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Sample records for accurate isotopic analysis

  1. An in-line micro-pyrolysis system to remove contaminating organic species for precise and accurate water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Hsiao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Trace levels of organic contaminants such as short alcohols and terpenoids have been shown to cause spectral interference in water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques. The result is degraded precision and accuracy in both δD and δ18O for samples such as beverages, plant extracts or slightly contaminated waters. An initial approach offered by manufacturers is post-processing software that analyzes spectral features to identify and flag contaminated samples. However, it is impossible for this software to accurately reconstruct the water isotope signature, thus it is primarily a metric for data quality. Here, we describe a novel in-line pyrolysis system (Micro-Pyrolysis Technology, MPT) placed just prior to the inlet of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer that effectively removes interfering organic molecules without altering the isotope values of the water. Following injection of the water sample, N2 carrier gas passes the sample through a micro-pyrolysis tube heated with multiple high temperature elements in an oxygen-free environment. The temperature is maintained above the thermal decomposition threshold of most organic compounds (≤ 900 oC), but well below that of water (~2000 oC). The main products of the pyrolysis reaction are non-interfering species such as elemental carbon and H2 gas. To test the efficacy and applicability of the system, waters of known isotopic composition were spiked with varying amounts of common interfering alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, trans-2-hexenol, cis-3-hexanol up to 5 % v/v) and common soluble plant terpenoids (carveol, linalool, geraniol, prenol). Spiked samples with no treatment to remove the organics show strong interfering absorption peaks that adversely affect the δD and δ18O values. However, with the MPT in place, all interfering absorption peaks are removed and the water absorption spectrum is fully restored. As a consequence, the δD and δ18O values also return to their original

  2. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis of the S. cerevisiae Metabolome Using Accurate Mass Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: A New Method for Discovery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunping; Moir, Robyn; Willis, Ian; Beecher, Chris; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A; Kurland, Irwin J

    2016-03-01

    Isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA) is a (13)C metabolomics profiling method that eliminates sample to sample variance, discriminates against noise and artifacts, and improves identification of compounds, previously done with accurate mass liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). This is the first report using IROA technology in combination with accurate mass gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), here used to examine the S. cerevisiae metabolome. S. cerevisiae was grown in YNB media, containing randomized 95% (13)C, or 5%(13)C glucose as the single carbon source, in order that the isotopomer pattern of all metabolites would mirror the labeled glucose. When these IROA experiments are combined, the abundance of the heavy isotopologues in the 5%(13)C extracts, or light isotopologues in the 95%(13)C extracts, follows the binomial distribution, showing mirrored peak pairs for the molecular ion. The mass difference between the (12)C monoisotopic and the (13)C monoisotopic equals the number of carbons in the molecules. The IROA-GC/MS protocol developed, using both chemical and electron ionization, extends the information acquired from the isotopic peak patterns for formulas generation. The process that can be formulated as an algorithm, in which the number of carbons, as well as the number of methoximations and silylations are used as search constraints. In electron impact (EI/IROA) spectra, the artifactual peaks are identified and easily removed, which has the potential to generate "clean" EI libraries. The combination of chemical ionization (CI) IROA and EI/IROA affords a metabolite identification procedure that enables the identification of coeluting metabolites, and allowed us to characterize 126 metabolites in the current study.

  3. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  4. High-Precision Tungsten Isotopic Analysis by Multicollection Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Based on Simultaneous Measurement of W and (18)O/(16)O Isotope Ratios for Accurate Fractionation Correction.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne; Touboul, Mathieu; Walker, Richard J

    2016-02-02

    Determination of the (182)W/(184)W ratio to a precision of ± 5 ppm (2σ) is desirable for constraining the timing of core formation and other early planetary differentiation processes. However, WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry normally results in a residual correlation between the instrumental-mass-fractionation-corrected (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W ratios that is attributed to mass-dependent variability of O isotopes over the course of an analysis and between different analyses. A second-order correction using the (183)W/(184)W ratio relies on the assumption that this ratio is constant in nature. This may prove invalid, as has already been realized for other isotope systems. The present study utilizes simultaneous monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O and W isotope ratios to correct oxide interferences on a per-integration basis and thus avoid the need for a double normalization of W isotopes. After normalization of W isotope ratios to a pair of W isotopes, following the exponential law, no residual W-O isotope correlation is observed. However, there is a nonideal mass bias residual correlation between (182)W/(i)W and (183)W/(i)W with time. Without double normalization of W isotopes and on the basis of three or four duplicate analyses, the external reproducibility per session of (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W normalized to (186)W/(183)W is 5-6 ppm (2σ, 1-3 μg loads). The combined uncertainty per session is less than 4 ppm for (183)W/(184)W and less than 6 ppm for (182)W/(184)W (2σm) for loads between 3000 and 50 ng.

  5. Addressing the current bottlenecks of metabolomics: Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis™, an isotopic-labeling technique for accurate biochemical profiling.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Felice A; Beecher, Chris

    2012-09-01

    Metabolomics or biochemical profiling is a fast emerging science; however, there are still many associated bottlenecks to overcome before measurements will be considered robust. Advances in MS resolution and sensitivity, ultra pressure LC-MS, ESI, and isotopic approaches such as flux analysis and stable-isotope dilution, have made it easier to quantitate biochemicals. The digitization of mass spectrometers has simplified informatic aspects. However, issues of analytical variability, ion suppression and metabolite identification still plague metabolomics investigators. These hurdles need to be overcome for accurate metabolite quantitation not only for in vitro systems, but for complex matrices such as biofluids and tissues, before it is possible to routinely identify biomarkers that are associated with the early prediction and diagnosis of diseases. In this report, we describe a novel isotopic-labeling method that uses the creation of distinct biochemical signatures to eliminate current bottlenecks and enable accurate metabolic profiling.

  6. Isotopic analysis of planetary solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Neuland, M.; Meyer, S.; Wurz, P.

    2013-09-01

    Isotopic analysis of planetary surfaces is of considerable interest for planetology. Studies of isotope composition can deliver information on radio-isotope chronology of planetary soil/regolith, an insight to processes that altered planetary surface (space weathering) or on possible biogenic processes that occurred or still occur on the planet. Mass spectrometry is a well-suited method that delivers accurate and precise isotope composition. Among other instruments (LAZMA and LAMS), the miniature laser ablation/ionisation mass analyser, LMS developed in Bern for in situ space research can be used to measure the elemental and isotopic composition of planetary solids. LMS support mass spectrometric investigation with a mass resolution of m/Δm≈500-1500, dynamic range of at least 8 decades and detection sensitivity of ~10 ppb. Current studies of various solid materials and standard reference materials show that isotope composition can be conducted with an accuracy and precision at per mill level if the isotope concentration exceeds 10-100 ppm. Implications of the studies for in situ application are discussed.

  7. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  8. Do foraminifera accurately record seawater neodymium isotope composition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivner, Adam; Skinner, Luke; Vance, Derek

    2010-05-01

    Palaeoclimate studies involving the reconstruction of past Atlantic meridional overturning circulation increasingly employ isotopes of neodymium (Nd), measured on a variety of sample media (Frank, 2002). In the open ocean, Nd isotopes are a conservative tracer of water mass mixing and are unaffected by biological and low-temperature fractionation processes (Piepgras and Wasserburg, 1987; Lacan and Jeandel, 2005). For decades, benthic foraminifera have been widely utilised in stable isotope and geochemical studies, but have only recently begun to be exploited as a widely distributed, high-resolution Nd isotope archive (Klevenz et al., 2008), potentially circumventing the difficulties associated with other methods used to recover past deep-water Nd isotopes (Klevenz et al., 2008; Rutberg et al., 2000; Tachikawa et al., 2004). Thus far, a single pilot study (Klevenz et al., 2008) has indicated that core-top sedimentary benthic foraminifera record a Nd isotope composition in agreement with the nearest available bottom seawater data, and has suggested that this archive is potentially useful on both millennial and million-year timescales. Here we present seawater and proximal core-top foraminifer Nd isotope data for samples recovered during the 2008 "RETRO" cruise of the Marion Dufresne. The foraminifer samples comprise a depth-transect spanning 3000m of the water column in the Angola Basin and permit a direct comparison between high-resolution water column and core-top foraminiferal Nd isotope data. We use these data to assess the reliability of both planktonic and benthic foraminifera as recorders of water column neodymium isotope composition. Frank, M., 2002. Radiogenic isotopes: Tracers of past ocean circulation and erosional input, Rev. Geophys., 40 (1), 1001, doi:10.1029/2000RG000094. Klevenz, V., Vance, D., Schmidt, D.N., and Mezger, K., 2008. Neodymium isotopes in benthic foraminifera: Core-top systematics and a down-core record from the Neogene south Atlantic

  9. Uranium Isotopic Analysis with the FRAM Isotopic Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Duc T. Vo; Thomas E. Sampson

    1999-05-01

    FRAM is the acronym for Fixed-energy Response-function Analysis with Multiple efficiency. This software was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory originally for plutonium isotopic analysis. Later, it was adapted for uranium isotopic analysis in addition to plutonium. It is a code based on a self-calibration using several gamma-ray peaks for determining the isotopic ratios. The versatile-parameter database structure governs all facets of the data analysis. User editing of the parameter sets allows great flexibility in handling data with different isotopic distributions, interfering isotopes, and different acquisition parameters such as energy calibration and detector type.

  10. Accurate Analysis of Array References

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-22

    This thesis addresses the problem of data dependence analysis, the base step in detecting loop level parallelism in scientific programs. Traditional...data dependence analysis research has concentrated on the simpler problem of affine memory disambiguation. Many algorithms have been developed that...can devise an experiment to test the effectiveness of affine memory disambiguation at approximating the full dependence problem. We discover that the

  11. Final Progress Report: Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Bounds, John Alan; Brumby, Steven P.; Prasad, Lakshman; Sullivan, John P.

