × 10-6 (2σ), consistent with the previously reported value of 6.5 ± 6.5 × 10-6 obtained from a handful of samples from the southern part of Sumatran outer-arc. Specifically, the calculated 230Th/232Th0 in the north and south are identical. The weighted mean of 3.5 (+7.0/-3.5) × 10-6 for fossil corals of 300-2000-yr old is slightly lower than the value of 5.4 ± 4.5 × 10-6 obtained from corals younger than 300 yrs B.P.. For corals containing less than 2 ppb of thorium, however, the age offset will be less than 10 yr by using different 230Th/232Th0, which is acceptable for most studies. We hereby recommend an updated 230Th/232Th0 value of 4.7 (+5.5/-4.7) × 10-6 for corals throughout the Sumatran outer-arc islands. For very high-precision age determination (<10 yr), coral samples with low Th concentration (< 2 ppb) are preferred.; ;

  2. Change in ST segment elevation 60 minutes after thrombolytic initiation predicts clinical outcome as accurately as later electrocardiographic changes

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, I; Newall, N; Farrer, M

    1997-01-01

    Objective—To compare prospectively the prognostic accuracy of a 50% decrease in ST segment elevation on standard 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) recorded at 60, 90, and 180 minutes after thrombolysis initiation in acute myocardial infarction.
Design—Consecutive sample prospective cohort study.
Setting—A single coronary care unit in the north of England.
Patients—190 consecutive patients receiving thrombolysis for first acute myocardial infarction.
Interventions—Thrombolysis at baseline.
Main outcome measures—Cardiac mortality and left ventricular size and function assessed 36 days later.
Results—Failure of ST segment elevation to resolve by 50% in the single lead of maximum ST elevation or the sum ST elevation of all infarct related ECG leads at each of the times studied was associated with a significantly higher mortality, larger left ventricular volume, and lower ejection fraction. There was some variation according to infarct site with only the 60 minute ECG predicting mortality after inferior myocardial infarction and only in anterior myocardial infarction was persistent ST elevation associated with worse left ventricular function. The analysis of the lead of maximum ST elevation at 60 minutes from thrombolysis performed as well as later ECGs in receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting clinical outcome.
Conclusion—The standard 12-lead ECG at 60 minutes predicts clinical outcome as accurately as later ECGs after thrombolysis for first acute myocardial infarction.

 Keywords: myocardial infarction;  thrombolysis;  ST segment elevation PMID:9415005

  3. Using Data to Determine the Initial Conditions in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltz, Ron; Garishvili, Irakli; Abelev, Betty

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a framework, the Comprehensive Heavy Ion Model Evaluation Reporting Algorithm (CHIMERA) to determine the optimal model and initial conditions of heavy ion collisions by comparing to data from a variety of observables. We have used this framework to study simple participant and binary collisions scaling in the presence of pre-equilibrium flow in the context of the VH2 2D+1 viscous hydrodynamic model with UrQMD afterburner for data from RHIC. We have also used this framework to explore the significance of variations in the equation of state. We have recently begun to apply this framework to a new hydro-solver tools known as CHOMBO, which incorporates adaptive mesh refinement techniques that are well suited to the study of initial state fluctuations. We will review results from using CHIMERA with VH2, and discuss future plans for using CHOMBO to study initial state fluctuations.

  4. Micro-mechanical study of stress path and initial conditions in granular materials using DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorostkar, Omid; Mirghasemi, Ali Asghar

    2016-03-01

    The macroscale response of granular materials under different loading conditions stems from the alteration of micromechanical properties during loading. Previous studies have used either physical experiments or discrete element method simulations to explore the effect of initial conditions and stress path on granular materials. However, microscale studies are not sufficient, especially for various loading paths. We study micromechanics of granular materials using the stress-force-fabric (SFF) relationship for a better understanding of the behavior of granular materials. Triaxial compression and extension tests are conducted on samples containing 1000 spherical particles, with periodic boundaries, and the effect of initial porosity is studied. In the next step, using the SFF relationship, we study the effect of anisotropic consolidation ratio. In addition to providing an appropriate explanation for shear strength out of evolution of anisotropy coefficients, our results show that anisotropic consolidation does not affect the micromechanical properties of granular materials in a way to change mobilized friction angle of sample at failure point.

  5. Non-Gaussian initial conditions in ΛCDM: Newtonian, relativistic, and primordial contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruni, Marco; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Meures, Nikolai; Wands, David

    2014-04-10

    The goal of the present paper is to set initial conditions for structure formation at nonlinear order, consistent with general relativity, while also allowing for primordial non-Gaussianity. We use the nonlinear continuity and Raychaudhuri equations, which together with the nonlinear energy constraint, determine the evolution of the matter density fluctuation in general relativity. We solve this equations at first and second order in a perturbative expansion, recovering and extending previous results derived in the matter-dominated limit and in the Newtonian regime. We present a second-order solution for the comoving density contrast in a ΛCDM universe, identifying nonlinear contributions coming from the Newtonian growing mode, primordial non-Gaussianity and intrinsic non-Gaussianity, due to the essential nonlinearity of the relativistic constraint equations. We discuss the application of these results to initial conditions in N-body simulations, showing that relativistic corrections mimic a non-zero nonlinear parameter f {sub NL}.

  6. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations: Initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Marcos, B.

    2007-03-15

    The relation between the results of cosmological N-body simulations, and the continuum theoretical models they simulate, is currently not understood in a way which allows a quantification of N dependent effects. In this first of a series of papers on this issue, we consider the quantification of such effects in the initial conditions of such simulations. A general formalism developed in [A. Gabrielli, Phys. Rev. E 70, 066131 (2004).] allows us to write down an exact expression for the power spectrum of the point distributions generated by the standard algorithm for generating such initial conditions. Expanded perturbatively in the amplitude of the input (i.e. theoretical, continuum) power spectrum, we obtain at linear order the input power spectrum, plus two terms which arise from discreteness and contribute at large wave numbers. For cosmological type power spectra, one obtains as expected, the input spectrum for wave numbers k smaller than that characteristic of the discreteness. The comparison of real space correlation properties is more subtle because the discreteness corrections are not as strongly localized in real space. For cosmological type spectra the theoretical mass variance in spheres and two-point correlation function are well approximated above a finite distance. For typical initial amplitudes this distance is a few times the interparticle distance, but it diverges as this amplitude (or, equivalently, the initial redshift of the cosmological simulation) goes to zero, at fixed particle density. We discuss briefly the physical significance of these discreteness terms in the initial conditions, in particular, with respect to the definition of the continuum limit of N-body simulations.

  7. Precipitation-climate sensitivity to initial conditions in an atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    Atmospheric climate, in contrast to weather, is traditionally considered to be determined by boundary conditions such as sea surface temperature (SST). To test this hypothesis, we examined annual mean precipitation from an ensemble of 20 general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Ensemble members were forced with identical 10-year series of SST and sea ice, but they began with slightly differing initial conditions. A surprisingly small proportion of the variance in the output is attributable to the effects of boundary forcing. This result-and similar evidence from smaller ensembles of other GCM simulations-implies that long-term precipitation variations are mostly unpredictable, even if SST forecasts are `perfect.`

  8. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Schilke, P.; Menten, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    As Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now ``hot topics''. We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class~0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  9. Optimal Initial Conditions and Stochastic Forcing for Central and East Pacific ENSO Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimont, D.; Newman, M.; Alexander, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Research on the structure and evolution of individual El Niño / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events has identified two categories of ENSO event characteristics that can be defined by maximum equatorial SST anomalies centered in the Central Pacific (around the dateline to 150°W; CP events) or in the Eastern Pacific (west of about 150°W; EP events). The distinction between these two events is not just academic: both types of event evolve differently, implying different predictability; the events tend to have different maximum amplitude; and the global teleconnection differs between each type of event. The identification of initial conditions that tend to grow into each type of event will lead to better predictability and better dynamical understanding of individual ENSO event evolution. In this study, we use a linear inverse model framework to (i) calculate optimal initial conditions that lead to CP or EP ENSO events, (ii) identify patterns of stochastic forcing that are responsible for exciting each type of event, and (iii) investigate the relative roles of stochastic forcing and internal dynamics in generating long term variations in CP and EP ENSO event statistics. We target our analysis toward CP or EP ENSO events by constructing a CP or EP norm under which optimal initial conditions are calculated. Results highlight a fundamentally different role for the Pacific Meridional Mode in the initial condition and subsequent evolution of CP vs. EP ENSO events. Analysis of stochastic forcing shows that CP ENSO events evolve via the Seasonal Footprinting Mechanism, in which mid-latitude atmospheric variability associated with the atmospheric North Pacific Oscillation lead to ENSO events through the Pacific Meridional Mode. Finally, variations in ENSO event statistics are investigated using a linear inverse model derived from a long simulation of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Earth System Model. Variations in stochastic forcing vs. dynamics of

  10. Sensitivity to initial conditions in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamarit, F. A.; Cannas, S. A.; Tsallis, C.

    1998-03-01

    We consider biological evolution as described within the Bak and Sneppen 1993 model. We exhibit, at the self-organized critical state, a power-law sensitivity to the initial conditions, calculate the associated exponent, and relate it to the recently introduced nonextensive thermostatistics. The scenario which here emerges without tuning strongly reminds of that of the tuned onset of chaos in say logistic-like one-dimensional maps. We also calculate the dynamical exponent z.

  11. Reconstructing cosmological initial conditions from galaxy peculiar velocities - I. Reverse Zeldovich Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumler, Timur; Hoffman, Yehuda; Courtois, Hélène; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We propose a new method to recover the cosmological initial conditions of the presently observed galaxy distribution, which can serve to run constrained simulations of the Local Universe. Our method, the Reverse Zeldovich Approximation (RZA), can be applied to radial galaxy peculiar velocity data and extends the previously used constrained realizations (CR) method by adding a Lagrangian reconstruction step. The RZA method consists of applying the Zeldovich approximation in reverse to galaxy peculiar velocities to estimate the cosmic displacement field and the initial linear matter distribution from which the present-day Local Universe evolved. We test our method with a mock survey taken from a cosmological simulation. We show that the halo peculiar velocities at z = 0 are close to the linear prediction of the Zeldovich approximation, if a grouping is applied to the data to remove virial motions. We find that the addition of RZA to the CR method significantly improves the reconstruction of the initial conditions. The RZA is able to recover the correct initial positions of the velocity tracers with a median error of only 1.36 Mpc h-1 in our test simulation. For realistic sparse and noisy data, this median increases to 5 Mpc h-1. This is a significant improvement over the previous approach of neglecting the displacement field, which introduces errors on a scale of 10 Mpc h-1 or even higher. Applying the RZA method to the upcoming high-quality observational peculiar velocity catalogues will generate much more precise constrained simulations of the Local Universe.

  12. A Comparison of Perturbed Initial Conditions and Multiphysics Ensembles in a Severe Weather Episode in Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Angelis, Carlos F.; Martinez, Miguel A.; Cecilia Marcos; Antonio Rodriguez; Hou, Arthur; Jong Shi, Jain

    2012-01-01

    Ensembles of numerical model forecasts are of interest to operational early warning forecasters as the spread of the ensemble provides an indication of the uncertainty of the alerts, and the mean value is deemed to outperform the forecasts of the individual models. This paper explores two ensembles on a severe weather episode in Spain, aiming to ascertain the relative usefulness of each one. One ensemble uses sensible choices of physical parameterizations (precipitation microphysics, land surface physics, and cumulus physics) while the other follows a perturbed initial conditions approach. The results show that, depending on the parameterizations, large differences can be expected in terms of storm location, spatial structure of the precipitation field, and rain intensity. It is also found that the spread of the perturbed initial conditions ensemble is smaller than the dispersion due to physical parameterizations. This confirms that in severe weather situations operational forecasts should address moist physics deficiencies to realize the full benefits of the ensemble approach, in addition to optimizing initial conditions. The results also provide insights into differences in simulations arising from ensembles of weather models using several combinations of different physical parameterizations.

  13. Effect of initial conditions on mixing within a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaine, Emmanuel; Mydlarski, Laurent; Cortelezzi, Luca

    2011-11-01

    We analyze the mixing of a passive scalar (temperature) in a turbulent channel flow for different initial conditions by means of numerical simulations. The numerical domain is a channel delimited by two parallel and infinite flat walls, simulated using periodic boundary conditions in the streamwise and spanwise directions. We consider three initial distributions of temperature, where hot and cold fluids are separated by a sharp but continuous interface that subdivides the computational domain into two identical halves. The interface is taken parallel to the walls or perpendicular to them, oriented in the streamwise or spanwise directions. We perform a direct numerical simulation of the temperature field at Reτ = 190 when the flow is fully turbulent. The numerical scheme combines an advection diffusion solver, i.e, a third-order flux integral method based on UTOPIA (Leonard et al., Appl. Math. Modeling, 1995), with a Navier-Stokes solver, i.e, spectral code released by Prof. John Gibson, http://www.channelflow.org). We quantify the time-evolution of the mixing performance of the turbulent flow using different measures of the mixing, including a negative Sobolev norm - a diagnostic currently used to asses the mixing performance of laminar flows. Finally, we discuss the influence of the initial conditions on the turbulent mixing. Funding was provided by NSERC (grants RGPIN217169 and RGPIN217184).

  14. The shear-free condition and constant-mean-curvature hyperboloidal initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Paul T.; Isenberg, James; Lee, John M.; Stavrov Allen, Iva

    2016-06-01

    We consider the Einstein-Maxwell-fluid constraint equations, and make use of the conformal method to construct and parametrize constant-mean-curvature hyperboloidal initial data sets that satisfy the shear-free condition. This condition is known to be necessary in order that a spacetime development admit a regular conformal boundary at future null infinity; see (Andersson and Chruściel 1994 Commun. Math. Phys. 161 533-68). We work with initial data sets in a variety of regularity classes, primarily considering those data sets whose geometries are weakly asymptotically hyperbolic, as defined in (Allen et al 2015 arXiv:1506.03399). These metrics are C 1,1 conformally compact, but not necessarily C 2 conformally compact. In order to ensure that the data sets we construct are indeed shear-free, we make use of the conformally covariant traceless Hessian introduced in (Allen et al 2015 arXiv:1506.03399). We furthermore construct a class of initial data sets with weakly asymptotically hyerbolic metrics that may be only C 0,1 conformally compact; these data sets are insufficiently regular to make sense of the shear-free condition.

  15. Improvement of Initial Conditions of Sea Fog Modeling with Cycling 3DVAR-WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Fu, G.; Wu, W.; Xu, X.

    2010-07-01

    Among the seas of China, the Yellow Sea (YS) experiences sea fog most frequently, especially during the spring and summer seasons. Recent studies of sea fog modeling over YS have suggested that data assimilation is a key important issue for sea fog modeling, because simulation result is significantly sensitive to initial conditions. In this talk, a heavy sea fog over YS occurred from 6 to 7 March 2006 is carefully studied by using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The evolution of sea fog area is demonstrated by the Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT)-1R visible imagery and infrared data using dual channel difference method. A cycling 3DVAR scheme with 12-h assimilation window is designed and employed to generate the initial conditions for this sea fog simulation. The result shows that the simulated sea fog area is greatly improved compared to the result without cycling 3DVAR. Additionally, the initial conditions with cycling 3DVAR-WRF are also used to force the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) model to simulate this sea fog case. We find that the simulated sea fog coverage is much better than the result with RAMS original isentropic analysis.

  16. The initial representation in reasoning towards an interpretation of conditional sentences.

    PubMed

    Schroyens, Walter; Braem, Senne

    2011-02-01

    All accounts of human reasoning (whether presented at the symbolic or subsymbolic level) have to reckon with the temporal organization of the human processing systems and the ephemeral nature of the representations it uses. We present three new empirical tests for the hypothesis that people commence the interpretational process by constructing a minimal initial representation. In the case of if A then C the initial representation captures the occurrence of the consequent, C, within the context of the antecedent, A. Conditional inference problems are created by a categorical premise that affirms or denies A or C. The initial representation allows an inference when the explicitly represented information matches (e.g., the categorical premise A affirms the antecedent "A") but not when it mismatches (e.g., "not-A" denies A). Experiments 1 and 2 confirmed that people tend to accept the conclusion that "nothing follows" for the denial problems, as indeed they do not have a determinate initial-model conclusion. Experiment 3 demonstrated the other way round that the effect of problem type (affirmation versus denial) is reduced when we impede the possibility of inferring a determinate conclusion on the basis of the initial representation of both the affirmation and the denial problems. PMID:21104563

  17. Transverse free vibrations of right triangular thin plates with combinations of clamped and simply supported boundary conditions: a highly accurate simplified solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, H. T.

    1995-06-01

    The practical engineering problem of right angled triangular plates with combinations of clamped and simply supported boundary conditions is dealt with in this paper. A highly accurate, economical and practical solution is used for the transverse free vibration analysis of these plates. The solution is based on a modified superposition method. The accuracy of the solution is discussed. Numerical results are compared with previously published reliable data. The advantages of the solution used in the paper over previously published solutions are discussed. Eigenvalues, mode shapes and contour plots are provided for a large number of plates.

  18. Parametrisation of initial conditions for seasonal stream flow forecasting in the Swiss Rhine basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Simon; Rössler, Ole; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Current climate forecast models show - to the best of our knowledge - low skill in forecasting climate variability in Central Europe at seasonal lead times. When it comes to seasonal stream flow forecasting, initial conditions thus play an important role. Here, initial conditions refer to the catchments moisture at the date of forecast, i.e. snow depth, stream flow and lake level, soil moisture content, and groundwater level. The parametrisation of these initial conditions can take place at various spatial and temporal scales. Examples are the grid size of a distributed model or the time aggregation of predictors in statistical models. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the extent to which the parametrisation of initial conditions at different spatial scales leads to differences in forecast errors. To do so, we conduct a forecast experiment for the Swiss Rhine at Basel, which covers parts of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland and is southerly bounded by the Alps. Seasonal mean stream flow is defined for the time aggregation of 30, 60, and 90 days and forecasted at 24 dates within the calendar year, i.e. at the 1st and 16th day of each month. A regression model is employed due to the various anthropogenic effects on the basins hydrology, which often are not quantifiable but might be grasped by a simple black box model. Furthermore, the pool of candidate predictors consists of antecedent temperature, precipitation, and stream flow only. This pragmatic approach follows the fact that observations of variables relevant for hydrological storages are either scarce in space or time (soil moisture, groundwater level), restricted to certain seasons (snow depth), or regions (lake levels, snow depth). For a systematic evaluation, we therefore focus on the comprehensive archives of meteorological observations and reanalyses to estimate the initial conditions via climate variability prior to the date of forecast. The experiment itself is based on four different

  19. Tensor to scalar ratio and large scale power suppression from pre-slow roll initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lello, Louis; Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    We study the corrections to the power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in single field slow roll inflation with standard kinetic term due to initial conditions imprinted by a ``fast-roll'' stage prior to slow roll. For a wide range of initial inflaton kinetic energy, this stage lasts only a few e-folds and merges smoothly with slow-roll thereby leading to non-Bunch-Davies initial conditions for modes that exit the Hubble radius during slow roll. We describe a program that yields the dynamics in the fast-roll stage while matching to the slow roll stage in a manner that is independent of the inflationary potentials. Corrections to the power spectra are encoded in a ``transfer function'' for initial conditions Script Tα(k), Script Pα(k) = PBDα(k)Script Tα(k), implying a modification of the ``consistency condition'' for the tensor to scalar ratio at a pivot scale k0: r(k0) = -8nT(k0) [Script TT(k0)/Script TScript R(k0)]. We obtain Script Tα(k) to leading order in a Born approximation valid for modes of observational relevance today. A fit yields Script Tα(k) = 1+Aαk-pcos [2πωk/Hsr+varphiα], with 1.5lesssimplesssim2, ω simeq 1 and Hsr the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation, where curvature and tensor perturbations feature the same p,ω for a wide range of initial conditions. These corrections lead to both a suppression of the quadrupole and oscillatory features in both PR(k) and r(k0) with a period of the order of the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation. The results are quite general and independent of the specific inflationary potentials, depending solely on the ratio of kinetic to potential energy κ and the slow roll parameters epsilonV, ηV to leading order in slow roll. For a wide range of κ and the values of epsilonV ηV corresponding to the upper bounds from Planck, we find that the low quadrupole is consistent with the results from Planck, and the oscillations in r(k0) as a function of k0 could

  20. Terrestrial-type planet formation. Comparing different types of initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The initial distributions of planetary embryos and planetesimals used in N-body simulations play an important role for studies of the terrestrial-type planet formation during the post oligarchic growth. In general, most of these studies typically use ad hoc initial distributions based primarily on theoretical and numerical studies. Aims: We analyze the formation of planetary systems without gas giants around solar-type stars by focusing on the sensitivity of the results to the particular initial distributions used for planetesimals and planetary embryos at the end of the gas phase of the protoplanetary disk. The formation process of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ) and their final water contents are also topics of special interest in this work. Methods: We developed two different sets of N-body simulations starting with the same protoplanetary disk. The first set assumes typical ad hoc initial distributions for embryos and planetesimals, and the second set obtains these initial distributions from the results of a semi-analytical model that simulates the evolution of the protoplanetary disk during the gaseous phase. Results: The two sets of simulations form planets within the HZ. Using ad hoc initial conditions, the masses of the planets that remain in the HZ range from 0.66 M⊕ to 2.27 M⊕. Using more realistic initial conditions obtained from a semi-analytical model, we found that the masses of the planets range from 1.18 M⊕ to 2.21 M⊕. Both sets of simulations form planets in the HZ with water contents ranging between 4.5% and 39.48% by mass. The planets that have the highest water contents with respect to those with the lowest water contents present differences regarding the sources of water supply. Conclusions: From comparing the two sets of simulations, we suggest that the number of planets that remain in the HZ is not sensitive to the particular initial distribution of embryos and planetesimals, and therefore the results are

  1. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Blanc, P.; Wald, L.; Ghedira, H.

    2015-07-01

    Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence (DNI) include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS) whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and that from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI). This study investigates if the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and a collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement (SAM) instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance, were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE) of 5 %, a relative bias of +1 % and acoefficient of determination greater than 0.97. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a Two Term Henyey-Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 22 and -19 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.89. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard DNI measurements.

  2. Constraining the initial conditions of globular clusters using their radius distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Poul E. R.; Gieles, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Studies of extragalactic globular clusters (GCs) have shown that the peak size of the GC radius distribution (RD) depends only weakly on galactic environment. We model RDs of GC populations using a simple prescription for a Hubble time of relaxation-driven evolution of cluster mass and radius. We consider a power-law cluster initial mass function (CIMF) with and without an exponential truncation, and focus in particular on a flat and a steep CIMF (power-law indices of 0 and -2, respectively). For the initial half-mass radii at birth, we adopt either Roche volume (RV) filling conditions (`filling', meaning that the ratio of half-mass to Jacobi radius is approximately rh/rJ ≃ 0.15) or strongly RV under-filling conditions (`under-filling', implying that initially rh/rJ ≪ 0.15). Assuming a constant orbital velocity about the galaxy centre, we find for a steep CIMF that the typical half-light radius scales with the galactocentric radius RG as R{^{1/3}_G}. This weak scaling is consistent with observations, but this scenario has the (well-known) problem that too many low-mass clusters survive. A flat CIMF with `filling' initial conditions results in the correct MF at old ages, but with too many large (massive) clusters at large RG. An `under-filling' GC population with a flat CIMF also results in the correct MF, and can also successfully reproduce the shape of the RD, with a peak size that is (almost) independent of RG. In this case, the peak size depends (almost) only on the peak mass of the GC MF. The (near) universality of the GC RD is therefore because of the (near) universality of the CIMF. There are some extended GCs in the outer halo of the Milky Way that cannot be explained by this model.

  3. An isotopic-independent highly accurate potential energy surface for CO2 isotopologues and an initial (12)C(16)O2 infrared line list.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Tashkun, Sergey A; Lee, Timothy J

    2012-03-28

    An isotopic-independent, highly accurate potential energy surface (PES) has been determined for CO(2) by refining a purely ab initio PES with selected, purely experimentally determined rovibrational energy levels. The purely ab initio PES is denoted Ames-0, while the refined PES is denoted Ames-1. Detailed tests are performed to demonstrate the spectroscopic accuracy of the Ames-1 PES. It is shown that Ames-1 yields σ(rms) (root-mean-squares error) = 0.0156 cm(-1) for 6873 J = 0-117 (12)C(16)O(2) experimental energy levels, even though less than 500 (12)C(16)O(2) energy levels were included in the refinement procedure. It is also demonstrated that, without any additional refinement, Ames-1 yields very good agreement for isotopologues. Specifically, for the (12)C(16)O(2) and (13)C(16)O(2) isotopologues, spectroscopic constants G(v) computed from Ames-1 are within ±0.01 and 0.02 cm(-1) of reliable experimentally derived values, while for the (16)O(12)C(18)O, (16)O(12)C(17)O, (16)O(13)C(18)O, (16)O(13)C(17)O, (12)C(18)O(2), (17)O(12)C(18)O, (12)C(17)O(2), (13)C(18)O(2), (13)C(17)O(2), (17)O(13)C(18)O, and (14)C(16)O(2) isotopologues, the differences are between ±0.10 and 0.15 cm(-1). To our knowledge, this is the first time a polyatomic PES has been refined using such high J values, and this has led to new challenges in the refinement procedure. An initial high quality, purely ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS) is constructed and used to generate a 296 K line list. For most bands, experimental IR intensities are well reproduced for (12)C(16)O(2) using Ames-1 and the DMS. For more than 80% of the bands, the experimental intensities are reproduced with σ(rms)(ΔI) < 20% or σ(rms)(ΔI∕δ(obs)) < 5. A few exceptions are analyzed and discussed. Directions for future improvements are discussed, though it is concluded that the current Ames-1 and the DMS should be useful in analyzing and assigning high-resolution laboratory or astronomical spectra. PMID:22462861

  4. Soil erosion and effluent particle size distribution under different initial conditions and rock fragment coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, S.; Barry, D. A.; Brovelli, A.; Heng, B. C. P.; Sander, G. C.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the presence of rock fragments on the soil surface and the soil's initial characteristics (moisture content, surface roughness, bulk density, etc.) are key factors influencing soil erosion dynamics and sediment delivery. In addition, the interaction of these factors increases the complexity of soil erosion patterns and makes predictions more difficult. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the effect of soil initial conditions and rock fragment coverage on soil erosion yields and effluent particle size distribution and (ii) to evaluate to what extent the rock fragment coverage controls this relationship. Three laboratory flume experiments with constant precipitation rate of 74 mm/h on a loamy soil parcel with a 2% slope were performed. Experiments with duration of 2 h were conducted using the 6-m × 2-m EPFL erosion flume. During each experiment two conditions were considered, a bare soil and a rock fragment-protected (with 40% coverage) soil. The initial soil surface state was varied between the three experiments, from a freshly re-ploughed and almost dry condition to a compacted soil with a well-developed shield layer and high moisture content. Experiments were designed so that rain splash was the primary driver of soil erosion. Results showed that the amount of eroded mass was highly controlled by the initial soil conditions and whether the steady-state equilibrium was un-, partially- or fully- developed during the previous event. Additionally, results revealed that sediment yields and particle size composition in the initial part of an erosion event are more sensitive to the erosion history than the long-time behaviour. This latter appears to be mainly controlled by rainfall intensity. If steady-state was achieved for a previous event, then the next event consistently produced concentrations for each size class that peaked rapidly, and then declined gradually to steady-state equilibrium. If steady state was not obtained, then

  5. Evaluation of the effects of initial conditions on transients in PUMA

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-06-01

    A Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is the latest Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) designed by the General Electric (GE). Major differences between the SBWR and the currently operating BWRs include the use of passive gravity-driven systems in the SBWR for emergency cooling of the vessel and containment. In order to investigate the phenomena expected during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored an integral scaled-test facility, called Purdue University Multidimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). The facility models all the major safety-related components of SBWR. Two PUMA initialization calculations were performed to assist the Purdue University in establishing test initialization procedures. Both calculations were based on the initial conditions obtained from SBWR LOCA simulation. In the base case, a complete separation between vapor and liquid was assumed, with all the water in the lower part of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and all the vapor above it. In the sensitivity case, the water inventory was distributed in the vessel in the same way as in the SBWR at 1.034 MPa, which is the initial pressure for PUMA facility. Purdue University plans to initialize the PUMA tests as in the base case. The sensitivity calculation is performed to provide assurance that this mode of initialization is adequate. It also provides information on possible differences in the progress of transients. The paper will discuss the differences in the early part of the transient. The conclusion from this study will also apply to many integral facilities which simulate the reactor transients form the middle of the transient.

  6. Medicare's Bundled Payment initiative: most hospitals are focused on a few high-volume conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Thomas C; Joynt, Karen E; Wild, Robert C; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-03-01

    The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative is a federally funded innovation model mandated by the Affordable Care Act. It is designed to help transition Medicare away from fee-for-service payments and toward bundling a single payment for an episode of acute care in a hospital and related postacute care in an appropriate setting. While results from the initiative will not be available for several years, current data can help provide critical early insights. However, little is known about the participating organizations and how they are focusing their efforts. We identified participating hospitals and used national Medicare claims data to assess their characteristics and previous spending patterns. These hospitals are mostly large, nonprofit, teaching hospitals in the Northeast, and they have selectively enrolled in the bundled payment initiative covering patient conditions with high clinical volumes. We found no significant differences in episode-based spending between participating and nonparticipating hospitals. Postacute care explains the largest variation in overall episode-based spending, signaling an opportunity to align incentives across providers. However, the focus on a few selected clinical conditions and the high degree of integration that already exists between enrolled hospitals and postacute care providers may limit the generalizability of bundled payment across the Medicare system. PMID:25732486

  7. Impact of soil moisture initial conditions on multi model summer predictions over mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardilouze, Constantin; Prodhomme, Chloé; Batté, Lauriane; Déqué, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Land surface initial conditions have been recognized as a potential source of predictability at seasonal time scales. As an example, results from GLACE-2 (phase 2 of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment) highlighted the impact of spring soil moisture in summer near-surface air temperature prediction over Europe and Northern America with global long-range forecast systems (Koster et al., 2011, van den Hurk et al.,2012). Yet, few studies have explored such an influence over a sufficient hindcast period to produce a robust quantitative assessment. In the framework of the FP7-SPECS project, dedicated experiments have been carried out with June-August hindcasts from 5 distinct Atmosphere Ocean Global Climate Models initialized either by realistic or climatological soil moisture conditions on May 1st. Realistic initialization leads to an improved 2-meter temperature prediction skill over parts of Europe in the multi model, particularly the Balkans peninsula which had been identified as a hot spot of soil moisture-atmosphere coupling (Seneviratne et al. 2006) However no improvement was found over North-American Great Plains in spite of the high potential of this region. Further analyses suggest that this lack of skill stems from a common shortcoming of the models. All of them tend to overestimate the positive feedback between soil moisture, temperature and precipitation with respect to the observations. Hence, tackling model systematic biases over the US Southern Great Plains appears as a necessary prerequisite for summer predictability enhancement.

  8. Analysis of initial reactions of MALDI based on chemical properties of matrixes and excitation condition.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Wang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chiu Wen; Liu, Bo-Hong; Lin, Sheng Hsien; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2012-08-16

    This investigation concerns the initial chemical reactions that affect the ionization of matrixes in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The study focuses on the relaxations of photon energy that occur on a comparable time scale to that of ionization, in which the available laser energy is shared and the ionization condition is changed. The relaxations include fluorescence, fragmentation, and nonradiative relaxation from the excited state to the ground state. With high absorption cross section and long excited-state lifetime, photoionization of matrix plays an important role if sufficient laser energy is used. Under other conditions, thermal ionization of the molecule in the ground state is predicted to be one of the important reactions. Evidence of change in the branching ratio of initial reactions with the matrix and the excitation wavelength was obtained with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, sinapinic acid, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone. These matrixes are studied by obtaining their mixed crystal absorption spectra, fluorescence properties, laser-induced infrared emission, and product ions. The exact ionization pathway depends on the chemical properties of matrixes and the excitation conditions. This concept may explain the diversity of experimental results observed in MALDI experiments, which provides an insight into the ensemble of chemical reactions that govern the generation of ions. PMID:22799495

  9. Reduction of damage initiation density in fused silica optics via UV laser conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John E.; Maricle, Stephen M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2004-03-16

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the density of sites on the surface of fused silica optics that are prone to the initiation of laser-induced damage, resulting in optics which have far fewer catastrophic defects and are better capable of resisting optical deterioration upon exposure for a long period of time to a high-power laser beam having a wavelength of about 360 nm or less. The initiation of laser-induced damage is reduced by conditioning the optic at low fluences below levels that normally lead to catastrophic growth of damage. When the optic is then irradiated at its high fluence design limit, the concentration of catastrophic damage sites that form on the surface of the optic is greatly reduced.

  10. Interface Equation for Thermocapillary Flow Leading to Nanoprotrusion Arrays: Sensitivity to Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dahan; Zhou, Chengzhe; Troian, Sandra

    Molten nanofilms whose free surface is exposed to a flat cooled substrate held in close proximity are known to develop spontaneous arrays of nanopillars which undergo runaway growth. Comparison between experiment and predictions of linear stability analysis (LSA) in the long wavelength approximation suggests the instability is caused by runaway thermocapillary forces. In previous work, we have examined the influence of experimental parameters on the value of the wavelength characterizing the most unstable mode. In this talk, we explore the sensitivity of the interface equation to initial conditions comprising extended and compact, spatially inhomogeneous perturbations in film thickness. While early time formations always migrate toward the most unstable mode from LSA, late time patterns exhibit interesting mode-mixing behavior even for initial disturbances characterized by a small wavenumber, single mode pulse. DC gratefully acknowledges support from a Caltech Summer Research Undergraduate fellowship.

  11. Origins of the rings of Uranus and Neptune. II - Initial conditions and ring moon populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.; Esposito, Larry W.

    1993-01-01

    Catastrophic fragmentation of the ring moons of Uranus and Neptune occurs in approximately 10 exp 8 years. The fate of the debris following a fragmenting impact is central to understanding the evolution of these satellites and the hypothesized origin of rings from their debris. In this paper the possible effects of the velocity distribution of fragments following a catastrophic fragmentation on satellite diminution via a collisional cascade is examined. Fragment velocities are critical in the evolution of the collisional cascade because of the possibility of reaccretion following disruption. The fragment velocity distribution is used to calculate the initial phase space distribution of the new ring particles. This provides a physically realistic initial condition for simulations of the collisional evolution of planetary rings.