    2012-04-30

    This is the final report of the project titled, 'Isotope Identification Algorithm for Rapid and Accurate Determination of Radioisotopes,' PMIS project number LA10-HUMANID-PD03. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). It summarizes work performed over the FY10 time period. The goal of the work was to demonstrate principles of emulating a human analysis approach towards the data collected using radiation isotope identification devices (RIIDs). Human analysts begin analyzing a spectrum based on features in the spectrum - lines and shapes that are present in a given spectrum. The proposed work was to carry out a feasibility study that will pick out all gamma ray peaks and other features such as Compton edges, bremsstrahlung, presence/absence of shielding and presence of neutrons and escape peaks. Ultimately success of this feasibility study will allow us to collectively explain identified features and form a realistic scenario that produced a given spectrum in the future. We wanted to develop and demonstrate machine learning algorithms that will qualitatively enhance the automated identification capabilities of portable radiological sensors that are currently being used in the field.

  12. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  13. In vivo investigation of homocysteine metabolism to polyamines by high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry and stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Ruseva, Silviya; Lozanov, Valentin; Markova, Petia; Girchev, Radoslav; Mitev, Vanio

    2014-07-15

    Polyamines are essential polycations, playing important roles in mammalian physiology. Theoretically, the involvement of homocysteine in polyamine synthesis via S-adenosylmethionine is possible; however, to our knowledge, it has not been established experimentally. Here, we propose an original approach for investigation of homocysteine metabolites in an animal model. The method is based on the combination of isotope-labeled homocysteine supplementation and high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry analysis. Structural identity of the isotope-labeled metabolites was confirmed by accurate mass measurements of molecular and fragment ions and comparison of the retention times and tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns. Isotope-labeled methionine, spermidine, and spermine were detected in all investigated plasma and tissue samples. The induction of moderate hyperhomocysteinemia leads to an alteration in polyamine levels in a different manner. The involvement of homocysteine in polyamine synthesis and modulation of polyamine levels could contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms connected with homocysteine toxicity.

  14. Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology.

    PubMed

    Walter, W David; Kurle, Carolyn M; Hopkins, John B

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, we provide a brief introduction and summarize the 10 research articles included in this Special Issue on Applications of stable isotope analysis in mammalian ecology. The first three articles report correction and discrimination factors that can be used to more accurately estimate the diets of extinct and extant mammals using stable isotope analysis. The remaining seven applied research articles use stable isotope analysis to address a variety of wildlife conservation and management questions from the oceans to the mountains.

  15. Accurate Hf isotope determinations of complex zircons using the "laser ablation split stream" method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Christopher M.; Vervoort, Jeffery D.; DuFrane, S. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The "laser ablation split stream" (LASS) technique is a powerful tool for mineral-scale isotope analyses and in particular, for concurrent determination of age and Hf isotope composition of zircon. Because LASS utilizes two independent mass spectrometers, a large range of masses can be measured during a single ablation, and thus, the same sample volume can be analyzed for multiple geochemical systems. This paper describes a simple analytical setup using a laser ablation system coupled to a single-collector (for U-Pb age determination) and a multicollector (for Hf isotope analyses) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). The ability of the LASS for concurrent Hf + age technique to extract meaningful Hf isotope compositions in isotopically zoned zircon is demonstrated using zircons from two Proterozoic gneisses from northern Idaho, USA. These samples illustrate the potential problems associated with inadvertently sampling multiple age and Hf components in zircons, as well as the potential of LASS to recover meaningful Hf isotope compositions. We suggest that such inadvertent sampling of differing age and Hf components can be a significant cause of excess scatter in Hf isotope analyses and demonstrate that the LASS approach offers a robust solution to these issues. The veracity of the approach is demonstrated by accurate analyses of 10 reference zircons with well-characterized age and Hf isotopic composition, using laser spot diameters of 30 and 40 µm. In order to expand the database of high-precision Lu-Hf isotope analyses of reference zircons, we present 27 new isotope dilution-MC-ICPMS Lu-Hf isotope measurements of five U-Pb zircon standards: FC1, Temora, R33, QGNG, and 91500.

  16. Thorium isotopic analysis by alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gingell, T

    2001-01-01

    The technique of alpha spectrometry is used to detect alpha particles and to determine their energy. In this way the technique is able to provide simultaneously quantitative information (i.e. the activity) and qualitative information (the identity) on any radionuclide that emits an alpha particle. The longer-lived naturally occurring isotopes of thorium are all alpha emitters so the technique can be used to quantify them directly and this is extremely important if radiation doses due to intakes of these isotopes into the body are to be accurately assessed. The principle of the technique is discussed, its advantages and disadvantages, and the instrumentation that is commonly used today. The need for radiochemical separation is discussed and illustrated by reference to analysis procedures in current use for thorium isotopic analysis. Practical issues such as detection limits, quality control procedures. sample throughput and cost will be covered.

  17. Trophic hierarchies revealed via amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the potential of isotopic methods to illuminate trophic function, accurate estimates of lifetime feeding tendencies have remained elusive. A relatively new approach—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino ...

  18. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  19. Accurate and precise determination of isotopic ratios by MC-ICP-MS: a review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu

    2009-01-01

    For many decades the accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios has remained a very strong interest to many researchers due to its important applications in earth, environmental, biological, archeological, and medical sciences. Traditionally, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has been the technique of choice for achieving the highest accuracy and precision. However, recent developments in multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have brought a new dimension to this field. In addition to its simple and robust sample introduction, high sample throughput, and high mass resolution, the flat-topped peaks generated by this technique provide for accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios with precision reaching 0.001%, comparable to that achieved with TIMS. These features, in combination with the ability of the ICP source to ionize nearly all elements in the periodic table, have resulted in an increased use of MC-ICP-MS for such measurements in various sample matrices. To determine accurate and precise isotope ratios with MC-ICP-MS, utmost care must be exercised during sample preparation, optimization of the instrument, and mass bias corrections. Unfortunately, there are inconsistencies and errors evident in many MC-ICP-MS publications, including errors in mass bias correction models. This review examines "state-of-the-art" methodologies presented in the literature for achievement of precise and accurate determinations of isotope ratios by MC-ICP-MS. Some general rules for such accurate and precise measurements are suggested, and calculations of combined uncertainty of the data using a few common mass bias correction models are outlined.

  20. Development of an accurate, sensitive, and robust isotope dilution laser ablation ICP-MS method for simultaneous multi-element analysis (chlorine, sulfur, and heavy metals) in coal samples.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Heilmann, Jens; Prohaska, Thomas; Heumann, Klaus G

    2007-10-01

    A method for the direct multi-element determination of Cl, S, Hg, Pb, Cd, U, Br, Cr, Cu, Fe, and Zn in powdered coal samples has been developed by applying inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (ICP-IDMS) with laser-assisted introduction into the plasma. A sector-field ICP-MS with a mass resolution of 4,000 and a high-ablation rate laser ablation system provided significantly better sensitivity, detection limits, and accuracy compared to a conventional laser ablation system coupled with a quadrupole ICP-MS. The sensitivity ranges from about 590 cps for (35)Cl+ to more than 6 x 10(5) cps for (238)U+ for 1 microg of trace element per gram of coal sample. Detection limits vary from 450 ng g(-1) for chlorine and 18 ng g(-1) for sulfur to 9.5 pg g(-1) for mercury and 0.3 pg g(-1) for uranium. Analyses of minor and trace elements in four certified reference materials (BCR-180 Gas Coal, BCR-331 Steam Coal, SRM 1632c Trace Elements in Coal, SRM 1635 Trace Elements in Coal) yielded good agreement of usually not more than 5% deviation from the certified values and precisions of less than 10% relative standard deviation for most elements. Higher relative standard deviations were found for particular elements such as Hg and Cd caused by inhomogeneities due to associations of these elements within micro-inclusions in coal which was demonstrated for Hg in SRM 1635, SRM 1632c, and another standard reference material (SRM 2682b, Sulfur and Mercury in Coal). The developed LA-ICP-IDMS method with its simple sample pretreatment opens the possibility for accurate, fast, and highly sensitive determinations of environmentally critical contaminants in coal as well as of trace impurities in similar sample materials like graphite powder and activated charcoal on a routine basis.

  1. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  2. Accurate and Efficient Resolution of Overlapping Isotopic Envelopes in Protein Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Tian, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been an analytical challenge to accurately and efficiently resolve extremely dense overlapping isotopic envelopes (OIEs) in protein tandem mass spectra to confidently identify proteins. Here, we report a computationally efficient method, called OIE_CARE, to resolve OIEs by calculating the relative deviation between the ideal and observed experimental abundance. In the OIE_CARE method, the ideal experimental abundance of a particular overlapping isotopic peak (OIP) is first calculated for all the OIEs sharing this OIP. The relative deviation (RD) of the overall observed experimental abundance of this OIP relative to the summed ideal value is then calculated. The final individual abundance of the OIP for each OIE is the individual ideal experimental abundance multiplied by 1 + RD. Initial studies were performed using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectra on myoglobin (with direct infusion) and the intact E. coli proteome (with liquid chromatographic separation). Comprehensive data at the protein and proteome levels, high confidence and good reproducibility were achieved. The resolving method reported here can, in principle, be extended to resolve any envelope-type overlapping data for which the corresponding theoretical reference values are available. PMID:26439836

  3. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with Adjustable Mass Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html.

  4. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  5. Investigation of mass dependence effects for the accurate determination of molybdenum isotope amount ratios by MC-ICP-MS using synthetic isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Dmitry; Dunn, Philip J H; Petrov, Panayot; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Methodology for absolute Mo isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using calibration with synthetic isotope mixtures (SIMs) is presented. For the first time, synthetic isotope mixtures prepared from seven commercially available isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders ((92)Mo, (94)Mo, (95)Mo, (96)Mo, (97)Mo, (98)Mo, and (100)Mo) are used to investigate whether instrumental mass discrimination of Mo isotopes in MC-ICP-MS is consistent with mass-dependent isotope distribution. The parent materials were dissolved and mixed as solutions to obtain mixtures with accurately known isotope amount ratios. The level of elemental impurities in the isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders was quantified by ICP-MS by using both high-resolution and reaction cell instruments to completely resolve spectral interferences. The Mo isotope amount ratio values with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), determined by MC-ICP-MS for a high-purity Mo rod from Johnson Matthey, were as follows: (92)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.9235(9), (94)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.5785(8), (96)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.0503(9), (97)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6033(6), (98)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.5291(20), and (100)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6130(7). A full uncertainty budget for the measurements is presented which shows that the largest contribution to the uncertainty budget comes from correction for elemental impurities (∼51%), followed by the contribution from weighing operations (∼26 %). The atomic weight of molybdenum was calculated to be 95.947(2); the uncertainty in parentheses is expanded uncertainty with the coverage factor of 2. A particular advantage of the developed method is that calibration factors for all six Mo isotope amount ratios, involving the (95)Mo isotope, were experimentally determined. This allows avoiding any assumption on mass-dependent isotope fractions in MC-ICP-MS, inherent to the method of double spike previously used for Mo isotope amount ratio

  6. Autonomous Instrumentation for Fast, Continuous and Accurate Isotopic Measurements of Water Vapor (δ18O, δ 2H, H2O) in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, J. S.; Dong, F.; Owano, T. G.; Baer, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    Stable isotopes of water vapor are powerful tracers to investigate the hydrological cycle and ecological processes. Therefore, continuous, in-situ and accurate measurements of δ18O and δ2H are critical to advance the understanding of water-cycle dynamics worldwide. Furthermore, the combination of meteorological techniques and high-frequency isotopic water measurements can provide detailed time-resolved information on the eco-physiological performance of plants and enable improved understanding of water fluxes at ecosystem scales. In this work, we present recent development and field deployment of a novel Water Vapor Isotope Measurement System (WVIMS) capable of simultaneous in situ measurements of δ18O and δ2H and water mixing ratio (H2O) with high precision, accuracy and speed (up to 10 Hz measurement rate). The WVIMS consists of an Analyzer (Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer), based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy, and a Standard Source (Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source), based on quantitative evaporation of a liquid water standard (with known isotopic content), and operates in a dual-inlet configuration. The WVIMS automatically controls the entire sample and data collection, data analysis and calibration process to allow for continuous, autonomous unattended long-term operation. The WVIMS has been demonstrated for accurate (i.e. fully calibrated) measurements ranging from 500 ppmv (typical of arctic environments) to over 30,000 ppmv (typical of tropical environments) in air. Dual-inlet operation, which involves regular calibration with isotopic water vapor reference standards, essentially eliminates measurement drift, ensures data reliability, and allows operation over an extremely wide ambient temperature range (5-45C). This presentation will include recent measurements recorded using the WVIMS in plant growth chambers and in arctic environments. The availability of this new instrumentation provides new opportunities for detailed continuous

  7. Innovations in Mass Spectrometry for Precise and Accurate Isotope Ratio Determination from Very Small Analyte Quantities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, N. S.; Bouman, C.; Horstwood, M. S.; Parrish, R. R.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation describes progress in mass spectrometry for analysing very small analyte quantities, illustrated by example applications from nuclear forensics. In this challenging application, precise and accurate (‰) uranium isotope ratios are required from 1 - 2 µm diameter uranium oxide particles, which comprise less than 40 pg of uranium. Traditionally these are analysed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), and more recently using secondary ionisation mass spectrometry (SIMS). Multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can offer higher productivity compared to these techniques, but is traditionally limited by low efficiency of analyte utilisation (sample through to ion detection). Samples can either be introduced as a solution, or sampled directly from solid using laser ablation. Large multi-isotope ratio datasets can help identify provenance and intended use of anthropogenic uranium and other nuclear materials [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus (Bremen, Germany) with ‘Jet Interface’ option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity. An analyte utilisation of c. 4% has previously been reported for uranium [2]. This high-sensitivity configuration utilises a dry high-capacity (100 m3/h) interface pump, special skimmer and sampler cones and a desolvating nebuliser system. Coupled with new acquisition methodologies, this sensitivity enhancement makes possible the analysis of micro-particles and small sample volumes at higher precision levels than previously achieved. New, high-performance, full-size and compact discrete dynode secondary electron multipliers (SEM) exhibit excellent stability and linearity over a large dynamic range and can be configured to simultaneously measure all of the uranium isotopes. Options for high abundance-sensitivity filters on two ion beams are also available, e.g. for 236U and 234U. Additionally, amplifiers with high ohm (1012 - 1013) feedback resistors have been developed to

  8. Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    1999-11-17

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

  9. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report which was a thirty-four month project conducted to develop and demonstrate stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish the source of carbon in products of coal/petroleum coprocessing. The work included assessing precision, accuracy, the range of application and the significance of selective isotopic fractionation effects. A method was devised to correct for selective isotopic fractionation errors. The method was demonstrated through application with samples from twelve continuous-unit coprocessing tests. A data base of carbon isotope analyses is appended. 21 refs.

  10. Amino acid isotopic analysis in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new approach to stable isotopic analysis—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino acids (glutamic acid and phenylalanine). CSIA has recently been used to generate trophic position estimates among anima...

  11. Accurate measurement of silver isotopic compositions in geological materials including low Pd/Ag meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, S. J.; Rehkämper, M.; Halliday, A. N.; Lee, D.-C.; Hattendorf, B.; Günther, D.

    2005-04-01

    Very precise silver (Ag) isotopic compositions have been determined for a number of terrestrial rocks, and high and low Pd/Ag meteorites by utilizing multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The meteorites include primitive chondrites, the Group IAB iron meteorites Canyon Diablo and Toluca, and the Group IIIAB iron meteorite Grant. Silver isotopic measurements are primarily of interest because 107Ag was produced by decay of the short-lived radionuclide 107Pd during the formation of the solar system and hence the Pd-Ag chronometer has set constraints on the timing of early planetesimal formation. A 2σ precision of ±0.05‰ can be obtained for analyses of standard solutions when Ag isotopic ratios are normalized to Pd, to correct for instrumental mass discrimination, and to bracketing standards. Caution must be exercised when making Ag isotopic measurements because isotopic artifacts can be generated in the laboratory and during mass spectrometry. The external reproducibility for geological samples based on replicate analyses of rocks is ±0.2‰ (2σ). All chondrites analyzed have similar Ag isotopic compositions that do not differ significantly (>0.3‰) from the 'terrestrial' value of the NIST SRM 978a Ag isotope standard. Hence, they show no evidence of excess 107Ag derived from 107Pd decay or, of stable Ag isotope fractionation associated with volatile element depletion within the accretion disk or from parent body metamorphism. The Group IAB iron meteorite samples analyzed show evidence of complex behavior and disturbance of Ag isotope systematics. Therefore, care must be taken when using this group of iron meteorites to obtain chronological information based on the Pd-Ag decay scheme.

  12. Uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis using MGA++

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W; Clark, D; Friensehner, A; Parker, W; Raschke, K; Romine, W; Ruhter, W; Wang, T-F; kreek, S

    1998-07-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory develops sophisticated gamma-ray analysis codes for the isotopic analysis of nuclear materials based on the principles used in the original MultiGroup Analysis (MGA) code. Over the years, the MGA methodology has been upgraded and expanded far beyond its original capabilities and is now comprised of a suite of codes known as MGA++. The early MGA code analyzed Pu gamma-ray data collected with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to yield Pu isotopic ratios. While the original MGA code relied solely on the lower-energy gamma rays (around 100 keV), the most recent addition to the MGA++ code suite, MGAHI, analyzes Pu data using higher-energy gamma rays (200 keV and higher) and is particulatly useful for Pu samples - that are enclosed in thick-walled containers. The MGA++ suite also includes capabilities to perform U isotopic analysis on data collected with either HPGe or cadmium-zinc-tellutide (CZT) detectors. These codes are commercially available and are known as U235 and CZTU, respectively. A graphical user interface has also been developed for viewing the data and the fitting procedure. In addition, we are developing new codes that will integrate into the MGA++ suite. These will include Pu isotopic analysis capabilities for data collected with CZT detectors, U isotopic analysis with HPGe detectors which utilizes only higher energy gamma rays, and isotopic analyses on mixtures of Pu and U.

  13. Accurate measurements of transition frequencies and isotope shifts of laser-trapped francium.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, S; Calabrese, R; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Khanbekyan, A; Mariotti, E; de Mauro, C; Minguzzi, P; Moi, L; Stancari, G; Tomassetti, L; Veronesi, S

    2009-04-01

    An interferometric method is used to improve the accuracy of the 7S-7P transition frequencies of three francium isotopes by 1 order of magnitude. The deduced isotope shifts for 209-211Fr confirm the ISOLDE data. The frequency of the D2 transition of 212Fr--the accepted reference for all Fr isotope shifts--is revised, and a significant difference with the ISOLDE value is found. Our results will be a benchmark for the accuracy of the theory of Fr energy levels, a necessary step to investigate fundamental symmetries.

  14. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1990-05-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Activities for this quarter include: method development -- investigation of selective fractionation. Three petroleum atmospheric still bottoms (ASBs) were separated by distillation and solubility fractionation to determine the homogeneity of the carbon isotope ratios of the separated fractions. These same three petroleum ASBs and three geographically distinct coals were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min and hydrogenated over a CoMo catalyst at 750{degree}F for 60 min to determine the effects of these treatments on the isotopic compositions of the produce fractions. Twelve coal liquefaction oils were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. These oils were derived from subbituminous and bituminous coals from the first- and second-stage reactors in the thermal/catalytic and modes; validation and application, analysis. Carbon isotope analyses of samples from HRI bench unit coprocessing run 238-2 (Taiheiyo coal/Maya VSB) were analyzed. A method to correct for selective isotopic fractionation was developed and applied to the data. Five coprocessing samples were analyzed at the request of SRI International. 12 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Isotope ratio determination in boron analysis.