  12. Directional RNA-seq reveals highly complex condition-dependent transcriptomes in E. coli K12 through accurate full-length transcripts assembling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although prokaryotic gene transcription has been studied over decades, many aspects of the process remain poorly understood. Particularly, recent studies have revealed that transcriptomes in many prokaryotes are far more complex than previously thought. Genes in an operon are often alternatively and dynamically transcribed under different conditions, and a large portion of genes and intergenic regions have antisense RNA (asRNA) and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts, respectively. Ironically, similar studies have not been conducted in the model bacterium E coli K12, thus it is unknown whether or not the bacterium possesses similar complex transcriptomes. Furthermore, although RNA-seq becomes the major method for analyzing the complexity of prokaryotic transcriptome, it is still a challenging task to accurately assemble full length transcripts using short RNA-seq reads. Results To fill these gaps, we have profiled the transcriptomes of E. coli K12 under different culture conditions and growth phases using a highly specific directional RNA-seq technique that can capture various types of transcripts in the bacterial cells, combined with a highly accurate and robust algorithm and tool TruHMM (http://bioinfolab.uncc.edu/TruHmm_package/) for assembling full length transcripts. We found that 46.9 ~ 63.4% of expressed operons were utilized in their putative alternative forms, 72.23 ~ 89.54% genes had putative asRNA transcripts and 51.37 ~ 72.74% intergenic regions had putative ncRNA transcripts under different culture conditions and growth phases. Conclusions As has been demonstrated in many other prokaryotes, E. coli K12 also has a highly complex and dynamic transcriptomes under different culture conditions and growth phases. Such complex and dynamic transcriptomes might play important roles in the physiology of the bacterium. TruHMM is a highly accurate and robust algorithm for assembling full-length transcripts in prokaryotes using directional RNA

  13. Rapid Optimal SPH Particle Distributions in Spherical Geometries for Creating Astrophysical Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-04-01

    Creating spherical initial conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that are spherically conformal is a difficult task. Here, we describe two algorithmic methods for evenly distributing points on surfaces that when paired can be used to build three-dimensional spherical objects with optimal equipartition of volume between particles, commensurate with an arbitrary radial density function. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method against stretched lattice arrangements on the metrics of hydrodynamic stability, spherical conformity, and the harmonic power distribution of gravitational settling oscillations. We further demonstrate how our method is highly optimized for simulating multi-material spheres, such as planets with core-mantle boundaries.

  14. Importance of Granular Structure in the Initial Conditions for the Elliptic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, R. P. G.; Grassi, F.; Hama, Y.; Qian, W. L.; Kodama, T.

    2008-09-12

    We show the effects of the granular structure of the initial conditions of a hydrodynamic description of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions on some observables, especially on the elliptic-flow parameter v{sub 2}. Such a structure enhances production of isotropically distributed high-p{sub T} particles, making v{sub 2} smaller there. Also, it reduces v{sub 2} in the forward and backward regions where the global matter density is smaller and, therefore, where such effects become more efficacious.

  15. How to impose initial conditions for QCD evolution of double parton distributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof; Lewandowska, Emilia

    2014-07-01

    Double parton distribution functions are used in the QCD description of double parton scattering. The double parton distributions evolve with hard scales through QCD evolution equations which obey nontrivial momentum and valence quark number sum rules. We describe an attempt to construct initial conditions for the evolution equations which exactly fulfill these sum rules and discuss its shortcomings. We also discuss the factorization of the double parton distributions into a product of two single parton distribution functions at small values of the parton momentum fractions.

  16. Exact solution for four-order acousto-optic Bragg diffraction with arbitrary initial conditions.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ron; Koslover, Deborah; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2009-03-01

    An exact solution to the four-order acousto-optic (AO) Bragg diffraction problem with arbitrary initial conditions compatible with exact Bragg angle incident light is developed. The solution, obtained by solving a 4th-order differential equation, is formalized into a transition matrix operator predicting diffracted light orders at the exit of the AO cell in terms of the same diffracted light orders at the entrance. It is shown that the transition matrix is unitary and that this unitary matrix condition is sufficient to guarantee energy conservation. A comparison of analytical solutions with numerical predictions validates the formalism. Although not directly related to the approach used to obtain the solution, it was discovered that all four generated eigenvalues from the four-order AO differential matrix operator are expressed simply in terms of Euclid's Divine Proportion. PMID:19252607

  17. INITIAL TEST WELL CONDITIONING AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    R.D. Oliver; J.C. Dinsmoor; S.J. Goldstein; I. Reyes; R. De La Garza

    2005-07-11

    Three test wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes during March-April 2003. The initial pumping to condition the wells was completed during December 2003. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, terminating 20 m below the top of the measured water level. The PB-2 and PB-3 wells, which were drilled on opposite sides of PB-1 at a radial distance of approximately 40 to 50 m outside of the remaining projected ore body, were also drilled to about 20 m below the top of the measured water level. Each test well was completed with 4-inch (10.2-cm) diameter PVC casing with a slotted liner below the water table. Initial conditioning of all three wells using a submersible pump at low pump rates [less than 1 gallon (3.8 1) per minute] resulted in measurable draw down and recoveries. The greatest drawdown ({approx}15 m) was observed in PB-2, whereas only minor (<1 m) drawdown occurred in PB-3. For PB-1 and PB-2, the water turbidity decreased as the wells were pumped and the pH values decreased, indicating that the contamination from the drilling fluid was reduced as the wells were conditioned. Test wells PB-1 and PB-2 showed increased inflow after several borehole volumes of fluid were removed, but their inflow rates remained less that the pumping rate. Test well PB-3 showed the smallest drawdown and least change in pH and conductivity during initial pumping and quickest recovery with a rise in measured water level after conditioning. The 195 gallons (750 l) of water pumped from PB-3 during conditioning was discharged through a household sponge. That sponge showed measurable gamma radiation, which decayed to background values in less than 12 hours. Preliminary interpretations include filtration of a radioisotope source with a short half-life or of a radioisotope that volatized as the sponge

  18. Assessment of land use impact on hydraulic threshold conditions for gully head cut initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari Samani, Aliakbar; Chen, Qiuwen; Khalighi, Shahram; Wasson, Robert James; Rahdari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-07-01

    A gully as an accelerated erosion process is responsible for land degradation under various environmental conditions and has been known as a threshold phenomenon. Although the effects of gullying processes have been well documented, few soil erosion models have taken into account the threshold condition necessary for gully development. This research was devoted to determining the effects of land use change on hydraulic threshold condition and stream power of water flow through an in situ experimental flume (15 m × 0.4 m). Results indicated that head cut initiation and detachment rates showed a better correlation to stream power indices than shear stress (τcr). The threshold unit stream power value (ωu) for head cut initiation in rangeland, abandoned land, and dry farming land was 0.0276, 0.0149, and 4.5 × 10-5 m s-1, respectively. Moreover, the micro-relief condition of soil surface and surface vegetation affected the flow regime of discharge and velocity. It is seen that the composite hydraulic criteria of Froude number (Fr) and discharge (Q) can clearly discriminate the land uses' threshold. In fact, the remarkable decrease of τcr in dry farming was related to the effect of tillage practice on soil susceptibility and aggregate strength. The findings indicated that using the unit steam power index instead of critical shear stress could increase the models' precision for prediction of head cut development. Compared to the Ephemeral Gully Erosion Model (EGEM) equation for critical shear stress, it is important to point out that for modelling of gully erosion, using single soil attributes can lead to an inaccurate estimation for τcr. In addition, based on the findings of this research, the use of threshold values of τcr = 35 dyne cm-2 and ωu = 0.4 cm s-1 in physically based soil erosion models is susceptible to high uncertainty when assessing gully erosion.

  19. Initial conditions for radiation analysis: models of galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, R. A.

    During interplanetary missions the radiation conditions are determined by fluxes of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) particles and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). The particle fluxes of these two high-energy radiation components differ fundamentally in energy spectra and have the opposite dependence on solar activity level. One of the key issues, associated with estimating flight conditions for missions to the Moon, various asteroids and Mars, is the relative balance between GCR and SCR, depending on the level of solar activity and the distance to the Sun for both open space conditions and conditions inside the spacecraft. This task can be solved with sufficient accuracy only when using such particle flux models (of the above mentioned radiation sources), which are based on unified parameters, describing the current solar activity level. Such models, employing smoothed Wolf numbers as the initial parameter, were developed at SINP MSU. These models are - the semi-empirical model of GCR fluxes, which has currently been approved as an international standard (ISO 15390), and the probabilistic model of SEP particle fluxes, which is currently under discussion as a draft international standard (ISO DRAFT 15391). The report presents a survey of experimental data on GCR and SEP fluxes in interplanetary space at various solar activity levels, and an analysis of the reliability and completeness of data on these fluxes, provided by various calculation models.

  20. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Blanc, P.; Wald, L.; Ghedira, H.

    2015-12-01

    Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS), whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI). This study investigates whether the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and the collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE) of 6 % and a coefficient of determination greater than 0.96. The observed relative bias obtained with libRadtran is +2 %, while that obtained with SMARTS is -1 %. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a two-term Henyey-Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 27 and -24 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.882. Therefore, AERONET data may very well be used to model the monochromatic DNIS and the monochromatic CSNI. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard measurements of the beam irradiance.

  1. Initial subjective reward: single-exposure conditioned place preference to alcohol in mice.

    PubMed

    Grisel, Judith E; Beasley, John B; Bertram, Emma C; Decker, Brooke E; Duan, Chunyu A; Etuma, Mahder; Hand, Annie; Locklear, Mallory N; Whitmire, Matthew P

    2014-01-01

    Most adults consume alcohol with relative impunity, but about 10-20% of users persist (or progress) in their consumption, despite mounting and serious repercussions. Identifying at-risk individuals before neuroadaptative changes associated with chronic use become well ingrained is thus a key step in mitigating and preventing the end stage disease and its devastating impacts. Explaining liability has been impeded, in part, by the absence of animal models for assessing initial sensitivity to the drug's reinforcing properties, an important endophenotype in the trajectory toward excessive drinking. Here we assess the initial rewarding effects of the drug in a novel application of the conditioned place preference paradigm. In contrast to previous studies that have all employed repeated drug administration, we demonstrated a robust preference for a context paired with a single exposure to 1.5 g/kg EtOH in male and female subjects of three strains. This model validates an assay of initial sensitivity to the subjective rewarding effects of alcohol, a widely used drug with multifarious impacts on both brain and society, and provides a new tool for theory-driven endophenotypic pharmacogenetic approaches to understanding and treating addiction. PMID:25408633

  2. Initial subjective reward: single-exposure conditioned place preference to alcohol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Grisel, Judith E.; Beasley, John B.; Bertram, Emma C.; Decker, Brooke E.; Duan, Chunyu A.; Etuma, Mahder; Hand, Annie; Locklear, Mallory N.; Whitmire, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Most adults consume alcohol with relative impunity, but about 10–20% of users persist (or progress) in their consumption, despite mounting and serious repercussions. Identifying at-risk individuals before neuroadaptative changes associated with chronic use become well ingrained is thus a key step in mitigating and preventing the end stage disease and its devastating impacts. Explaining liability has been impeded, in part, by the absence of animal models for assessing initial sensitivity to the drug's reinforcing properties, an important endophenotype in the trajectory toward excessive drinking. Here we assess the initial rewarding effects of the drug in a novel application of the conditioned place preference paradigm. In contrast to previous studies that have all employed repeated drug administration, we demonstrated a robust preference for a context paired with a single exposure to 1.5 g/kg EtOH in male and female subjects of three strains. This model validates an assay of initial sensitivity to the subjective rewarding effects of alcohol, a widely used drug with multifarious impacts on both brain and society, and provides a new tool for theory-driven endophenotypic pharmacogenetic approaches to understanding and treating addiction. PMID:25408633

  3. What initial condition of inflation would suppress the large-scale CMB spectrum?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Pisin; Lin, Yu -Hsiang

    2016-01-08

    There is an apparent power deficit relative to the Λ CDM prediction of the cosmic microwave background spectrum at large scales, which, though not yet statistically significant, persists from WMAP to Planck data. Proposals that invoke some form of initial condition for the inflation have been made to address this apparent power suppression, albeit with conflicting conclusions. By studying the curvature perturbations of a scalar field in the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe parameterized by the equation of state parameter w, we find that the large-scale spectrum at the end of inflation reflects the superhorizon spectrum of the initial state. The large-scale spectrummore » is suppressed if the universe begins with the adiabatic vacuum in a superinflation (w < –1) or positive-pressure (w > 0) era. In the latter case, there is however no causal mechanism to establish the initial adiabatic vacuum. On the other hand, as long as the universe begins with the adiabatic vacuum in an era with –1 < w < 0, even if there exists an intermediate positive-pressure era, the large-scale spectrum would be enhanced rather than suppressed. In conclusion, we further calculate the spectrum of a two-stage inflation model with a two-field potential and show that the result agrees with that obtained from the ad hoc single-field analysis.« less

  4. Large-scale bias and efficient generation of initial conditions for nonlocal primordial non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Román; Hui, Lam; Manera, Marc; Chan, Kwan Chuen

    2012-04-01

    We study the scale dependence of halo bias in generic (nonlocal) primordial non-Gaussian (PNG) initial conditions of the type motivated by inflation, parametrized by an arbitrary quadratic kernel. We first show how to generate nonlocal PNG initial conditions with minimal overhead compared to local PNG models for a general class of primordial bispectra that can be written as linear combinations of separable templates. We run cosmological simulations for the local, and nonlocal equilateral and orthogonal models and present results on the scale dependence of halo bias. We also derive a general formula for the Fourier-space bias using the peak-background split in the context of the excursion-set approach to halos and discuss the difference and similarities with the known corresponding result from local bias models. Our peak-background split bias formula generalizes previous results in the literature to include non-Markovian effects and nonuniversality of the mass function and are in better agreement with measurements in numerical simulations than previous results for a variety of halo masses, redshifts and halo definitions. We also derive for the first time quadratic bias results for arbitrary nonlocal PNG, and show that nonlinear bias loops give small corrections at large scales. The resulting well-behaved perturbation theory paves the way to constrain nonlocal PNG from measurements of the power spectrum and bispectrum in galaxy redshift surveys.

  5. N-body simulations with generic non-Gaussian initial conditions II: halo bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Verde, Licia

    2012-03-01

    We present N-body simulations for generic non-Gaussian initial conditions with the aim of exploring and modelling the scale-dependent halo bias. This effect is evident on very large scales requiring large simulation boxes. In addition, the previously available prescription to implement generic non-Gaussian initial conditions has been improved to keep under control higher-order terms which were spoiling the power spectrum on large scales. We pay particular attention to the differences between physical, inflation-motivated primordial bispectra and their factorizable templates, and to the operational definition of the non-Gaussian halo bias (which has both a scale-dependent and an approximately scale-independent contributions). We find that analytic predictions for both the non-Gaussian halo mass function and halo bias work well once a fudge factor (which was introduced before but still lacks convincing physical explanation) is calibrated on simulations. The halo bias remains therefore an extremely promising tool to probe primordial non-Gaussianity and thus to give insights into the physical mechanism that generated the primordial perturbations. The simulation outputs and tables of the analytic predictions will be made publicly available via the non-Gaussian comparison project web site http://icc.ub.edu/~liciaverde/NGSCP.html.

  6. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Slosar, Anže; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce and explore "paired" cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x ,tinitial)=-δB(x ,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from Λ CDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void in simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.

  7. Reconstruction of Initial Beam Conditions at the Exit of the DARHT II Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Arthur

    We consider a technique to determine the initial beam conditions of the DARHT II Accelerator by measuring the beam size under three different magnetic transport settings. This may be time gated to resolve the parameters as a function of time within the 2000 nsec pulse. This technique leads to three equations in three unknowns with solution giving the accelerator exit beam radius, tilt and emittance. We find that systematic errors cancel and so are not a problem in unfolding the initial beam conditions. Random uncorrelated shot to shot errors can be managed by one of three strategies: 1) make the transport system optically de-magnifying; 2) average over many individual shots; or 3) make the random uncorrelated shot to shot errors sufficiently small. The high power of the DARHT II beam requires that the beam transport system leading to a radius measuring apparatus be optically magnifying. This means that the shot to shot random errors must either be made small (less than about 1%) or that we average each of the three beam radius determinations over many individual shots.

  8. Reconstruction of Initial Beam Conditions at the Exit of the DARHT II Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    2000-02-18

    We consider a technique of determining the initial beam conditions of the DARHT II accelerator by measuring the beam size under three different magnetic transport settings. This may be time gated to resolve the parameters as a function of time within the 2000 nsec pulse. This technique leads to three equations in three unknowns with solution giving the accelerator exit beam radius, tilt, and emittance. We find that systematic errors cancel and so are not a problem in the initial beam condition unfolding. Random uncorrelated shot to shot errors can be managed by one of three strategies: (1) make the transport system optically de-magnifying; (2) average over many individual shots; or (3) make the random uncorrelated shot to shot errors sufficiently small. The high power of the DARHT II beam requires that the beam transport system leading to a radius measuring apparatus be optically magnifying. This means that the shot to shot random errors must either be made small (less than about 1%) or that we average each of the three beam radius determinations over many individual shots. We find that for the anticipated DARHT II beam parameters that 60 to 120 shots should be sufficient to determine the accelerator beam parameters.

  9. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pontzen, Andrew; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slosar, Anze

    2016-05-18

    We introduce and explore “paired” cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x,tinitial) = –δB(x,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from ΛCDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void inmore » simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Furthermore, generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.« less

  10. Plate tectonics on large exoplanets and the importance of the initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Breuer, Doris

    2013-04-01

    Several numerical studies have been published in the past years speculating about the existence of plate tectonics on large exoplanets. These studies focus on various aspects like the mass of a planet [1,2,3,5], the interior heating rate and mantle temperatures [4,5] and the occurrence of water in the upper mantle [6]. Different trends in the propensity for plate tectonics have been observed in particular when varying the planetary mass: with increasing mass the surface mobilization is found to be either more [2,3,5], equally [3,6] or less [1,4] likely than on Earth. These studies and their implications are, however, difficult to compare as they assume different initial conditions and parameter sets, and either neglect the pressure effect on the viscosity or assume a rather small influence of the pressure on the rheology. Furthermore, the thermal evolution of the planets (i.e. cooling of core and decrease in radioactive heat sources with time) is typically neglected. In our study, we us the finite volume code GAIA [7] and apply a pseudo-plastic rheology. We investigate how a strong pressure-dependence of the viscosity [8] influences not only the convective regime in the lower mantle, but also the upper mantle and hence the likelihood to obtain plate tectonics. We investigate how our results change when assuming different initial conditions, focussing on the initial temperature in the lower mantle and at the core-mantle boundary. We find that the initial temperature conditions have a first-order influence on the likelihood of plate tectonics on large exoplanets and (as observed in earlier studies) surface mobilization may either be more, equally or less likely than on Earth. References [1] O'Neill, C. and A. Lenardic (2007), GRL 34, 1-4. [2] Valencia, D., O'Connell, R.J. and Sasselov, D.D. (2007), Astrophys. J. Let., 670(1):45-48. [3] van Heck, H.J. and Tackley, P.J. (2011), EPSL, 310:252-261. [4] Stein, C.; A. Finnenkötter, J. P. Lowman and U. Hansen (2011), GRL

  11. 10 CFR 40.53 - Conditions for licenses issued for initial transfer of certain items containing source material...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conditions for licenses issued for initial transfer of... Section 40.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Transfer of Source Material § 40.53 Conditions for licenses issued for initial transfer of certain items...

  12. Tensor to scalar ratio and large scale power suppression from pre-slow roll initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lello, Louis; Boyanovsky, Daniel E-mail: boyan@pitt.edu

    2014-05-01

    We study the corrections to the power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in single field slow roll inflation with standard kinetic term due to initial conditions imprinted by a ''fast-roll'' stage prior to slow roll. For a wide range of initial inflaton kinetic energy, this stage lasts only a few e-folds and merges smoothly with slow-roll thereby leading to non-Bunch-Davies initial conditions for modes that exit the Hubble radius during slow roll. We describe a program that yields the dynamics in the fast-roll stage while matching to the slow roll stage in a manner that is independent of the inflationary potentials. Corrections to the power spectra are encoded in a ''transfer function'' for initial conditions T{sub α}(k), P{sub α}(k) = P{sup BD}{sub α}(k)T{sub α}(k), implying a modification of the ''consistency condition'' for the tensor to scalar ratio at a pivot scale k{sub 0}: r(k{sub 0}) = −8n{sub T}(k{sub 0}) [T{sub T}(k{sub 0})/T{sub R}(k{sub 0})]. We obtain T{sub α}(k) to leading order in a Born approximation valid for modes of observational relevance today. A fit yields T{sub α}(k) = 1+A{sub α}k{sup −p}cos [2πωk/H{sub sr}+φ{sub α}], with 1.5∼initial conditions. These corrections lead to both a suppression of the quadrupole and oscillatory features in both P{sub R}(k) and r(k{sub 0}) with a period of the order of the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation. The results are quite general and independent of the specific inflationary potentials, depending solely on the ratio of kinetic to potential energy κ and the slow roll parameters ε{sub V}, η{sub V} to leading order in slow roll. For a wide range of κ and the values of ε{sub V}; η{sub V} corresponding to the upper bounds from Planck, we find that the low quadrupole is consistent

  13. Effects of initial condition spectral content on shock-driven turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Grinstein, Fernando F

    2015-07-01

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the rage code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band of high density gas (SF(6)) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF(6) bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF(6) band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models. PMID:26274276

  14. Effect of Initial Conditions on Compressible Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Transition to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Aaron; Edwards, John; Greenough, Jeffrey

    2003-10-01

    The influence of the state of an initial interface over the subsequent evolutionary phases of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability through the deep non-linear regime, transition to turbulence, and eventual asymptotic growth, remains a hotly debated topic. Apart from academic curiosity, there is a keen interest in this because RT instability in a form probably near transition can seriously diminish or even quench thermonuclear burn in double-shell ignition capsules being designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) (Amendt et al., Phys. Plas. 9(5),2221,(2002)). In addition to this, experimental test beds are being developed on high power laser facilities with a view to studying compressible turbulent mixing of relevance to the dynamics of supernovae explosions (Robey et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 614 (2003)). In these experiments a high Mach number blast wave accelerates an interface with a specified, pre-machined initial spectrum, driving a brief phase of Richtmyer-Meshkov growth, followed by a sustained period of RT growth as the interface decelerates, much as in a supernova. While current facilities are barely powerful enough to edge the flow through a turbulent transition, the next generation of lasers such as the NIF will force the instability well beyond this making supernova relevant, turbulent experiments in the laboratory a real possibility. However, understanding the effects, if any, of the initial interface structure on the late time mixing in these small scale flows will clearly be an important aspect of this work. This talk will discuss the effect of initial interface conditions on the progress and structure of late time RT instability using results from the multi-physics, AMR, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor. Comparison with Omega experiments will be made and prospects for the NIF presented.

  15. Critical behavior of a fixed-energy Manna sandpile model for regular initial conditions in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sungchul; Kim, Jin Min

    2015-12-01

    For a fixed-energy (FE) Manna sandpile model in one dimension, we investigate the critical behavior for regular initial conditions in which activities are distributed at regular intervals on average. The FE Manna model conserves the density ρ of total particles and undergoes an absorbing phase transition at a critical ρ(c). For the regular initial conditions, we show via extensive simulations that the dynamical scaling behaviors differ from those of the random and the natural initial conditions. Off-critical scaling exponents β and ν(⊥) are also measured and shown to agree well with the values of the directed percolation (DP) class as reported by Basu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 015702 (2012)]. Our results suggest that the dynamical scaling behaviors depend on the characteristics of initial conditions, but the off-critical scaling behaviors in the steady state are independent of initial conditions and belong to the DP class. PMID:26764674

  16. Genome-Scale Metabolic Model for the Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 395 Accurately Predicts Phenotypes under Autotrophic, Heterotrophic, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zuñiga, Cristal; Li, Chien-Ting; Huelsman, Tyler; Levering, Jennifer; Zielinski, Daniel C; McConnell, Brian O; Long, Christopher P; Knoshaug, Eric P; Guarnieri, Michael T; Antoniewicz, Maciek R; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Zengler, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    The green microalga Chlorella vulgaris has been widely recognized as a promising candidate for biofuel production due to its ability to store high lipid content and its natural metabolic versatility. Compartmentalized genome-scale metabolic models constructed from genome sequences enable quantitative insight into the transport and metabolism of compounds within a target organism. These metabolic models have long been utilized to generate optimized design strategies for an improved production process. Here, we describe the reconstruction, validation, and application of a genome-scale metabolic model for C. vulgaris UTEX 395, iCZ843. The reconstruction represents the most comprehensive model for any eukaryotic photosynthetic organism to date, based on the genome size and number of genes in the reconstruction. The highly curated model accurately predicts phenotypes under photoautotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. The model was validated against experimental data and lays the foundation for model-driven strain design and medium alteration to improve yield. Calculated flux distributions under different trophic conditions show that a number of key pathways are affected by nitrogen starvation conditions, including central carbon metabolism and amino acid, nucleotide, and pigment biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, model prediction of growth rates under various medium compositions and subsequent experimental validation showed an increased growth rate with the addition of tryptophan and methionine. PMID:27372244

  17. Dynamic analysis of offshore structures with non-zero initial conditions in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Lu, Hongchao; Li, Huajun

    2016-03-01

    The state of non-zero conditions is typically treated as fact when considering the dynamic analysis of offshore structures. This article extends a newly proposed method [1] to manage the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures in the frequency domain, including new studies on original environmental loads reconstruction, response comparisons with the commercial software ANSYS, and a demonstration using an experimental cantilever beam. The original environmental loads, such as waves, currents, and winds, that act on a structure are decomposed into multiple complex exponential components are represented by a series of poles and corresponding residues. Counter to the traditional frequency-domain method, the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures could be solved in the frequency domain. Compared with reference [1], an improvement reported in this article is that practical issues, including the choice of model order and central-processing-unit (CPU) time consumption, are further studied when applying this new method to offshore structures. To investigate the feasibility of the representation of initial environmental loads by their poles and corresponding residues, a measured random wave force collected from a column experiment at the Lab of Ocean University of China is used, decomposed, reconstructed and then compared with the original wave force; then, a numerical offshore platform is used to study the performance of the proposed method in detail. The numerical results of this study indicate that (1) a short duration of environmental loads are required to obtain their constitutive poles and residues, which implies good computational efficiency; and (2) the proposed method has a similar computational efficiency to traditional methods due to the use of the inverse Fourier transform technique. To better understand the performance, of time consumption and accuracy of the proposed method, the commercial software ANSYS is used to determine responses

  18. Accurate and high-resolution boundary conditions and flow fields in the first-class cabin of an MD-82 commercial airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wen, Jizhou; Chao, Jiangyue; Yin, Weiyou; Shen, Chen; Lai, Dayi; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Liu, Junjie; Sun, Hejiang; Chen, Qingyan

    2012-09-01

    Flow fields in commercial airliner cabins are crucial for creating a thermally comfortable and healthy cabin environment. Flow fields depend on the thermo-fluid boundary conditions at the diffusers, in addition to the cabin geometry and furnishing. To study the flow fields in cabins, this paper describes a procedure to obtain the cabin geometry, boundary conditions at the diffusers, and flow fields. This investigation used a laser tracking system and reverse engineering to generate a digital model of an MD-82 aircraft cabin. Even though the measuring error by the system was very small, approximations and assumptions were needed to reduce the workload and data size. The geometric model can also be easily used to calculate the space volume. A combination of hot-sphere anemometers (HSA) and ultrasonic anemometers (UA) were applied to obtain the velocity magnitude, velocity direction, and turbulence intensity at the diffusers. The measured results indicate that the flow boundary conditions in a real cabin were rather complex and the velocity magnitude, velocity direction, and turbulence intensity varied significantly from one slot opening to another. UAs were also applied to measure the three-dimensional air velocity at 20 Hz, which could also be used to determine the turbulence intensity. Due to the instability of the flow, it should at least be measured for 4 min to obtain accurate averaged velocity and turbulence information. It was found that the flow fields were of low speed and high turbulence intensity. This study provides high quality data for validating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, including cabin geometry, boundary conditions of diffusers, and high-resolution flow field in the first-class cabin of a functional MD-82 commercial airliner.

  19. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  20. Nonminimally coupled inflation with initial conditions from a preinflation anamorphic contracting era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, John

    2016-08-01

    Inflation due to a nonminimally coupled scalar field, as first proposed by Salopek, Bardeen and Bond (SBB), is in good agreement with the observed value of the spectral index and constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio. Here we explore the possibility that SBB inflation represents the late stage of a Universe which emerges from an early contracting era. We present a model in which the Universe smoothly transitions from an anamorphic contracting era to late-time SBB inflation without encountering a singular bounce. This corresponds to a continuous expansion in the Einstein frame throughout. We show that the anamorphic contracting era is able to provide the smooth superhorizon initial conditions necessary for subsequent SBB inflation to occur. The model predicts corrections to the nonminimal coupling, kinetic term and potential of SBB inflation which can observably increase the spectral index relative to its SBB prediction.

  1. A simple method to calculate first-passage time densities with arbitrary initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Markus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Lizana, Ludvig

    2016-06-01

    Numerous applications all the way from biology and physics to economics depend on the density of first crossings over a boundary. Motivated by the lack of general purpose analytical tools for computing first-passage time densities (FPTDs) for complex problems, we propose a new simple method based on the independent interval approximation (IIA). We generalise previous formulations of the IIA to include arbitrary initial conditions as well as to deal with discrete time and non-smooth continuous time processes. We derive a closed form expression for the FPTD in z and Laplace-transform space to a boundary in one dimension. Two classes of problems are analysed in detail: discrete time symmetric random walks (Markovian) and continuous time Gaussian stationary processes (Markovian and non-Markovian). Our results are in good agreement with Langevin dynamics simulations.

  2. The one-point PDF of the initial conditions of our local Universe from the IRAS PSC redshift catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, P.; Efstathiou, G.; Maddox, S. J.; Branchini, E.; Frenk, C. S.; McMahon, R. G.; Oliver, S. J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; Sutherland, W. J.; Tadros, H.; White, S. D. M.

    2000-11-01

    The algorithm ztrace of Monaco & Efstathiou is applied to the IRAS PSCz catalogue to reconstruct the initial conditions of our local Universe with a resolution down to ~5h-1Mpc. The one-point probability distribution function (PDF) of the reconstructed initial conditions is consistent with the assumptions that: (i) IRAS galaxies trace mass on scales of ~5h-1Mpc and (ii) the statistics of the primordial density fluctuations are Gaussian. We use simulated PSCz catalogues, constructed from N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions, to show that local non-linear bias can cause the recovered initial PDF (assuming no bias) to be non-Gaussian. However, for plausible bias models, the distortions of the recovered PDF would be difficult to detect using the volume finely sampled by the PSCz catalogue. So, for Gaussian initial conditions, a range of bias models remain compatible with our PSCz reconstruction results.

  3. INITIAL CHEMICAL AND RESERVOIR CONDITIONS AT LOS AZUFRES WELLHEAD POWER PLANT STARTUP

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, P.; Semprini, L.; Verma, S.; Barragan, R.; Molinar, R.; Aragon, A.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, C.

    1985-01-22

    One of the major concerns of electric utilities in installing geothermal power plants is not only the longevity of the steam supply, but also the potential for changes in thermodynamic properties of the resource that might reduce the conversion efficiency of the design plant equipment. Production was initiated at Los Azufres geothermal field with wellhead generators not only to obtain electric energy at a relatively early date, but also to acquire needed information about the resource so that plans for large central power plants could be finalized. Commercial electric energy production started at Los Azufres during the summer of 1982 with five 5-MWe wellhead turbine-generator units. The wells associated with these units had undergone extensive testing and have since been essentially in constant production. The Los Azufres geothermal reservoir is a complex structural and thermodynamic system, intersected by at least 4 major parallel faults and producing geothermal fluids from almost all water to all steam. The five wellhead generators are associated with wells of about 30%, 60%, and 100% steam fraction. A study to compile existing data on the chemical and reservoir conditions during the first two years of operation has been completed. Data have been compiled on mean values of wellhead and separator pressures, steam and liquid flowrates, steam fraction, enthalpy, and pertinent chemical components. The compilation serves both as a database of conditions during the start-up period and as an initial point to observe changes with continued and increased production. Current plans are to add additional wellhead generators in about two years followed by central power plants when the data have been sufficiently evaluated for optimum plant design. During the next two years, the data acquired at the five 5-MWe wellhead generator units can be compared to this database to observe any significant changes in reservoir behavior at constant production.

  4. Sensitivity of Initial Conditions on Diurnal Variability of Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta Kumar; Deb, Sanjib Kumar; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, Pradip Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The diurnal cycle of different surface parameters, viz. surface air temperature, surface pressure, and rain intensities, simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) in the operational seasonal forecast of ISM-2012 using initial conditions (ICs) taken at synoptic hours of the day has been examined and compared with observations. Four members were simulated with ICs at 0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC on 1 August 2012. The impact of the initial conditions at the synoptic hours of the day was more visible over the landmass compared with the oceanic regions. The diurnal variation of the surface temperature in the model simulation showed the major features when compared with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis except for the warm pool of northwest India and the Tibetan region. The surface pressure in the ECMWF reanalysis showed the semidiurnal cycle with two peaks at 0600 UTC and 1800 UTC; however, the range of the cycle was underestimated by the model simulation, showing only one peak at 0600 UTC. Significant variations in the diurnal cycle of rain intensities were seen among the different members. The model captured the diurnal cycle as the positive and negative peaks at 1200 and 0000 UTC with intensities at the peaks ~0.5 mm high and low, respectively, in the model simulation when compared with the observations. Presently, the seasonal forecast of ISM is generated through ensemble CAM experiments using different ICs taken from different dates but all at 0000 UTC. Consideration of ICs at different times of the day will add different ranges of diurnal variations in all the surface parameters within the family of ensemble members and also increase the number of members in the family. Indeed, these improve the ensemble processes in generating the seasonal forecast of ISM.