    PubMed

    Sah, R N; Brown, P H

    1998-01-01

    method of choice for B isotope ratio determination. The current state of instrumental capabilities is adequate for B isotope determination. However, precision and accuracy are primarily limited by sample preparation, introduction, and analytical methodology, including 1. Analyte loss and isotope fractionation during sample preparation. 2. The precision of B isotope determination in small samples, especially those containing low concentrations. 3. Difficult matrices. 4. Memory effects. Sample preparation by alkali fusion allows rapid and complete decomposition of hard-to-digest samples, but high-salt environments of the fused materials require extensive sample purification for B ratio determination. The alternative wet-ashing sample decomposition with HF also results in B loss and isotopic fractionation owing to the high volatility of BF3. Open-vessel dry- or wet-ashing methods usually do not work well for animal samples, and are also prone to B loss and contamination. Closed-vessel microwave digestion overcomes these problems, but the digests of biological materials have high C contents, which cause spectral interference on 11B and affect 11B/10B ratios. Exchange separation/preconcentration of B using exchange (cation or anion exchange, B-specific resin, e.g., Amberlite IRA-743) tend to cause B isotope fractionation, and C eluting from these resin columns may interfere with B isotope ratio determination. Memory effects of B that occur during sample determination may cause serious errors in B isotope ratio determination, especially when samples varying in B concentrations and/or isotope composition are analyzed together. Although the utilization of high-resolution plasma-source MS will undoubtedly improve analytical precision, it is the sample preparation, sample introduction, and analytical methodology that represent the primary limitation to accurate and precise B isotope ratio determination.

  16. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric R.; Pangle, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so. PMID:27077010

  17. Connecting laboratory behavior to field function through stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Glon, Mael G; Larson, Eric R; Pangle, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Inherent difficulties of tracking and observing organisms in the field often leave researchers with no choice but to conduct behavioral experiments under laboratory settings. However, results of laboratory experiments do not always translate accurately to natural conditions. A fundamental challenge in ecology is therefore to scale up from small area and short-duration laboratory experiments to large areas and long durations over which ecological processes generally operate. In this study, we propose that stable isotope analysis may be a tool that can link laboratory behavioral observations to past field interactions or function of individual organisms. We conducted laboratory behavioral assays to measure dominance of invasive rusty crayfish, Orconectes rusticus, and used stable isotope analysis to hindcast trophic positions of these crayfish under preceding natural conditions. We hypothesized that more dominant crayfish in our assays would have higher trophic positions if dominance were related to competitive ability or willingness to pursue high-risk, high-reward prey. We did not find a relationship between crayfish dominance and trophic position, and therefore infer that laboratory dominance of crayfish may not necessarily relate to their ecology in the field. However, this is to our knowledge the first attempt to directly relate laboratory behavior to field performance via stable isotope analysis. We encourage future studies to continue to explore a possible link between laboratory and field behavior via stable isotope analysis, and propose several avenues to do so.

  18. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  19. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-03-01

    Research on coprocessing materials/products continued. Major topics reported here are described below. Microautoclave runs are described in which gases and insoluble organic matter produced from five coals and gases produced from three petroleum resids were analyzed to study feedstock/product selective isotopic fractionation. Selective isotopic fractionation was further explored through isotope analysis of the feed New Mexico coal and products from a continuous coal liquefaction run (HRI CC-10 or 227-68). Feeds (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and products from two HRI continuous coprocessing runs (227-54 and 238-12) were analyzed. The results were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation and carbon sourcing was performed for the product fractions. {sup 1}H-NMR and phenolic -OH determinations are reported for all continuous unit samples obtained under this contract. 13 refs., 17 figs., 40 tabs.

  20. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis.

  1. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  2. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application an authentic continuous-unit products. The experimental details used for stable carbon isotope analyses by the organization that performs most of those analyses under this contract are described. A method was developed previously under this contract to correct the carbon sourcing calculations performed from stable carbon isotope analyses for selective isotopic fractionation. The method relies on three assumptions. This quarter, a study was completed to define the sensitivity of the carbon sourcing results to errors in the assumptions. Carbon contents and carbon isotope ratios were determined for the available feeds and product fractions from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 238-10 (Texas lignite/Hondo vacuum still bottoms (VSB), Texas lignite/Cold Lake VSB and Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB). These data were used for carbon sourcing calculations and individual feedstock conversion calculations. A previously devised means for correcting for selective isotope fractionation was applied. 6 refs., 30 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Accurate electron affinity of Pb and isotope shifts of binding energies of Pb-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-08-01

    Lead (Pb) was the last element of the group IVA whose electron affinity had a low accuracy around 10 meV before the present work. This was due to the generic threshold photodetachment measurement that cannot extent well below 0.5 eV due to the light source limitation. In the present work, the electron affinity of Pb was determined to be 2877.33(13) cm-1 or 0.356 743(16) eV for the isotope m = 208. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 500 with respect to the previous laser photodetachment electron spectroscopy. Moreover, remarkable isotope shifts of the binding energy of Pb- 6p3 4S3/2 - Pb 6p2 3P2 were observed for m = 206, 207, and 208.

  4. Accurate electron affinity of Pb and isotope shifts of binding energies of Pb(.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-08-28

    Lead (Pb) was the last element of the group IVA whose electron affinity had a low accuracy around 10 meV before the present work. This was due to the generic threshold photodetachment measurement that cannot extent well below 0.5 eV due to the light source limitation. In the present work, the electron affinity of Pb was determined to be 2877.33(13) cm(-1) or 0.356 743(16) eV for the isotope m = 208. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 500 with respect to the previous laser photodetachment electron spectroscopy. Moreover, remarkable isotope shifts of the binding energy of Pb(-) 6p(3) (4)S3/2 - Pb 6p(2) (3)P2 were observed for m = 206, 207, and 208.

  5. On the isotope analysis of cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begemann, Friedrich

    1989-01-01

    It is thought that comets are an intimate mixture of ices and sub-micron to pebble sized silicates. Based on experience with carbonaceous chrondrites, part of the smallest grains are expected to be primary condensates carrying the unadulterated isotopic signature of their place of origin. In order to extract this information a grain-by-grain analysis will be necessary.

  6. Accurate time-dependent wave packet study of the Li + H₂⁺ reaction and its isotopic variants.

    PubMed

    Aslan, E; Bulut, N; Castillo, J F; Bañares, L; Roncero, O; Aoiz, F J

    2012-01-12

    The dynamics and kinetics of the Li + H₂⁺ reaction and its isotopic variants (D₂⁺ and T₂⁺) have been studied by using a time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel (CC) method on the ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of Martinazzo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 119, 21]. Total initial v = 0, j = 0 state-selected reaction probabilities for the Li + H₂⁺ reaction and its isotopic variants have been calculated from the threshold up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 90. Integral cross sections have been evaluated from the reaction probabilities at collision energies from threshold (≈0.2 eV) up to 1.0 eV collision. The calculated rate constants as a function of temperature show an Arrhenius type behavior in the 200 ≤ T ≤ 1000 K temperature interval. It has been found to be a considerable large intermolecular kinetic isotope effect. The TDWP-CC results are in overall good agreement with those obtained applying the TDWP Centrifugal-Sudden (CS) approximation, showing that the CS approximation is rather accurate for the title reaction.

  7. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.; Burke, F.P.

    1990-07-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of coprocessing research (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique currently is in routine use for other applications. Progress is discussed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Simple and accurate measurement of carbamazepine in surface water by use of porous membrane-protected micro-solid-phase extraction coupled with isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hui Ling; Wong, Lingkai; Liu, Qinde; Teo, Tang Lin; Lee, Tong Kooi; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-03-17

    To achieve fast and accurate analysis of carbamazepine in surface water, we developed a novel porous membrane-protected micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE) method, followed by liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS/MS) analysis. The μ-SPE device (∼0.8 × 1 cm) was fabricated by heat-sealing edges of a polypropylene membrane sheet to devise a bag enclosing the sorbent. The analytes (both carbamazepine and isotope-labelled carbamazepine) were first extracted by μ-SPE device in the sample (10 mL) via agitation, then desorbed in an organic solvent (1 mL) via ultrasonication. Several parameters such as organic solvent for pre-conditioning of μ-SPE device, amount of sorbent, adsorption time, and desorption solvent and time were investigated to optimize the μ-SPE efficiency. The optimized method has limits of detection and quantitation estimated to be 0.5 ng L(-1) and 1.6 ng L(-1), respectively. Surface water samples spiked with different amounts of carbamazepine (close to 20, 500, and 1600 ng L(-1), respectively) were analysed for the validation of method precision and accuracy. Good precision was obtained as demonstrated by relative standard deviations of 0.7% for the samples with concentrations of 500 and 1600 ng kg(-1), and 5.8% for the sample with concentration of 20 ng kg(-1). Good accuracy was also demonstrated by the relative recoveries in the range of 96.7%-103.5% for all samples with uncertainties of 1.1%-5.4%. Owing to the same chemical properties of carbamazepine and isotope-labelled carbamazepine, the isotope ratio in the μ-SPE procedure was accurately controlled. The use of μ-SPE coupled with IDMS analysis significantly facilitated the fast and accurate measurement of carbamazepine in surface water.

  9. Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nondestructive Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir; Haefner, Andrew; Quiter, Brian

    2010-07-14

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) has been studied as one of the nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques currently being investigated by a multi-laboratory collaboration for the determination of Pu mass in spent fuel. In NRF measurements specific isotopes are identified by their characteristic lines in recorded gamma spectra. The concentration of an isotope in a material can be determined from measured NRF signal intensities if NRF cross sections and assay geometries are known. The potential of NRF to quantify isotopic content and Pu mass in spent fuel has been studied. The addition of NRF data to MCNPX and an improved treatment of the elastic photon scattering at backward angles has enabled us to more accurately simulate NRF measurements on spent fuel assemblies. Using assembly models from the spent fuel assembly library generated at LANL, NRF measurements are simulated to find the best measurement configurations, and to determine measurement sensitivities and times, and photon source and gamma detector requirements. A first proof-of-principal measurement on a mock-up assembly with a bremsstrahlung photon source demonstrated isotopic sensitivity to approximately 1% limited by counting statistics. Data collection rates are likely a limiting factor of NRF-based measurements of fuel assemblies but new technological advances may lead to drastic improvements.