  5. Improvement of boundary conditions for non-planar boundaries represented by polygons with an initial particle arrangement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiangang; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Murotani, Kohei; Shibata, Kazuya; Ishii, Eiji; Ishikawa, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    The boundary conditions represented by polygons in moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method (Koshizuka and Oka, Nuclear Science and Engineering, 1996) have been widely used in the industry simulations since it can simply simulate complex geometry with high efficiency. However, the inaccurate particle number density near non-planar wall boundaries dramatically affects the accuracy of simulations. In this paper, we propose an initial boundary particle arrangement technique coupled with the wall weight function method (Zhang et al. Transaction of JSCES, 2015) to improve the particle number density near slopes and curved surfaces with boundary conditions represented by polygons in three dimensions. Two uniform grids are utilized in the proposed technique. The grid points in the first uniform grid are used to construct boundary particles, and the second uniform grid stores the same information as in the work by Zhang et al. The wall weight functions of the grid points in the second uniform grid are calculated by newly constructed boundary particles. The wall weight functions of the fluid particles are interpolated from the values stored on the grid points in the second uniform grid. Because boundary particles are located on the polygons, complex geometries can be accurately represented. The proposed method can dramatically improve the particle number density and maintain the high efficiency. The performance of the previously proposed wall weight function (Zhang et al.) with the boundary particle arrangement technique is verified in comparison with the wall weight function without boundary particle arrangement by investigating two example geometries. The simulations of a water tank with a wedge and a complex geometry show the general applicability of the boundary particle arrangement technique to complex geometries and demonstrate its improvement of the wall weight function near the slopes and curved surfaces.

  6. Modeling large wind farms in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers under varying initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers (ABL) are frequently capped by an inversion layer limiting the entrainment rate and boundary layer growth. Commonly used analytical models state that the entrainment rate is inversely proportional to the inversion strength. The height of the inversion turns out to be a second important parameter. Conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers (CNBL) are ABLs with zero surface heat flux developing against a stratified free atmosphere. In this regime the inversion-filling process is merely driven by the downward heat flux at the inversion base. As a result, CNBLs are strongly dependent on the heating history of the boundary layer and strong inversions will fail to erode during the course of the day. In case of large wind farms, the power output of the farm inside a CNBL will depend on the height and strength of the inversion above the boundary layer. On the other hand, increased turbulence levels induced by wind farms may partially undermine the rigid lid effect of the capping inversion, enhance vertical entrainment of air into the farm, and increase boundary layer growth. A suite of large eddy simulations (LES) is performed to investigate the effect of the capping inversion on the conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer and on the wind farm performance under varying initial conditions. For these simulations our in-house pseudo-spectral LES code SP-Wind is used. The wind turbines are modelled using a non-rotating actuator disk method. In the absence of wind farms, we find that a decrease in inversion strength corresponds to a decrease in the geostrophic angle and an increase in entrainment rate and geostrophic drag. Placing the initial inversion base at higher altitudes further reduces the effect of the capping inversion on the boundary layer. The inversion can be fully neglected once it is situated above the equilibrium height that a truly neutral boundary layer would attain under the same external conditions such as

  7. A Robust and Accurate Two-Step Auto-Labeling Conditional Iterative Closest Points (TACICP) Algorithm for Three-Dimensional Multi-Modal Carotid Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hengkai; Wang, Guijin; Huang, Lingyun; Hu, Yuxin; Yuan, Chun; Li, Rui; Zhao, Xihai

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is among the leading causes of death and disability. Combining information from multi-modal vascular images is an effective and efficient way to diagnose and monitor atherosclerosis, in which image registration is a key technique. In this paper a feature-based registration algorithm, Two-step Auto-labeling Conditional Iterative Closed Points (TACICP) algorithm, is proposed to align three-dimensional carotid image datasets from ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR). Based on 2D segmented contours, a coarse-to-fine strategy is employed with two steps: rigid initialization step and non-rigid refinement step. Conditional Iterative Closest Points (CICP) algorithm is given in rigid initialization step to obtain the robust rigid transformation and label configurations. Then the labels and CICP algorithm with non-rigid thin-plate-spline (TPS) transformation model is introduced to solve non-rigid carotid deformation between different body positions. The results demonstrate that proposed TACICP algorithm has achieved an average registration error of less than 0.2mm with no failure case, which is superior to the state-of-the-art feature-based methods. PMID:26881433

  8. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a

  9. Transcriptional initiation under conditions of anoxia-induced quiescence in mitochondria from Artemia franciscana embryos.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-02-01

    In response to anoxia, embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able coordinately to downregulate metabolism to levels low enough to permit survival for several years at room temperature. In addition to dramatic decreases in free ATP levels and heat production, intracellular pH drops from 7.8 to 6.3 overnight. Use of isolated mitochondria to study transcriptional responses to anoxia offers several advantages: (1). the localized nature of transcript initiation, processing and degradation, all of which may be followed in organello; (2). the relatively simple cis- and trans-machinery involved and (3). the ability to provide relevant physiological treatments in vitro. In response to anoxic incubation of embryos in vivo for 4 h followed by anoxic mitochondrial isolation and anoxic transcription assay at pH 6.4, a significant decrease in overall UTP incorporation (77%) was seen after 30 min relative to normoxic, pH 7.9 controls. A less severe inhibition of transcription under anoxia (52%) was observed compared with controls when pH was raised to 7.9. Similarly, under normoxia, the incubation at low pH (6.4) reduced transcription by 59%. Ribonuclease protection assays showed that the contribution of in vitro initiation during the assay fell from 78% at pH 7.9 to approximately 32% at pH 6.4 under either normoxic or anoxic conditions. DNA footprinting of putative transcriptional promoters revealed proteins at regular intervals upstream of the 12S rRNA in the control region, which previously had been indirectly inferred to contain promoters for H-strand transcription. The area between 1230 and 12065 contains a sequence in the tRNA(leu) gene believed to bind the transcription termination factor mTERF or TERM, and we provide the first evidence that this sequence is protein-bound in A. franciscana. However, our hypothesis that initiation is reduced at low pH because of a change in DNA binding by mitochondrial transcription factors was not confirmed. We propose that

  10. Conditions for initiating Lake Victoria haplochromine (Oreochromis esculentus) primary cell cultures from caudal fin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Filice, Melissa; Lee, C; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F

    2014-10-01

    The global decline of freshwater fishes has created a need to cryopreserve biological materials from endangered species in an effort to conserve the biodiversity within this taxon. Since maternal gametes and embryos from fish are difficult to cryopreserve, somatic cells obtained from caudal fins have become an increasingly popular resource as they contain both maternal and paternal DNA ensuring valuable traits are not lost from the population. Somatic cells stored in cryobanks can be used to supplement endangered populations with genetically valuable offspring with the use of assisted reproductive technologies. However, initiating primary cell cultures from caudal fin biopsies of endangered species can be challenging as standardized protocols have not yet been developed. The objective of this study was to identify culture conditions, including antibiotic supplementation, biopsy size, and culture temperature, suitable for establishing primary cell cultures of ngege (Oreochromis esculentus), a critically endangered African cichlid. Six-millimeter caudal fin biopsies provided sufficient material to develop a primary cell culture when incubated at 25°C using standard fish cell culture medium containing 1× Primocin. Further investigation and application of these culture conditions for other endangered freshwater fishes is necessary. PMID:24985486

  11. Welfare Conditions of Donkeys in Europe: Initial Outcomes from On-Farm Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Francesca; Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Murray, Leigh Margareth Anne; Canali, Elisabetta; Minero, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper aims to present the first outcomes of data collected using the AWIN welfare assessment protocol for donkeys in 20 EU donkey facilities. Three assessors evaluated 278 donkeys. The authors found recurrent issues: tendency to obesity, lack of hoof care and irregular positive interactions with humans. The protocol proved to be applicable in different management conditions and for donkeys of different attitude. Abstract This paper is a baseline study to present the initial outcomes of data collected in a sample of EU donkey farms using the AWIN welfare assessment protocol for donkeys, comprehensive of 22 valid, reliable and feasible animal-based indicators. A total of 20 donkey facilities (N = 12 in Italy and N = 8 in United Kingdom) were visited and 278 donkeys of different breed, aged 2–45 years, were assessed. Three assessors underwent a common training period to learn how to perform and score all the indicators included in the protocol. Data was collected using digitalized systems and downloaded to a database. A descriptive statistic for each welfare indicator was calculated. The authors found recurrent issues: 25% of donkeys were moderately over weight; although most of the assessed animals had good quality hoof care, 15.16% of them presented some signs of neglect, such as overgrowth and/or incorrect trimming; 18.05% of donkeys showed an avoidance reaction to an approaching human in the avoidance distance test. The protocol has proven to be applicable in different management conditions and for donkeys of different attitude. PMID:26761034

  12. The method of waveform images for finite waveguides with resistive terminations subject to arbitrary initial conditions.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Jerry H

    2006-04-01

    Reflection at normal incidence of a plane wave can be described by imaging the incident wave profile on the opposite side of the boundary. This concept has been introduced in a few texts, but only for nondissipative conditions. In this paper the procedure to describe a purely resistive boundary is generalized, and then the concept is extended to describe the transient response of a one-dimensional, finite length waveguide. The field generated by arbitrary initial conditions is characterized by an infinite number of images, which leads to a representation of the acoustic field as oppositely propagating waves in an unbounded waveguide. Both graphical and mathematical descriptions of these waves are derived, with the former shown to provide significant insights. Mathematical analysis of the image construction leads to identification of several fundamental acoustic phenomena, including acoustic modes and reverberation time. From an instructional viewpoint the ability to explore fundamental acoustic phenomena without recourse to solving differential equations makes the waveform image concept especially useful as an introductory tool. PMID:16642809

  13. Using Near-infrared Light to Establish the Initial Conditions of Star Formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Jonathan B.

    2009-01-01

    The dense cores of dust and gas which form stars have long been objects of study, but recent observations suggest that the initial mass function (IMF) of stars may arise directly from the mass function of these dense cores; to understand the initial conditions of star formation it is therefore crucial to understand dense cores. Near-infrared observations provide two different methods for constraining dense core properties: extinction maps and studies of scattered light. In extinction mapping, background starlight is reddened as it passes through the core, allowing us to probe the density profile. We have extended this method to include background galaxies in an unbiased way, improving the noise and resolution possible in such maps (a procedure we call GNICER). Currently, the gains are largest for clouds far from the galactic plane, but deeper surveys in the future will pick up an ever-growing number of galaxies. Extinction mapping requires us to understand the extinction law, so we have surveyed large portions of a single molecular cloud (Perseus), to study small variations in the extinction law with density across a single cloud. We find a change in the red-optical/NIR extinction law as a function of density. Finally, dense cores also scatter the interstellar radiation field. In the near-infrared, this scattering dominates over other sources of light, resulting in a uniquely useful phenomena we call "Cloudshine". In a few simple situations, we have inverted Cloudshine images to infer the dust density profile of dense cores at unprecedented resolution (a few arcseconds). Over larger regions, Cloudshine can be used to make statistical comparisons between real molecular clouds and simulations thereof.

  14. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  15. Note on starting the Numerov method more accurately by a hybrid formula of order four for an initial--value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adee, S. O.; Onumanyi, P.; Sirisena, U. W.; Yahaya, Y. A.

    2005-03-01

    In this note we report a hybrid formula of order four for starting the Numerov method applied to the initial--value problem for y''=f(x,y), over the recently obtained result of order three by two different papers (J. Pure Appl. Sci. 2(2) (2002) 1, Abacus 29(2) (2002) 92), based on two different approaches. We illustrate the accuracy of the methods by two numerical examples.

  16. Hydrologic modification to improve habitat in riverine lakes: Management objectives, experimental approach, and initial conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Barry L.; Barko, John W.; Gerasimov, Yuri; James, William F.; Litvinov, Alexander; Naimo, Teresa J.; Wiener, James G.; Gaugush, Robert F.; Rogala, James T.; Rogers, Sara J.

    1996-01-01

    The Finger Lakes habitat-rehabilitation project is intended to improve physical and chemical conditions for fish in six connected back water lakes in Navigation Pool 5 of the upper Missouri River. The primary management objective is to improve water temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and current velocity during winter for bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, and black crappies, Pomoxis nigromaculatus, two of the primary sport fishes in the lakes. The lakes will be hydrologically altered by Installing culverts to Introduce controlled flows of oxygenated water into four lakes, and an existing unregulated culvert on a fifth lake will be equipped with a control gate to regulate inflow. These habitat modifications constitute a manipulative field experiment that will compare pre-project (1991 to summer 1993) and post-project (fall 1993 to 1996) conditions in the lakes, including hydrology, chemistry, rooted vegetation, and fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Initial data indicate that the Finger Lakes differ in water chemistry, hydrology, and macrophyte abundance. Macroinvertebrate communities also differed among lakes: species diversity was highest in lakes with dense aquatic macrophytes. The system seems to support a single fish community, although some species concentrated in individual lakes at different times. The introduction of similar flows into five of the lakes will probably reduce the existing physical and chemical differences among lakes. However, our ability to predict the effects of hydrologic modification on fish populations is limited by uncertainties concerning both the interactions of temperature, oxygen and current in winter and the biological responses of primary and secondary producers. Results from this study should provide guidance for similar habitat-rehabilitation projects in large rivers.

  17. Welfare Conditions of Donkeys in Europe: Initial Outcomes from On-Farm Assessment.

    PubMed

    Dai, Francesca; Dalla Costa, Emanuela; Murray, Leigh Margareth Anne; Canali, Elisabetta; Minero, Michela

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a baseline study to present the initial outcomes of data collected in a sample of EU donkey farms using the AWIN welfare assessment protocol for donkeys, comprehensive of 22 valid, reliable and feasible animal-based indicators. A total of 20 donkey facilities (N = 12 in Italy and N = 8 in United Kingdom) were visited and 278 donkeys of different breed, aged 2-45 years, were assessed. Three assessors underwent a common training period to learn how to perform and score all the indicators included in the protocol. Data was collected using digitalized systems and downloaded to a database. A descriptive statistic for each welfare indicator was calculated. The authors found recurrent issues: 25% of donkeys were moderately over weight; although most of the assessed animals had good quality hoof care, 15.16% of them presented some signs of neglect, such as overgrowth and/or incorrect trimming; 18.05% of donkeys showed an avoidance reaction to an approaching human in the avoidance distance test. The protocol has proven to be applicable in different management conditions and for donkeys of different attitude. PMID:26761034

  18. Initial moments of adaptation to microgravity of human orientation behavior, in parabolic flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafforin, Carole

    1996-06-01

    The first ethological studies of astronauts' adaptation to microgravity dealt with the behavioral strategies observed during short-term space missions. No attempts had however been made to consider the initial moments of adaptation dynamics, when the subject is first submitted to conditions allowing body orientations in the full three dimensions of space. The present experimental approach was both longitudinal and transversal. It consisted of analysing, during a goal-directed orientation task in parabolic flight, the orientation behavior of 12 subjects with a past experience of 0, 30 or more than 300 parabolas. During each microgravity phase, the subjects were asked to orientate their bodies and touch, with the dominant hand, four coloured targets arranged inside the aircraft. Results showed that for inexperienced subjects, the time between two target contacts was longer than experienced subjects. They often failed to reach all targets in the series during the first parabolas. They showed right-left confusion and a preference for the "up-down" vertical body orientation. Their performance, described by the efficiency of orientation in all three dimensions, improved over time and according to the level of experience. The results are discussed for the spontaneous, preliminary and integrative stages of adaptation, emphasizing new relationships between the body references and those of the surroundings. Such experiences lead the subject to develop a new mental representation of space.

  19. The charged inflaton and its gauge fields: preheating and initial conditions for reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozanov, Kaloian D.; Amin, Mustafa A.

    2016-06-01

    We calculate particle production during inflation and in the early stages of reheating after inflation in models with a charged scalar field coupled to Abelian and non-Abelian gauge fields. A detailed analysis of the power spectra of primordial electric fields, magnetic fields and charge fluctuations at the end of inflation and preheating is provided. We carefully account for the Gauss constraints during inflation and preheating, and clarify the role of the longitudinal components of the electric field. We calculate the timescale for the back-reaction of the produced gauge fields on the inflaton condensate, marking the onset of non-linear evolution of the fields. We provide a prescription for initial conditions for lattice simulations necessary to capture the subsequent nonlinear dynamics. On the observational side, we find that the primordial magnetic fields generated are too small to explain the origin of magnetic fields on galactic scales and the charge fluctuations are well within observational bounds for the models considered in this paper.

  20. Evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    1999-01-01

    The concordance of autoimmune disease among identical twins is virtually always less than 50% and often in the 25-40% range. This observation, as well as epidemic clustering of some autoimmune diseases following xenobiotic exposure, reinforces the thesis that autoimmune disease is secondary to both genetic and environmental factors. Because nonliving agents do not have genomes, disease characteristics involving nonliving xenobiotics are primarily secondary to host phenotype and function. In addition, because of individual genetic susceptibilities based not only on major histocompatibility complex differences but also on differences in toxin metabolism, lifestyles, and exposure rates, individuals will react differently to the same chemicals. With these comments in mind it is important to note that there have been associations of a number of xenobiotics with human autoimmune disease, including mercury, iodine, vinyl chloride, canavanine, organic solvents, silica, l-tryptophan, particulates, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. In addition, there is discussion in the literature that raises the possibility that xenobiotics may also exacerbate an existing autoimmune disease. In this article we discuss these issues and, in particular, the evidence for the role of environmental agents in the initiation or progression of autoimmune conditions. With the worldwide deterioration of the environment, this is a particularly important subject for human health. PMID:10970167

  1. Power-law sensitivity to initial conditions within a logisticlike family of maps: Fractality and nonextensivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, U. M. S.; Lyra, M. L.; Plastino, A. R.; Tsallis, C.

    1997-07-01

    Power-law sensitivity to initial conditions, characterizing the behavior of dynamical systems at their critical points (where the standard Liapunov exponent vanishes), is studied in connection with the family of nonlinear one-dimensional logisticlike maps xt+1=1-a\\|xt\\|z (z>1 00[Δx(t)/Δx(0)]=[1+(1-q)λqt]1/(1-q) (equal to eλ1t for q=1, and proportional, for large t, to t1/(1-q) for q≠1 q∈R is the entropic index appearing in the recently introduced nonextensive generalized statistics). The relation between the parameter q and the fractal dimension df of the onset-to-chaos attractor is revealed: q appears to monotonically decrease from 1 (Boltzmann-Gibbs, extensive, limit) to -∞ when df varies from 1 (nonfractal, ergodiclike, limit) to zero.

  2. Exploring conditions for craze initiation and for absence of crazing in polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2014-03-01

    Although crazing in polymer glasses has been extensively studied in the past, it is still difficult to predict and explain when and why crazing would take place. There is even a recent proposal to suggest that craze initiation is ``a frustrated fracture process than rather a yield mechanism''. In this work, we report the variable parameters that influence crazing. Specifically, we show that a ``young'' glass (prepared by mechanical ``rejuvenation'') can resist crazing and aging promotes crazing. Thus, the degree of vitrification is one variable. Under creep, crazes form faster at a higher tensile stress, showing that crazing is an activation process and depends on the external condition. We also show how the large-scale structure such as the degree of chain networking affects crazing behavior. For example, melt stretching suppresses crazing. Finally, we demonstrate crazing in absence of any ongoing extension when a cold-drawn polymer glass is held fixed when annealing well below Tg during the elastic yielding. These new observations have inspired a molecular picture for large deformation of polymer glasses. This work is supported, in part, by NSF (CMMI-0926522 and DMR-1105135).

  3. The CFL condition for spectral approximations to hyperbolic initial-boundary value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, David; Tadmor, Eitan

    1990-01-01

    The stability of spectral approximations to scalar hyperbolic initial-boundary value problems with variable coefficients are studied. Time is discretized by explicit multi-level or Runge-Kutta methods of order less than or equal to 3 (forward Euler time differencing is included), and spatial discretizations are studied by spectral and pseudospectral approximations associated with the general family of Jacobi polynomials. It is proved that these fully explicit spectral approximations are stable provided their time-step, delta t, is restricted by the CFL-like condition, delta t less than Const. N(exp-2), where N equals the spatial number of degrees of freedom. We give two independent proofs of this result, depending on two different choices of approximate L(exp 2)-weighted norms. In both approaches, the proofs hinge on a certain inverse inequality interesting for its own sake. The result confirms the commonly held belief that the above CFL stability restriction, which is extensively used in practical implementations, guarantees the stability (and hence the convergence) of fully-explicit spectral approximations in the nonperiodic case.

  4. [Influence of the initial vegetative tone on the condition of haemodynamics of younger schoolboys].

    PubMed

    Shaĭkhelislamova, M V; Sitdikova, A A; Sitdikov, F G; Kaiumova, G G

    2012-01-01

    The comparative analysis of the functional condition of cardiovascular system and their reaction to the local isometric exercise for the 7-8-year-old boys, who are practically healthy, and in relation ship with the initial tone of the vegetative nervous system is given in the article. By means of variation pulsometer analysis, as well as by means of tetrapolar breast rheography it is found that children with sympathetic influences on heart rate (67.00%-55.55% out of all the studied) in comparison with those, who are normal or vagotonic show the higher activity of neuromediator link in sympathoadrenal system, as well as the increased stroke and minute blood volume on aveioge tachycardia background. With sympathotonic boys it is found that the leadiry link in the mechanism of urgent adaptation of the cardiovascular system to local static exercise there may be the spastic reactions of bloodstream, which allows us to distinguish such-like schoolchildren as a high-risk group in terms of appearance of vegetative dystonia with hypertensire vascular syndrome. PMID:23101370

  5. Proceedings: Workshop on Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Under LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    1988-05-01

    Participants at this 1986 workshop discussed methods, such as electrochemical monitoring, for determining stress corrosion crack (SCC) initiation and for identifying variables involved in initiation. A survey of field occurrences of SCC revealed a correlation between fabrication-related defects and crack initiation.

  6. Does complex absorption behavior leading to conditioning and damage in KDP/DKDP reflect the electronic structure of initiators?

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; DeMange, P P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Demos, S G

    2007-10-24

    Currently, most of our thinking about the defects responsible for initiating laser damage considers them as featureless absorbers. However, an increasing body of evidence, particularly involving multi-wavelength irradiation, suggests electronic structure of damage initiators is important in determining both initiation and conditioning behaviors in KDP. The effective absorption coefficient of energy under multi-wavelength irradiation cannot be accounted for by a structureless absorber, but is consistent with an initiator with a multi-level structure. We outline the evidence and assess the ability of such a simple multi-level model to explain these and other experimentally observed behaviors.

  7. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted comulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  8. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  9. EFFECT OF INITIAL BODY CONDITION OF BOER X SPANISH YEARLING WETHERS AND LEVEL OF NUTRIENT INTAKE ON BODY COMPOSITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yearling Boer x Spanish wethers were used to assess effects of initial body condition and level of feed intake on body composition. Before the experiment, 27 wethers were fed to achieve high body condition score (BCS; 1 to 5, with 1 = extremely thin and 5 = extremely fat) and BW (I-F) and 27 were f...

  10. A new large initial condition ensemble to assess avoided impacts in a climate mitigation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, B. M.; Tebaldi, C.; Knutti, R.; Oleson, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that when considering timescales of up to 50 years, natural variability may play an equal role to anthropogenic forcing on subcontinental trends for a variety of climate indicators. Thus, for many questions assessing climate impacts on such time and spatial scales, it has become clear that a significant number of ensemble members may be required to produce robust statistics (and especially so for extreme events). However, large ensemble experiments to date have considered the role of variability in a single scenario, leaving uncertain the relationship between the forced climate trajectory and the variability about that path. To address this issue, we present a new, publicly available, 15 member initial condition ensemble of 21st century climate projections for the RCP 4.5 scenario using the CESM1.1 Earth System Model, which we propose as a companion project to the existing 40 member CESM large ensemble which uses the higher greenhouse gas emission future of RCP8.5. This provides a valuable data set for assessing what societal and ecological impacts might be avoided through a moderate mitigation strategy in contrast to a fossil fuel intensive future. We present some early analyses of these combined ensembles to assess to what degree the climate variability can be considered to combine linearly with the underlying forced response. In regions where there is no detectable relationship between the mean state and the variability about the mean trajectory, then linear assumptions can be trivially exploited to utilize a single ensemble or control simulation to characterize the variability in any scenario of interest. We highlight regions where there is a detectable nonlinearity in extreme event frequency, how far in the future they will be manifested and propose mechanisms to account for these effects.

  11. STAR FORMATION AT VERY LOW METALLICITY. IV. FRAGMENTATION DOES NOT DEPEND ON METALLICITY FOR COLD INITIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jappsen, Anne-Katharina; Klessen, Ralf S.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: rklessen@ita.uni-heidelberg.de

    2009-05-10

    Primordial star formation appears to result in stars at least an order of magnitude more massive than modern star formation. It has been proposed that the transition from primordial to modern initial mass functions occurs due to the onset of effective metal-line cooling at a metallicity Z/Z {sub sun} = 10{sup -3.5}. However, these simulations neglected molecular hydrogen cooling. We perform simulations using the same initial conditions, but including molecular cooling, using a complex network that follows molecular hydrogen formation and also directly follows carbon monoxide and water. We find that molecular hydrogen cooling allows roughly equivalent fragmentation to proceed even at zero metallicity for these initial conditions. The apparent transition just represents the point where metal-line cooling becomes more important than molecular cooling. In all cases, the fragments are massive enough to be consistent with models of primordial stellar masses, suggesting that the transition to the modern initial mass function may be determined by other physics such as dust formation. We conclude that such additional cooling mechanisms, combined with the exact initial conditions produced by cosmological collapse are likely more important than metal-line cooling in determining the initial mass function, and thus that there is unlikely to be a sharp transition in the initial mass function at Z/Z {sub sun} = 10{sup -3.5}.

  12. The Murine Norovirus Core Subgenomic RNA Promoter Consists of a Stable Stem-Loop That Can Direct Accurate Initiation of RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Muhammad Amir; Lin, Xiaoyan; Bailey, Dalan; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Vashist, Surender; Zhang, Guo; Thorne, Lucy; Kao, C. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT All members of the Caliciviridae family of viruses produce a subgenomic RNA during infection. The subgenomic RNA typically encodes only the major and minor capsid proteins, but in murine norovirus (MNV), the subgenomic RNA also encodes the VF1 protein, which functions to suppress host innate immune responses. To date, the mechanism of norovirus subgenomic RNA synthesis has not been characterized. We have previously described the presence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA stem-loop structure on the negative-sense RNA, the complementary sequence of which codes for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS7). The conserved stem-loop is positioned 6 nucleotides 3′ of the start site of the subgenomic RNA in all caliciviruses. We demonstrate that the conserved stem-loop is essential for MNV viability. Mutant MNV RNAs with substitutions in the stem-loop replicated poorly until they accumulated mutations that revert to restore the stem-loop sequence and/or structure. The stem-loop sequence functions in a noncoding context, as it was possible to restore the replication of an MNV mutant by introducing an additional copy of the stem-loop between the NS7- and VP1-coding regions. Finally, in vitro biochemical data suggest that the stem-loop sequence is sufficient for the initiation of viral RNA synthesis by the recombinant MNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, confirming that the stem-loop forms the core of the norovirus subgenomic promoter. IMPORTANCE Noroviruses are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis, and it is important to understand the mechanism of norovirus RNA synthesis. Here we describe the identification of an RNA stem-loop structure that functions as the core of the norovirus subgenomic RNA promoter in cells and in vitro. This work provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of norovirus RNA synthesis and the sequences that determine the recognition of viral RNA by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. PMID:25392209

  13. Sensitivity of CFC-11 uptake to physical initial conditions and interannually varying surface forcing in a global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Peacock, Synte; Lindsay, Keith; Tsumune, Daisuke

    Sensitivity of the oceanic chlorofluorocarbon CFC-11 uptake to physical initial conditions and surface dynamical forcing (heat and salt fluxes and wind stress) is investigated in a global ocean model used in climate studies. Two different initial conditions are used: a solution following a short integration starting with observed temperature and salinity and zero velocities, and the quasi-equilibrium solution of an independent integration. For surface dynamical forcing, recently developed normal-year and interannually varying (1958-2000) data sets are used. The model CFC-11 global and basin inventories, particularly in the normal-year forcing case, are below the observed mean estimates, but they remain within the observational error bars. Column inventory spatial distributions indicate nontrivial differences due to both initial condition and forcing changes, particularly in the northern North Atlantic and Southern Ocean. These differences are larger between forcing sensitivity experiments than between the initial condition cases. The comparisons along the A16N and SR3 WOCE sections also show differences between cases. However, comparisons with observations do not clearly favor a particular case, and model-observation differences remain much larger than model-model differences for all simulations. The choice of initial condition does not significantly change the CFC-11 distributions. Both because of locally large differences between normal-year and interannually varying simulations and because the dynamical and CFC-11 forcing calendars are synchronized, we favor using the more realistic interannually varying forcing in future simulations, given the availability of the forcing data sets.

  14. Critical behavior of a fixed-energy Manna sandpile model for regular initial conditions in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sungchul; Kim, Jin Min

    2015-12-01

    For a fixed-energy (FE) Manna sandpile model in one dimension, we investigate the critical behavior for regular initial conditions in which activities are distributed at regular intervals on average. The FE Manna model conserves the density ρ of total particles and undergoes an absorbing phase transition at a critical ρc. For the regular initial conditions, we show via extensive simulations that the dynamical scaling behaviors differ from those of the random and the natural initial conditions. Off-critical scaling exponents β and ν⊥ are also measured and shown to agree well with the values of the directed percolation (DP) class as reported by Basu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 015702 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.015702]. Our results suggest that the dynamical scaling behaviors depend on the characteristics of initial conditions, but the off-critical scaling behaviors in the steady state are independent of initial conditions and belong to the DP class.

  15. FalconIC: Initial conditions generator for cosmological N-body simulations in Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkenburg, Wessel; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    FalconIC generates discrete particle positions, velocities, masses and pressures based on linear Boltzmann solutions that are computed by libraries such as CLASS and CAMB. FalconIC generates these initial conditions for any species included in the selection, including Baryons, Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy fluids. Any species can be set in Eulerian (on a fixed grid) or Lagrangian (particle motion) representation, depending on the gauge and reality chosen. That is, for relativistic initial conditions in the synchronous comoving gauge, Dark Matter can only be described in an Eulerian representation. For all other choices (Relativistic in Longitudinal gauge, Newtonian with relativistic expansion rates, Newtonian without any notion of radiation), all species can be treated in all representations. The code also computes spectra. FalconIC is useful for comparative studies on initial conditions.

  16. The effects of initial conditions and control time on optimal actuator placement via a max-min Genetic Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Parker, G.

    1993-07-01

    This paper examines the role of the control objective and the control time in determining fuel-optimal actuator placement for structural vibration suppression. A general theory is developed that can be easily extended to include alternative performance metrics such as energy and time-optimal control. The performance metric defines a convex admissible control set which leads to a max-min optimization problem expressing optimal location as a function of initial conditions and control time. A solution procedure based on a nested Genetic Algorithm is presented and applied to an example problem. Results indicate that the optimal locations vary widely as a function of control time and initial conditions.

  17. Initial Accuracy of HIV Rapid Test Kits Stored in Suboptimal Conditions and Validity of Delayed Reading of Oral Fluid Tests

    PubMed Central

    Choko, Augustine T.; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Cocker, Derek; Khundi, McEwen; Thindwa, Deus; Sambakunsi, Rodrick S.; Kumwenda, Moses K.; Chiumya, Kondwani; Malema, Owen; Makombe, Simon D.; Webb, Emily L.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of storing commonly used rapid diagnostic tests above manufacturer-recommended temperature (at 37°C), and the accuracy of delayed reading of oral fluid kits with relevance to HIV self-testing programmes. Design A quality assurance study of OraQuick (OraSure), Determine HIV 1/2™ (Alere) and Uni-Gold™ (Recombigen®). Methods Consecutive adults (≥18y) attending Ndirande Health Centre in urban Blantyre, Malawi in January to April 2012 underwent HIV testing with two of each of the three rapid diagnostic test kits stored for 28 days at either 18°C (optimally-stored) or at 37°C (pre-incubated). Used OraQuick test kits were stored in a laboratory for delayed day 1 and subsequent monthly re-reading was undertaken for one year. Results Of 378 individuals who underwent parallel testing, 5 (1.3%) were dropped from the final analysis due to discordant or missing reference standard results (optimally-stored Determine and Uni-Gold). Compared to the diagnostic reference standard, OraQuick had a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% CI: 93.6–99.6). There were 7 false negative results among all test kits stored at 37°C and three false negatives among optimally stored kits. Excellent agreement between pre-incubated tests and optimally-stored tests with Kappa values of 1.00 for Determine and Uni-Gold; and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95; 1.00) for OraQuick were observed. There was high visual stability on re-reading of OraQuick, with only 1/375 pre-incubated and 1/371 optimally-stored OraQuick kits changing from the initial result over 12 months. Conclusion Erroneous results observed during HIV testing in low income settings are likely to be due to factors other than suboptimal storage conditions. Re-reading returned OraQuick kits may offer a convenient and accurate quality assurance approach, including in HIV self-testing programmes. PMID:27336161

  18. Shadows and Dust: Mid-Infrared Extinction Mapping of the Initial Conditions of Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan

    We describe a research plan to develop and extend the mid-infrared (MIR) extinction mapping technique presented by Butler & Tan (2009), who studied Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) using Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 8 micron images. This method has the ability to probe the detailed spatial structure of very high column density regions, i.e. the gas clouds thought to represent the initial conditions for massive star and star cluster formation. We will analyze the data Spitzer obtained at other wavelengths, i.e. the IRAC bands at 3.6, 4.5 and 5.8 microns, and the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) bands, especially at 24 microns. This will allow us to measure the dust extinction law across the MIR and search for evidence of dust grain evolution, e.g. grain growth and ice mantle formation, as a function of gas density and column density. We will also study the detailed structure of the extinction features, including individual cores that may form single stars or close binaries, especially focusing on those cores that may form massive stars. By studying independent dark cores in a given IRDC, we will be able to test if they have a common minimum observed intensity, which we will then attribute to the foreground. This is a new method that should allow us to more accurately map distant, high column density IRDCs, probing more extreme regimes of star formation. We will combine MIR extinction mapping, which works best at high column densities, with near- IR mapping based on 2MASS images of star fields, which is most useful at lower columns that probe the extended giant molecular cloud structure. This information is crucial to help understand the formation process of IRDCs, which may be the rate limiting step for global galactic star formation rates. We will use our new extinction mapping methods to analyze large samples of IRDCs and thus search the Galaxy for the most extreme examples of high column density cores and assess the global star formation

  19. SCIENTIFIC UNCERTAINTIES IN ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS III: BOUNDARY AND INITIAL CONDITIONS, MODEL GRID RESOLUTION, AND HG(II) REDUCTION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we investigate the CMAQ model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary/initial conditions (BC/IC), model grid resolution (12- versus 36-km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms. The model response to the change of g...

  20. Visible-light initiated oxidative cyclization of phenyl propiolates with sulfinic acids to coumarin derivatives under metal-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenchao; Yang, Shuai; Li, Pinhua; Wang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    A visible-light initiated oxidative cyclization of phenyl propiolates with sulfinic acids has been developed. The arylsulfonylation of alkynes was performed at room temperature under metal-free conditions to generate coumarin derivatives with wide functional group tolerance, good yields and high regioselectivity. PMID:25838160

  1. Influence of the initial conditions of the flow in axisymmetric slipstreams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navoznov, O. I.; Pavelev, A. A.

    1980-08-01

    The paper deals with an experimental investigation of the flow in the initial portion of axisymmetric helium, air, and Freon-12 jets in turbulent mixing layers. Measurements of the mean and pulsation velocities and temperature are presented, along with flow pattern photographs.

  2. Influence of the initial conditions on axisymmetric jets in a parallel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navoznov, O. I.; Pavelev, A. A.

    1980-07-01

    The paper deals with an experimental investigation of the flow in the initial portion of axisymmetric helium, air, and Freon-12 jets in turbulent mixing layers. Measurements of the mean and pulsation velocities and temperature are presented, along with flow pattern photographs.

  3. 42 CFR 410.16 - Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Eligible beneficiary means, for the purposes of this section, an individual who receives his or her initial preventive examination not more than 1 year after the effective date of his or her first Medicare Part B... disorders, based on the use of an appropriate screening instrument for persons without a current...

  4. A Knoevenagel Initiated Annulation Reaction Using Room Temperature or Microwave Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, A. Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is presented that has the student execute a Knoevenagel initiated annulation reaction. The reaction can be carried out either through use of a microwave reactor or by allowing the mixture to stand at room temperature for two days. The student is then challenged to identify the reaction product through a guided prelab exercise of the…

  5. Critical behavior for random initial conditions in the one-dimensional fixed-energy Manna sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sungchul; Kim, Jin Min

    2016-07-01

    A fixed-energy Manna sandpile model undergoes an absorbing phase transition at a critical ρc, where an order parameter ϕ (t ) decays as t-α in time t . As the prototype of the Manna class, the model has been extensively studied in one dimension. However, the previous estimates of ρc and some critical exponents are different, depending on the types of initial conditions; random, natural, and regular conditions. The estimates of ρc for the random and the regular conditions are the lower and the upper bound among currently known estimates, respectively. In this work, for the random conditions, ρc and α are measured by taking into account finite-size (FS) effects. At the previous estimate of ρc, simulation results show that the temporal decay of ϕ (t ) is strongly affected by the FS effects up to much larger system size (˜106 ). For the sizes for which ϕ (t ) is independent up to t =2 ×107 , we estimate ρc=0.8925 (1 ) and α =0.110 (5 ) , which clearly differ from the previous results for the random conditions, ρc=0.89199 (5 ) and α =0.141 (24 ) . Instead, the present ρc agrees with ρc=0.89255 (2 ) of the regular conditions. In addition, the present α is substantially distinguishable from the results of the other types of initial conditions, α =0.159 (3 ) and 0.146 (2 ) for the natural and the regular conditions, respectively, which supports the claim of the initial condition dependence of dynamical exponents in the Manna class.

  6. Adaptation and Diversification of an RNA Replication System under Initiation- or Termination-Impaired Translational Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Ryo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation to various environments is a remarkable characteristic of life. Is this limited to extant complex living organisms, or is it also possible for a simpler self-replication system to adapt? In this study, we addressed this question by using a translation-coupled RNA replication system that comprised a reconstituted translation system and an RNA "genome" that encoded a replicase gene. We performed RNA replication reactions under four conditions, under which different components of translation were partly inhibited. We found that replication efficiency increased with the number of rounds of replication under all the tested conditions. The types of dominant mutations differed depending on the condition, thus indicating that this simple system adapted to different environments in different ways. This suggests that even a primitive self-replication system composed of a small number of genes on the early earth could have had the ability to adapt to various environments. PMID:27038303

  7. Initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations of the scalar sector of theories of Newtonian, Relativistic and Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkenburg, Wessel; Hu, Bin

    2015-09-01

    We present a description for setting initial particle displacements and field values for simulations of arbitrary metric theories of gravity, for perfect and imperfect fluids with arbitrary characteristics. We extend the Zel'dovich Approximation to nontrivial theories of gravity, and show how scale dependence implies curved particle paths, even in the entirely linear regime of perturbations. For a viable choice of Effective Field Theory of Modified Gravity, initial conditions set at high redshifts are affected at the level of up to 5% at Mpc scales, which exemplifies the importance of going beyond Λ-Cold Dark Matter initial conditions for modifications of gravity outside of the quasi-static approximation. In addition, we show initial conditions for a simulation where a scalar modification of gravity is modelled in a Lagrangian particle-like description. Our description paves the way for simulations and mock galaxy catalogs under theories of gravity beyond the standard model, crucial for progress towards precision tests of gravity and cosmology.

  8. On critical conditions for detonation initiation by shock reflection from obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. O.; Ward, S. M.; Williams, R. Ll.; Bambrey, R. J.

    A series of experiments supported by numerical simulations are reported on the interaction between a planar incident shock and a single obstacle. The test mixtures used were stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen diluted with either argon or nitrogen at sub-atmospheric pressures. The main aim of the study was to determine the conditions under which a reflected detonation was generated. Observed critical conditions are compared with a simple predictive criterion based on the ratio of auto-ignition delay time behind an ideal reflected shock to the acoustic transit time across the face of the obstacle.

  9. Sensitivity of ICTP Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) to Initial and Lateral Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, I.; Formayer, H.

    2009-04-01

    Regional climate simulations require lateral boundary conditions. These are typically reanalysis of past observations or alternatively, output from climate general circulation models. Lateral boundary conditions are available at various temporal and spatial resolutions. At present, spatial resolution of reanalysis datasets ranges from few kilometers, for example, regional reanalysis limited to only single continent, to the coarser but global datasets like ECMWF 40 Years Re-Analysis. While these datasets represent reasonable analyses of 3-D atmospheric as well as surface conditions, their resolutions, the physics of the models used to generate them, and the means of assimilating data into them can produce very different results when used as boundary conditions for regional climate models. The sensitivity of ICTP Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) to different lateral boundary conditions was investigated over the Alpine region. The model was run directly at 10km horizontal resolution as well as in one-way double nested mode, with a 30 km grid point spacing mother domain encompassing the Europe and a 10 km grid point spacing nested domain covering the Alpine Region. The simulations spans the one-year period of 1989. The boundary conditions used for various simulations were ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim, 0.75° and 1.5° grid spacings, 6-h intervals), the ECMWF 40 Years Re-Analysis (ERA40, 1° and 2.5° grid spacings, 6-h interval) and finally the 2.5°, 6-h NCEP/DOE AMIP-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2). Sea Surface Temperature for the simulated periods were obtained from a UK Met Office Global Ocean Surface Temperature (GISST), a set of SST data in monthly 1° area grids. When recently released ERA-Interim Reanalysis, which is based on a recent release of the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS Cy31r2) containing many improvements both in the forecasting model and analysis methodology, was used as lateral and boundary conditions, the simulated precipitation field

  10. The effect of initial conditions on the electromagnetic radiation generation in type III solar radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, H.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2013-06-15

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 052903 (2011)]. The numerical simulations were carried out using different density profiles and fast electron distribution functions. It is shown that electromagnetic L and R modes are excited by the transverse current, initially imposed on the system. In the course of the simulations, no further interaction of the electron beam with the background plasma could be observed.

  11. Mechanistic studies of two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks rapidly polymerized from initially homogenous conditions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Dichtel, William R

    2014-06-18

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are periodic two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) polymer networks with high surface areas, low densities, and designed structures. Despite intense interest in framework materials, the nucleation and growth processes of COFs, and even of more established metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), are poorly understood. The kinetics of COF growth under varied reaction conditions provides mechanistic insight needed to improve their crystallinity and rationally synthesize new materials. Such kinetic measurements are unprecedented and difficult to perform on typical heterogeneous COF reaction mixtures. Here we synthesize 2D boronate ester-linked COF-5 under conditions in which the monomers are fully soluble. These homogeneous growth conditions provide equal or better material quality compared to any previous report and enable the first rigorous studies of the early stages of COF growth. COF-5 forms within minutes, and the precipitation rate is readily quantified from optical turbidity measurements. COF-5 formation follows an Arrhenius temperature dependence between 60-90 °C with an activation energy of 22-27 kcal/mol. The measured rate law includes a second order in both boronic acid and catechol moieties, and inverse second order in MeOH concentration. A competitive monofunctional catechol slows COF-5 formation but does not redissolve already precipitated COF, indicating both dynamic covalent bond formation and irreversible precipitation. Finally, stoichiometric H2O provides a 4-fold increase in crystallite domain areas, representing the first rational link between reaction conditions and material quality. PMID:24892961

  12. Modeling Thermal Ignition and the Initial Conditions for Internal Burning in PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.

    2009-12-01

    Work has been ongoing in our group for several years to produce a global chemistry model of thermal ignition for octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) based plastic bonded explosives valid over the entire temperature range of energetic response. We have made considerable progress recently, resulting in both the first broadly accurate model of this type and the possible identification of a crucial component of the chemical mechanism governing thermal decomposition and ignition. The model is similar in kind, but very different in detail from previous models produced by us and others. The model is based on independently measured parameters for known processes in the chemistry of HMX decomposition. We have applied the model in simple calculations of ignition time over the full temperature range of energetic response for HMX, including directly observed ignition induced by fast shear and compression. In this paper we present the model and new calculations relevant to the parameterization of the model to the formulation PBX 9501.

  13. Measurement of Initial Conditions at Nozzle Exit of High Speed Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The time averaged and unsteady density fields close to the nozzle exit (0.1 less than or = x/D less than or = 2, x: downstream distance, D: jet diameter) of unheated free jets at Mach numbers of 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8 were measured using a molecular Rayleigh scattering based technique. The initial thickness of shear layer and its linear growth rate were determined from time-averaged density survey and a modeling process, which utilized the Crocco-Busemann equation to relate density profiles to velocity profiles. The model also corrected for the smearing effect caused by a relatively long probe length in the measured density data. The calculated shear layer thickness was further verified from a limited hot-wire measurement. Density fluctuations spectra, measured using a two-Photomultiplier-tube technique, were used to determine evolution of turbulent fluctuations in various Strouhal frequency bands. For this purpose spectra were obtained from a large number of points inside the flow; and at every axial station spectral data from all radial positions were integrated. The radially-integrated fluctuation data show an exponential growth with downstream distance and an eventual saturation in all Strouhal frequency bands. The initial level of density fluctuations was calculated by extrapolation to nozzle exit.

  14. Initial conditions or emergence; what determines dissolution patterns in heterogeneous porous rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Upadhyay, Virat; Ladd, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution of fractured or porous rocks is often accompanied by the formation of highly localized flow paths. Dissolution, in general, does not proceed uniformly, as it is influenced both by the heterogeneities in the rock matrix and by the instabilities associated with the positive feedback loops between the flow, dispersion, and chemical reactions. As a result, distinct channels or "wormholes" develop within the rocks in which both the flow and dissolution focus. In this communication, we aim to investigate how these emerging flow paths are influenced by the initial local inhomogeneities of the porosity field. Our results indicate a surprising insensitivity of the evolving dissolution patterns and flow rates to the amplitude and correlation length characterizing the inhomogeneities. At long times wormhole competition overwhelms the initial variations in aperture distribution, resulting in a universal relation between the separation of the wormholes and their length. This hierarchy of scales even persists in the presence of relatively large inhomogeneities (vugs), which focus the flow at the beginning of the dissolution process, but - if the sample is large enough - with time tend to be overwhelmed by the spontaneous growth of instabilities. A natural consequence of wormhole competition is that the separation between growing wormholes corresponds roughly to their length, something that is borne out by field observations.

  15. Entropy Growth in the Early Universe and Confirmation of Initial Big Bang Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    This paper shows how increased entropy values from an initially low big bang level can be measured experimentally by counting relic gravitons. Furthermore the physical mechanism of this entropy increase is explained via analogies with early-universe phase transitions. The role of Jack Ng's (2007, 2008a, 2008b) revised infinite quantum statistics in the physics of gravitational wave detection is acknowledged. Ng's infinite quantum statistics can be used to show that ΔS~ΔNgravitons is a startmg point to the increasing net universe cosmological entropy. Finally, in a nod to similarities AS ZPE analysis, it is important to note that the resulting ΔS~ΔNgravitons ≠ 1088, that in fact it is much lower, allowing for evaluating initial graviton production as an emergent field phenomena, which may be similar to how ZPE states can be used to extract energy from a vacuum if entropy is not maximized. The rapid increase in entropy so alluded to without near sudden increases to 1088 may be enough to allow successful modeling of relic graviton production for entropy in a manner similar to ZPE energy extraction from a vacuum state.

  16. Infrared Extinction and the Initial Conditions For Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    This grant funds a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular clouds and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of the this program are to: 1) acquire deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds, 2) reduce and analyze the data obtained in order to produce detailed extinction maps of the clouds, 3) prepare results, where appropriate, for publication.

  17. One at a time: counting single-nanoparticle/electrode collisions for accurate particle sizing by overcoming the instability of gold nanoparticles under electrolytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Danfeng; Wang, Song; Zheng, Yuanqin; Deng, Zhaoxiang

    2013-12-20

    In response to an increasing demand for understanding electrochemical processes on the nanometer scale, it now becomes possible to monitor electron transfer reactions at the single-nanoparticle level, namely particle collision electrochemistry. This technique has great potential in the development of research tools towards single-particle electrocatalysis and selective and multiplexed particle sizing. However, one existing problem that may discourage these applications is the relatively weak colloidal stability of nanoparticles in an electrolytic solution. Here we report on a facile but efficient way to achieve a good stability of gold nanoparticles in an acidic media so that 'zero-aggregation' collisions can be achieved at a carbon ultramicroelectrode. This allows us to obtain anodic dissolution currents from individual nanoparticles in a 'one particle at a time' manner, based on which accurate particle sizing with a resolution of 1-2 nm can be achieved. Our work strongly suggests that to maintain a well dispersed nanoparticle solution during a particle impact electrochemical experiment is critically important for accurate particle sizing, as well as other applications that require information to be extracted from individual nanoparticles (not their aggregates). PMID:24269991

  18. INITIATORS AND TRIGGERING CONDITIONS FOR ADAPTIVE AUTOMATION IN ADVANCED SMALL MODULAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna h Oxstrand

    2014-04-01

    It is anticipated that Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs) will employ high degrees of automation. High levels of automation can enhance system performance, but often at the cost of reduced human performance. Automation can lead to human out-of the loop issues, unbalanced workload, complacency, and other problems if it is not designed properly. Researchers have proposed adaptive automation (defined as dynamic or flexible allocation of functions) as a way to get the benefits of higher levels of automation without the human performance costs. Adaptive automation has the potential to balance operator workload and enhance operator situation awareness by allocating functions to the operators in a way that is sensitive to overall workload and capabilities at the time of operation. However, there still a number of questions regarding how to effectively design adaptive automation to achieve that potential. One of those questions is related to how to initiate (or trigger) a shift in automation in order to provide maximal sensitivity to operator needs without introducing undesirable consequences (such as unpredictable mode changes). Several triggering mechanisms for shifts in adaptive automation have been proposed including: operator initiated, critical events, performance-based, physiological measurement, model-based, and hybrid methods. As part of a larger project to develop design guidance for human-automation collaboration in AdvSMRs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have investigated the effectiveness and applicability of each of these triggering mechanisms in the context of AdvSMR. Researchers reviewed the empirical literature on adaptive automation and assessed each triggering mechanism based on the human-system performance consequences of employing that mechanism. Researchers also assessed the practicality and feasibility of using the mechanism in the context of an AdvSMR control room. Results indicate that there are tradeoffs associated with each

  19. Influence of Obtaining Conditions on Kinetics of the Initial Sintering Stage of Zirconia Nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Lakusta, Marharyta; Danilenko, Igor; Konstantinova, Tetyana; Volkova, Galina

    2016-12-01

    The present paper is devoted to the problem of sintering ceramics based on yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP). In this paper, we studied the effect of two obtaining methods (co-precipitation and technical hydrolysis) on sintering kinetics of Y-TZP nanopowders. We used the constant rate of heating (CRH) method at different heating rates for determining the sintering mechanisms. The basic mechanism and activation energy (Q) of diffusion at the initial sintering stage were estimated using the sintering rate equations that are applicable to the CRH data. We found that nanopowder 3Y-TZP produced by the co-precipitation method (DIPE) was sintered according to the volume diffusion mechanism (n = 1/2) and nanopowder TZ-3Y (TOSOH) produced by the technical hydrolysis was sintered according to the grain boundary diffusion mechanism (n = 1/3). PMID:27142876

  20. Influence of Obtaining Conditions on Kinetics of the Initial Sintering Stage of Zirconia Nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakusta, Marharyta; Danilenko, Igor; Konstantinova, Tetyana; Volkova, Galina

    2016-05-01

    The present paper is devoted to the problem of sintering ceramics based on yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP). In this paper, we studied the effect of two obtaining methods (co-precipitation and technical hydrolysis) on sintering kinetics of Y-TZP nanopowders. We used the constant rate of heating (CRH) method at different heating rates for determining the sintering mechanisms. The basic mechanism and activation energy ( Q) of diffusion at the initial sintering stage were estimated using the sintering rate equations that are applicable to the CRH data. We found that nanopowder 3Y-TZP produced by the co-precipitation method (DIPE) was sintered according to the volume diffusion mechanism ( n = 1/2) and nanopowder TZ-3Y (TOSOH) produced by the technical hydrolysis was sintered according to the grain boundary diffusion mechanism ( n = 1/3).

  1. Initial conditions implied by t exp 1/2 solidification of a sphere with capillarity and interfacial kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerka, R. F.; Voorhees, P. W.; Coriel, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1988-01-01

    The paper explores the initial conditions implied by t exp 1/2 growth of a spherical crystal solidifying from a pure, undercooled melt, including the effects of both capillarity and interface kinetics, and relates the findings to initial conditions that would be expected on the basis of classical nucleation theory. For crystal sizes near the nucleation radius, the calculated temperature profiles show a cold region ahead of the advancing interface that is even more undercooled than the undercooled bath. This cold region acts as a local heat sink that compensates for the reduced growth speed that would otherwise result from capillarity and kinetics, leading to precisely the same t exp 1/2 growth law that would have been obtained had both capillarity and kinetics been neglected.

  2. Rock thermal conductivity at the cap rock and initial conditions in two-phase volcanic hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Suarez Arriaga

    1993-01-28

    Numerical experiments are performed to investigate the rock thermal conductivity influence in the formation of the thermodynamic initial conditions of two-phase systems located in volcanic rocks. These systems exhibit pressure and temperature profiles characterized by a sudden change or discontinuity in their vertical gradients. Vapor dominated, two-phase fluids are found at the upper reservoir's levels. Liquid is the dominated phase within the layers below some critical point. Numerical results presented in this paper, suggest that the vertical location of this point of discontinuity be controlled by the thermal conductivity existing between the limit of the reservoir and the caprock. Too high values could originate liquid dominated reservoirs. Small values would be at the origin of vapor dominated reservoirs. A characteristic middle value could be responsible for the formation of a counter flow mechanism originating the initial conditions observed at some locations of the Los Azufres, Mexico, geothermal field.

  3. Assessment on Integrity of BWR Internals Against Impact Load by Water Hammer Under Conditions of Reactivity Initiated Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Mie; Taniguchi, Atsushi; Hotta, Akitoshi; Ohta, Takeshi

    2005-03-15

    The integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head and reactor internals was assessed by means of fluid and fluid-structural coupled analyses to evaluate the water hammer phenomenon arising from postulated high burnup fuel failure under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. The fluid viscosity effect on the water column burst as well as the complex three-dimensional flow paths caused by a core shroud and standpipes were considered in this study. It is shown that fluid viscosity becomes an influential factor to dissipate impacting kinetic energy. Integrity of the RPV head and the shroud head was ensured with a sufficient level of margin even under these excessively conservative RIA conditions.

  4. Impact of rainfall spatial distribution on rainfall-runoff modelling efficiency and initial soil moisture conditions estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramblay, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Ayral, P.-A.; Marchandise, A.

    2011-01-01

    A good knowledge of rainfall is essential for hydrological operational purposes such as flood forecasting. The objective of this paper was to analyze, on a relatively large sample of flood events, how rainfall-runoff modeling using an event-based model can be sensitive to the use of spatial rainfall compared to mean areal rainfall over the watershed. This comparison was based not only on the model's efficiency in reproducing the flood events but also through the estimation of the initial conditions by the model, using different rainfall inputs. The initial conditions of soil moisture are indeed a key factor for flood modeling in the Mediterranean region. In order to provide a soil moisture index that could be related to the initial condition of the model, the soil moisture output of the Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) model developed by Météo-France was used. This study was done in the Gardon catchment (545 km2) in South France, using uniform or spatial rainfall data derived from rain gauge and radar for 16 flood events. The event-based model considered combines the SCS runoff production model and the Lag and Route routing model. Results show that spatial rainfall increases the efficiency of the model. The advantage of using spatial rainfall is marked for some of the largest flood events. In addition, the relationship between the model's initial condition and the external predictor of soil moisture provided by the SIM model is better when using spatial rainfall, in particular when using spatial radar data with R2 values increasing from 0.61 to 0.72.

  5. Merger Rates of Double Neutron Stars and Stellar Origin Black Holes: The Impact of Initial Conditions on Binary Evolution Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, S. E.; Belczynski, K.

    2015-11-01

    The initial mass function (IMF), binary fraction, and distributions of binary parameters (mass ratios, separations, and eccentricities) are indispensable inputs for simulations of stellar populations. It is often claimed that these are poorly constrained, significantly affecting evolutionary predictions. Recently, dedicated observing campaigns have provided new constraints on the initial conditions for massive stars. Findings include a larger close binary fraction and a stronger preference for very tight systems. We investigate the impact on the predicted merger rates of neutron stars and black holes. Despite the changes with previous assumptions, we only find an increase of less than a factor of 2 (insignificant compared with evolutionary uncertainties of typically a factor of 10–100). We further show that the uncertainties in the new initial binary properties do not significantly affect (within a factor of 2) our predictions of double compact object merger rates. An exception is the uncertainty in IMF (variations by a factor of 6 up and down). No significant changes in the distributions of final component masses, mass ratios, chirp masses, and delay times are found. We conclude that the predictions are, for practical purposes, robust against uncertainties in the initial conditions concerning binary parameters, with the exception of the IMF. This eliminates an important layer of the many uncertain assumptions affecting the predictions of merger detection rates with the gravitational wave detectors aLIGO/aVirgo.

  6. Infrared Extinction and the Initial Conditions for Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2004-01-01

    This grant funds a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular clouds and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of the this program are to: 1) acquire deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds, 2) reduce and analyze the data obtained in order to produce detailed extinction maps of the clouds, 3) prepare results, where appropriate, for publication. A description of how these goals were met are included.

  7. Infrared Extinction and the Initial Conditions for Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    This grant funds a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular clouds and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of the this program are to: (1) acquire deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds; (2) reduce and analyze the data obtained in order to produce detailed extinction maps of the clouds; and (3) prepare results, where appropriate, for publication.

  8. Visible Light Initiated Hantzsch Synthesis of 2,5-Diaryl-Substituted Pyrroles at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lei, Tao; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jian; Huang, Mao-Yong; Yang, Bing; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-05-20

    Irradiation of a mixture of enamines and α-bromo ketones, with a catalytic amount of Ir(ppy)3 by visible light (λ = 450 nm), enables the production of various 2,5-diaryl-substituted pyrroles in good to excellent yields. The key intermediates in this reaction have been identified as alkyl radicals, generated from single-electron transfer from the photoexcited Ir(ppy)3* to α-bromo ketones, which subsequently react with a broad range of enamines to undergo the Hantzsch reaction rapidly at ambient conditions. PMID:27199225

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey III photometric quasar clustering: probing the initial conditions of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley; Agarwal, Nishant; Myers, Adam D.; Lyons, Richard; Disbrow, Ashley; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley; Hirata, Christopher; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; O'Connell, Ross; Huff, Eric; Schlegel, David; Slosar, Anže; Weinberg, David; Strauss, Michael; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta; Brinkmann, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    parameters. In this paper, if the bias and shot noise parameters are fixed to their known values (which we model by fixing them to their best-fit Gaussian values), we find that the error bar reduces to 1σ simeq 65. We expect this error bar to reduce further by at least another factor of five if the data is free of any observational systematics. We therefore emphasize that in order to make best use of large scale structure data we need an accurate modeling of known systematics, a method to mitigate unknown systematics, and additionally independent theoretical models or observations to probe the bias of dark matter halos.

  10. Predicting uncertainty in sediment transport and landscape evolution - the influence of initial surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, G. R.; Coulthard, T. J.; Lowry, J. B. C.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical landscape evolution models were initially developed to examine natural catchment hydrology and geomorphology and have become a common tool to examine geomorphic behaviour over a range of time and space scales. These models all use a digital elevation model (DEM) as a representation of the landscape surface and a significant issue is the quality and resolution of this surface. Here we focus on how subtle perturbations or roughness on the DEM surface can produce alternative model results. This study is carried out by randomly varying the elevations of the DEM surface and examining the effect on sediment transport rates and geomorphology for a proposed rehabilitation design for a post-mining landscape using multiple landscape realisations with increasing magnitudes of random changes. We show that an increasing magnitude of random surface variability does not appear to have any significant effect on sediment transport over millennial time scales. However, the random surface variability greatly changes the temporal pattern or delivery of sediment output. A significant finding is that all simulations at the end of the 10,000 year modelled period are geomorphologically similar and present a geomorphological equifinality. However, the individual patterns of erosion and deposition were different for repeat simulations with a different sequence of random perturbations. The alternative positions of random perturbations strongly influence local patterns of hillslope erosion and evolution together with the pattern and behaviour of deposition. The findings demonstrate the complex feedbacks that occur even within a simple modelled system.

  11. Methane hydrate destabilization sensitivity to physical complexity and initial conditions in a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    We modify an existing dynamic, multiphase fluid flow model after Liu and Flemings (2007) to form methane hydrate and subsequently melt the hydrate in a marine, sedimentary environment. We then investigate the timing and evolution of hydrate melting when we include varying degrees of thermodynamic and chemical complexity. Our findings indicate that the incorporation of the latent heat of hydrate melting coupled with fresh water release retards the melting process. If the latent heat is neglected, the time required for the warming signal propagation to melt the hydrate completely is shorter by as much as a factor of two. Our basic model considers a one dimensional sedimentary column where the sediment is initially water saturated and supplied with a constant gas flux from below the hydrate stability zone, with the assumption that solid/gas/liquid phases are in equilibrium at the local pressure, temperature and salinity. We consider transport of water, methane, and salt over a 30 kyr interval to generate a modern hydrate deposit and corresponding salinity profile. Then, an instantaneous temperature increase is applied at the seafloor and held constant. This work suggests an alternative timing on the Gulf Stream shift that has been deduced from anomalous hydrate deposits by Phrampus and Hornbach (2012). Furthermore, we are able to show that current warming and relict warming from several hundreds years may be simultaneously convoluted in any current hydrate destabilization.

  12. Initial conditions or emergence: What determines dissolution patterns in rough fractures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Virat K.; Szymczak, Piotr; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2015-09-01

    Dissolution of fractured rocks is often accompanied by the formation of highly localized flow paths. While the fluid flow follows existing fractures in the rock, these fissures do not, in general, open uniformly. Simulations and laboratory experiments have shown that distinct channels or "wormholes" develop within the fracture, from which a single highly localized flow path eventually emerges. The aim of the present work is to investigate how these emerging flow paths are influenced by the initial aperture field. We have simulated the dissolution of a single fracture starting from a spatially correlated aperture distribution. Our results indicate a surprising insensitivity of the evolving dissolution patterns and flow rates to the amplitude and correlation length characterizing the imposed aperture field. We connect the similarity in outcomes to the self-organization of the flow into a small number of wormholes, with the spacing determined by the length of the longest wormholes. We have also investigated the effect of a localized region of increased aperture on the developing dissolution patterns. A competition was observed between the tendency of the high-permeability region to develop the dominant wormhole and the tendency of wormholes to spontaneously nucleate throughout the rest of the fracture. We consider the consequences of these results for the modeling of dissolution in fractured and porous rocks.

  13. Constraining the initial conditions of the Universe using large scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Nishant; Ho, Shirley; Shandera, Sarah E-mail: shirleyh@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-02-01

    Primordial non-Gaussianity induces a scale-dependent bias in large scale structure (LSS) data, proportional to f{sub NL}/k{sup 2} for the exact local ansatz. Recent work has shown that models of inflation that predict a large squeezed limit bispectrum, such as multi-field models and single field inflation with a modified initial state, typically give rise to a generalized local ansatz, with the scale-dependent bias now proportional to A{sub NL}/k{sup α}. We use photometric measurements of the angular power spectrum of luminous red galaxies and quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Eight (SDSS DR8) with the above parameterization to constrain the amplitude A{sub NL} and scale-dependence α. We find that the marginalized upper limit on α is 2.0 at the 95% confidence level, consistent with the local ansatz. We also present Fisher forecasts for a survey of the same size as DR8 to assess the role of systematics in current photometric LSS data. Moreover, we present analytic results on the expected mass dependence of A{sub NL} for different inflationary models, which can be an important observable for future surveys, if primordial non-Gaussianity is non-zero.

  14. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2006-03-24

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  15. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  16. Sudden pore pressure rise and rapid landslide initiation induced under extreme rainfall conditions - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Wang, Fawu; Wang, Gonghui

    2010-05-01

    Since July 19 to 26, 2009, western Japan had a severe rainstorms and caused floods and landslides. Most of the landslides are debris slide - debris flows. Most devastated case took place in Hofu city, Japan. On July 21, extremely intense rainstorm caused numerous debris flows and mud flows in the hillslopes Some of the debris flows destroyed residential houses and home for elderly people, and finally killed 14 residents. Debris flow distribution map was prepared soon based on airphoto interpretation. Japanese Meteorological Agency runs nation-wide ground-based rain gauge network as well as radar rain gauges, which provide hourly to 10 minutes precipitation distribution real-time with spatial resolution of about 5 km. Distribution of daily (cumulative) precipitation of July 21 shows (1) The cumulative precipitation from 6 am -- 12 am of the day was evaluated that their return period could be 200 - 600 years statistically. In 2009, another extraordinary rainfall, of which intensity was evaluated as less than 100 years more more, caused floods in another city claiming many residents lives on the way to evacuation area. Those frequent extraordinary extreme rainfall is not concluded as the consequence of global warming nor climate change, however, those frequency of extreme rainfall events affecting societies are obviously increasing in Japan, too. As for the Hofu city case, it was proved that debris flows took place in the high precipitation area and covered by covered by weathered granite sands and silts which is called "masa". This sands has been proved susceptible against landslides under extreme rainfall conditions. However, the transition from slide - debris flow process is not well revealed, except authors past experiment on the similar masa samples in June 1999 Hiroshima debris flow case. Authors have embedded pore pressure control system for the undrained ring shear apparatus. Strongly weathered sandy soils were sampled just on the smooth and flat granitic

  17. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  18. Effects of ventrolateral thalamic nucleus cooling on initiation of forelimb ballistic flexion movements by conditioned cats.

    PubMed

    Bénita, M; Condé, H; Dormont, J F; Schmied, A

    1979-02-15

    Five cats were trained to perform a forelimb ballistic flexion on a reaction time paradigm including an upper limit of about 400 ms for reinforcement (food pellets). They were implanted with a cyrogenic probe thermically insulated, except at the tip, by a vacuum jacket (outer diameter, 1.1 mm). Four cats had the probe inserted into the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus (VL), contralateral to the moving limb. During cooling they showed increased reaction times, which remained constant throughout daily sessions performed during many weeks, independent of the foreperiod but varying from 25 to 100 ms according to the subject. The temperatures used to upset the reaction times varied from +10 decrees C to -8 degrees C, depending on the localisation of the probe and on the insulation of the silver tip used to prevent nervous tissue reaction, but for each subject the reaction times always increased when the temperature was lowered. The fifth cat, with a probe inserted between VL and the Centre Median, showed a decrease of reaction times on cooling to 0 degrees C and an increase of the reaction times for a cooling at -10 degrees C. For one of the four cats with a probe properly inserted into the VL, strain-gauges were stuck on the lever to measure the latency of the decrease of the pressure exerted by the subject when the subject initiated the forelimb flexion in response to the CS. Reaction times and latencies of pressure changes were closely correlated with the movement onset, and they were equally delayed during cooling. This result demonstrates that it is not by slowing down movement velocity that reaction times are upset during VL cooling but by delaying the movement onset. PMID:421758

  19. ENSO response to high-latitude volcanic eruptions: the role of the initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Caballero, Rodrigo; Battisti, David S.

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions can have major impacts on global climate affecting both atmospheric and ocean circulation through changes in atmospheric chemical composition and optical properties. The residence time of volcanic aerosol from strong eruptions is around 2-3 years and attention has consequently focused on their short-term impacts, and in particular on tropical eruptions. The long-term, ocean-mediated response has been less studied and large uncertainties remain. Moreover, studies have largely focused on tropical eruptions; high-latitude eruptions have drawn less attention because their impacts have been thought to be merely hemispheric rather than global and no study has hitherto investigated the long-term effects of such eruptions. Here we use a climate model to show that large summer high-latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere could cause an El Niño-like anomaly in the equatorial Pacific during the first 8-9 months after the start of the eruption owing to a strong hemispheric cooling. The hemispherically asymmetric cooling shifts the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone southwards, triggering a weakening of the trade winds over the western and central equatorial Pacific that leads to an El Niño-like anomaly. However, the El Niño-like anomaly strongly depends on the initial ENSO state: a 3-time larger response is shown when the climate system is going towards a La Niña compared to when is going towards an El Niño. Finally, the eruption also leads to a strengthening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the first twenty-five years after the eruption, followed by a weakening lasting at least 35 years. The long-lived changes in the AMOC strength also alter the variability of El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

  20. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on immunized cattle that showed

  1. Effect of Initial Condition on Subsonic Jet Noise from Two Rectangular Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in jet noise data from two small 8:1 aspect ratio nozzles are investigated experimentally. The interiors of the two nozzles are identical but one has a thin-lip at the exit while the has a perpendicular face at the exit (thick-lip). It is found that the thin-lip nozzle is substantially noisier throughout the subsonic Mach number range. As much as 5dB difference in OASPL is noticed around Mj =0.96. Hot-wire measurements are carried out for the characteristics of the exit boundary layer and, overall, the noise difference can be ascribed to differences in the boundary layer state. The boundary layer of the quieter (thick-lip) nozzle goes through transition around M(sub j) =0.25 and at higher M(sub j) it remains "nominally turbulent". In comparison, the boundary layer of the thin-lip nozzle is found to remain "nominally laminar". at high subsonic conditions. The nominally laminar state involves significantly larger turbulence intensities commensurate with the higher radiated noise.