  10. Reducing the matrix effects in chemical analysis: fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris

    2016-04-01

    The combination of isotope dilution and mass spectrometry has become an ubiquitous tool of chemical analysis. Often perceived as one of the most accurate methods of chemical analysis, it is not without shortcomings. Current isotope dilution equations are not capable of fully addressing one of the key problems encountered in chemical analysis: the possible effect of sample matrix on measured isotope ratios. The method of standard addition does compensate for the effect of sample matrix by making sure that all measured solutions have identical composition. While it is impossible to attain such condition in traditional isotope dilution, we present equations which allow for matrix-matching between all measured solutions by fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods.

  11. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, C.V.; Killian, E.W.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Randolph, P.D.

    1996-09-03

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector. 7 figs.

  12. Device and method for accurately measuring concentrations of airborne transuranic isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, Charles V.; Killian, E. Wayne; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.; Randolph, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) with two silicon alpha detectors and three sample collection filters is described. This alpha CAM design provides continuous sampling and also measures the cumulative transuranic (TRU), i.e., plutonium and americium, activity on the filter, and thus provides a more accurate measurement of airborne TRU concentrations than can be accomplished using a single fixed sample collection filter and a single silicon alpha detector.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis by accurate mass retention time pairs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jeffrey C; Denny, Richard; Dorschel, Craig A; Gorenstein, Marc; Kass, Ignatius J; Li, Guo-Zhong; McKenna, Therese; Nold, Michael J; Richardson, Keith; Young, Phillip; Geromanos, Scott

    2005-04-01

    Current methodologies for protein quantitation include 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques, metabolic labeling, and stable isotope labeling methods to name only a few. The current literature illustrates both pros and cons for each of the previously mentioned methodologies. Keeping with the teachings of William of Ockham, "with all things being equal the simplest solution tends to be correct", a simple LC/MS based methodology is presented that allows relative changes in abundance of proteins in highly complex mixtures to be determined. Utilizing a reproducible chromatographic separations system along with the high mass resolution and mass accuracy of an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the quantitative comparison of tens of thousands of ions emanating from identically prepared control and experimental samples can be made. Using this configuration, we can determine the change in relative abundance of a small number of ions between the two conditions solely by accurate mass and retention time. Employing standard operating procedures for both sample preparation and ESI-mass spectrometry, one typically obtains under 5 ppm mass precision and quantitative variations between 10 and 15%. The principal focus of this paper will demonstrate the quantitative aspects of the methodology and continue with a discussion of the associated, complementary qualitative capabilities.

  14. Isotopic ratio outlier analysis global metabolomics of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Stupp, Gregory S; Clendinen, Chaevien S; Ajredini, Ramadan; Szewc, Mark A; Garrett, Timothy; Menger, Robert F; Yost, Richard A; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S

    2013-12-17

    We demonstrate the global metabolic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans stress responses using a mass-spectrometry-based technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA). In an IROA protocol, control and experimental samples are isotopically labeled with 95 and 5% (13)C, and the two sample populations are mixed together for uniform extraction, sample preparation, and LC-MS analysis. This labeling strategy provides several advantages over conventional approaches: (1) compounds arising from biosynthesis are easily distinguished from artifacts, (2) errors from sample extraction and preparation are minimized because the control and experiment are combined into a single sample, (3) measurement of both the molecular weight and the exact number of carbon atoms in each molecule provides extremely accurate molecular formulas, and (4) relative concentrations of all metabolites are easily determined. A heat-shock perturbation was conducted on C. elegans to demonstrate this approach. We identified many compounds that significantly changed upon heat shock, including several from the purine metabolism pathway. The metabolomic response information by IROA may be interpreted in the context of a wealth of genetic and proteomic information available for C. elegans . Furthermore, the IROA protocol can be applied to any organism that can be isotopically labeled, making it a powerful new tool in a global metabolomics pipeline.

  15. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis Global Metabolomics of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Szewc, Mark A.; Garrett, Timothy; Menger, Robert F.; Yost, Richard A.; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the global metabolic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans stress responses using a mass spectrometry-based technique called Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis (IROA). In an IROA protocol, control and experimental samples are isotopically labeled with 95% and 5% 13C, and the two sample populations are mixed together for uniform extraction, sample preparation, and LC-MS analysis. This labeling strategy provides several advantages over conventional approaches: 1) compounds arising from biosynthesis are easily distinguished from artifacts, 2) errors from sample extraction and preparation are minimized because the control and experiment are combined into a single sample, 3) measurement of both the molecular weight and the exact number of carbon atoms in each molecule provides extremely accurate molecular formulae, and 4) relative concentrations of all metabolites are easily determined. A heat shock perturbation was conducted on C. elegans to demonstrate this approach. We identified many compounds that significantly changed upon heat shock, including several from the purine metabolism pathway, which we use to demonstrate the approach. The metabolomic response information by IROA may be interpreted in the context of a wealth of genetic and proteomic information available for C. elegans. Furthermore, the IROA protocol can be applied to any organism that can be isotopically labeled, making it a powerful new tool in a global metabolomics pipeline. PMID:24274725

  16. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-02-01

    Consol R D is developing and demonstrating stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken is develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation is being determined and, when necessary, corrections are applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability are being defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques also is being assessed. Previously reported data on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Runs 227-53 (Texas lignite/Maya ASB and Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and 238-1 (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) were corrected for selective isotopic fractionation. Carbon sourcing was performed on samples from HRI bench-scale coprocessing Run 227-60 (Texas lignite/Maya VSB) and samples from UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 26 (Illinois 6 coal/Lloydminster vacuum resid); the latter data were corrected for isotopic fractionation, though the former could not be corrected. A paper presented at the 1990 DOE Direct Liquefaction Contractor's Review Meeting is appended. 15 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Accurate stone analysis: the impact on disease diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Neil S; Mandel, Ian C; Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M

    2017-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the requirements for acceptable compositional analysis of kidney stones using various biophysical methods. High-resolution X-ray powder diffraction crystallography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are the only acceptable methods in our labs for kidney stone analysis. The use of well-constructed spectral reference libraries is the basis for accurate and complete stone analysis. The literature included in this manuscript identify errors in most commercial laboratories and in some academic centers. We provide personal comments on why such errors are occurring at such high rates, and although the work load is rather large, it is very worthwhile in providing accurate stone compositions. We also provide the results of our almost 90,000 stone analyses and a breakdown of the number of components we have observed in the various stones. We also offer advice on determining the method used by the various FTIR equipment manufacturers who also provide a stone analysis library so that the FTIR users can feel comfortable in the accuracy of their reported results. Such an analysis on the accuracy of the individual reference libraries could positively influence the reduction in their respective error rates.

  18. Evaluation of accurate mass and relative isotopic abundance measurements in the LTQ-orbitrap mass spectrometer for further metabolomics database building.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Heilier, Jean-François; Madalinski, Geoffrey; Genin, Eric; Ezan, Eric; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Junot, Christophe

    2010-07-01

    Recently, high-resolution mass spectrometry has been largely employed for compound identification, thanks to accurate mass measurements. As additional information, relative isotope abundance (RIA) is often needed to reduce the number of candidates prior to tandem MS(n). Here, we report on the evaluation of the LTQ-Orbitrap, in terms of accurate mass and RIA measurements for building further metabolomics spectral databases. Accurate mass measurements were achieved in the ppm range, using external calibration within 24 h, and remained at <5 ppm over a one-week period. The experimental relative abundances of (M+1) isotopic ions were evaluated in different data sets. First of all, 137 solutions of commercial compounds were analyzed by flow injection analysis in both the positive and negative ion modes. It was found that the ion abundance was the main factor impacting the accuracy of RIA measurements. It was possible to define some intensity thresholds above which errors were systematically <20% of their theoretical values. The same type of results were obtained with analyses from two biological media. Otherwise, no significant effect of ion transmission between the LTQ ion trap and the Orbitrap analyzer on RIA measurement errors was found, whereas the reliability of RIA measurements was dramatically improved by reducing the mass detection window. It was also observed that the signal integration method had a significant impact on RIA measurement errors, with the most-reliable results being obtained with peak height integrations. Finally, automatic integrations using the data preprocessing software XCMS and MZmine gave results similar to those obtained by manual integration, suggesting that it is relevant to use the RIA information in automatic elemental composition determination software from metabolomic peak tables.

  19. Accurate interlaminar stress recovery from finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Riggs, H. Ronald

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy and robustness of a two-dimensional smoothing methodology is examined for the problem of recovering accurate interlaminar shear stress distributions in laminated composite and sandwich plates. The smoothing methodology is based on a variational formulation which combines discrete least-squares and penalty-constraint functionals in a single variational form. The smoothing analysis utilizes optimal strains computed at discrete locations in a finite element analysis. These discrete strain data are smoothed with a smoothing element discretization, producing superior accuracy strains and their first gradients. The approach enables the resulting smooth strain field to be practically C1-continuous throughout the domain of smoothing, exhibiting superconvergent properties of the smoothed quantity. The continuous strain gradients are also obtained directly from the solution. The recovered strain gradients are subsequently employed in the integration o equilibrium equations to obtain accurate interlaminar shear stresses. The problem is a simply-supported rectangular plate under a doubly sinusoidal load. The problem has an exact analytic solution which serves as a measure of goodness of the recovered interlaminar shear stresses. The method has the versatility of being applicable to the analysis of rather general and complex structures built of distinct components and materials, such as found in aircraft design. For these types of structures, the smoothing is achieved with 'patches', each patch covering the domain in which the smoothed quantity is physically continuous.

  20. A bacterial method for the nitrogen isotopic analysis of nitrate in seawater and freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigman, D.M.; Casciotti, K.L.; Andreani, M.; Barford, C.; Galanter, M.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    We report a new method for measurement of the isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3-) at the natural-abundance level in both seawater and freshwater. The method is based on the isotopic analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O) generated from nitrate by denitrifying bacteria that lack N2O-reductase activity. The isotopic composition of both nitrogen and oxygen from nitrate are accessible in this way. In this first of two companion manuscripts, we describe the basic protocol and results for the nitrogen isotopes. The precision of the method is better than 0.2‰ (1 SD) at concentrations of nitrate down to 1 μM, and the nitrogen isotopic differences among various standards and samples are accurately reproduced. For samples with 1 μM nitrate or more, the blank of the method is less than 10% of the signal size, and various approaches may reduce it further.

  1. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    PubMed

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  2. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  3. Accurate first-principles calculations for 12CH3D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm-1 are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane (12CH3D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue 12CH4. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  4. Accurate first-principles calculations for 12CH3D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Michaël; Nikitin, Andrei V; Tyuterev, Vladimir G

    2014-07-28

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm(-1) are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane ((12)CH3D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue (12)CH4. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  5. Accurate first-principles calculations for {sup 12}CH{sub 3}D infrared spectra from isotopic and symmetry transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Michaël Tyuterev, Vladimir G.; Nikitin, Andrei V.

    2014-07-28

    Accurate variational high-resolution spectra calculations in the range 0-8000 cm{sup −1} are reported for the first time for the monodeutered methane ({sup 12}CH{sub 3}D). Global calculations were performed by using recent ab initio surfaces for line positions and line intensities derived from the main isotopologue {sup 12}CH{sub 4}. Calculation of excited vibrational levels and high-J rovibrational states is described by using the normal mode Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian combined with irreducible tensor formalism and appropriate numerical procedures for solving the quantum nuclear motion problem. The isotopic H→D substitution is studied in details by means of symmetry and nonlinear normal mode coordinate transformations. Theoretical spectra predictions are given up to J = 25 and compared with the HITRAN 2012 database representing a compilation of line lists derived from analyses of experimental spectra. The results are in very good agreement with available empirical data suggesting that a large number of yet unassigned lines in observed spectra could be identified and modeled using the present approach.

  6. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  7. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelwicks, J. T.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  8. Carbon-isotopic analysis of dissolved acetate.

    PubMed

    Gelwicks, J T; Hayes, J M

    1990-01-01

    Heating of dried, acetate-containing solids together with oxalic acid dihydrate conveniently releases acetic acid for purification by gas chromatography. For determination of the carbon-isotopic composition of total acetate, the acetate-containing zone of the chromatographic effluent can be routed directly to a combustion furnace coupled to a vacuum system allowing recovery, purification, and packaging of CO2 for mass-spectrometric analysis. For analysis of methyl carbon, acetic acid can be cryogenically trapped from the chromatographic effluent, then transferred to a tube containing excess NaOH. The tube is evacuated, sealed, and heated to 500 degrees C to produce methane by pyrolysis of sodium acetate. Subsequent combustion of the methane allows determination of the 13C content at the methyl position in the parent acetate. With typical blanks, the standard deviation of single analyses is less than 0.4% for acetate samples larger than 5 micromoles. A full treatment of uncertainties is outlined.

  9. Compound specific stable isotope analysis vs. bulk stable isotope analysis of agricultural food products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psomiadis, David; Horváth, Balázs; Nehlich, Olaf; Bodiselitsch, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    The bulk analysis of stable isotopes (carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, oxygen and hydrogen) from food staples is a common tool for inferring origin and/or fraud of food products. Many studies have shown that bulk isotope analyses of agricultural products are able to separate large geographical areas of food origin. However, in micro-localities (regions, districts, and small ranges) these general applications fail in precision and discriminative power. The application of compound specific analysis of specific components of food products helps to increase the precision of established models. Compound groups like fatty acids (FAMEs), vitamins or amino acids can help to add further detailed information on physiological pathways and local conditions (micro-climate, soil, water availability) and therefore might add further information for the separation of micro-localities. In this study we are aiming to demonstrate the power and surplus of information of compound specific isotope analysis in comparison to bulk analysis of agricultural products (e.g. olive oil, cereal crops or similar products) and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such (labor intense) analysis methods. Here we want to identify tools for further detailed analysis of specific compounds with high powers of region separation for better prediction models.

  10. Estimating pathway-specific contributions to biodegradation in aquifers based on dual isotope analysis: theoretical analysis and reactive transport simulations.

    PubMed

    Centler, Florian; Heße, Falk; Thullner, Martin

    2013-09-01

    At field sites with varying redox conditions, different redox-specific microbial degradation pathways contribute to total contaminant degradation. The identification of pathway-specific contributions to total contaminant removal is of high practical relevance, yet difficult to achieve with current methods. Current stable-isotope-fractionation-based techniques focus on the identification of dominant biodegradation pathways under constant environmental conditions. We present an approach based on dual stable isotope data to estimate the individual contributions of two redox-specific pathways. We apply this approach to carbon and hydrogen isotope data obtained from reactive transport simulations of an organic contaminant plume in a two-dimensional aquifer cross section to test the applicability of the method. To take aspects typically encountered at field sites into account, additional simulations addressed the effects of transverse mixing, diffusion-induced stable-isotope fractionation, heterogeneities in the flow field, and mixing in sampling wells on isotope-based estimates for aerobic and anaerobic pathway contributions to total contaminant biodegradation. Results confirm the general applicability of the presented estimation method which is most accurate along the plume core and less accurate towards the fringe where flow paths receive contaminant mass and associated isotope signatures from the core by transverse dispersion. The presented method complements the stable-isotope-fractionation-based analysis toolbox. At field sites with varying redox conditions, it provides a means to identify the relative importance of individual, redox-specific degradation pathways.

  11. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Alonso

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  12. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  13. Preparative separation of underivatized amino acids for compound-specific stable isotope analysis and radiocarbon dating of hydrolyzed bone collagen.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Jennifer A; McCullagh, James S O; Hedges, Robert E M

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of stable and radioactive isotopes from bone collagen provides useful information to archaeologists about the origin and age of bone artifacts. Isolation and analysis of single amino acids from the proteins can provide additional and more accurate information by removing contamination and separating a bulk isotope signal into its constituent parts. In this paper, we report a new method for the separation and isolation of underivatized amino acids from bone collagen, and their analysis by isotope ratio MS and accelerator MS. RP chromatography is used to separate the amino acids with nonpolar side chains, followed by an ion pair separation to isolate the remaining amino acids. The method produces single amino acids with little or no contamination from the separation process and allows for the measurement of accurate stable isotope ratios and pure samples for radiocarbon dating.

  14. Progress toward accurate high spatial resolution actinide analysis by EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jercinovic, M. J.; Allaz, J. M.; Williams, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    High precision, high spatial resolution EPMA of actinides is a significant issue for geochronology, resource geochemistry, and studies involving the nuclear fuel cycle. Particular interest focuses on understanding of the behavior of Th and U in the growth and breakdown reactions relevant to actinide-bearing phases (monazite, zircon, thorite, allanite, etc.), and geochemical fractionation processes involving Th and U in fluid interactions. Unfortunately, the measurement of minor and trace concentrations of U in the presence of major concentrations of Th and/or REEs is particularly problematic, especially in complexly zoned phases with large compositional variation on the micro or nanoscale - spatial resolutions now accessible with modern instruments. Sub-micron, high precision compositional analysis of minor components is feasible in very high Z phases where scattering is limited at lower kV (15kV or less) and where the beam diameter can be kept below 400nm at high current (e.g. 200-500nA). High collection efficiency spectrometers and high performance electron optics in EPMA now allow the use of lower overvoltage through an exceptional range in beam current, facilitating higher spatial resolution quantitative analysis. The U LIII edge at 17.2 kV precludes L-series analysis at low kV (high spatial resolution), requiring careful measurements of the actinide M series. Also, U-La detection (wavelength = 0.9A) requires the use of LiF (220) or (420), not generally available on most instruments. Strong peak overlaps of Th on U make highly accurate interference correction mandatory, with problems compounded by the ThMIV and ThMV absorption edges affecting peak, background, and interference calibration measurements (especially the interference of the Th M line family on UMb). Complex REE bearing phases such as monazite, zircon, and allanite have particularly complex interference issues due to multiple peak and background overlaps from elements present in the activation

  15. Use of stable isotope analysis in determining aquatic food webs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool for describing resource-consumer dynamics in ecosystems. In general, organisms of a given trophic level or functional feeding group will have a stable isotope ratio identifiable different than their prey because of preferential use of one ...

  16. Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Image segmentation for uranium isotopic analysis by SIMS: Combined adaptive thresholding and marker controlled watershed approach

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Zimmer, Mindy M.; Barrett, Christopher A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-05-31

    A novel approach to particle identification and particle isotope ratio determination has been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This particle search approach combines an adaptive thresholding algorithm and marker-controlled watershed segmentation (MCWS) transform, which improves the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) isotopic analysis of uranium containing particle populations for nuclear safeguards applications. The Niblack assisted MCWS approach (a.k.a. SEEKER) developed for this work has improved the identification of isotopically unique uranium particles under conditions that have historically presented significant challenges for SIMS image data processing techniques. Particles obtained from five NIST uranium certified reference materials (CRM U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850) were successfully identified in regions of SIMS image data 1) where a high variability in image intensity existed, 2) where particles were touching or were in close proximity to one another and/or 3) where the magnitude of ion signal for a given region was count limited. Analysis of the isotopic distributions of uranium containing particles identified by SEEKER showed four distinct, accurately identified 235U enrichment distributions, corresponding to the NIST certified 235U/238U isotope ratios for CRM U129A/U015 (not statistically differentiated), U150, U500 and U850. Additionally, comparison of the minor uranium isotope (234U, 235U and 236U) atom percent values verified that, even in the absence of high precision isotope ratio measurements, SEEKER could be used to segment isotopically unique uranium particles from SIMS image data. Although demonstrated specifically for SIMS analysis of uranium containing particles for nuclear safeguards, SEEKER has application in addressing a broad set of image processing challenges.