  2. Infrared Extinction and the Initial Conditions for Star and Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    This grant funded a research program to use infrared extinction measurements to probe the detailed structure of dark molecular clouds and investigate the physical conditions which give rise to star and planet formation. The goals of the this program were to: 1) acquire deep infrared and molecular-line observations of a carefully selected sample of nearby dark clouds, 2) reduce and analyze the data obtained in order to produce detailed extinction maps of the clouds, 3) use the results to measure and quantitatively describe the physical conditions of the dense gas and dust that produce stars and their accompanying planetary systems in molecular clouds. The goals of this project were met and exceeded as described below. 1) The infrared data for the project were obtained in a number of observing runs using the 3.5-meter NTT and 8-meter VLT telescopes of the European Southern Observatory in Chile and the 1.2-meter telescope of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Arizona, the 1 0-meter Keck telescope in Hawaii, the 6.5-meter MMT of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Arizona, and the NASA Hubble Space Telescope. The molecular-line data was obtained in three runs using the IRAM 30-meter telescope in Spain and one run with the ESO-15 meter millimeter-wave telescope in Chile. Millimeter-wave continuum measurements were obtained with the 15-meter JCMT in Hawaii. 2) Considerable effort was expended to reduce the infrared imaging observations including the development of custom software to produce high quality photometry and source astrometry. All the millimeter-line data was reduced using standard reduction routines. The highlights of the infrared analysis were the production of detailed extinction maps and the construction of profiles of the density structure of the B68, Coalsack, B335 and Lupus clouds. 3) The principal scientific accomplishments of this research program include the following: We were able to use our infrared observations to determine the

  3. Effect of initial conditions and of intra-event rainfall intensity variability on shallow landslide triggering return period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, David Johnny; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of shallow landslide hazard is important for appropriate planning of mitigation measures. Generally, return period of slope instability is assumed as a quantitative metric to map landslide triggering hazard on a catchment. The most commonly applied approach to estimate such return period consists in coupling a physically-based landslide triggering model (hydrological and slope stability) with rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves. Among the drawbacks of such an approach, the following assumptions may be mentioned: (1) prefixed initial conditions, with no regard to their probability of occurrence, and (2) constant intensity-hyetographs. In our work we propose the use of a Monte Carlo simulation approach in order to investigate the effects of the two above mentioned assumptions. The approach is based on coupling a physically based hydrological and slope stability model with a stochastic rainfall time series generator. By this methodology a long series of synthetic rainfall data can be generated and given as input to a landslide triggering physically based model, in order to compute the return period of landslide triggering as the mean inter-arrival time of a factor of safety less than one. In particular, we couple the Neyman-Scott rectangular pulses model for hourly rainfall generation and the TRIGRS v.2 unsaturated model for the computation of transient response to individual rainfall events. Initial conditions are computed by a water table recession model that links initial conditions at a given event to the final response at the preceding event, thus taking into account variable inter-arrival time between storms. One-thousand years of synthetic hourly rainfall are generated to estimate return periods up to 100 years. Applications are first carried out to map landslide triggering hazard in the Loco catchment, located in highly landslide-prone area of the Peloritani Mountains, Sicily, Italy. Then a set of additional simulations are performed

  4. Effects of initial conditions uncertainty on regional climate variability: An analysis using a low-resolution CESM ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriver, Ryan L.; Forest, Chris E.; Keller, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    The uncertainties surrounding the initial conditions in Earth system models can considerably influence interpretations about climate trends and variability. Here we present results from a new climate change ensemble experiment using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to analyze the effect of internal variability on regional climate variables that are relevant for decision making. Each simulation is initialized from a unique and dynamically consistent model state sampled from a ~10,000 year fully coupled equilibrium simulation, which captures the internal unforced variability of the coupled Earth system. We find that internal variability has a sizeable contribution to the modeled ranges of temperature and precipitation. The effects increase for more localized regions. The ensemble exhibits skill in simulating key regional climate processes relevant to decision makers, such as seasonal temperature variability and extremes. The presented ensemble framework and results can provide useful resources for uncertainty quantification, integrated assessment, and climate risk management.

  5. Influence of initial growth conditions and Mg-surfactant on the quality of GaN film grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junsong, Cao; Xin, Lü; Lubing, Zhao; Shuang, Qu; Wei, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The initial growth conditions of a 100 nm thick GaN layer and Mg-surfactant on the quality of the GaN epilayer grown on a 6H-SiC substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated in this research. Experimental results have shown that a high V/III ratio and the initially low growth rate of the GaN layer are favorable for two-dimension growth and surface morphology of GaN and the formation of a smoother growth surface. Mg-surfactant occurring during GaN growth can reduce the dislocations density of the GaN epilayer but increase the surface RMS, which are attributed to the change of growth mode.

  6. Simultaneous PIV/PLIF Measurements of Multi-mode Perturbed Initial Conditions of Single-Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Alvarez, R.; Wilson, B.; Prestridge, K.

    A Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) might occur when a shock wave interacts with the interface between two fluids of different density. An initial perturbation in the interface is an optimal condition for the RMI. This is so because local misalignments between the density gradient across the interface and the pressure gradient of the shock wave induce non-zero baroclinic vorticity that amplifies the initial perturbation. RMI is known to occur in supernovas, collapsing gas bubbles in liquids, supersonic and hypersonic combustion, interacting flame fronts and pressure waves, laser-matter interactions, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The effects of RMIinduced mixing are detrimental to energy conversion efficiency in ICF, but can be advantageous in combustion processes.

  7. Modelling decisions to undergo genetic testing for susceptibility to common health conditions: an ancillary study of the Multiplex Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wade, Christopher H; Shiloh, Shoshana; Woolford, Samuel W; Roberts, J Scott; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Marteau, Theresa M; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2012-01-01

    New genetic tests reveal risks for multiple conditions simultaneously, although little is understood about the psychological factors that affect testing uptake. We assessed a conceptual model called the multiplex genetic testing model (MGTM) using structural equation modelling. The MGTM delineates worry, perceived severity, perceived risk, response efficacy and attitudes towards testing as predictors of intentions and behaviour. Participants were 270 healthy insured adults aged 25-40 from the Multiplex Initiative conducted within a health care system in Detroit, MI, USA. Participants were offered a genetic test that assessed risk for eight common health conditions. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that worry, perceived risk and severity clustered into two disease domains: cancer or metabolic conditions. Only perceived severity of metabolic conditions was correlated with general response efficacy (β = 0.13, p<0.05), which predicted general attitudes towards testing (β = 0.24, p<0.01). Consistent with our hypothesised model, attitudes towards testing were the strongest predictors of intentions to undergo testing (β = 0.49, p<0.01), which in turn predicted testing uptake (OR 17.7, β = 0.97, p<0.01). The MGTM explained a striking 48% of the variance in intentions and 94% of the variation in uptake. These findings support use of the MGTM to explain psychological predictors of testing for multiple health conditions. PMID:21660870

  8. Ideal hydrodynamics and elliptic flow at CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies: Importance of the initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Hannah; Bleicher, Marcus

    2009-05-15

    The elliptic flow excitation function calculated in a full (3+1) dimensional hybrid Boltzmann approach with an intermediate hydrodynamic stage for heavy ion reactions from GSI Schwerionen Synchrotron to the highest CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies is discussed in the context of the experimental data. In this study, we employ a hadron gas equation of state to investigate the differences in the dynamics and viscosity effects. The specific event-by-event setup with initial conditions and freeze-out from a nonequilibrium transport model allows for a direct comparison between ideal fluid dynamics and transport simulations. At higher SPS energies, where the pure transport calculation cannot account for the high elliptic flow values, the smaller mean free path in the hydrodynamic evolution leads to higher elliptic flow values. In contrast to previous studies within pure hydrodynamics, the more realistic initial conditions employed here and the inclusion of a sequential final state hadronic decoupling provides results that are in line with the experimental data almost over the whole energy range from E{sub lab}=2-160A GeV. Thus, this new approach leads to a substantially different shape of the v{sub 2}/{epsilon} scaling curve as a function of (1/SdN{sub ch}/dy) in line with the experimental data compared to previous ideal hydrodynamic calculations. This hints at a strong influence of the initial conditions for the hydrodynamic evolution on the finally observed v{sub 2} values, thus questioning the standard interpretation that the hydrodynamic limit is only reached at BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies.

  9. Effect of initial condition on the sound generation by flow past a rotary-oscillating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Osamu

    2006-11-01

    Effects of forced rotary oscillation on the generation of the sound from a circular cylinder in a uniform flow are investigated by direct solution of the two-dimensional, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Results show that the effect on the sound generation of rotary oscillation with frequency f is equivalent to that of periodic blowing and suction with frequency 2f; the sound field is determined by the interaction between the monopole generated by rotary oscillation and the dipole generated by vortex shedding from the cylinder. Results also show that, depending on initial conditions, different sound fields as well as flow fields can be generated for same flow parameters.

  10. Post-processing of medium-range ensemble hydrological forecasting: impact of forcing, initial conditions and model errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulin, Emmanuel; Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    The impact of errors in the forcing, errors in the model structure and parameters, and errors in the initial conditions are investigated in a simple hydrological ensemble prediction system. The hydrological model is forced by precipitation forecasts from the ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System. The post-processing of the precipitation and/or the streamflow using information from the reforecasts performed by ECMWF are tested. For this purpose, hydrological reforecasts are obtained by forcing the hydrological model with the precipitation from the reforecast data. In the present case study, it is found that the post-processing of the hydrological ensembles with a statistical model fitted on the hydrological reforecasts improves the verification scores better than the use of post-processed precipitation ensembles. In the case of large biases in the precipitation, combining the post-processing of both precipitation and streamflow allows for further improvements. During winter, errors in the initial conditions have a larger impact on the scores than errors in the model structure as designed in the experiments. Errors in the parameter values are largely corrected with the post-processing.

  11. The Role of Model and Initial Condition Error in Numerical Weather Forecasting Investigated with an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments that explore the roles of model and initial condition error in numerical weather prediction are performed using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (NASA/GMAO). The use of an OSSE allows the analysis and forecast errors to be explicitly calculated, and different hypothetical observing networks can be tested with ease. In these experiments, both a full global OSSE framework and an 'identical twin' OSSE setup are utilized to compare the behavior of the data assimilation system and evolution of forecast skill with and without model error. The initial condition error is manipulated by varying the distribution and quality of the observing network and the magnitude of observation errors. The results show that model error has a strong impact on both the quality of the analysis field and the evolution of forecast skill, including both systematic and unsystematic model error components. With a realistic observing network, the analysis state retains a significant quantity of error due to systematic model error. If errors of the analysis state are minimized, model error acts to rapidly degrade forecast skill during the first 24-48 hours of forward integration. In the presence of model error, the impact of observation errors on forecast skill is small, but in the absence of model error, observation errors cause a substantial degradation of the skill of medium range forecasts.

  12. Transients from initial conditions based on Lagrangian perturbation theory in N-body simulations II: the effect of the transverse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatekawa, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    We study the initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations for precision cosmology. In general, Zel'dovich approximation has been applied for the initial conditions of N-body simulations for a long time. These initial conditions provide incorrect higher-order growth. These error caused by setting up the initial conditions by perturbation theory is called transients. We investigated the impact of transient on non-Gaussianity of density field by performing cosmological N-body simulations with initial conditions based on first-, second-, and third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory in previous paper. In this paper, we evaluates the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory for several statistical quantities such as power spectrum and non-Gaussianty. Then we clarified that the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory is quite small.

  13. Examining the influence of meteorological simulations forced by different initial and boundary conditions in volcanic ash dispersion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulena, Gabriela C.; Allende, David G.; Puliafito, Salvador E.; Lakkis, Susan G.; Cremades, Pablo G.; Ulke, Ana G.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the combination of the FALL3D ash dispersion model with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) meteorological model in the southern cone of South America under two initial and boundary conditions was evaluated. ERA-Interim and NCEP-GFS datasets were used as dynamic conditions by WRF to simulate meteorological fields for FALL3D. As a study case, we used the eruption of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex occurred in Chile in June 2011. The simulated meteorological results were compared with the horizontal wind direction, meridional and zonal wind components, air and dew point temperatures of 7 radio sounding stations using a set of error indicators. In addition, the ash mass load simulated by FALL3D for a day of maximum dispersion of volcanic ash was evaluated using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, on which the Prata algorithm was applied. As well as this, the WRF-dominant physical processes with both dynamic conditions were analyzed for that same date. Meteorological results indicated that the simulation performed with WRF and NCEP-GFS shows the lowest errors at levels between 925 and 300 hPa. Ash dispersion simulated with FALL3D and WRF in both dynamic conditions shows a different perfomance, which from the synoptic and dynamic viewpoint can be explained for the result of wind intensity and geopotential height. Moreover, WRF intiliazed with NCEP-GFS and FALL3D has a higher degree of concordance with the MODIS image. Based on the analysis and results, it was concluded that for the southern cone of South America, 1) it was not trivial for the simulation of volcanic ash dispersion to use one dynamic condition or another in WRF; 2) in that sense, meteorological variables that influenced the differences in volcanic ash dispersion were horizontal wind intensity and direction and geopotential heights; 3) the system generated from the combination of the WRF model initialized with NCEP-GFS and the FALL3D dispersion

  14. High throughput nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry screening of microbial growth conditions for maximal β-glucosidase production

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoliang; Hiras, Jennifer; Deng, Kai; Bowen, Benjamin; Simmons, Blake A.; Adams, Paul D.; Singer, Steven W.; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Production of biofuels via enzymatic hydrolysis of complex plant polysaccharides is a subject of intense global interest. Microbial communities are known to express a wide range of enzymes necessary for the saccharification of lignocellulosic feedstocks and serve as a powerful reservoir for enzyme discovery. However, the growth temperature and conditions that yield high cellulase activity vary widely, and the throughput to identify optimal conditions has been limited by the slow handling and conventional analysis. A rapid method that uses small volumes of isolate culture to resolve specific enzyme activity is needed. In this work, a high throughput nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS)-based approach was developed for screening a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete, Thermobispora bispora, for β-glucosidase production under various growth conditions. Media that produced high β-glucosidase activity were found to be I/S + glucose or microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), Medium 84 + rolled oats, and M9TE + MCC at 45°C. Supernatants of cell cultures grown in M9TE + 1% MCC cleaved 2.5 times more substrate at 45°C than at all other temperatures. While T. bispora is reported to grow optimally at 60°C in Medium 84 + rolled oats and M9TE + 1% MCC, approximately 40% more conversion was observed at 45°C. This high throughput NIMS approach may provide an important tool in discovery and characterization of enzymes from environmental microbes for industrial and biofuel applications. PMID:24367356

  15. The Effect of Initial Conditions on the Nonlinear Evolution of Perturbed Interfaces Driven by Strong Blast Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A

    2004-04-27

    In core-collapse supernovae, strong blast waves drive interfaces susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. In addition, perturbation growth can result from material expansion in large-scale velocity gradients behind the shock front. Laser-driven experiments are designed to produce a strongly shocked interface whose evolution is a scaled version of the unstable hydrogen-helium interface in core-collapse supernovae such as SN 1987A. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop an understanding of the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities and the resulting transition to turbulence on supernovae observables that remain as yet unexplained. In this dissertation, we present a computational study of unstable systems driven by high Mach number shock and blast waves. Using multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics codes and theoretical models, we consider the late nonlinear instability evolution of single mode, few mode, and multimode interfaces. We rely primarily on 2D calculations but present recent 3D results as well. For planar multimode systems, we show that compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions (IC's) by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Aspects of the IC's are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime. With higher-dimensional blast waves, divergence restores the properties necessary for establishment of the self-similar state, but achieving it requires very high initial characteristic mode number and high Mach number for the incident blast wave. We point to recent stellar calculations that predict IC's we find incompatible with self-similarity, and emphasize the

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced mixing: initial conditions modeling, three-dimensional simulations and comparisons with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O; Andrews, M

    2007-01-09

    A spectral/compact finite-difference method with a third-order Adams-Bashforth-Moulton time-evolution scheme is used to perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of Rayleigh-Taylor flow. The initial conditions are modeled by parameterizing the multi-mode velocity and density perturbations measured just off of the splitter plate in water channel experiments. Parameters in the DNS are chosen to match the experiment as closely as possible. The early-time transition from a weakly-nonlinear to a strongly-nonlinear state, as well as the onset of turbulence, is examined by comparing the DNS and experimental results. The mixing layer width, molecular mixing parameter, vertical velocity variance, and density variance spectrum obtained from the DNS are shown to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values.

  17. The Effects of Initial Conditions on Photoacoustic Waveforms Generated by a Gaussian Heating Source Moving in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Wenyu; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2016-05-01

    Although the photoacoustic effect is almost universally generated by radiation whose intensity is varied in time either by amplitude modulation of a continuous optical source or through the use of pulsed irradiation, it is possible to produce sound by movement of a continuous source in space. Here, the characteristics of sound production by movement of a light source in one dimension are discussed by solution to the wave equation for pressure. Solutions to the wave equation for the velocity potential, from which the acoustic pressure can be determined, are found using the D'Alembert integral and by Fourier transformation of the wave equation. The characteristics of the waveform generated by a Gaussian heat source moving uniformly in space are found to depend on the initial conditions for movement of the source.

  18. Dynamics of combined initial-condition and model-related errors in a Quasi-Geostrophic prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, R. A. P.; Pires, C. A. L.; Vannitsem, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric prediction systems are known to suffer from fundamental uncertainties associated with their sensitivity to the initial conditions and with the inaccuracy in the model representation. A formulation for the error dynamics taking into account both these factors and intrinsic properties of the system has been developed in a study by Nicolis, Perdigao and Vannitsem (2008, in press). In the present study that study is generalized to systems of higher complexity. The extended approach admits systems with non-Euclidean metrics, multivariate perturbations, correlated and anisotropic initial errors, including error sources stemming from the data assimilation process. As in the low-order case, the formulation admits small perturbations relative to the attractor of the underlying dynamics and respective parameters, and contemplates the short to intermediate time regime. The underlying system is assumed to be governed by non-linear evolution laws with continuous derivatives, where the variables representing the unperturbed and perturbed models span the same manifold defined by a phase space with the same topological dimension. As a core ilustrative case a three-level Quasi-Geostrophic system with triangular truncation T21 is considered. While some generic features are identified that come in agreement with those seen in lower-order systems, further properties of physical relevance, stemming from the generalizations, are also unveiled.

  19. Breakdown of coral colonial form under reduced pH conditions is initiated in polyps and mediated through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kvitt, Hagit; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Maor-Landaw, Keren; Zandbank, Keren; Kushmaro, Ariel; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Fine, Maoz; Tchernov, Dan

    2015-02-17

    Certain stony corals can alternate between a calcifying colonial form and noncalcifying solitary polyps, supporting the hypothesis that corals have survived through geologic timescale periods of unfavorable calcification conditions. However, the mechanisms enabling this biological plasticity are yet to be identified. Here we show that incubation of two coral species (Pocillopora damicornis and Oculina patagonica) under reduced pH conditions (pH 7.2) simulating past ocean acidification induce tissue-specific apoptosis that leads to the dissociation of polyps from coenosarcs. This in turn leads to the breakdown of the coenosarc and, as a consequence, to loss of coloniality. Our data show that apoptosis is initiated in the polyps and that once dissociation between polyp and coenosarc terminates, apoptosis subsides. After reexposure of the resulting solitary polyps to normal pH (pH 8.2), both coral species regenerated coenosarc tissues and resumed calcification. These results indicate that regulation of coloniality is under the control of the polyp, the basic modular unit of the colony. A mechanistic explanation for several key evolutionarily important phenomena that occurred throughout coral evolution is proposed, including mechanisms that permitted species to survive the third tier of mass extinctions. PMID:25646434

  20. Breakdown of coral colonial form under reduced pH conditions is initiated in polyps and mediated through apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kvitt, Hagit; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Maor-Landaw, Keren; Zandbank, Keren; Kushmaro, Ariel; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Fine, Maoz; Tchernov, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Certain stony corals can alternate between a calcifying colonial form and noncalcifying solitary polyps, supporting the hypothesis that corals have survived through geologic timescale periods of unfavorable calcification conditions. However, the mechanisms enabling this biological plasticity are yet to be identified. Here we show that incubation of two coral species (Pocillopora damicornis and Oculina patagonica) under reduced pH conditions (pH 7.2) simulating past ocean acidification induce tissue-specific apoptosis that leads to the dissociation of polyps from coenosarcs. This in turn leads to the breakdown of the coenosarc and, as a consequence, to loss of coloniality. Our data show that apoptosis is initiated in the polyps and that once dissociation between polyp and coenosarc terminates, apoptosis subsides. After reexposure of the resulting solitary polyps to normal pH (pH 8.2), both coral species regenerated coenosarc tissues and resumed calcification. These results indicate that regulation of coloniality is under the control of the polyp, the basic modular unit of the colony. A mechanistic explanation for several key evolutionarily important phenomena that occurred throughout coral evolution is proposed, including mechanisms that permitted species to survive the third tier of mass extinctions. PMID:25646434

  1. Inverse dynamical population synthesis. Constraining the initial conditions of young stellar clusters by studying their binary populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2012-07-01

    Binary populations in young star clusters show multiplicity fractions both lower and up to twice as high as those observed in the Galactic field. We follow the evolution of a population of binary stars in dense and loose star clusters starting with an invariant initial binary population and a formal multiplicity fraction of unity, and demonstrate that these models can explain the observed binary properties in Taurus, ρ Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Orion, IC 348, Upper Scorpius A, Praesepe, and the Pleiades. The model needs to consider solely different birth densities for these regions. The evolved theoretical orbital-parameter distributions are highly probable parent distributions for the observed ones. We constrain the birth conditions (stellar mass, Mecl, and half-mass radius, rh) for the derived progenitors of the star clusters and the overall present-day binary fractions allowed by the present model. The results compare very well with properties of molecular cloud clumps on the verge of star formation. Combining these with previously and independently obtained constraints on the birth densities of globular clusters, we identify a weak stellar mass - half-mass radius correlation for cluster-forming cloud clumps, rh/pc ∝ (Mecl/M⊙)0.13 ± 0.04. The ability of the model to reproduce the binary properties in all the investigated young objects, covering present-day densities from 1-10 stars pc-3 (Taurus) to 2 × 104 stars pc-3 (Orion), suggests that environment-dependent dynamical evolution plays an important role in shaping the present-day properties of binary populations in star clusters, and that the initial binary properties may not vary dramatically between different environments.

  2. Singular initial data and uniform global bounds for the hyper-viscous Navier-Stokes equation with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrin, Joel

    In the hyper-viscous Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible flow, the operator A=- Δ is replaced by Aα, a, b≡ aAα+ bA for real numbers α, a, b with α⩾1 and b⩾0. We treat here the case a>0 and equip A (and hence Aα, a, b) with periodic boundary conditions over a rectangular solid Ω⊂R n. For initial data in L p(Ω) with α⩾ n/(2 p)+1/2 we establish local existence and uniqueness of strong solutions, generalizing a result of Giga/Miyakawa for α=1 and b=0. Specializing to the case p=2, which holds a particular physical relevance in terms of the total energy of the system, it is somewhat interesting to note that the condition α⩾ n/4+1/2 is sufficient also to establish global existence of these unique regular solutions and uniform higher-order bounds. For the borderline case α= n/4+1/2 we generalize standard existing (for n=3) "folklore" results and use energy techniques and Gronwall's inequality to obtain first a time-dependent Hα-bound, and then convert to a time-independent global exponential Hα-bound. This is to be expected, given that uniform bounds already exist for n=2, α=1 ([6, pp. 78-79]), and the folklore bounds already suggest that the α⩾ n/4+1/2 cases for n⩾3 should behave as well as the n=2 case. What is slightly less expected is that the n⩾3 cases are easier to prove and give better bounds, e.g. the uniform bound for n⩾3 depends on the square of the data in the exponential rather than the fourth power for n=2. More significantly, for α> n/4+1/2 we use our own entirely semigroup techniques to obtain uniform global bounds which bootstrap directly from the uniform L2-estimate and are algebraic in terms of the uniform L2-bounds on the initial and forcing data. The integer powers on the square of the data increase without bound as α↓ n/4+1/2, thus "anticipating" the exponential bound in the borderline case α= n/4+1/2. We prove our results for the case a=1 and b=0; the general case with a>0 and b⩾0 can be recovered by

  3. Self-similar bumps and wiggles: Isolating the evolution of the BAO peak with power-law initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban, Chris; Weinberg, David H.

    2011-09-01

    Motivated by cosmological surveys that demand accurate theoretical modeling of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in galaxy clustering, we analyze N-body simulations in which a BAO-like Gaussian bump modulates the linear theory correlation function ξL(r)=(r0/r)n+3 of an underlying self-similar model with initial power spectrum P(k)=Akn. These simulations test physical and analytic descriptions of BAO evolution far beyond the range of most studies, since we consider a range of underlying power spectra (n=-0.5, -1, -1.5) and evolve simulations to large effective correlation amplitudes (equivalent to σ8=4-12 for rbao=100h-1Mpc). In all cases, nonlinear evolution flattens and broadens the BAO bump in ξ(r) while approximately preserving its area. This evolution resembles a diffusion process in which the bump width σbao is the quadrature sum of the linear theory width and a length proportional to the rms relative displacement Σpair(rbao) of particle pairs separated by rbao. For n=-0.5 and n=-1, we find no detectable shift of the location of the BAO peak, but the peak in the n=-1.5 model shifts steadily to smaller scales, following rpeak/rbao=1-1.08(r0/rbao)1.5. The perturbation theory scheme of McDonald (2007) [P. McDonald, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 75, 043514 (2007).10.1103/PhysRevD.75.043514] and, to a lesser extent, standard 1-loop perturbation theory are fairly successful at explaining the nonlinear evolution of the Fourier power spectrum of our models. Analytic models also explain why the ξ(r) peak shifts much more for n=-1.5 than for n≥-1, though no ab initio model we have examined reproduces all of our numerical results. Simulations with Lbox=10rbao and Lbox=20rbao yield consistent results for ξ(r) at the BAO scale, provided one corrects for the integral constraint imposed by the uniform density box.

  4. Scientific uncertainties in atmospheric mercury models III: Boundary and initial conditions, model grid resolution, and Hg(II) reduction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Che-Jen; Pongprueksa, Pruek; Lindberg, Steven Eric; Jang, Carey; Braverman, Thomas; Bullock, Russell O; Ho, Thomas; Chu, Hsing-Wei

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary condition (BC), initial condition (IC), model grid resolution (12 km versus 36 km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms, was investigated. The model response to the change of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentration from 0 to 2 ngm3 in IC/BC is found to be very linear (r240.99) based on the results of sensitivity simulations in July 2001. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in BC resulted in an increase of 0.81 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 1270 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. IC has similar but weaker effects compared to those of BC. An increase of 1 ngm3 of GEM in IC resulted in an increase of 0.14 ngm3 in the monthly average of total mercury concentration, and 250 ngm2 in the monthly total deposition. Varying reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) or particulate mercury (PHg) in BC/IC has much less significant impact. Simulation results at different grid resolutions show good agreement (slope 0.950 1.026, r 0.816 0.973) in mercury concentration, dry deposition, and total deposition. The agreement in wet deposition is somewhat weaker (slope 0.770 0.794, r 0.685 0.892) due to the difference in emission dilution and simulated precipitation that subsequently change reaction rates in the aqueous phase. Replacing the aqueous Hg(II)-HO2 reduction by either RGM reduction by CO (51018cm3 molecule1 s1) or photoreduction of RGM (1105 s1) gives significantly better model agreement with the wet deposition measured by Mercury Deposition Network (MDN). Possible ranges of the reduction rates are estimated based on model sensitivity results. The kinetic estimate requires further verification by laboratory studies.

  5. Impacts of alien invasive plants on soil nutrients are correlated with initial site conditions in NW Europe.

    PubMed

    Dassonville, Nicolas; Vanderhoeven, Sonia; Vanparys, Valérie; Hayez, Mathieu; Gruber, Wolf; Meerts, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Alien invasive plants are capable of modifying ecosystem function. However, it is difficult to make generalisations because impacts often appear to be species- and site-specific. In this study, we examined the impacts of seven highly invasive plant species in NW Europe (Fallopia japonica, Heracleum mantegazzianum, Impatiens glandulifera, Prunus serotina, Rosa rugosa, Senecio inaequidens, Solidago gigantea) on nutrient pools in the topsoil and the standing biomass. We tested if the impacts follow predictable patterns, across species and sites or, alternatively, if they are entirely idiosyncratic. To that end, we compared invaded and adjacent uninvaded plots in a total of 36 sites with widely divergent soil chemistry and vegetation composition. For all species, invaded plots had increased aboveground biomass and nutrient stocks in standing biomass compared to uninvaded vegetation. This suggests that enhanced nutrient uptake may be a key trait of highly invasive plant species. The magnitude and direction of the impact on topsoil chemical properties were strongly site-specific. A striking finding is that the direction of change in soil properties followed a predictable pattern. Thus, strong positive impacts (higher topsoil nutrient concentrations in invaded plots compared to uninvaded ones) were most often found in sites with initially low nutrient concentrations in the topsoil, while negative impacts were generally found under the opposite conditions. This pattern was significant for potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese and nitrogen. The particular site-specific pattern in the impacts that we observed provides the first evidence that alien invasive species may contribute to a homogenisation of soil conditions in invaded landscapes. PMID:18491146

  6. Mean Flow Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a new type of boundary condition for time-accurate Computational Aeroacoustics solvers is described. This boundary condition is designed to complement the existing nonreflective boundary conditions while ensuring that the correct mean flow conditions are maintained throughout the flow calculation. Results are shown for a loaded 2D cascade, started with various initial conditions.

  7. Effect of initial conditions of a catchment on seasonal streamflow prediction using ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP) technique for the Rangitata and Waitaki River basins on the South Island of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shailesh Kumar; Zammit, Christian; Hreinsson, Einar; Woods, Ross; Clark, Martyn; Hamlet, Alan

    2013-04-01

    Increased access to water is a key pillar of the New Zealand government plan for economic growths. Variable climatic conditions coupled with market drivers and increased demand on water resource result in critical decision made by water managers based on climate and streamflow forecast. Because many of these decisions have serious economic implications, accurate forecast of climate and streamflow are of paramount importance (eg irrigated agriculture and electricity generation). New Zealand currently does not have a centralized, comprehensive, and state-of-the-art system in place for providing operational seasonal to interannual streamflow forecasts to guide water resources management decisions. As a pilot effort, we implement and evaluate an experimental ensemble streamflow forecasting system for the Waitaki and Rangitata River basins on New Zealand's South Island using a hydrologic simulation model (TopNet) and the familiar ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP) paradigm for estimating forecast uncertainty. To provide a comprehensive database for evaluation of the forecasting system, first a set of retrospective model states simulated by the hydrologic model on the first day of each month were archived from 1972-2009. Then, using the hydrologic simulation model, each of these historical model states was paired with the retrospective temperature and precipitation time series from each historical water year to create a database of retrospective hindcasts. Using the resulting database, the relative importance of initial state variables (such as soil moisture and snowpack) as fundamental drivers of uncertainties in forecasts were evaluated for different seasons and lead times. The analysis indicate that the sensitivity of flow forecast to initial condition uncertainty is depend on the hydrological regime and season of forecast. However initial conditions do not have a large impact on seasonal flow uncertainties for snow dominated catchments. Further analysis indicates

  8. Curli fimbriae are conditionally required in Escherichia coli O157:H7 for initial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle Qiu; Louie, Jacqueline W; Feng, Doris; Zhong, Wayne; Brandl, Maria T

    2016-08-01

    Several species of enteric pathogens produce curli fimbriae, which may affect their interaction with surfaces and other microbes in nonhost environments. Here we used two Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak strains with distinct genotypes to understand the role of curli in surface attachment and biofilm formation in several systems relevant to fresh produce production and processing. Curli significantly enhanced the initial attachment of E. coli O157:H7 to spinach leaves and stainless steel surfaces by 5-fold. Curli was also required for E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation on stainless steel and enhanced biofilm production on glass by 19-27 fold in LB no-salt broth. However, this contribution was not observed when cells were grown in sterile spinach lysates. Furthermore, both strains of E. coli O157:H7 produced minimal biofilms on polypropylene in LB no-salt broth but considerable amounts in spinach lysates. Under the latter conditions, curli appeared to slightly increase biofilm production. Importantly, curli played an essential role in the formation of mixed biofilm by E. coli O157:H7 and plant-associated microorganisms in spinach leaf washes, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Little or no E. coli O157:H7 biofilms were detected at 4 °C, supporting the importance of temperature control in postharvest and produce processing environments. PMID:27052705

  9. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    SciTech Connect

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  10. Sensitivity to initial conditions of a d -dimensional long-range-interacting quartic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model: Universal scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Debarshee; Tsallis, Constantino

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a generalized d -dimensional Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model in the presence of long-range interactions, and perform a first-principle study of its chaos for d =1 ,2 ,3 through large-scale numerical simulations. The nonlinear interaction is assumed to decay algebraically as dij -α (α ≥0 ) , {di j} being the distances between N oscillator sites. Starting from random initial conditions we compute the maximal Lyapunov exponent λmax as a function of N . Our N ≫1 results strongly indicate that λmax remains constant and positive for α /d >1 (implying strong chaos, mixing, and ergodicity), and that it vanishes like N-κ for 0 ≤α /d <1 (thus approaching weak chaos and opening the possibility of breakdown of ergodicity). The suitably rescaled exponent κ exhibits universal scaling, namely that (d +2 )κ depends only on α /d and, when α /d increases from zero to unity, it monotonically decreases from unity to zero, remaining so for all α /d >1 . The value α /d =1 can therefore be seen as a critical point separating the ergodic regime from the anomalous one, κ playing a role analogous to that of an order parameter. This scaling law is consistent with Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics for α /d >1 , and possibly with q statistics for 0 ≤α /d <1 .

  11. An ensemble study of HyMeX IOP6 and IOP7a: sensitivity to physical and initial and boundary condition uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hally, A.; Richard, E.; Ducrocq, V.

    2013-12-01

    The first Special Observation Period of the HyMeX campaign took place in the Mediterranean between September and November 2012 with the aim of better understanding the mechanisms which lead to heavy precipitation events (HPEs) in the region during the autumn months. Two such events, referred to as Intensive Observation Period 6 (IOP6) and Intensive Observation Period 7a (IOP7a), occurred respectively on 24 and 26 September over south-eastern France. IOP6 was characterised by moderate to weak low-level flow which led to heavy and concentrated convective rainfall over the plains near the coast, while IOP7a had strong low-level flow and consisted of a convective line over the mountainous regions further north and a band of stratiform rainfall further east. Firstly, an ensemble was constructed for each IOP using analyses from the AROME, AROME-WMED, ARPEGE and ECMWF operational models as initial (IC) and boundary (BC) conditions for the research model Meso-NH at a resolution of 2.5 km. A high level of model skill was seen for IOP7a, with a lower level of agreement with the observations for IOP6. Using the most accurate member of this ensemble as a CTRL simulation, three further ensembles were constructed in order to study uncertainties related to cloud physic and surface turbulence parameterisations. Perturbations were introduced by perturbing the time tendencies of the warm and cold microphysical and turbulence processes. An ensemble where all three sources of uncertainty were perturbed gave the greatest degree of dispersion in the surface rainfall for both IOPs. Comparing the level of dispersion to that of the ICBC ensemble demonstrated that when model skill is low (high) and low-level flow is weak to moderate (strong), the level of dispersion of the ICBC and physical perturbation ensembles is (is not) comparable. The level of sensitivity to these perturbations is thus concluded to be case dependent.

  12. Role of climate forecasts and initial conditions in developing streamflow and soil moisture forecasts in a rainfall-runoff regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, T.; Sankarasubramanian, A.

    2013-02-01

    Skillful seasonal streamflow forecasts obtained from climate and land surface conditions could significantly improve water and energy management. Since climate forecasts are updated on a monthly basis, we evaluate the potential in developing operational monthly streamflow forecasts on a continuous basis throughout the year. Further, basins in the rainfall-runoff regime critically depend on the forecasted precipitation in the upcoming months as opposed to snowmelt regimes where initial hydrological conditions (IHC) play a critical role. The goal of this study is to quantify the role of updated monthly precipitation forecasts and IHC in forecasting 6-month lead monthly streamflow and soil moisture for a rainfall-runoff mechanism dominated basin - Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee, FL. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model is implemented with two forcings: (a) updated monthly precipitation forecasts from ECHAM4.5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) forced with sea surface temperature forecasts and (b) daily climatological ensembles. The difference in skill between the above two quantifies the improvements that could be attainable using the AGCM forecasts. Monthly retrospective streamflow forecasts are developed from 1981 to 2010 and streamflow forecasts estimated from the VIC model are also compared with those predicted by using the principal component regression (PCR) model. The mean square error (MSE) in predicting monthly streamflows, using the VIC model, are compared with the MSE of streamflow climatology under ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscilation) conditions as well as under normal years. Results indicate that VIC forecasts obtained using ECHAM4.5 are significantly better than VIC forecasts obtained using climatological ensembles and PCR models over 2-6 month lead time during winter and spring seasons in capturing streamflow variability and reduced mean square errors. However, at 1-month lead time, streamflow utilizing the

  13. An experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system over the Yellow River basin - Part 1: Understanding the role of initial hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Ma, Feng; Wang, Linying; Zheng, Ziyan; Ma, Zhuguo; Ye, Aizhong; Peng, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    The hydrological cycle over the Yellow River has been altered by the climate change and human interventions greatly during past decades, with a decadal drying trend mixed with a large variation of seasonal hydrological extremes. To provide support for the adaptation to a changing environment, an experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system is established over the Yellow River basin. The system draws from a legacy of a global hydrological forecasting system that is able to make use of real-time seasonal climate predictions from North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) climate models through a statistical downscaling approach but with a higher resolution and a spatially disaggregated calibration procedure that is based on a newly compiled hydrological observation dataset with 5 decades of naturalized streamflow at 12 mainstream gauges and a newly released meteorological observation dataset including 324 meteorological stations over the Yellow River basin. While the evaluation of the NMME-based seasonal hydrological forecasting will be presented in a companion paper to explore the added values from climate forecast models, this paper investigates the role of initial hydrological conditions (ICs) by carrying out 6-month Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) and reverse ESP-type simulations for each calendar month during 1982-2010 with the hydrological models in the forecasting system, i.e., a large-scale land surface hydrological model and a global routing model that is regionalized over the Yellow River. In terms of streamflow predictability, the ICs outweigh the meteorological forcings up to 2-5 months during the cold and dry seasons, but the latter prevails over the former in the predictability after the first month during the warm and wet seasons. For the streamflow forecasts initialized at the end of the rainy season, the influence of ICs for lower reaches of the Yellow River can be 5 months longer than that for the upper reaches, while such a difference

  14. A COSMIC-RAY-DOMINATED INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN ULTRA LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: NEW INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.

    2010-09-01

    The high-density star formation typical of the merger/starburst events that power the large IR luminosities of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) (L{sub IR}(8-1000 {mu}m) {approx}>10{sup 12} L{sub sun}) throughout the universe results in extraordinarily high cosmic-ray (CR) energy densities of U{sub CR} {approx} few x(10{sup 3}-10{sup 4}) U{sub CR,Gal} permeating their interstellar medium, a direct consequence of the large supernova remnant number densities in such systems. Unlike far-UV photons emanating from numerous star-forming (SF) sites, these large CR energy densities in ULIRGs will volumetrically heat and raise the ionization fraction of dense (n > 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}) UV-shielded gas cores throughout their compact SF volumes. Such conditions can turn most of the large molecular gas masses found in such systems and their high redshift counterparts ({approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} M {sub sun}) into giant CR-dominated regions (CRDRs) rather than ensembles of photon-dominated regions (PDRs) which dominate in less IR-luminous systems where star formation and molecular gas distributions are much more extended. The molecular gas in CRDRs will have a minimum temperature of T{sub kin} {approx} (80-160) K, and very high ionization fractions of x(e) > 10{sup -6} throughout its UV-shielded dense core, which in turn will fundamentally alter the initial conditions for star formation in such systems. Observational tests of CRDRs can be provided by high-J CO and {sup 13}CO lines or multi-J transitions of any heavy rotor molecules (e.g., HCN) and their isotopologs. Chemical signatures of very high ionization fractions in dense UV-shielded gas such as low [DCO{sup +}]/[HCO{sup +}] and high [HCO{sup +}]/[CO] abundance ratios would be good probes of CRDRs in extreme starbursts. These tests, along with direct measurements of the high CO line brightness temperatures expected over the areas of compact dense gas disks found in ULIRGs, will soon be feasible as sub

  15. Impact of initial and boundary conditions on regional winter climate over the Western Himalayas: A fixed domain size experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharana, P.; Dimri, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The Western Himalayas during winter receives precipitation due to the eastward moving low pressure synoptic weather systems, called Western Disturbances (WDs) in Indian meteorological parlance. The complex Himalayan topography, sparse observational data, less understanding of physical processes, etc. form many interesting research questions over this region. One of the important research goals is to study the change in the winter (Dec., Jan. and Feb. - DJF) climate over the Himalayas. In the presented study with modelling efforts having varying initial and boundary conditions (ICBC) with same model physics option is attempted to provide a comment on important physical processes pertaining to precipitation and temperature fields. A 22 year (1980-2001) simulation with Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3) forced with National Centre for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis 1 (NNRP1), NCEP/NCAR reanalysis 2 (NNRP2) and European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast 40 Year reanalysis (ERA40) as three different ICBC is carried out. The present study focuses on the winter climatology of the main meteorological parameters viz., temperature, precipitation and snow depth and interannual variability of winter seasonal precipitation. The model shows overestimation of seasonal average precipitation and underestimation of seasonal average temperature fields over the Western Himalayas in all the three model simulations. The interannual variability of precipitation and temperature over this region is nicely captured by the model. The model simulation with NNRP2 as the ICBC shows more realistic results. In addition the ensemble mean of the three simulations has shown improved results and is closer to the abovementioned simulation. Precipitation bias explained in terms of the higher vertical integrated moisture flux and transport shows strong convergence zone over and along the southern rim of the Indian Himalayas. The

  16. Random initial condition in small Barabasi-Albert networks and deviations from the scale-free behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Paulo R., Jr.; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.; Bascompte, Jordi; Jordano, Pedro; Dos Reis, Sérgio Furtado

    2005-03-01

    Barabasi-Albert networks are constructed by adding nodes via preferential attachment to an initial core of nodes. We study the topology of small scale-free networks as a function of the size and average connectivity of their initial random core. We show that these two parameters may strongly affect the tail of the degree distribution, by consistently leading to broad-scale or single-scale networks. In particular, we argue that the size of the initial network core and its density of connections may be the main responsible for the exponential truncation of the power-law behavior observed in some small scale-free networks.

  17. Studies on flower initiation of Super-Dwarf wheat under stress conditions simulating those on the Space Station, Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, L.; Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Nan, R.

    1998-01-01

    Super-Dwarf wheat plants were grown in growth chambers under 12 treatments with three photoperiods (18 h, 21 h, 24 h) and four carbon dioxide (CO2) levels (360, 1,200, 3,000 and 7,000 micromoles mol-1). Carbon dioxide concentrations affected flower initiation rates of Super-Dwarf wheat. The optimum CO2 level for flower initiation and development was 1,200 micromoles mol-1. Super-optimum CO2 levels delayed flower initiation, but did not decrease final flower bud number per head. Longer photoperiods not only accelerated flower initiation rates, but also decreased deleterious effects of super-optimum CO2. Flower bud size and head length at the same developmental stage were larger under longer photoperiods, but final flower bud number was not affected by photoperiod.

  18. Impact of chemical and meteorological boundary and initial conditions on air quality modeling: WRF-Chem sensitivity evaluation for a European domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Mathias; Müller, Mathias D.; Jorba, Oriol; Parlow, Eberhard; Liu, L.-J. Sally

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of different chemical and meteorological boundary and initial conditions on the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with its chemistry extension (WRF-Chem). The evaluation is done for July 2005 with 50 km horizontal resolution. The effect of monthly mean chemical boundary conditions derived from the chemical transport model LMDZ-INCA on WRF-Chem is evaluated against the effect of the preset idealized profiles. Likewise, the impact of different meteorological initial and boundary conditions (GFS and Reanalysis II) on the model is evaluated. Pearson correlation coefficient between these different runs range from 0.96 to 1.00. Exceptions exists for chemical boundary conditions on ozone and for meteorological boundary conditions on PM10, where coefficients of 0.90 were obtained. Best results were achieved with boundary and initial conditions from LMDZ-INCA and GFS. Overall, the European simulations show encouraging results for observed air pollutant, with ozone being the most and PM10 being the least satisfying.

  19. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  20. Theoretical investigations of initial growth processes on semipolar AlN(11\\bar{2}2) surfaces under metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy growth condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Takemoto, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2016-05-01

    The initial growth processes on semipolar AlN(11\\bar{2}2) surfaces, such as adsorption behavior of Al adatoms, are investigated on the basis of ab initio calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. By using surface phase diagrams, which are obtained by comparing the adsorption energy from ab initio calculations with gas-phase chemical potentials, we find that the adsorption of Al adatoms under H-poor condition is much easier than that under H-rich condition. Furthermore, our kinetic MC simulations demonstrate that the surface lifetime (diffusion length) of Al adatoms under H-poor condition is found to be four (two) orders of magnitude larger than that under H-rich condition. These differences implie that the growth under H-poor condition is much faster than that under H-rich condition, qualitatively consistent with the experimental results.

  1. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  2. Comparisons of Stuttering Frequency during and after Speech Initiation in Unaltered Feedback, Altered Auditory Feedback and Choral Speech Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Kalinowski, Joseph; Robbins, Mary; Crawcour, Stephen; Bowers, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background: Stuttering is prone to strike during speech initiation more so than at any other point in an utterance. The use of auditory feedback (AAF) has been found to produce robust decreases in the stuttering frequency by creating an electronic rendition of choral speech (i.e., speaking in unison). However, AAF requires users to self-initiate…

  3. The elasticity of hydrological forecast skill with respect to initial conditions and meteorological forcing for two major flood events in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thober, Stephan; Wood, Andy; Samaniego, Luis; Clark, Martyn; Kumar, Rohini; Zink, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Major flood events are causing severe socio-economic damages. In Germany alone, the havoc wreaked by the 2002 and 2013 floods along the Elbe and Danube river amounted to more than 11 bn EUR. Highly skilled hydrological forecasts can help to mitigate such damages. Among several factors, these hydrological forecasts are strongly dependent on the initial conditions of the land surface at the beginning of the forecast period and the forecast skill of the meteorological forcing. Prior research has investigated how uncertainties of the initial conditions and meteorological forcing impact hydrological forecasts. In these studies, uncertainty is investigated by coupling an ensemble of basin initial conditions (e.g., snow, soil moisture) with an ensemble of meteorological forecasts (e.g., precipitation). However, most previous hydrological predictability studies focus on seasonal forecasts (e.g., forecasts of June-July-August flow volume, initialized on April 1st), and neglect the errors in meteorological forecasts at lead times from 1-14 days. In this study, an error growth model is proposed to investigate hydrological predictability at lead times of 1-14 days. This error growth model calculates a time-dependent weighted average between the perfect forecast and a stochastic perturbation of this. The time-dependent weights are derived from a logistic function. This error growth model thus attributes high weights to the perfect forecast for short lead times (e.g., less than five days) and low weights for longer lead times (e.g., more than five days). For longer lead times, more weight is given to the stochastic perturbation of the forecast and, hence, the ensemble spread is larger for these lead times resembling a higher uncertainty. Analogous to the error growth model, the initial conditions are calculated as a weighted average between the perfect condition and a historic condition of the land surface. The proposed framework is tested in Germany for the 2002 and 2013 flood

  4. Preliminary results for a large angle oblique jet impingement and flow and for the effect of initial conditions on the near field of an axisymmetric jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.; Kleis, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The structure of an axisymmetric jet in the near field is discussed for jet noise and for jet impingment schemes for STOL aircraft. It is inferred from previous studies, and the inference is supported by analysis, that the scale and intensity of the turbulence structure at the jet exit plane are the important boundary conditions which effect the development of the flow in the near field. The techniques to study these effects while maintaining a uniform mean flow and the results which document the range of the initial conditions are presented. The large angle, oblique jet impingment condition is of interest in terms of the jet/flap interaction. Detailed turbulence data can be obtained with the specially constructed facility. The development of the flow and instrumentation system and initial data from the new facility are presented.

  5. The growth of prognostic differences between GLAS model forecasts from SAT and NOSAT initial conditions. [for synoptic meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the cause of a major synoptic difference in the 72 h GLAS model forecasts from 0000 GMT 19 February 1976 that resulted from the inclusion of satellite data. The prognostic differences that resulted in diverging cyclone paths between the forecast that included satellite temperature soundings (SAT) and the forecast that excluded satellite sounding data (NOSAT) have been traced to initial state differences in the upper level wind and temperature patterns. These modifications enhanced the variation of thermal vorticity and thermal advection across the cyclone center and in the SAT case, gave a greater initial rate of movement of the upper-level vorticity maximum associated with the surface cyclone.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Temporally Evolving Incompressible Plane Wake: Effect of Initial Conditions on Evolution and Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergaard, R.; Cantwell, B.; Mansour, N.

    1997-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been used to examine the effect of the initial disturbance field on the development of three-dimensionality and the transition to turbulence in the incompressible plane wake. The simulations were performed using a new numerical method for solving the time-dependent, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in flows with one infinite and two periodic directions. The method uses standard Fast Fourier Transforms and is applicable to cases where the vorticity field is compact in the infinite direction. Initial disturbances fields examined were combinations of two-dimensional waves and symmetric pairs of 60 deg oblique waves at the fundamental, subharmonic, and sub-subharmonic wavelengths. The results of these simulations indicate that the presence of 60 deg disturbances at the subharmonic streamwise wavelength results in the development of strong coherent three-dimensional structures. The resulting strong three-dimensional rate-of-strain triggers the growth of intense fine scale motions. Wakes initiated with 60 deg disturbances at the fundamental streamwise wavelength develop weak coherent streamwise structures, and do not develop significant fine scale motions, even at high Reynolds numbers. The wakes which develop strong three-dimensional structures exhibit growth rates on par with experimentally observed turbulent plane wakes. Wakes which develop only weak three-dimensional structures exhibit significantly lower late time growth rates. Preliminary studies of wakes initiated with an oblique fundamental and a two-dimensional subharmonic, which develop asymmetric coherent oblique structures at the subharmonic wavelength, indicate that significant fine scale motions only develop if the resulting oblique structures are above an angle of approximately 45 deg.

  7. Body condition and wind support initiate the shift of migratory direction and timing of nocturnal departure in a songbird.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohann, Heiko; Naef-Daenzer, Beat

    2011-11-01

    1. An innate migration strategy guides birds through space and time. Environmental variation further modulates individual behaviour within a genetically determined frame. In particular, ecological barriers could influence departure direction and its timing. A shift in the migratory direction in response to an ecological barrier could reveal how birds adjust their individual trajectories to environmental cues and body condition. 2. Northern wheatears of the Greenland/Iceland subspecies Oenanthe oenanthe leucorhoa arrive in Western Europe en route from their West African winter range. They then undergo an endogenously controlled shift in migratory direction from north to north-west to cross a large ecological barrier, the North Atlantic. We radiotracked these songbirds departing from Helgoland, a small island in the North Sea, over an unprecedented range of their journey. 3. Here, we show that both birds' body condition and the wind conditions that they encountered influenced the departure direction significantly. Jointly high fuel loads and favourable wind conditions enabled migrants to cross large stretches of sea. Birds in good condition departed early in the night heading to the sea towards their breeding areas, while birds with low fuel loads and/or flying in poor weather conditions departed in directions leading towards nearby mainland areas during the entire night. These areas could be reached even after setting off late at night. 4. Behavioural adjustment of migratory patterns is a critical adaptation for crossing ecological barriers. The observed variation in departure direction and time in relation to fuel load and wind revealed that these birds have an innate ability to respond by jointly incorporating internal information (body condition) and external information (wind support). PMID:21615404

  8. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  9. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  10. Initializing Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with land surface conditions from the Terrestrial Observation and PredictionSystem (TOPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, H.; Wang, W.; Melton, F.; Milesi, C.; Michaellis, A.; Nemani, R.

    2008-12-01

    Weather forecasting models have been shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to land surface conditions, particularly soil moisture. However, the lack of robust estimates of soil moisture at appropriate time and space scales has been a persistent problem. Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) integrates surface weather observations and satellite data with ecosystem simulation models to produce spatially and temporally consistent nowcasts and forecasts of land surface conditions such as soil moisture, evapotranspiration, vegetation stress and photosynthesis. To extend TOPS capabilities beyond estimating ecosystem rocesses, we integrated TOPS with Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model to evaluate the utility of TOPS-derived surface conditions such as soil moisture in weather forecasting. TOPS land surface schemes are based on a well-calibrated ecosystem model, Biome-BGC, for simulating water and carbon budgets. One of the advantages of TOPS is its flexibility, which enables it to ingest data from a variety of sensors and surface networks, and thus we can provide the surface conditions to users from historical to near real-time, and for spatial scales ranging from 1km and up. We ran the TOPS-WRF system over California for several days during 2007. The results show TOPS-WRF simulations are consistently better than default WRF simulations, particularly over the dry season when spatial variability in soil moisture becomes a significant factor in influencing local energy balance.

  11. Tense or Aspect?: A Review of Initial Past Tense Marking and Task Conditions for Beginning Classroom Learners of Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilla, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    This essay contributes to the research on the emergence of tense/aspect morphology by reviewing the results and task conditions of studies supporting either the Aspect Hypothesis (AH) or the Default Past Tense Hypothesis (DPTH) for second language (L2) learners of Spanish. The AH has found that past marking emerges based on inherent aspectual…

  12. Effect of Initial Conditions on 2D Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Transition to Turbulence in Planar Blast-wave-driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M J; Greenough, J A

    2004-03-26

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, we present the first results from a computational study of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility. Using the multiphysics, AMR, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor, we consider the late nonlinear instability evolution for multiple amplitude and phase realizations of a variety of multimode spectral types. We show that compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Certain aspects of the initial conditions, including the rms amplitude, are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime.

  13. Effect of initial conditions on two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability and transition to turbulence in planar blast-wave-driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, A. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Greenough, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, the results from a computational study of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution for multiple amplitude and phase realizations of a variety of multimode spectral types is considered. Compressibility effects preclude the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions by allowing for memory of the initial conditions to be retained in the mix-width at all times. The loss of transverse spectral information is demonstrated, however, along with the existence of a quasi-self-similar regime over short time intervals. Certain aspects of the initial conditions, including the rms amplitude, are shown to have a strong effect on the time to transition to the quasi-self-similar regime.

  14. Cumulative Coulomb Stress Triggering as an Explanation for the Canterbury (New Zealand) Aftershock Sequence: Initial Conditions Are Everything?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark; Harte, David; Williams, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Using 2 years of aftershock data and three fault-plane solutions for each of the initial M7.1 Darfield earthquake and the larger (M >6) aftershocks, we conduct a detailed examination of Coulomb stress transfer in the Canterbury 2010-2011 earthquake sequence. Moment tensor solutions exist for 283 of the events with M ≥ 3.6, while 713 other events of M ≥ 3.6 have only hypocentre and magnitude information available. We look at various methods for deciding between the two possible mechanisms for the 283 events with moment tensor solutions, including conformation to observed surface faulting, and maximum ΔCFF transfer from the Darfield main shock. For the remaining events, imputation methods for the mechanism including nearest-neighbour, kernel smoothing, and optimal plane methods are considered. Fault length, width, and depth are arrived at via a suite of scaling relations. A large (50-70 %) proportion of the faults considered were calculated to have initial loading in excess of the final stress drop. The majority of faults that accumulated positive ΔCFF during the sequence were `encouraged' by the main shock failure, but, on the other hand, of the faults that failed during the sequence, more than 50 % of faults appeared to have accumulated a negative ΔCFF from all preceding failures during the sequence. These results were qualitatively insensitive to any of the factors considered. We conclude that there is much unknown about how Coulomb stress triggering works in practice.

  15. Magma Storage Conditions, Eruption Initiation and Magma Evolution Over Time: Investigating the Eruptions of Organ Caldera, Southern NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lente, J. L.; Johnson, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Organ caldera in southern New Mexico formed ~36 Ma from a series of three explosive, voluminous eruptions. The volcanic deposits are now exposed in the Organ Mountains and have a combined thickness of nearly 3 km and an estimated volume between 500 and1000 km3 (Seager & McCurry, 1988). This research uses analyses of quartz-hosted melt inclusions from the first- and last-erupted units to study the storage and differentiation of the magma body prior-to and during the initial eruption, as well as changes in the magma chamber over time as the eruptions progressed and ultimately ceased. Previous work suggests the Organ magma chamber was compositionally stratified (Seager, 1981) erupting top-down and tapping less-evolved magmas over time. However, preliminary results suggest a more complex system; possibly a convecting, homogenized magma chamber or a series of dykes and sills. Results obtained using FTIR analyses of H2O and CO2 in melt inclusions have shown variable volatile contents from the first erupted unit (~2.3 to 6.8 weight percent H2O, 0-118 ppm CO2). Using these values, saturation pressures of 45 to 266 MPa were calculated, indicating a minimum pressure at which the melt inclusion was trapped. These pressures suggest magma storage depths for the first erupted magmas of ~2 to 9 km (with most inclusions trapped between 4 and 8 km) which is inconsistent with the initial eruption coming from the top of a normally stratified chamber. The large variation in volatile contents and storage depths can have many explanations, such as degassing and shallow crystallization during ascent, or perhaps a more complex, elongate magma storage system. These possibilities, and whether or not magma mixing/rejuvenation triggered the initial eruption, will be explored with the acquisition of major and trace element compositions of melt inclusions. Additionally, analyses of melt inclusions from the last erupted ignimbrite, which erupted ~0.5 Ma after the first eruption, will enable

  16. Effects of Initial Temper Condition and Postweld Heat Treatment on the Properties of Dissimilar Friction-Stir-Welded Joints between AA7075 and AA6061 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İpekoğlu, Güven; Çam, Gürel

    2014-06-01

    In this study, dissimilar AA7075-O/6061-O and AA7075-T6/6061-T6 butt joints were produced by friction stir welding (FSW), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to the joints obtained. The effects of initial temper condition and PWHT on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints were thus investigated. It was demonstrated that sound dissimilar joints can be produced for both temper conditions. A hardness increase in the joint area ( i.e., strength overmatching) was obtained in the joints produced in the O-temper condition, whereas a hardness loss was observed in the joint area of the joints obtained in the T6 temper condition. It was also well demonstrated that PWHT could be used in order to improve the joint properties for both O and T6 joints provided that the joint is defect-free prior to subsequent heat treatment.

  17. Development of ultrafine-grained 1100 aluminum alloy by cryorolling with the optimized initial heat treatment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Siti Aminah; Hussain, Zuhailawati; Seman, Anasyida Abu

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this study to determine the suitable initial heat treatment for 1100 aluminum alloy prior to cryorolling process and the properties of annealed and cryorolled annealed sample. The samples were annealed at different annealing temperature of 200˚C, 250˚C, 300˚C, 350˚C and 400˚C for 2 hours soaking time before cryorolling. The annealing samples then were cryorolled up to 50% thickness reduction after dipping in liquid nitrogen for 30 minutes. The effect of annealing temperature on cryorolled sample was investigated by employing hardness measurements and tensile test. The highest hardness and tensile properties achieved for sample annealed at 250 °C. The entire cryorolled sample showed severely deformed grain which are elongated along and following the rolling direction.

  18. Phasic excitation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons potentiates the initiation of conditioned approach behavior: parametric and reinforcement-schedule analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ilango, Anton; Kesner, Andrew J.; Broker, Carl J.; Wang, Dong V.; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are implicated in motivation and learning. However, it is unclear how phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, which is implicated in learning, is involved in motivation. Here we used a self-stimulation procedure to examine how mice seek for optogenetically-induced phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, with an emphasis on the temporal dimension. TH-Cre transgenic mice received adeno-associated viral vectors encoding channelrhodopsin-2 into the ventral tegmental area, resulting in selective expression of the opsin in dopamine neurons. These mice were trained to press on a lever for photo-pulse trains that phasically excited dopamine neurons. They learned to self-stimulate in a fast, constant manner, and rapidly reduced pressing during extinction. We first determined effective parameters of photo-pulse trains in self-stimulation. Lever-press rates changed as a function of the manipulation of pulse number, duration, intensity, and frequency. We then examined effects of interval and ratio schedules of reinforcement on photo-pulse train reinforcement, which was contrasted with food reinforcement. Reinforcement with food inhibited lever pressing for a few seconds, after which pressing was robustly regulated in a goal-directed manner. In contrast, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons robustly potentiated the initiation of lever pressing; however, this effect did not last more than 1 s and quickly diminished. Indeed, response rates markedly decreased when lever pressing was reinforced with inter-reinforcement interval schedules of 3 or 10 s or ratio schedules requiring multiple responses per reinforcement. Thus, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons briefly potentiates the initiation of approach behavior with apparent lack of long-term motivational regulation. PMID:24834037

  19. Increase on the Initial Soluble Heme Levels in Acidic Conditions Is an Important Mechanism for Spontaneous Heme Crystallization In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Timothy J.; Wright, David W.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal that represents a vital pathway for heme disposal in several blood-feeding organisms. Recent evidence demonstrated that β-hematin (βH) (the synthetic counterpart of Hz) formation occurs under physiological conditions near synthetic or biological hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. This seems to require a heme dimer acting as a precursor of Hz crystals that would be formed spontaneously in the absence of the competing water molecules bound to the heme iron. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of medium polarity on spontaneous βH formation in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the effect of water content on spontaneous βH formation by using the aprotic solvent dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and a series of polyethyleneglycols (PEGs). We observed that both DMSO and PEGs (3.350, 6.000, 8.000, and 22.000) increased the levels of soluble heme under acidic conditions. These compounds were able to stimulate the production of βH crystals in the absence of any biological sample. Interestingly, the effects of DMSO and PEGs on βH formation were positively correlated with their capacity to promote previous heme solubilization in acidic conditions. Curiously, a short chain polyethyleneglycol (PEG 300) caused a significant reduction in both soluble heme levels and βH formation. Finally, both heme solubilization and βH formation strongly correlated with reduced medium water activity provided by increased DMSO concentrations. Conclusions The data presented here support the notion that reduction of the water activity is an important mechanism to support spontaneous heme crystallization, which depends on the previous increase of soluble heme levels. PMID:20856937

  20. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers

  1. Determination of Marginal Conditions for Thermoacoustic Oscillations in a Looped Tube by Evolution of an Initial Disturbance Based on the Boundary-Layer Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2014-03-01

    Marginal conditions are determined for the onset of thermoacoustic oscillations of a gas in a looped tube with a so-called stack sandwiched by hot and cold heat exchangers on the basis of the boundary-layer theory so far developed. Given a couple of impulses applied initially to a quiescent gas, the evolution of an infinitesimally small disturbance is studied by solving an initial-value problem to the linearized equations. Marginal states correspond to those in which the initial disturbance neither decays nor grows with time. In the case studied by Ueda and Kato [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 851 (2008)], the marginal conditions are obtained in two cases of the temperature distribution in the thermal buffer tube and compared with their results. To identify the marginal curves, the porosity of the stack or one of the subsidiary parameters such as the wall thickness of the stack is required in addition to the squared ratio of the hydraulic radius to the typical thickness of the thermal diffusion layer in a flow passage of gas. It is found that the marginal conditions are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results and that the right branch of the marginal curve is obtainable down to such a considerably low temperature ratio that the theory may become invalid.

  2. Pyrite Oxidation under initially neutral pH conditions and in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and micromolar hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Lin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at a micromolar level played a role in the microbial surface oxidation of pyrite crystals under initially neutral pH. When the mineral-bacteria system was cyclically exposed to 50 μM H2O2, the colonization of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans onto the mineral surface was markedly enhanced, as compared to the control (no added H2O2). This can be attributed to the effects of H2O2 on increasing the roughness of the mineral surfaces, as well as the acidity and Fe2+ concentration at the mineral-solution interfaces. All of these effects tended to create more favourable nano- to micro-scale environments in the mineral surfaces for the cell adsorption. However, higher H2O2 levels inhibited the attachment of cells onto the mineral surfaces, possibly due to the oxidative stress in the bacteria when they approached the mineral surfaces where high levels of free radicals are present as a result of Fenton-like reactions. The more aggressive nature of H2O2 as an oxidant caused marked surface flaking of the mineral surface. The XPS results suggest that H2O2 accelerated the oxidation of pyrite-S and consequently facilitated the overall corrosion cycle of pyrite surfaces. This was accompanied by pH drop in the solution in contact with the pyrite cubes.

  3. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-clay based hydrogels controlled by the initiating conditions: evolution of structure and gel formation.

    PubMed

    Strachota, Beata; Matějka, Libor; Zhigunov, Alexander; Konefał, Rafał; Spěváček, Jiří; Dybal, Jiří; Puffr, Rudolf

    2015-12-28

    The formation of the hydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-clay (LAPONITE®) by redox polymerization was investigated, and the main factors governing the gel build-up were determined. The significant effect of the redox initiating system ammonium peroxodisulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) on gel formation and structure was established, making it possible to control the structure of the gel. Moreover, the pre-reaction stage involving the quality of the clay exfoliation in an aqueous suspension and the interaction of reaction components with the clay play a role in controlling the polymerization and gel structure. The molecular and phase structure evolution during polymerization was followed in situ by the following independent techniques: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), chemorheology, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis). The combination of these methods enabled us to describe in detail particular progress stages during the gel formation and determine the correlation of the corresponding processes on a time and conversion scale. The mechanism of gel formation was refined based on these experimental results. PMID:26428943

  4. Effect of Particle Morphology on Critical Conditions for Shock-Initiated Reactions in Titanium-Silicon Powder Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David; Jette, Francois; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew; Lee, Julian

    2009-06-01

    The effect of titanium particle morphology on the shock sensitivity of titanium-silicon powder mixtures has been investigated experimentally. The powder mixtures were tested in a planar recovery capsule, with the shock loading produced by a high explosive Tetryl booster charge placed on top of the capsule and a PMMA attenuator. Reactions were not observed for stoichiometric mixtures of large (75 -- 106 μm), spherical Ti particles with fine (< 44 μm) Si particles for incident peak shock pressures of up to 23 GPa, estimated with LS-DYNA. In contrast, mixtures with fine (< 45 μm) spherical Ti particles or irregularly-shaped fine (< 20 μm) Ti particles had critical shock pressures for reaction initiation of 7±3 GPa and 5±2 GPa, respectively. Microscopy and spectroscopy were used to identify the degree of intermixing between the particles for shock loading just below the reaction threshold. For the largest spherical Ti particles, little particle intermixing was evident. However, differential thermal analysis carried out demonstrated that even for the large Ti particles, shock loading of the samples generated microstructural effects which lowered the temperature for the onset of exothermic reaction of the shocked sample by about 80^oC.

  5. Kinetics of OH-initiated oxidation of some oxygenated organic compounds in the aqueous phase under tropospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, L.; Grubert, S.; François, S.; Monod, A.; Wortham, H.

    2003-04-01

    The interest for multiphase interactions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the troposphere has increased for a few years. Inside the clouds water droplets, soluble VOCs can be oxidized by free radicals thus modifying the droplet composition. This reactivity has an impact on the tropospheric oxidizing capacity as well as the aerosols' properties. In the present work, we measured aqueous phase OH-initiated oxidation rate constants of several oxygenated organic compounds relevant to the atmosphere or chosen as test compounds (ethanol, t-butanol, 1-butanol, iso-propanol, 1-propanol, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, valeraldehyde, phenol, ethyl ter-butyl ether (ETBE), n-propyl acetate, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), methyl iso-butyl ketone (MIBK), ethyl formate). Experiments took place in an aqueous phase photoreactor. The rate constants were determinated using the relative kinetic method. Different OH-radical sources were tested, as well as different reference compounds in order to detect any artifact. The results have shown validation of the experimental protocol on test compounds. The overall results allowed to propose a structure reactivity method in order to predict OH-oxidation rate constant of new compounds. Finally, tropospheric life times of the studied compounds were compared inside and outside a cloud.

  6. Observables in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions from two different transport approaches for the same initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, R.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Cassing, W.; Aichelin, J.