  18. Mercury speciation in seafood using isotope dilution analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Clémens, Stéphanie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David; Guérin, Thierry

    2012-01-30

    Mercury is a toxic compound that can contaminate humans through food and especially via fish consumption. Mercury's toxicity depends on the species, with methylmercury being the most hazardous form for humans. Hg speciation analysis has been and remains a widely studied subject because of the potential difficulty of preserving the initial distribution of mercury species in the analysed sample. Accordingly, many analytical methods have been developed and most of them incur significant loss and/or cross-species transformations during sample preparation. Therefore, to monitor and correct artefact formations, quantification by isotope dilution is increasingly used and provides significant added value for analytical quality assurance and quality control. This review presents and discusses the two different modes of application of isotope dilution analysis for elemental speciation (i.e. species-unspecific isotope dilution analysis and species-specific isotope dilution analysis) and the different quantification techniques (i.e. classical and multiple spike isotope dilution analyses). Isotope tracers are thus used at different stages of sample preparation to determine the extent of inter-species transformations and correct such analytical artefacts. Finally, a synthesis of the principal methods used for mercury speciation in seafood using isotope dilution analysis is presented.

  19. Use of Stable Isotopes in Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-18

    The use of isotopic signatures for forensic analysis of biological materials is well-established, and the same general principles that apply to interpretation of stable isotope content of C, N, O, and H apply to the analysis of microorganisms. Heterotrophic microorganisms derive their isotopic content from their growth substrates, which are largely plant and animal products, and the water in their culture medium. Thus the isotope signatures of microbes are tied to their growth environment. The C, N, O, and H isotope ratios of spores have been demonstrated to constitute highly discriminating signatures for sample matching. They can rule out specific samples of media and/or water as possible production media, and can predict isotope ratio ranges of the culture media and water used to produce a given sample. These applications have been developed and tested through analyses of approximately 250 samples of Bacillus subtilis spores and over 500 samples of culture media, providing a strong statistical basis for data interpretation. A Bayesian statistical framework for integrating stable isotope data with other types of signatures derived from microorganisms has been able to characterize the culture medium used to produce spores of various Bacillus species, leveraging isotopic differences in different medium types and demonstrating the power of data integration for forensic investigations.

  20. Isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Kimura, Takaumi

    2010-12-15

    Information on plutonium isotope ratios in individual particles is of great importance for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and so on. Although secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is successfully utilized for the analysis of individual uranium particles, the isobaric interference of americium-241 to plutonium-241 makes difficult to obtain accurate isotope ratios in individual plutonium particles. In the present work, an analytical technique by a combination of chemical separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is developed and applied to isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles. The ICP-MS results for individual plutonium particles prepared from a standard reference material (NBL SRM-947) indicate that the use of a desolvation system for sample introduction improves the precision of isotope ratios. In addition, the accuracy of the (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio is much improved, owing to the chemical separation of plutonium and americium. In conclusion, the performance of the proposed ICP-MS technique is sufficient for the analysis of individual plutonium particles.

  1. Isotopic ratio correlation for the isotopic composition analysis of plutonium in Am-Pu mixed samples having high americium content.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sabyasachi; Agarwal, Chhavi; Chaudhury, Sanhita; Newton Nathaniel, T; Gathibandhe, M; Goswami, A

    2013-08-01

    Interference of high amount of americium in the plutonium isotopic composition analysis has been studied by simulating gamma-ray spectra for Am-Pu samples over a wide composition range (5-97% (241)Am) for both power and research reactor grade plutonium. An alternate way for isotopic composition analysis has been proposed by correlating the isotopic ratios available in our old database with the experimentally obtained (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio. The proposed method has been validated using simulated spectra of known isotopic compositions.

  2. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  3. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  4. Stable isotope dilution assay for the accurate determination of mycotoxins in maize by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Varga, Elisabeth; Glauner, Thomas; Köppen, Robert; Mayer, Katharina; Sulyok, Michael; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Berthiller, Franz

    2012-03-01

    A fast, easy-to-handle and cost-effective analytical method for 11 mycotoxins currently regulated in maize and other cereal-based food products in Europe was developed and validated for maize. The method is based on two extraction steps using different acidified acetonitrile–water mixtures. Separation is achieved using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) by a linear water–methanol gradient. After electrospray ionisation, tandem mass spectrometric detection is performed in dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mode. Since accurate mass spectrometric quantification is hampered by matrix effects, uniformly [(13)C]-labelled mycotoxins for each of the 11 compounds were added to the sample extracts prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. Method performance parameters were obtained by spiking blank maize samples with mycotoxins before as well as after extraction on six levels in triplicates. The twofold extraction led to total recoveries of the extraction steps between 97% and 111% for all target analytes, including fumonisins. The [(13)C]-labelled internal standards efficiently compensated all matrix effects in electrospray ionisation, leading to apparent recoveries between 88% and 105% with reasonable additional costs. The relative standard deviations of the whole method were between 4% and 11% for all analytes. The trueness of the method was verified by the measurement of several maize test materials with well-characterized concentrations. In conclusion, the developed method is capable of determining all regulated mycotoxins in maize and presuming similar matrix effects and extraction recovery also in other cereal-based foods.

  5. Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Ben D.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO.sub.2 and CuCl. The CO.sub.2 is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH.sub.3 I to form CH.sub.3 Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio.

  6. Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Holt, B.D.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO{sub 2} and CuCl. The CO{sub 2} is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH{sub 3}I to form CH{sub 3}Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio. 9 figs.

  7. Evaluation of bioremediation systems utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, K.; Nowell, C.; Marley, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon, whether in an organic or inorganic form, is composed primarily of two stable isotopes, carbon-12 and carbon-13. The ratio of carbon-12 to carbon-13 is approximately 99:1. The stable carbon isotope ratios of most natural carbon materials of biological interest range from approximately 0 to {minus}110 per mil ({per_thousand}) versus the PDB standard. Utilizing stable carbon isotope analysis, it is often possible to determine the source(s) of the liberated carbon dioxide, thereby confirming successful mineralization of the targeted carbon compound(s) and, if the carbon dioxide results from multiple carbon compounds, in what ratio the carbon compounds are mineralized. Basic stable isotope `theory` recommended sampling procedures and analysis protocols are reviewed. A case study involving fuel oil presented on the application of stable carbon isotope analysis for the monitoring and evaluation of in situ bioremediation. At the site, where a field bioventing study was being conducted, multiple potential sources of carbon dioxide production existed. Additional potential applications of stable carbon isotope analysis for bioremediation evaluation and monitoring are discussed.

  8. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  9. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, M.S.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of obtaining stable carbon isotope analyses of coprocessing products is to determine the amount of coal (or petroleum) carbon that is present in any reaction product. This carbon-sourcing of distillate fractions, soluble resid, and insoluble organic matter, etc. is useful in modeling reactions, and evaluating synergistic effects if they exist.

  10. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1989-06-01

    The program is designed to address a substantial, demonstrated need of the coprocessing community (both exploratory and development) for a technique to quantitatively distinguish the contributions of the individual coprocessing feedstocks to the various products. The carbon isotope technique is currently in routine use for other applications. Results achieved this quarter include: Feed and product fractions from a Kentucky 9 coal/Kentucky tar sand bitumen coprocessing bench unit run at the Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. Corrections were made to the coal carbon recoveries and selectivities from the products of HRI Run 227-53. Feeds (Westerholt coal/Cold Lake VSB) and products from two periods of HRI coprocessing Run 238-1 were analyzed. Three petroleum samples and three coal samples were pyrolyzed at 800{degree}F for 30 min to determine the effect of pyrolysis on the isotopic homogeneity of each petroleum and coal sample. Products from each pyrolysis test were separated into five fractions; an additional set of coprocessing samples and a set of two-stage coal liquefaction samples were obtained from HRI for future work; work performed by the Pennsylvania State University show that microscopy is a promising method for distinguishing coal and petroleum products in residual coprocessing materials; and coal and petroleums that have large differences in carbon isotope ratios were identified for Auburn University. 7 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Soil Carbon: Compositional and Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Alexander, M. L.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    This is a short chapter to be included in the next edition of the Encyclopedia of Soil Science. The work here describes techniques being developed at PNNL for investigating organic carbon in soils. Techniques discussed include: laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry, laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometry, and nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  12. Light stable isotope analysis of meteorites by ion microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The main goal was to develop the necessary secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) techniques to use a Cameca ims-4f ion microprobe to measure light stable isotope ratios (H, C, O and S) in situ and in non-conducting mineral phases. The intended application of these techniques was the analysis of meteorite samples, although the techniques that have been developed are equally applicable to the investigation of terrestrial samples. The first year established techniques for the analysis of O isotope ratios (delta O-18 and delta O-17) in conducting mineral phases and the measurement of S isotope ratios (delta S-34) in a variety of sulphide phases. In addition, a technique was developed to measure delta S-34 values in sulphates, which are insulators. Other research undertaken in the first year resulted in SIMS techniques for the measurement of wide variety of trace elements in carbonate minerals, with the aim of understanding the nature of alteration fluids in carbonaceous chondrites. In the second year we developed techniques for analyzing O isotope ratios in nonconducting mineral phases. These methods are potentially applicable to the measurement of other light stable isotopes such as H, C and S in insulators. Also, we have further explored the analytical techniques used for the analysis of S isotopes in sulphides by analyzing troilite in a number of L and H ordinary chondrites. This was done to see if there was any systematic differences with petrological type.

  13. Proteome Analysis using Selective Incorporation of Isotopically Labeled Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Timothy D.; Martinovic, Suzana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Smith, Richard D.