    2015-07-01

    For nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies currently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we calculate observables in two different transport approaches, i.e., the n -body molecular dynamical model "relativistic quantum molecular dynamics for strongly interacting matter with phase transition or crossover" (RSP) and the two-body parton hadron string dynamics (PHSD), starting out from the same distribution in the initial energy density at the quark gluon plasma (QGP) formation time. The RSP dynamics is based on the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) Lagrangian, whereas in PHSD the partons are described by the dynamical quasiparticle model (DQPM). Despite the very different description of the parton properties and their interactions and of the hadronization in both approaches, the final transverse momentum distributions of pions turn out to be quite similar, which is less visible for the strange mesons owing to the large NJL cross sections involved. Our findings can be attributed, in part, to a partial thermalization of the quark degrees of freedom in central Au +Au collisions for both approaches. The rapidity distribution of mesons shows a stronger sensitivity to the nature of the degrees of freedom involved and to their interaction strength in the QGP.

  7. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  8. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  9. Incompressible limit of all-time solutions to 3-D full Navier-Stokes equations for perfect gas with well-prepared initial condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Dandan; Ou, Yaobin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we prove the incompressible limit of all-time strong solutions to the three-dimensional full compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Here the velocity field and temperature satisfy the Dirichlet boundary condition and convective boundary condition, respectively. The uniform estimates in both the Mach number {ɛin(0,overline{ɛ}]} and time {tin[0,∞)} are established by deriving a differential inequality with decay property, where {overline{ɛ} in(0,1]} is a constant. Based on these uniform estimates, the global solution of full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with "well-prepared" initial conditions converges to the one of isentropic incompressible Navier-Stokes equations as the Mach number goes to zero.

  10. Transition to Turbulence and Effect of Initial Conditions on 3D Compressible Mixing in Planar Blast-wave-driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M J; Greenough, J A

    2004-11-08

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams, 9(2), 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multi-physics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J.A. Greenough, J. Comp. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pre-transition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernova are discussed.

  11. Initial conditions from the shadowed Glauber model for Pb + Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Snigdha; Singh, Sushant K.; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Alam, Jane; Sarkar, Sourav

    2016-05-01

    We study the initial conditions for Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV using the two-component Monte-Carlo Glauber model with shadowing of the nucleons in the interior by the leading ones. The model parameters are fixed by comparing them to the multiplicity data of p +Pb and Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 and 2.76 TeV, respectively. We then compute the centrality dependence of the eccentricities up to the fourth order as well as their event-by-event distributions. The inclusion of shadowing brings the Monte-Carlo Glauber model predictions in agreement with data as well as with results from other dynamical models of initial conditions based on gluon saturation at high-energy nuclear collisions. Further, we find that the shadowed Glauber model provides the desired relative magnitude between the ellipticity and the triangularity of the initial energy distribution required to explain the data on the even and odd flow harmonics v2 and v3, respectively, at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  12. Using Hydrus-1D to Predict Solute Conservative Tracer Transfer from Initially Saturated Soil into the Surface Runoff Water underwith Controlled Drainage Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, J.; Yang, J.; Hu, B.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a mixing layer theory is coupled with the Hydrus-1D to predict solute transfer from an initially saturated soil into surface runoff water under a controlled drainage condition with low infiltration rate, and various ponding waterwith the increasing depths of the ponding water on the soil surface before the surface runoff. A sand experiment is used as the reference experiment to identify the parameters for the water flow model and solute transfer model with increasing mixing layer depth after the surface runoff water. Based on these identified parameters andan increasing depth of the mixing layer, the model well predicts the experimental results, and much better than the a simulation results by thewith a constant mixing layer depth under the controlled drainage without drainage theory. The model is also applied to another initially saturated sand experiment under the controlled drainage water condition, and the simulation resultsdata agree well with the observed data. These results suggest that the model can efficiently simulate the solute transfer from the initially saturated soil into the surface runoff water. It is found from this study that with the increase of the surface runoff time or/and the decrease of the mixing layer, the solute loss in the mixing layer before the surface runoff will increase, the solute source in the mixing layer for the surface runoff water will decrease after the surface runoff and the increase rate of the mixing layer depth will increase. Simple sketch of the model Hydraulic parameters in the reference sand experiment

  13. THE INITIAL CONDITIONS OF CLUSTERED STAR FORMATION. III. THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF THE OPHIUCHUS B2 CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, R. K.; Di Francesco, J.; Myers, P. C.; Bourke, T. L.; Belloche, A.; Shirley, Y. L.; Andre, P.

    2010-08-01

    We present N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 (IRAM), and H{sub 2}D{sup +} 1{sub 11}-1{sub 10} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 4-3 (JCMT) maps of the small cluster-forming Ophiuchus B2 core in the nearby Ophiuchus molecular cloud. In conjunction with previously published N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1-0 observations, the N{sub 2}D{sup +} data reveal the deuterium fractionation in the high-density gas across Oph B2. The average deuterium fractionation R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) {approx} 0.03 over Oph B2, with several small scale R{sub D} peaks and a maximum R{sub D} = 0.1. The mean R{sub D} is consistent with previous results in isolated starless and protostellar cores. The column density distributions of both H{sub 2}D{sup +} and N{sub 2}D{sup +} show no correlation with total H{sub 2} column density. We find, however, an anticorrelation in deuterium fractionation with proximity to the embedded protostars in Oph B2 to distances {approx}>0.04 pc. Destruction mechanisms for deuterated molecules require gas temperatures greater than those previously determined through NH{sub 3} observations of Oph B2 to proceed. We present temperatures calculated for the dense core gas through the equating of non-thermal line widths for molecules (i.e., N{sub 2}D{sup +} and H{sub 2}D{sup +}) expected to trace the same core regions, but the observed complex line structures in B2 preclude finding a reasonable result in many locations. This method may, however, work well in isolated cores with less complicated velocity structures. Finally, we use R{sub D} and the H{sub 2}D{sup +} column density across Oph B2 to set a lower limit on the ionization fraction across the core, finding a mean x{sub e,lim} {approx}> few x 10{sup -8}. Our results show that care must be taken when using deuterated species as a probe of the physical conditions of dense gas in star-forming regions.

  14. The Impact of Depression and Pain Catastrophization on Initial Presentation and Treatment Outcomes for Atraumatic Hand Conditions

    PubMed Central

    London, Daniel A.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prior studies have suggested that patient-rated hand function is impacted by depression and pain catastrophization. We studied the impact that these comorbidities have on treatment outcomes. Methods: Two hundred and fifty-six patients presenting to an orthopaedic hand clinic were followed in this prospective cohort investigation. Patients who were prescribed treatment for atraumatic hand/wrist conditions were eligible for inclusion. At enrollment, all patients completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ; scale of 0 to 100, with 100 indicating the best hand performance). One month and three months after treatment, patients again completed the MHQ. Participants’ psychological comorbidity status was categorized as either affected (a CES-D score of ≥16, indicating depression, or a PCS score of ≥30, indicating catastrophization) or unaffected (a CES-D score of <16 and a PCS score of <30). Diagnoses and treatments for both the affected and unaffected groups were examined. The effect of time and patient status, and their interaction, on MHQ scores was evaluated by mixed modeling. Results: Fifty patients were categorized as affected and 206 as unaffected. Diagnoses and treatments differed minimally between the two groups. At the time of enrollment, the mean MHQ score of the unaffected group (64.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 62.5 to 67.3) was significantly higher than that of the affected group (48.1; 95% CI, 43.3 to 53.0). Both groups demonstrated similar significant absolute improvement over baseline at three months after treatment (an increase of 12.5 points [95% CI, 7.5 to 17.4] in the affected group and 12.8 points [95% CI, 10.4 to 15.3] in the unaffected group). Thus, at the time of final follow-up, the rating of hand function by the affected patients (60.6 [95% CI, 55.0 to 66.2]) was still significantly poorer than the rating by

  15. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  16. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  17. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  18. Multi-Physics Feedback Simulations with Realistic Initial Conditions of the Formation of Star Clusters: From Large Scale Magnetized Clouds to Turbulent Clumps to Cores to Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R. I.; Li, P.; McKee, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    Multi-physics zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement simulations with feedback and realistic initial conditions, starting from large scale turbulent molecular clouds through the formation of clumps and cores to the formation os stellar clusters are presented. I give a summary of results at the different scales undergoing gravitational collapse from cloud to core to cluster formation. Detailed comparisons with observations are made at each stage of the simulations. In particular, properties of the magnetized clumps are compared with recent observations of Crutcher et al. 2010 and Crutcher 2012 and the magnetic field orientation in cloud clumps relative to the global mean field of the inter-cloud medium (Li et al. 2009). The Initial Mass Function (IMF) obtained is compared with the Chabrier IMF and the protostellar mass function of the cluster is compared with different theories.

  19. Continuum-scale investigation of evaporation from bare soil under different boundary and initial conditions: An evaluation of nonequilibrium phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, Andrew C.; Smits, Kathleen M.; Cihan, Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Evaporation and condensation in bare soils govern water and energy fluxes between the land and atmosphere. Phase change between liquid water and water vapor is commonly evaluated in soil hydrology using an assumption of instantaneous phase change (i.e., chemical equilibrium). Past experimental studies have shown that finite volatilization and condensation times can be observed under certain environmental conditions, thereby questioning the validity of this assumption. A comparison between equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase change modeling approaches showed that the latter is able to provide better estimates of evaporation, justifying the need for more research on this topic. Several formulations based on irreversible thermodynamics, first-order reaction kinetics, or the kinetic theory of gases have been employed to describe nonequilibrium phase change at the continuum scale. In this study, results from a fully coupled nonisothermal heat and mass transfer model applying four different nonequilibrium phase change formulations were compared with experimental data generated under different initial and boundary conditions. Results from a modified Hertz-Knudsen formulation based on kinetic theory of gases, proposed herein, were consistently in best agreement in terms of preserving both magnitude and trends of experimental data under all environmental conditions analyzed. Simulation results showed that temperature-dependent formulations generally better predict evaporation than formulations independent of temperature. Analysis of vapor concentrations within the porous media showed that conditions were not at equilibrium under the experimental conditions tested.

  20. Effect of Boron Addition and Initial Heat-Treatment Temperature on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steels Under Different Heat-Treatment Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of initial heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of boron-free and boron-containing modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (P91 and P91B, respectively) has been studied under different heat-treatment conditions. The prior austenite grains evolved in P91 steel, having different prior austenite grain sizes, were found to be similar in size after heat treatment in the range of 1073 K to 1448 K (800 °C to 1175 °C) for 5 minutes. The microstructural evolution in P91B steel having different prior austenite grain sizes appeared to be uniform when subjected to different heat-treatment temperatures with the prior austenite grain size being similar to that of initial grain size. Lath martensite was observed in P91B steel after all heat treatments. On the other hand, lath martensite was observed in P91 steel only when subjected to high-temperature heat treatment, whereas subgrain/substructure as well as coarse precipitates were observed after a lower temperature heat treatment. Large differences in the hardness/strength values between different microstructures corresponding to coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) of P91 steel weldment were due to the distinct difference in these microstructures. The difference in hardness/strength values between the CGHAZ and ICHAZ was found to be insignificant in P91B steel under similar heat-treatment conditions.

  1. Critical conditions for initiation of localized corrosion of mild steels in contact with bentonite used in geological disposal packages of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1993-12-31

    In the current design of geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste, the use of bentonite to stand as an artificial barrier-cum-buffer between the host rock and the packages made of mild steel is being investigated. Although mild steels commonly have been considered to be passivity in alkaline environments, under certain circumstances, they become liable to localized corrosion, e.g., pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Since bentonite can turn the environment alkaline to a pH of approximately 10 when it is mixed with groundwater, critical conditions for the initiation of localized corrosion of mild steel must be known to evaluate the extremely long time integrity of disposal packages serving in such an environment. This paper presents and discusses the observations and results acquired in a series of critical conditions for the initiation of localized corrosion of mild steels in various groundwater-bentonite environments at 20C, with a deaerated aqueous solution of 1 mMol/L [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] + 10 ppm [Cl{sup -}], simulating the natural groundwater and varying the bentonite content.

  2. Semiclassical modelling of finite-pulse effects on non-adiabatic photodynamics via initial condition filtering: The predissociation of NaI as a test case

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-05-21

    Femtosecond-laser pulse driven non-adiabatic spectroscopy and dynamics in molecular and condensed phase systems continue to be a challenge for theoretical modelling. One of the main obstacles is the “curse of dimensionality” encountered in non-adiabatic, exact wavepacket propagation. A possible route towards treating complex molecular systems is via semiclassical surface-hopping schemes, in particular if they account not only for non-adiabatic post-excitation dynamics but also for the initial optical excitation. One such approach, based on initial condition filtering, will be put forward in what follows. As a simple test case which can be compared with exact wavepacket dynamics, we investigate the influence of the different parameters determining the shape of a laser pulse (e.g., its finite width and a possible chirp) on the predissociation dynamics of a NaI molecule, upon photoexcitation of the A(0{sup +}) state. The finite-pulse effects are mapped into the initial conditions for semiclassical surface-hopping simulations. The simulated surface-hopping diabatic populations are in qualitative agreement with the quantum mechanical results, especially concerning the subpicosend photoinduced dynamics, the main deviations being the relative delay of the non-adiabatic transitions in the semiclassical picture. Likewise, these differences in the time-dependent electronic populations calculated via the semiclassical and the quantum methods are found to have a mild influence on the overall probability density distribution. As a result, the branching ratios between the bound and the dissociative reaction channels and the time-evolution of the molecular wavepacket predicted by the semiclassical method agree with those computed using quantum wavepacket propagation. Implications for more challenging molecular systems are given.

  3. The temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration controls initial conditions and soil carbon resilience to global warming in CMIP5 models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exbrayat, J.; Pitman, A. J.; Abramowitz, G.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, biogeochemical models have been implemented in the land component of global circulation models to investigate the interactions between the global terrestrial carbon cycle, anthropogenic CO2 emissions and global warming. These models are now the state-of-the-art tools used in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5). Usually, in each grid cell microbial decomposition and routing of soil organic matter between pools of different turn-over time is modelled as a first-order kinetics controlled by a pool-specific residence time. It is adjusted by response functions to environmental conditions and then applied to the pool size. One result of this methodology is a six-fold range (~500 to 3,000 Pg C) variation in total soil carbon simulated at the end of the CMIP5 historical simulations (1850 - 2005). Resolving why this range exists is crucial to understanding the large CMIP5 ensemble spread in projected land-atmosphere fluxes. In this talk, we show that the present CMIP5 range is already established in 1850. We demonstrate that it is an artefact of the representation of microbial decomposition during model initialization under constant pre-industrial atmospheric CO2. We then use a simple model representative of the first-order parameterization of heterotrophic respiration (Rh) that is driven by primary productivity and soil temperature data from a representative global climate model. Our setup is able to reproduce the CMIP5 range in initial conditions by changing one parameter and the formulation of the temperature sensitivity of Rh. Further, we show that the global response of soil carbon during historical simulations and 21st century projections under the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 strongly depends on initial conditions in both our simple model and CMIP5 simulations. This can switch soils from a net sink to a net source of

  4. Fitting Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models with Random Effects and Unknown Initial Conditions Using the Stochastic Approximation Expectation-Maximization (SAEM) Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Lu, Zhaohua; Sherwood, Andrew; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has evidenced the increased prevalence of irregularly spaced longitudinal data in social sciences. Clearly lacking, however, are modeling tools that allow researchers to fit dynamic models to irregularly spaced data, particularly data that show nonlinearity and heterogeneity in dynamical structures. We consider the issue of fitting multivariate nonlinear differential equation models with random effects and unknown initial conditions to irregularly spaced data. A stochastic approximation expectation-maximization algorithm is proposed and its performance is evaluated using a benchmark nonlinear dynamical systems model, namely, the Van der Pol oscillator equations. The empirical utility of the proposed technique is illustrated using a set of 24-h ambulatory cardiovascular data from 168 men and women. Pertinent methodological challenges and unresolved issues are discussed. PMID:25416456

  5. The impact of the uncertainty in the initial soil moisture condition of irrigated areas on the spatiotemporal characteristics of convective activity in Central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsopoulos, Stylianos; Ioannis, Tegoulias; Ioannis, Pytharoulis; Stergios, Kartsios; Dimitrios, Bampzelis; Theodore, Karacostas

    2015-04-01

    The region of Thessaly is the second largest plain in Greece and has a vital role in the financial life of the country, because of its significant agricultural production. The intensive and extensive cultivation of irrigated crops, in combination with the population increase and the alteration of precipitation patterns due to climate change, often leading the region to experience severe drought conditions, especially during the warm period of the year. The aim of the DAPHNE project is to tackle the problem of drought in this area by means of Weather Modification.In the framework of the project DAPHNE, the numerical weather prediction model WRF-ARW 3.5.1 is used to provide operational forecasts and hindcasts for the region of Thessaly. The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of the uncertainty in the initial soil moisture condition of irrigated areas, on the spatiotemporal characteristics of convective activity in the region of interest. To this end, six cases under the six most frequent synoptic conditions, which are associated with convective activity in the region of interest, are utilized, considering six different soil moisture initialization scenarios. In the first scenario (Control Run), the model is initialized with the surface soil moisture of the ECMWF analysis data, that usually does not take into account the modification of soil moisture due to agricultural activity in the area of interest. In the other five scenarios (Experiment 1,2,3,4,5) the soil moisture in the upper soil layers of the study area are modified from -50% to 50% of field capacity (-50%FC, -25%FC, FC, 25%FC, 50%FC),for the irrigated cropland.Three model domains, covering Europe, the Mediterranean Sea and northern Africa (d01), the wider area of Greece (d02) and central Greece - Thessaly region (d03) are used at horizontal grid-spacings of 15km, 5km and 1km respectively. ECMWF operational analyses at 6-hourly intervals (0.25ox0.25o lat.-long.) are imported as initial and

  6. The effects of initial acetate concentration on CO2-brine-anorthite interactions under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Ronzio, Christian; Jun, Young-Shin

    2011-12-09

    Acetate is one of the most abundant organic compounds in many formation waters and is likely to be present in deep saline aquifers suitable for geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS). This work studied the effect of initially present acetate on the dissolution of anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) and on subsequent secondary mineral precipitation under GCS conditions (35 °C and 74.8 atm). Anorthite was chosen as a model mineral because of the abundance of feldspar in clayey sandstones and the possibility of metal carbonation. In this study, acetate was found to decrease the cumulative aqueous concentrations of Al, Si, and Ca upon CO2 injection by inhibiting anorthite dissolution and increasing the amount of secondary mineral precipitates. The extent of the effect of acetate on metal concentration changes was element-specific (Al > Si > Ca), and the effect was found to be more significant in systems with lower salinity and lower pH. For anorthite dissolution, acetic acid inhibited the proton-mediated decomposition of the Al/Si-containing feldspar framework, while acetate anions may have facilitated the ion-exchange between interstitial Ca and aqueous cations. For secondary mineral precipitation, stoichiometry analysis of aqueous metal concentrations suggested the formation of Al-containing mineral(s). The presence of kaolinite as a secondary mineral was confirmed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy's electron diffraction data. An increase in the relative amount of precipitation due to the initial presence of acetate was suggested by mass balancing and verified on the cleaved anorthite surfaces by atomic force microscopy analysis. These results provide new insights for understanding and predicting GCS system evolution upon scCO2 injection in the initial presence of acetate.

  7. Measurements of the yields of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under NOx free conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, M. A.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Hites, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    The chemical mechanism for the oxidation of isoprene is a subject of considerable interest in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene, the dominant natural hydrocarbon emitted into the atmosphere by deciduous trees, can contribute significantly to the production of ozone, organic nitrates, and secondary VOCs in the troposphere because of its high reactivity with the hydroxyl radical (OH). The accuracy of urban and regional air quality models depends on a complete understanding of the mechanism of isoprene oxidation and the product branching ratios under atmospheric conditions. Recent measurements of OH and HO2 radicals in forest environments show serious discrepancies with modeled concentrations of these radicals, bringing into question our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of isoprene and other reactive biogenic emissions. A small UV-irradiated reaction chamber was coupled to an on-line mass spectrometer to investigate the formation of isoprene oxidation products under NOx free conditions. UV-photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was employed as the OH precursor to initiate the oxidation of isoprene. During experiments carried out at 50°C and various concentrations of H2O2, yields of methacrolein (MAC) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) were derived from their time-resolved concentration profiles. The measured yields exhibit a strong dependence on the initial concentration of H2O2 and decrease with increasing H2O2, suggesting that the relative yields of MVK and MAC depend on the concentration of radicals. Experimental concentration profiles were compared to model predictions to test current mechanisms of isoprene chemistry. In addition, preliminary measurements of the temperature dependence of the MAC and MVK yields over the temperature range of 30-70°C will be presented.

  8. Impacts of biological parameterization, initial conditions, and environmental forcing on parameter sensitivity and uncertainty in a marine ecosystem model for the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, G. A.; Spitz, Y. H.

    2011-11-01

    We use a series of Monte Carlo experiments to explore simultaneously the sensitivity of the BEST marine ecosystem model to environmental forcing, initial conditions, and biological parameterizations. Twenty model output variables were examined for sensitivity. The true sensitivity of biological and environmental parameters becomes apparent only when each parameter is allowed to vary within its realistic range. Many biological parameters were important only to their corresponding variable, but several biological parameters, e.g., microzooplankton grazing and small phytoplankton doubling rate, were consistently very important to several output variables. Assuming realistic biological and environmental variability, the standard deviation about simulated mean mesozooplankton biomass ranged from 1 to 14 mg C m - 3 during the year. Annual primary productivity was not strongly correlated with temperature but was positively correlated with initial nitrate and light. Secondary productivity was positively correlated with primary productivity and negatively correlated with spring bloom timing. Mesozooplankton productivity was not correlated with water temperature, but a shift towards a system in which smaller zooplankton undertake a greater proportion of the secondary production as the water temperature increases appears likely. This approach to incorporating environmental variability within a sensitivity analysis could be extended to any ecosystem model to gain confidence in climate-driven ecosystem predictions.

  9. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  10. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  11. Residues required for phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α under diverse stress conditions are divergent between yeast and human.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Mithu; Mitchell, Daniel; Merkulov, Sergei; Wu, Jing; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Snider, Martin D; Krokowski, Dawid; Yee, Vivien C; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-02-01

    PERK, PKR, HRI and GCN2 are the four mammalian kinases that phosphorylate the α subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) on Ser51. This phosphorylation event is conserved among many species and attenuates protein synthesis in response to diverse stress conditions. In contrast, Saccharmyces cerevisiae expresses only the GCN2 kinase. It was demonstrated previously in S. cerevisiae that single point mutations in eIF2α's N-terminus severely impaired phosphorylation at Ser51. To assess whether similar recognition patterns are present in mammalian eIF2α, we expressed human eIF2α's with these mutations in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and assessed their phosphorylation under diverse stress conditions. Some of the mutations prevented the stress-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α by all mammalian kinases, thus defining amino acid residues in eIF2α (Gly 30, Leu 50, and Asp 83) that are required for substrate recognition. We also identified residues that were less critical or not required for recognition by the mammalian kinases (Ala 31, Met 44, Lys 79, and Tyr 81), even though they were essential for recognition of the yeast eIF2α by GCN2. We propose that mammalian eIF2α kinases evolved to maximize their interactions with the evolutionarily conserved Ser51 residue of eIF2α in response to diverse stress conditions, thus adding to the complex signaling pathways that mammalian cells have over simpler organisms. PMID:25541374

  12. Residues required for phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α under diverse stress conditions are divergent between yeast and human

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Mithu; Mitchell, Daniel; Merkulov, Sergei; Wu, Jing; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Snider, Martin D.; Krokowski, Dawid; Yee, Vivien C.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    PERK, PKR, HRI and GCN2 are the four mammalian kinases that phosphorylate the α subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) on Ser51. This phosphorylation event is conserved among many species and attenuates protein synthesis in response to diverse stress conditions. In contrast, Saccharmyces cerevisiae expresses only the GCN2 kinase. It was demonstrated previously in S. cerevisiae that single point mutations in eIF2α’s N-terminus severely impaired phosphorylation at Ser51. To assess whether similar recognition patterns are present in mammalian eIF2α, we expressed human eIF2α’s with these mutations in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and assessed their phosphorylation under diverse stress conditions. Some of the mutations prevented the stress-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α by all mammalian kinases, thus defining amino acid residues in eIF2α (Gly 30, Leu 50, and Asp 83) that are required for substrate recognition. We also identified residues that were less critical or not required for recognition by the mammalian kinases (Ala 31, Met 44, Lys 79, and Tyr 81), even though they were essential for recognition of the yeast eIF2α by GCN2. We propose that mammalian eIF2α kinases evolved to maximize their interactions with the evolutionarily conserved Ser51 residue of eIF2α in response to diverse stress conditions, thus adding to the complex signaling pathways that mammalian cells have over simpler organisms. PMID:25541374

  13. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  14. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  15. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  16. Initial Piloted Simulation Evaluation of the Reference-H High-Speed Civil Transport Design During Takeoff and Recovery From Limit Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.

    1999-01-01

    An initial assessment of a proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) was conducted in the fall of 1995 at the NASA Langley Research Center. This configuration, known as the Industry Reference-H (Ref.-H), was designed by the Boeing Aircraft Company as part of their work in the High Speed Research program. It included a conventional tail, a cranked-arrow wing, four mixed-flow turbofan engines, and capacity for transporting approximately 300 passengers. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate and quantify operational aspects of the Reference-H configuration from a pilot's perspective with the additional goal of identifying design strengths as well as any potential configuration deficiencies. This study was aimed at evaluating the Ref.-H configuration at many points of the aircraft's envelope to determine the suitability of the vehicle to accomplish typical mission profiles as well as emergency or envelope-limit conditions. Pilot-provided Cooper-Harper ratings and comments constituted the primary vehicle evaluation metric. The analysis included simulated real-time piloted evaluations, performed in a 6 degree of freedom motion base NASA Langley Visual-Motion Simulator, combined with extensive bath analysis. The assessment was performed using the third major release of the simulation data base (known as Ref.-H cycle 2B).

  17. A preliminary study of the application of HCMM satellite data to define initial and boundary conditions for numerical models: A case study in St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, F. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Infrared and visible HCMM data were used to examine the potential application of these data to define initial and boundary conditions for mesoscale numerical models. Various boundary layer models were used to calculate the distribution of the surface heat flux, specific humidity depression (the difference between the specific humidity in the air at approxmately the 10 m level and the specific humidity at the ground), and the eddy vicosity in a 72 km by 72 km area centered about St. Louis, Missouri. Various aspects of the implications of the results on the meteorology of St. Louis are discussed. Overall, the results indicated that a reasonable estimate of the surface heat flux, urban albedo, ground temperature, and specific humidity depression can be obtained using HCMM satellite data. Values of the ground-specific humidity can be obtained if the distribution of the air-specific humidity is available. More research is required in estimating the absolute magnitude of the specific humidity depression because calculations may be sensitive to model parameters.

  18. Sensitivity to initial conditions of a d-dimensional long-range-interacting quartic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model: Universal scaling.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Debarshee; Tsallis, Constantino

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a generalized d-dimensional Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model in the presence of long-range interactions, and perform a first-principle study of its chaos for d=1,2,3 through large-scale numerical simulations. The nonlinear interaction is assumed to decay algebraically as d_{ij}^{-α} (α≥0), {d_{ij}} being the distances between N oscillator sites. Starting from random initial conditions we compute the maximal Lyapunov exponent λ_{max} as a function of N. Our N≫1 results strongly indicate that λ_{max} remains constant and positive for α/d>1 (implying strong chaos, mixing, and ergodicity), and that it vanishes like N^{-κ} for 0≤α/d<1 (thus approaching weak chaos and opening the possibility of breakdown of ergodicity). The suitably rescaled exponent κ exhibits universal scaling, namely that (d+2)κ depends only on α/d and, when α/d increases from zero to unity, it monotonically decreases from unity to zero, remaining so for all α/d>1. The value α/d=1 can therefore be seen as a critical point separating the ergodic regime from the anomalous one, κ playing a role analogous to that of an order parameter. This scaling law is consistent with Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics for α/d>1, and possibly with q statistics for 0≤α/d<1. PMID:27415261

  19. Use of fog water to the initial establishment of tree species under conditions of barren Lomas in the Quebrada Topará, Chincha-Perú

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, A.; Cabrera, R.; Bederski, K.; Orellana, A.

    2010-07-01

    The Quebrada Topara is located in the Peruvian coastal desert (13012'L.S, 76009'L.W.) and is influenced by the fog during the winter months, these conditions of high humidity allows its use to achieve the establishment of a permanent vegetation cover Huaquina hill, which is representative at the place of study. Uncounted fog water can be captured and used for irrigation of plants. Also due to the absence of any tree species coverage in this region is not known which or which could have a better performance under these environmental conditions, We used to native species Caesalpinia spinosa "tara" and Schinus molle "molle" also introduced species Casuarina equisetifolia "Casuarina", as these could have a better adaptation. Soil analysis determined a high salinity and nitrogen poverty, preventing water infiltration into the soil and is not used by the plant so that the saline soil difficult to establish plants. This research can be considered an exploratory phase, the objectives were: to determine the potential for fog water harvesting to capture in the study area, to assess for 20 months the initial performance of the species tara, molle and casuarina, and profit incorporation in the final sowing of organic matter and soil amendments to facilitate a better development of plants. 3 standard fog collector (SFC) proposed by Schemenauer and Cereceda (1993) were installed and we evaluated the capture water during 31 months, from June 2007 to December 2009, finding much water collected in the winter months, the average annual in the 3 SFC was similar (1.1, 1.2 and 1.1 L m -2 day-1) which allows us to plan according to necessary the best way to harness and store water to supply the plants. It was found that native species, tara and molle were more adaptable to extreme conditions of the place that introduced casuarina species. The tara does grow faster in height and stem diameter, also achieves a good coverage to intercept fog water itself making it more viable and capable

  20. Role of climate forecasts and initial land-surface conditions in developing operational streamflow and soil moisture forecasts in a rainfall-runoff regime: skill assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, T.; Sankarasubramanian, A.

    2012-04-01

    Skillful seasonal streamflow forecasts obtained from climate and land surface conditions could significantly improve water and energy management. Since climate forecasts are updated on monthly basis, we evaluate the potential in developing operational monthly streamflow forecasts on a continuous basis throughout the year. Further, basins in the rainfall-runoff regime critically depend on the forecasted precipitation in the upcoming months as opposed to snowmelt regimes where initial hydrological conditions (IHC) play a critical role. The goal of this study is to quantify the role of monthly updated precipitation forecasts and IHC in forecasting 6-month lead monthly streamflow for a rainfall-runoff mechanism dominated basin - Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee, FL. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model is implemented with two forcings: (a) monthly updated precipitation forecasts from ECHAM4.5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) forced with sea surface temperature forecasts and (b) daily climatological ensemble. The difference in skill between the above two quantifies the improvements that could be attainable using the AGCM forecasts. Monthly retrospective streamflow forecasts are developed from 1981 to 2010 and streamflow forecasts estimated from the VIC model are also compared with those predicted by using the principal component regression (PCR) model. Mean square error (MSE) in predicting monthly streamflow using the above VIC model are compared with the MSE of streamflow climatology under ENSO conditions as well as under normal years. Results indicate that VIC forecasts, at 1-2 month lead time, obtained using ECHAM4.5 are significantly better than VIC forecasts obtained using climatological ensemble over all the seasons except forecasts issued in fall and the PCR models perform better during the fall months. Over longer lead times (3-6 months), VIC forecasts derived using ECHAM4.5 forcings alone performed better compared to the

  1. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  2. Temperature dependence of the yields of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under NOx free conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, M. A.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Hites, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene, the dominant biogenic hydrocarbon emitted into the atmosphere by deciduous trees, can contribute significantly to the production of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols due to its high reactivity with oxidants. It is therefore important to correctly describe its oxidation chemistry in models of atmospheric chemistry. However, recent measurements of HOx (OH + HO2) radicals in forest environments show serious discrepancies with modeled concentrations, bringing into question our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of isoprene and other reactive biogenic compounds. A previous study conducted in our group on the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under NOx free conditions indicated that the yields of methacrolein (MAC) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) are dependent on the ratio of HO2-to-isoprene-based peroxy radicals (ISORO2). It is likely due to a competition between ISORO2 self- and cross-reactions that leads to the formation of the primary products, with reactions between these peroxy radicals and HO2 which can lead to the formation of peroxides. This presentation will expand the scope of the abovementioned study by investigating the temperature dependence of the yields of MAC and MVK in the range 30-70°C. We will present results from experiments conducted using a small UV-irradiated reaction chamber coupled to an on-line mass spectrometer. In addition, we will compare the measured yields to that predicted by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM), including recently proposed radical recycling reactions, to determine whether current models of atmospheric chemistry provide a complete description for the formation of these primary products as a function of temperature.

  3. Precipitation monitoring to accurately depict drought conditions on your allotment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service has been reading numerous precipitation gauges throughout the Great Basin for more than three decades. State climatologists, land owners and researchers have obtained data from this long-ter...

  4. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  5. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  6. Adolescents with co-occurring substance use and mental conditions in a private managed care health plan: prevalence, patient characteristics, and treatment initiation and engagement.

    PubMed

    Chi, Felicia W; Sterling, Stacy; Weisner, Constance

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence, patient characteristics, and treatment initiation and engagement of adolescents with co-occurring substance use (SU) and serious mental health (MH) diagnoses in a private, managed care health plan. We identified 2,005 adolescents aged 12-17, who received both SU and MH diagnoses within a 1-year window between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2002; 57% were girls. Gender variations were found in diagnoses received and point of identification. Being dually diagnosed in specialty departments (rather than Primary Care and Emergency) and receiving both diagnoses within a shorter time period were associated with treatment initiation and engagement. PMID:17182422

  7. The influence of loading conditions on fracture initiation, propagation, and interaction in rocks with veins: Results from a comparative Discrete Element Method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgo, Simon; Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a comparative study of loading conditions on the interactions between extension fractures and veins. We model the fracture behavior of brittle discrete element materials each containing a tabular vein body of variable orientation and strength in two different loading conditions. The first is uniaxial tension, applied with servo-controlled sidewalls. The second is a boudinage boundary condition in which a tensile triaxial stress state is induced in the brittle model volume by quasi-viscous extensional deformation in the adjacent layers. Most of the fracture- vein interactions observed in uniaxial tension also exists in boudinage boundary conditions. However, the importance of each interaction mechanism for a given configuration of relative strength and misorientation of the vein may differ according to the loading mechanism. Nucleation and internal deflection is under both boundary conditions the dominating fracture-vein interaction style in weak veins. In uniaxial tension models, strong veins tend to alter the fracture path by external deflection, while under boudinage loading these veins are more likely overcome by the fracture step over mechanism. Dynamic bifurcation of fractures was observed in uniaxial tension models but never for boudinage boundary conditions. This is because the acceleration of fracture tips in these conditions is suppressed by interaction with distributed fractures as well as viscous damping by the neighboring layers.

  8. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  9. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  10. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  11. Elliptic and hexadecapole flow of charged hadrons in viscous hydrodynamics with Glauber and color glass condensate initial conditions for Pb-Pb collision at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Victor; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Chaudhuri, A. K.

    2013-06-01

    The experimentally measured elliptic (v2) and hexadecapole (v4) flow of charged particles as a function of transverse momentum (pT) at midrapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{s_{{N}N}} = 2.76 TeV is compared with the relativistic viscous hydrodynamic model simulations. The simulations are carried out for two different initial energy density profiles obtained from (i) the Glauber model, and (ii) the color glass condensate (CGC) model. A comparison to experimental data for 10-20% to 40-50% centrality shows that a centrality dependent shear viscosity to entropy density (η/s) ratio with values ranging between 0.0 to 0.12 is needed to explain the v2 data for simulations with the Glauber based initial condition, whereas for the CGC based initial conditions a slightly higher value of η/s is preferred, around 0.08 to 0.16. From the comparison of the v4 simulated results to the corresponding experimental measurements we observe that for the centralities 20-30% to 40-50% the η/s values lie between 0.0 to 0.12 for both the initial conditions studied. The η/s values obtained from our studies for Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{s_{{N}N}} = 2.76 TeV are compared to other studies which use both transport and hydrodynamic approaches.

  12. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  13. Biological and Environmental Initial Conditions Shape the Trajectories of Cognitive and Social-Emotional Development across the First Years of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I.

    2009-01-01

    Human development is thought to evolve from the dynamic interchange of biological dispositions and environmental provisions; yet the effects of specific biological and environmental birth conditions on the trajectories of cognitive and social-emotional growth have rarely been studied. We observed 126 children at six time-points from birth to 5…

  14. Initial results from dissolution rate testing of N-Reactor spent fuel over a range of potential geologic repository aqueous conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.; Einziger, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Hanford N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (HSNF) may ultimately be placed in a geologic repository for permanent disposal. To determine whether the engineered barrier system that will be designed for emplacement of light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel will also suffice for HSNF, aqueous dissolution rate measurements were conducted on the HSNF. The purpose of these tests was to determine whether HSNF dissolves faster or slower than LWR spent fuel under some limited repository-relevant water chemistry conditions. The tests were conducted using a flowthrough method that allows the dissolution rate of the uranium matrix to be measured without interference by secondary precipitation reactions that would confuse interpretation of the results. Similar tests had been conducted earlier with LWR spent fuel, thereby allowing direct comparisons. Two distinct corrosion modes were observed during the course of these 12 tests. The first, Stage 1, involved no visible corrosion of the test specimen and produced no undissolved corrosion products. The second, Stage 2, resulted in both visible corrosion of the test specimen and left behind undissolved corrosion products. During Stage 1, the rate of dissolution could be readily determined because the dissolved uranium and associated fission products remained in solution where they could be quantitatively analyzed. The measured rates were much faster than has been observed for LWR spent fuel under all conditions tested to date when normalized to the exposed test specimen surface areas. Application of these results to repository conditions, however, requires some comparison of the physical conditions of the different fuels. The surface area of LWR fuel that could potentially be exposed to repository groundwater is estimated to be approximately 100 times greater than HSNF. Therefore, when compared on the basis of mass, which is more relevant to repository conditions, the HSNF and LWR spent fuel dissolve at similar rates.

  15. Shock Emergence in Supernovae: Limiting Cases and Accurate Approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2013-08-01

    We examine the dynamics of accelerating normal shocks in stratified planar atmospheres, providing accurate fitting formulae for the scaling index relating shock velocity to the initial density and for the post-shock acceleration factor as functions of the polytropic and adiabatic indices which parameterize the problem. In the limit of a uniform initial atmosphere, there are analytical formulae for these quantities. In the opposite limit of a very steep density gradient, the solutions match the outcome of shock acceleration in exponential atmospheres.

  16. SHOCK EMERGENCE IN SUPERNOVAE: LIMITING CASES AND ACCURATE APPROXIMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2013-08-10

    We examine the dynamics of accelerating normal shocks in stratified planar atmospheres, providing accurate fitting formulae for the scaling index relating shock velocity to the initial density and for the post-shock acceleration factor as functions of the polytropic and adiabatic indices which parameterize the problem. In the limit of a uniform initial atmosphere, there are analytical formulae for these quantities. In the opposite limit of a very steep density gradient, the solutions match the outcome of shock acceleration in exponential atmospheres.

  17. Connecting the dots: Semi-analytical and random walk numerical solutions of the diffusion–reaction equation with stochastic initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo; Benson, David A.

    2014-04-15

    We study a system with bimolecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B→∅ where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by diffusion, and the local reaction term is given by the law of mass action. We consider the case where the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a white noise perturbation. Our goal is to solve the diffusion–reaction equation which governs the system, and we tackle it with both analytical and numerical approaches. To obtain an analytical solution, we develop the equations of moments and solve them approximately. To obtain a numerical solution, we develop a grid-less Monte Carlo particle tracking approach, where diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of annihilation is derived analytically from the particles' co-location probability. We rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the amplitude of white noise represented by that number. This enables us to compare the particle simulations and the approximate analytical solution and offer an explanation of the late time discrepancies. - Graphical abstract:.

  18. A practical method based on stress evaluation ({sigma}{sub d} criterion) to predict initiation of crack under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, D.; Drubay, B.; Acker, D.; Laiarinandrasana, L.

    1995-11-01

    In some parts of primary circuit of fast breeder reactor, where the temperature is higher than 427 C, preservice inspection has revealed indications that were conservatively assumed to be sharp cracks. These pipes are made of 316 SPH material, an austenitic material close to 316L. This material is subjected to creep behavior at this temperature. Here, the behavior of defects like cracks in nuclear components operating at high temperature, where creep is significant, must be under control. There exists the need to have a practical method of analysis, which can be used by engineers, to calculate the time of initiation for defects existing at the start of life of nuclear components. This study presents the background, the development, the application, and results concerning validation work made for a simplified method named {sigma}{sub d} of prediction of initiation for nuclear structures made of 316L austenitic steel and operating at temperature where creep is significant. This method relies on the evaluation of real stress-strain history on a small distance d (d = 0.05 mm) close to the crack front and material characteristics (limiting stresses) that are available in nuclear codes like ASME Code cases or RCC-MR.

  19. Motor equivalence during multi-finger accurate force production

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Daniela; Schöner, Gregor; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We explored stability of multi-finger cyclical accurate force production action by analysis of responses to small perturbations applied to one of the fingers and inter-cycle analysis of variance. Healthy subjects performed two versions of the cyclical task, with and without an explicit target. The “inverse piano” apparatus was used to lift/lower a finger by 1 cm over 0.5 s; the subjects were always instructed to perform the task as accurate as they could at all times. Deviations in the spaces of finger forces and modes (hypothetical commands to individual fingers) were quantified in directions that did not change total force (motor equivalent) and in directions that changed the total force (non-motor equivalent). Motor equivalent deviations started immediately with the perturbation and increased progressively with time. After a sequence of lifting-lowering perturbations leading to the initial conditions, motor equivalent deviations were dominating. These phenomena were less pronounced for analysis performed with respect to the total moment of force with respect to an axis parallel to the forearm/hand. Analysis of inter-cycle variance showed consistently higher variance in a subspace that did not change the total force as compared to the variance that affected total force. We interpret the results as reflections of task-specific stability of the redundant multi-finger system. Large motor equivalent deviations suggest that reactions of the neuromotor system to a perturbation involve large changes of neural commands that do not affect salient performance variables, even during actions with the purpose to correct those salient variables. Consistency of the analyses of motor equivalence and variance analysis provides additional support for the idea of task-specific stability ensured at a neural level. PMID:25344311

  20. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  1. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  2. Entropy growth in the early universe and confirmation of initial big bang conditions (Why the quark-gluon model is not the best analogy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    This paper shows how increased entropy values from an initially low big bang level can be measured experimentally by counting relic gravitons. Furthermore the physical mechanism of this entropy increase is explained via analogies with early-universe phase transitions. The role of Jack Ng's revised infinite quantum statistics in the physics of gravitational wave detection is acknowledged. Ng's infinite quantum statistics can be used to show that δS δNgravitons is a starting point to the increasing net universe cosmological entropy. Furthermore, we compare the increase in relic gravitons with ``chilled neutrinos'' generated as of at the start of the pre CMBR era, before CMBR ``turned on'' roughly 400 thousand years after the big bang.

  3. Model simulation studies to clarify the effect on saccadic eye movements of initial condition velocities set by the Vestibular Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, M. H.; Winters, J. M.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Voluntary active head rotations produced vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements (VOR) with the subject viewing a fixation target. When this target jumped, the size of the refixation saccades were a function of the ongoing initial velocity of the eye. Saccades made against the VOR were larger in magnitude. Simulation of a reciprocally innervated model eye movement provided results comparable to the experimental data. Most of the experimental effect appeared to be due to linear summation for saccades of 5 and 10 degree magnitude. For small saccades of 2.5 degrees, peripheral nonlinear interaction of state variables in the neuromuscular plant also played a role as proven by comparable behavior in the simulated model with known controller signals.

  4. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia. PMID:25211199

  5. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  6. Effecting change in primary care management of respiratory conditions: a global scoping exercise and literature review of educational interventions to inform the IPCRG's E-Quality initiative.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Juliet; Williams, Siân; Chavannes, Niels H; Correia de Sousa, Jaime; Fardy, H John; Fletcher, Monica; Stout, James; Tomlins, Ron; Yusuf, Osman M; Pinnock, Hilary

    2012-12-01

    This discussion paper describes a scoping exercise and literature review commissioned by the International Primary Care Respiratory Group (IPCRG) to inform their E-Quality programme which seeks to support small-scale educational projects to improve respiratory management in primary care. Our narrative review synthesises information from three sources: publications concerning the global context and health systems development; a literature search of Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane databases; and a series of eight interviews conducted with members of the IPCRG faculty. Educational interventions sit within complex healthcare, economic, and policy contexts. It is essential that any development project considers the local circumstances in terms of economic resources, political circumstances, organisation and administrative capacities, as well as the specific quality issue to be addressed. There is limited evidence (in terms of changed clinician behaviour and/or improved health outcomes) regarding the merits of different educational and quality improvement approaches. Features of educational interventions that were most likely to show some evidence of effectiveness included being carefully designed, multifaceted, engaged health professionals in their learning, provided ongoing support, were sensitive to local circumstances, and delivered in combination with other quality improvement strategies. To be effective, educational interventions must consider the complex healthcare systems within which they operate. The criteria for the IPCRG E-Quality awards thus require applicants not only to describe their proposed educational initiative but also to consider the practical and local barriers to successful implementation, and to propose a robust evaluation in terms of changed clinician behaviour or improved health outcomes. PMID:22875141

  7. Developing a public health-tracking system for follow-up of newborn screening metabolic conditions: a four-state pilot project structure and initial findings

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Cynthia F.; Mai, Cara T.; Nabukera, Sarah K.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Feuchtbaum, Lisa; Romitti, Paul A.; Wang, Ying; Piper, Kimberly Noble; Olney, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to describe the methods, cases, and initial results of a pilot project using existing public health data collection programs (birth defect surveillance or newborn screening) to conduct long-term follow-up of children with metabolic disorders. Methods California, Iowa, New York, and Utah expanded birth defect surveillance or newborn screening programs to collect long-term follow-up data on 19 metabolic disorders. Data elements to monitor health status and services delivered were identified, and record abstraction and data linkages were conducted. Children were followed up through to the age of 3 years. Results A total of 261 metabolic cases were diagnosed in 1,343,696 live births (19.4 cases/100,000; 95% confidence interval = 17.1–21.8). Four deaths were identified. Children with fatty acid oxidation disorders had a higher percentage of health service encounters compared with children with other disorders of at least one health service encounter (hospitalization, emergency room, metabolic clinic, genetic service provider, or social worker) except for hospitalizations; children with organic acid disorders had a higher percentage of at least one hospitalization during their third year of life than children with other disorders. Conclusion Existing public health data programs can be leveraged to conduct population-based newborn screening long-term follow-up. This approach is flexible according to state needs and resources. These data will enable the states in assessing health burden, assuring access to services, and supporting policy development. PMID:24310309

  8. Detecting Cancer Quickly and Accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; McDonald, Anthony; Hendricks, Judy; Copeland, Guild; Hunter, John; Akhil, Ohmar; Capps, Heather; Curry, Marc; Skirboll, Steve

    2000-03-01

    We present a new technique for high throughput screening of tumor cells in a sensitive nanodevice that has the potential to quickly identify a cell population that has begun the rapid protein synthesis and mitosis characteristic of cancer cell proliferation. Currently, pathologists rely on microscopic examination of cell morphology using century-old staining methods that are labor-intensive, time-consuming and frequently in error. New micro-analytical methods for automated, real time screening without chemical modification are critically needed to advance pathology and improve diagnoses. We have teamed scientists with physicians to create a microlaser biochip (based upon our R&D award winning bio-laser concept)1 which evaluates tumor cells by quantifying their growth kinetics. The key new discovery was demonstrating that the lasing spectra are sensitive to the biomolecular mass in the cell, which changes the speed of light in the laser microcavity. Initial results with normal and cancerous human brain cells show that only a few hundred cells -- the equivalent of a billionth of a liter -- are required to detect abnormal growth. The ability to detect cancer in such a minute tissue sample is crucial for resecting a tumor margin or grading highly localized tumor malignancy. 1. P. L. Gourley, NanoLasers, Scientific American, March 1998, pp. 56-61. This work supported under DOE contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. Detecting cancer quickly and accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Hendricks, Judy K.; Copeland, G. C.; Hunter, John A.; Akhil, O.; Cheung, D.; Cox, Jimmy D.; Capps, H.; Curry, Mark S.; Skirboll, Steven K.

    2000-03-01

    We present a new technique for high throughput screening of tumor cells in a sensitive nanodevice that has the potential to quickly identify a cell population that has begun the rapid protein synthesis and mitosis characteristic of cancer cell proliferation. Currently, pathologists rely on microscopic examination of cell morphology using century-old staining methods that are labor-intensive, time-consuming and frequently in error. New micro-analytical methods for automated, real time screening without chemical modification are critically needed to advance pathology and improve diagnoses. We have teamed scientists with physicians to create a microlaser biochip (based upon our R&D award winning bio- laser concept) which evaluates tumor cells by quantifying their growth kinetics. The key new discovery was demonstrating that the lasing spectra are sensitive to the biomolecular mass in the cell, which changes the speed of light in the laser microcavity. Initial results with normal and cancerous human brain cells show that only a few hundred cells -- the equivalent of a billionth of a liter -- are required to detect abnormal growth. The ability to detect cancer in such a minute tissue sample is crucial for resecting a tumor margin or grading highly localized tumor malignancy.

  10. Pre-eruptive storage conditions of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff from quartz-hosted melt inclusions in the initial fall deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M.; Wallace, P. J.; Wilson, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    boundaries, and (c) crystals that lack any zoning. Analyses of reentrants provide information on conditions during late-stage assembly that can be compared with fully sealed inclusions trapped during earlier crystallization stages. The reentrants have higher F concentrations than the majority of inclusions (~0.5-0.7 wt.%) and CO2 below detection, documenting changing conditions in the system either during or shortly before the eruption.

  11. Transition to turbulence and effect of initial conditions on three-dimensional compressible mixing in planar blast-wave-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A.R.; Blue, B.; Edwards, M.J.; Greenough, J.A.; Hansen, J.F.; Robey, H.F.; Drake, R.P.; Kuranz, C.; Leibrandt, D.R.

    2005-05-15

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pretransition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  12. Transition to turbulence and effect of initial conditions on three-dimensional compressible mixing in planar blast-wave-driven systemsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, A. R.; Blue, B.; Edwards, M. J.; Greenough, J. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Robey, H. F.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C.; Leibrandt, D. R.

    2005-05-01

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multiphysics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J. A. Greenough, J. Comput. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pretransition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  13. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  16. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  17. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  18. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  19. Increased belowground C release during initial plant development of Populus deltoides x nigra grown under light and C reserve limited conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Plants might be a key factor for the long-term stabilisation of carbon (C) in the soil, e.g. through enhanced physical protection of root-derived C against microbial decomposition in soil aggregates. On the other hand C released by the plants into the soil might promote the decomposition of native soil organic matter (SOM) through the stimulation of microbial activity. We measured the C budget of developing plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. In order to distinguish plant-derived from native C in the SOM and the soil CO2 efflux, we labelled the poplar shoots continuously with 13C-CO2 from first emergence of leaves (sprouting from stem cuttings). Throughout the experiment the CO2 fluxes (photosynthetic assimilation, dark respiratory loss, soil CO2 efflux) were measured frequently (every 30 min) and the 13C was traced in the soil CO2 efflux (1-2 times a week). After 10 weeks the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested and the distribution of the 13C distribution was analysed. The plants developed slowly (compared to previous experiments), most likely due to limitation in C reserves (long term cutting storage) and C supply (low light intensities). The amount of 13C recovered in the roots, microbial biomass and soil CO2 efflux was directly correlated with the leaf area of the different plant individuals. After 3-4 weeks of plant development we observed a high peak in the total soil CO2 efflux. During this time the relative belowground C release was increased massively over the basal rate of 17 % of net C assimilated, whereby the variability between the plant individuals was large. The smallest plants, i.e. the plants that were most resource limited, obtained the highest belowground C release accounting at the peak time for up to 57 % of net assimilated C. We hypothesize that the plants released specific compounds, which either directly (enzymatically) or indirectly (priming

  20. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  1. Research Initiatives

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides detailed information about currently funded RFA initiatives both led by DCCPS, and those led by other NIH Institutes and Centers (I/Cs) that include DCCPS as a partner. Each initiative includes a table of funded grants and a map that shows the location of funded institutions.

  2. Initial conditions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-10-01

    At very high energies, partons in nuclei form a color glass condensate (CGC). In a nuclear collision, the color glass shatters, producing a high multiplicity of gluons. We discuss the results of numerical simulations which describe the real time evolution of the CGC in a heavy ion collision.

  3. Accurate orbit propagation with planetary close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baù, Giulio; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Guerra, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    We tackle the problem of accurately propagating the motion of those small bodies that undergo close approaches with a planet. The literature is lacking on this topic and the reliability of the numerical results is not sufficiently discussed. The high-frequency components of the perturbation generated by a close encounter makes the propagation particularly challenging both from the point of view of the dynamical stability of the formulation and the numerical stability of the integrator. In our approach a fixed step-size and order multistep integrator is combined with a regularized formulation of the perturbed two-body problem. When the propagated object enters the region of influence of a celestial body, the latter becomes the new primary body of attraction. Moreover, the formulation and the step-size will also be changed if necessary. We present: 1) the restarter procedure applied to the multistep integrator whenever the primary body is changed; 2) new analytical formulae for setting the step-size (given the order of the multistep, formulation and initial osculating orbit) in order to control the accumulation of the local truncation error and guarantee the numerical stability during the propagation; 3) a new definition of the region of influence in the phase space. We test the propagator with some real asteroids subject to the gravitational attraction of the planets, the Yarkovsky and relativistic perturbations. Our goal is to show that the proposed approach improves the performance of both the propagator implemented in the OrbFit software package (which is currently used by the NEODyS service) and of the propagator represented by a variable step-size and order multistep method combined with Cowell's formulation (i.e. direct integration of position and velocity in either the physical or a fictitious time).

  4. EUROANDRILL Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florindo, Fabio; Steering Committee, Euroandrill

    2010-05-01

    EuroANDRILL is a new initiative to create a European network with the goal to increase future involvement of European countries in the ANDRILL [ANtarctic geological DRILLing] Programme. Antarctica has been heavily glaciated for approximately 34 million years, but its ice sheets have fluctuated considerably and are one of the major driving forces for changes in climate throughout the Cenozoic Era. The spatial scale and temporal pattern of these fluctuations is subject to considerable debate. Understanding the response of large ice masses to climatic forcing is of vital importance because ice volume variations drive global sea level changes and also alter the capacity of ice sheets and sea-ice to act as major heat sinks/insulators. It is particularly important to assess the stability of the cryosphere in the face of rising CO2 levels, as modelling of the climate shift from a warm, vegetated Antarctica to a cold, ice-covered state 34 million years ago suggests a powerful greenhouse gas influence. As Antarctica is the major driver of Earth's climate and sea level, much effort has been expended in deriving models of its behaviour. Some of these models have been successfully validated against modern conditions. EuroANDRILL will provide a coherent, integrated platform for European leadership and involvement in the international ANDRILL programme. The coordination and networking provided by EuroANDRILL will seek to expand participation by European nations, institutions, and individual scientists in the study of the geologic history of the polar regions and their paleoclimatic significance. During the IPY, ANDRILL has been a highly visible and successful programme. This programme seeks to expand on this legacy beyond the IPY and make these contributions sustainable in the European Research Area through networking of research projects and future planning efforts, which establish Europe as a key player in future polar sediment and rock drilling. EuroANDRILL is set up under

  5. Simulation of shock-initiated ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melguizo-Gavilanes, J.; Rezaeyan, N.; Lopez-Aoyagi, M.; Bauwens, L.

    2010-12-01

    The scenario of detonative ignition in shocked mixture is significant because it is a contributor to deflagration to detonation transition, for example following shock reflections. However, even in one dimension, simulation of ignition between a contact surface or a flame and a shock moving into a combustible mixture is difficult because of the singular nature of the initial conditions. Initially, as the shock starts moving into reactive mixture, the region filled with reactive mixture has zero thickness. On a fixed grid, the number of grid points between the shock and the contact surface increases as the shock moves away from the latter. Due to initial lack of resolution in the region of interest, staircasing may occur, whereby the resulting plots consist of jumps between few values a few grid points, and these numerical artifacts are amplified by the chemistry which is very sensitive to temperature, leading to unreliable results. The formulation is transformed, replacing time and space by time and space over time as the independent variables. This frame of reference corresponds to the self-similar formulation in which the non-reactive problem remains stationary, and the initial conditions are well-resolved. Additionally, a solution obtained from short time perturbation is used as initial condition, at a time still short enough for the perturbation to be very accurate, but long enough so that there is sufficient resolution. The numerical solution to the transformed problem is obtained using an essentially non-oscillatory algorithm, which is adequate not only for the early part of the process, but also for the latter part, when chemistry leads to appearance of a shock and eventually a detonation wave is formed. A validation study was performed and the results were compared with the literature, for single step Arrhenius chemistry. The method and its implementation were found to be effective. Results are presented for values of activation energy ranging from mild to

  6. Learning fast accurate movements requires intact frontostriatal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Shabbott, Britne; Ravindran, Roshni; Schumacher, Joseph W.; Wasserman, Paula B.; Marder, Karen S.; Mazzoni, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The basal ganglia are known to play a crucial role in movement execution, but their importance for motor skill learning remains unclear. Obstacles to our understanding include the lack of a universally accepted definition of motor skill learning (definition confound), and difficulties in distinguishing learning deficits from execution impairments (performance confound). We studied how healthy subjects and subjects with a basal ganglia disorder learn fast accurate reaching movements. We addressed the definition and performance confounds by: (1) focusing on an operationally defined core element of motor skill learning (speed-accuracy learning), and (2) using normal variation in initial performance to separate movement execution impairment from motor learning abnormalities. We measured motor skill learning as performance improvement in a reaching task with a speed-accuracy trade-off. We compared the performance of subjects with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disorder, to that of premanifest carriers of the HD mutation and of control subjects. The initial movements of HD subjects were less skilled (slower and/or less accurate) than those of control subjects. To factor out these differences in initial execution, we modeled the relationship between learning and baseline performance in control subjects. Subjects with HD exhibited a clear learning impairment that was not explained by differences in initial performance. These results support a role for the basal ganglia in both movement execution and motor skill learning. PMID:24312037

  7. On the importance of having accurate data for astrophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Francois

    2016-06-01

    The Herschel telescope and the ALMA and NOEMA interferometers have opened new windows of observation for wavelengths ranging from far infrared to sub-millimeter with spatial and spectral resolutions previously unmatched. To make the most of these observations, an accurate knowledge of the physical and chemical processes occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar media is essential.In this presentation, I will discuss what are the current needs of astrophysics in terms of molecular data and I will show that accurate molecular data are crucial for the proper determination of the physical conditions in molecular clouds.First, I will focus on collisional excitation studies that are needed for molecular lines modelling beyond the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) approach. In particular, I will show how new collisional data for the HCN and HNC isomers, two tracers of star forming conditions, have allowed solving the problem of their respective abundance in cold molecular clouds. I will also present the last collisional data that have been computed in order to analyse new highly resolved observations provided by the ALMA interferometer.Then, I will present the calculation of accurate rate constants for the F+H2 → HF+H and Cl+H2 ↔ HCl+H reactions, which have allowed a more accurate determination of the physical conditions in diffuse molecular clouds. I will also present the recent work on the ortho-para-H2 conversion due to hydrogen exchange that allow more accurate determination of the ortho-to-para-H2 ratio in the universe and that imply a significant revision of the cooling mechanism in astrophysical media.

  8. A novel P450-initiated biphasic process for sustainable biodegradation of benzo[a]pyrene in soil under nutrient-sufficient conditions by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sukanta S.; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Shann, Jodi; Yadav, Jagjit S.

    2013-01-01

    High molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) are resistant to biodegradation in soil. Conventionally, white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated for HMW-PAH degradation in soil primarily using nutrient-deficient (ligninolytic) conditions, albeit with limited and non-sustainable biodegradation outcomes. In this study, we report development of an alternative novel biphasic process initiated under nutrient-sufficient (non-ligninolytic) culture conditions, by employing an advanced experimental design strategy. During the initial nutrient-sufficient non-ligninolytic phase (16 days), the process showed upregulation (3.6-and 22.3-fold, respectively) of two key PAH-oxidizing P450 monooxygenases pc2 (CYP63A2) and pah4 (CYP5136A3) and formation of typical P450-hydroxylated metabolite. This along with abrogation (84.9%) of BaP degradation activity in response to a P450-specific inhibitor implied key role of these monooxygenases. The subsequent phase triggered on continued incubation (to 25 days) switched the process from non-ligninolytic to ligninolytic resulting in a significantly higher net degradation (91.6% as against 67.4% in the control nutrient-limited set) of BaP with concomitant de novo ligninolytic enzyme expression making it a biphasic process yielding improved sustainable bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. To our knowledge this is the first report on development of such biphasic process for bioremediation application of a white rot fungus. PMID:24051002

  9. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  10. Remote balance weighs accurately amid high radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggenberger, D. N.; Shuck, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    Commercial beam-type balance, modified and outfitted with electronic controls and digital readout, can be remotely controlled for use in high radiation environments. This allows accurate weighing of breeder-reactor fuel pieces when they are radioactively hot.

  11. Understanding the Code: keeping accurate records.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In his continuing series looking at the legal and professional implications of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's revised Code of Conduct, Richard Griffith discusses the elements of accurate record keeping under Standard 10 of the Code. This article considers the importance of accurate record keeping for the safety of patients and protection of district nurses. The legal implications of records are explained along with how district nurses should write records to ensure these legal requirements are met. PMID:26418404

  12. Accurate modeling of switched reluctance machine based on hybrid trained WNN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Shoujun Ge, Lefei; Ma, Shaojie; Zhang, Man

    2014-04-15

    According to the strong nonlinear electromagnetic characteristics of switched reluctance machine (SRM), a novel accurate modeling method is proposed based on hybrid trained wavelet neural network (WNN) which combines improved genetic algorithm (GA) with gradient descent (GD) method to train the network. In the novel method, WNN is trained by GD method based on the initial weights obtained per improved GA optimization, and the global parallel searching capability of stochastic algorithm and local convergence speed of deterministic algorithm are combined to enhance the training accuracy, stability and speed. Based on the measured electromagnetic characteristics of a 3-phase 12/8-pole SRM, the nonlinear simulation model is built by hybrid trained WNN in Matlab. The phase current and mechanical characteristics from simulation under different working conditions meet well with those from experiments, which indicates the accuracy of the model for dynamic and static performance evaluation of SRM and verifies the effectiveness of the proposed modeling method.

  13. Water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2010-05-01

    Cotter and Bokhove (Journal of Engineering Mathematics 2010) derived a variational water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity. In one limit, it leads to Luke's variational principle for potential flow water waves. In the another limit it leads to the depth-averaged shallow water equations including vertical vorticity. Presently, focus will be put on the Hamiltonian formulation of the variational model and its boundary conditions.

  14. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  15. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-11-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  16. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  17. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  18. Accurate evaluation of homogenous and nonhomogeneous gas emissivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Lee, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    Spectral transmittance and total band adsorptance of selected infrared bands of carbon dioxide and water vapor are calculated by using the line-by-line and quasi-random band models and these are compared with available experimental results to establish the validity of the quasi-random band model. Various wide-band model correlations are employed to calculate the total band absorptance and total emissivity of these two gases under homogeneous and nonhomogeneous conditions. These results are compared with available experimental results under identical conditions. From these comparisons, it is found that the quasi-random band model can provide quite accurate results and is quite suitable for most atmospheric applications.

  19. Vibration of clamped right triangular thin plates: Accurate simplified solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, H. T.

    1994-12-01

    Use of the superposition techniques in the free-vibration analyses of thin plates, as they were first introduced by Gorman, has provided simple and effective solutions to a vast number of rectangular plate problems. A modified superposition method is presented that is a noticeable improvement over existing techniques. It deals only with simple support conditions, leading to a simple, highly accurate, and very economical solution to the free-vibration problem of simply-supported right angle triangular plates. The modified method is also applicable to clamped-edge conditions.

  20. Accurate methods for computing inviscid and viscous Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael J.; Forbes, Lawrence K.

    2011-02-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is modelled for inviscid and viscous fluids. Here, two bounded fluid layers flow parallel to each other with the interface between them growing in an unstable fashion when subjected to a small perturbation. In the various configurations of this problem, and the related problem of the vortex sheet, there are several phenomena associated with the evolution of the interface; notably the formation of a finite time curvature singularity and the ‘roll-up' of the interface. Two contrasting computational schemes will be presented. A spectral method is used to follow the evolution of the interface in the inviscid version of the problem. This allows the interface shape to be computed up to the time that a curvature singularity forms, with several computational difficulties overcome to reach that point. A weakly compressible viscous version of the problem is studied using finite difference techniques and a vorticity-streamfunction formulation. The two versions have comparable, but not identical, initial conditions and so the results exhibit some differences in timing. By including a small amount of viscosity the interface may be followed to the point that it rolls up into a classic ‘cat's-eye' shape. Particular attention was given to computing a consistent initial condition and solving the continuity equation both accurately and efficiently.

  1. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  2. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  3. Accurate and occlusion-robust multi-view stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Fraser, Clive S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an accurate multi-view stereo method for image-based 3D reconstruction that features robustness in the presence of occlusions. The new method offers improvements in dealing with two fundamental image matching problems. The first concerns the selection of the support window model, while the second centers upon accurate visibility estimation for each pixel. The support window model is based on an approximate 3D support plane described by a depth and two per-pixel depth offsets. For the visibility estimation, the multi-view constraint is initially relaxed by generating separate support plane maps for each support image using a modified PatchMatch algorithm. Then the most likely visible support image, which represents the minimum visibility of each pixel, is extracted via a discrete Markov Random Field model and it is further augmented by parameter clustering. Once the visibility is estimated, multi-view optimization taking into account all redundant observations is conducted to achieve optimal accuracy in the 3D surface generation for both depth and surface normal estimates. Finally, multi-view consistency is utilized to eliminate any remaining observational outliers. The proposed method is experimentally evaluated using well-known Middlebury datasets, and results obtained demonstrate that it is amongst the most accurate of the methods thus far reported via the Middlebury MVS website. Moreover, the new method exhibits a high completeness rate.

  4. Accurate and robust estimation of camera parameters using RANSAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Cui, Yi; Wang, Yexin; Liu, Liu; Gao, He

    2013-03-01

    Camera calibration plays an important role in the field of machine vision applications. The popularly used calibration approach based on 2D planar target sometimes fails to give reliable and accurate results due to the inaccurate or incorrect localization of feature points. To solve this problem, an accurate and robust estimation method for camera parameters based on RANSAC algorithm is proposed to detect the unreliability and provide the corresponding solutions. Through this method, most of the outliers are removed and the calibration errors that are the main factors influencing measurement accuracy are reduced. Both simulative and real experiments have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method and the results show that the proposed method is robust under large noise condition and quite efficient to improve the calibration accuracy compared with the original state.

  5. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  6. Accurate camera calibration method specialized for virtual studios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Hidehiko; Yamanouchi, Yuko; Mitsumine, Hideki; Fukaya, Takashi; Inoue, Seiki

    2008-02-01

    Virtual studio is a popular technology for TV programs, that makes possible to synchronize computer graphics (CG) to realshot image in camera motion. Normally, the geometrical matching accuracy between CG and realshot image is not expected so much on real-time system, we sometimes compromise on directions, not to come out the problem. So we developed the hybrid camera calibration method and CG generating system to achieve the accurate geometrical matching of CG and realshot on virtual studio. Our calibration method is intended for the camera system on platform and tripod with rotary encoder, that can measure pan/tilt angles. To solve the camera model and initial pose, we enhanced the bundle adjustment algorithm to fit the camera model, using pan/tilt data as known parameters, and optimizing all other parameters invariant against pan/tilt value. This initialization yields high accurate camera position and orientation consistent with any pan/tilt values. Also we created CG generator implemented the lens distortion function with GPU programming. By applying the lens distortion parameters obtained by camera calibration process, we could get fair compositing results.

  7. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  8. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  9. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  10. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  11. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  12. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  13. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  14. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  15. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  16. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  17. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  18. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  19. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  20. The Impact of Soil Moisture Initialization On Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, R. D.; Suarez, M. J.; Tyahla, L.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Some studies suggest that the proper initialization of soil moisture in a forecasting model may contribute significantly to the accurate prediction of seasonal precipitation, especially over mid-latitude continents. In order for the initialization to have any impact at all, however, two conditions must be satisfied: (1) the initial soil moisture anomaly must be "remembered" into the forecasted season, and (2) the atmosphere must respond in a predictable way to the soil moisture anomaly. In our previous studies, we identified the key land surface and atmospheric properties needed to satisfy each condition. Here, we tie these studies together with an analysis of an ensemble of seasonal forecasts. Initial soil moisture conditions for the forecasts are established by forcing the land surface model with realistic precipitation prior to the start of the forecast period. As expected, the impacts on forecasted precipitation (relative to an ensemble of runs that do not utilize soil moisture information) tend to be localized over the small fraction of the earth with all of the required land and atmosphere properties.