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for identifying intact proteins from genomic databases using a combination of accurate molecular mass measurements and partial amino acid content. An initial demonstration was conducted for proteins isolated from Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a multiple auxotrophic strain of K12. Proteins were extracted from the organism grown in natural isotopic abundance minimal medium and also minimal medium containing isotopically labeled leucine (Leu-D10), were mixed and analyzed by capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR). The incorporation of the isotopically labeled Leu residue has no effect on the CIEF separation of the protein, therefore both versions of the protein are observed within the same FTICR spectrum. The difference in the molecular mass of the natural isotopic abundance and Leu-D10 isotopically labeled proteins is used to determine the number of Leu residues present in that particular protein. Knowledge of the molecular mass and number of Leu residues present can be used to unambiguously identify the intact protein. Preliminary results show the efficacy of using this method to unambiguously identify proteins isolated from E. coli.

  14. High Resolution Gamma Ray Analysis of Medical Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillery, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Compton-suppressed high-purity Germanium detectors at the University of Massachusetts Lowell have been used to study medical radioisotopes produced at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), in particular isotopes such as Pt-191 used for cancer therapy in patients. The ability to precisely analyze the concentrations of such radio-isotopes is essential for both production facilities such as Brookhaven and consumer hospitals across the U.S. Without accurate knowledge of the quantities and strengths of these isotopes, it is possible for doctors to administer incorrect dosages to patients, thus leading to undesired results. Samples have been produced at Brookhaven and shipped to UML, and the advanced electronics and data acquisition capabilities at UML have been used to extract peak areas in the gamma decay spectra. Levels of Pt isotopes in diluted samples have been quantified, and reaction cross-sections deduced from the irradiation parameters. These provide both cross checks with published work, as well as a rigorous quantitative framework with high quality state-of-the-art detection apparatus in use in the experimental nuclear physics community.

  15. Basalt Pb isotope analysis and the prehistoric settlement of Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Weisler, M I; Woodhead, J D

    1995-03-14

    The prehistoric settlement of the Pacific Ocean has intrigued scholars and stimulated anthropological debate for the past two centuries. Colonized over a few millennia during the mid to late Holocene, the islands of the Pacific--displaying a wide diversity of geological and biotic variability--provided the stage for endless "natural experiments" in human adaptation. Crucial to understanding the evolution and transformation of island societies is documenting the relative degree of interisland contacts after island colonization. In the western Pacific, ideal materials for archaeologically documenting interisland contact--obsidian, pottery, and shell ornaments--are absent or of limited geographic distribution in Polynesia. Consequently, archaeologists have relied increasingly on fine-grained basalt artifacts as a means for documenting colonization routes and subsequent interisland contacts. Routinely used x-ray fluorescence characterization of oceanic island basalt has some problems for discriminating source rocks and artifacts in provenance studies. The variation in trace and major element abundances is largely controlled by near-surface magma-chamber processes and is broadly similar between most oceanic islands. We demonstrate that Pb isotope analysis accurately discriminates rock source and is an excellent technique for charting the scale, frequency, and temporal span of imported fine-grained basalt artifacts found throughout Polynesia. The technique adds another tool for addressing evolutionary models of interaction, isolation, and cultural divergence in the eastern Pacific.

  16. Accurate feature detection and estimation using nonlinear and multiresolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, Leonid; Osher, Stanley

    1994-11-01

    A program for feature detection and estimation using nonlinear and multiscale analysis was completed. The state-of-the-art edge detection was combined with multiscale restoration (as suggested by the first author) and robust results in the presence of noise were obtained. Successful applications to numerous images of interest to DOD were made. Also, a new market in the criminal justice field was developed, based in part, on this work.

  17. A rapid, accurate and sensitive method with the new stable isotopic tags based on microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and its application to the determination of hydroxyl UV filters in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu; Chen, Guang; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Yuxia; Zhao, Xianen; Cao, Ziping; Xia, Lian; Li, Guoliang; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shijuan; Wang, Hua; You, Jinmao

    2017-05-15

    A rapid, accurate and sensitive method, using the stable isotope labeling (SIL), microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid micro extraction (MADLLME) and the ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS), was developed and validated for the determination of hydroxyl UV Filters in environmental water samples. A pair of new isotopic tags D0-/D3-1-methylindole-3-acetic acid (D0-/D3-MIAA) is synthesized, with which a simple yet efficient pretreatment MADLLME-SIL is developed. Under the optimized conditions (80℃, 240W, 180s), the sample pretreatment including analyte extraction, pre-concentration and isotope labeling can be finished conveniently in only 9min. D0-/D3-MIAA labeling improves the chromatographic retention by strengthening the hydrophobicity and enhances the MS response for 3-4 orders of magnitude. Excellent linearity is established by the H/D ratios of 1/10-10/1 with the correlation coefficients >0.9990. The quite low detection limits (0.54-1.79ng/L) are achieved, ensuring the trace detection. This method is successfully applied to a series of environmental water samples. The recoveries (93.2%~103.5%) are significantly improved and the analysis time is largely reduced (<15min). The excellent sensitivity, accuracy, recovery, and efficiency demonstrate this MADLLME-SIL-LC-MS/MS method a superior alternative for the analysis of UV filters in water samples.

  18. Reduction procedures for accurate analysis of MSX surveillance experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. Mike; Lane, Mark T.; Abbot, Rick I.

    1994-01-01

    Technical challenges of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) science instruments require careful characterization and calibration of these sensors for analysis of surveillance experiment data. Procedures for reduction of Resident Space Object (RSO) detections will be presented which include refinement and calibration of the metric and radiometric (and photometric) data and calculation of a precise MSX ephemeris. Examples will be given which support the reduction, and these are taken from ground-test data similar in characteristics to the MSX sensors and from the IRAS satellite RSO detections. Examples to demonstrate the calculation of a precise ephemeris will be provided from satellites in similar orbits which are equipped with S-band transponders.

  19. Isotopic analysis of cometary organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1991-04-01

    Carbon isotope ratios have been measured for CN in the coma of Comet Halley and for several CHON particles emitted by Halley. Of these, only the CHON-particle data may be reasonably related to organic matter in the cometary nucleus, but the true range of (C-13)/(C-12) values in those particles is quite uncertain. The D/H ratio in H2O in the Halley coma resembles that in Titan/Uranus.

  20. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    PubMed Central

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236U/238U isotope ratios (i.e. 10−5). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234U/238U and 235U/238U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236U/238U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties Uc (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234U/238U, 235U/238U and 236U/238U, respectively. PMID:22595724

  1. Stable isotopic analysis of porcine, bovine, and ovine heparins.

    PubMed

    Jasper, John P; Zhang, Fuming; Poe, Russell B; Linhardt, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    The assessment of provenance of heparin is becoming a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry and its regulatory bodies. Batch-specific [carbon (δ(13) C), nitrogen (δ(15) N), oxygen (δ(18) O), sulfur (δ(34) S), and hydrogen (δD)] stable isotopic compositions of five different animal-derived heparins were performed. Measurements readily allowed their differentiation into groups and/or subgroups based on their isotopic provenance. Principle component analysis showed that a bivariate plot of δ(13) C and δ(18) O is the best single, bivariate plot that results in the maximum discrimination ability when only two stable isotopes are used to describe the variation in the data set. Stable isotopic analyses revealed that (1) stable isotope measurements on these highly sulfated polysaccharide (molecular weight ∼15 kDa) natural products ("biologics") were feasible; (2) in bivariate plots, the δ(13) C versus δ(18) O plot reveals a well-defined relationship for source differentiation of hogs raised in the United States from hogs raised in Europe and China; (3) the δD versus δ(18) O plot revealed the most well-defined relationship for source differentiation based on the hydrologic environmental isotopes of water (D/H and (18) O/(16) O); and (4) the δ(15) N versus δ(18) O and δ(34) S versus δ(18) O relationships are both very similar, possibly reflecting the food sources used by the different heparin producers.

  2. Isotopic trace analysis by atomic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffels, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    All the production facilities at Hanford are now shut down. However, the legacy from half a century of plutonium production includes 177 underground storage tanks of up to one million gallons each containing the largest accumulation of high-level radioactive waste in what used to be called ``the free world.`` Hanford`s new mission, in addition to a spectrum of ongoing research and development, is radioactive waste management and environmental restoration. Isotope-ratio mass spectrometry will continue to be an essential tool in monitoring the progress of that mission.

  3. Enantioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) of polar Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Michael; Qiu, Shiran; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The complexity of aquatic systems makes it challenging to assess the environmental fate of chiral micropolutants. As an example, chiral herbicides are frequently detected in the environment (Buser and Muller, 1998); however, hydrological data is needed to determine their degradability from concentration measurements. Otherwise declining concentrations cannot unequivocally be attributed to degradation, but could also be caused by dilution effects. In contrast, isotope ratios or enantiomeric ratios are elegant alternatives that are independent of dilution and can even deliver insights into reaction mechanisms. To combine the advantages of both approaches we developed an enatioselective stable isotope analysis (ESIA) method to investigate the fate of the chiral herbicides 4-CPP ((RS)-2-(4-chlorophenoxy)-propionic acid), mecoprop (2-(4-Chloro-2-methylphenoxy)-propionic acid) and dichlorprop (2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)-propionic acid). After testing the applicable concentration range of the method, enantioselective isotope fractionation was investigated by microbial degradation using dichlorprop as a model compound. The method uses enantioselective gas-chromatography (GC) to separate enantiomers. Subsequently samples are combusted online to CO2 and carbon isotope ratios are determined for each enantiomer by isotope-ratio-mass-spectrometry (IRMS). Because the analytes contain a polar carboxyl-group, samples were derivatised prior to GC-IRMS analysis with methanolic BF3 solution. Precise carbon isotope analysis (2σ ≤0.5‰) was achieved with a high sensitivity of ≥ 7 ng C that is needed on column for one analysis. Microbial degradation of the model compound dichlorprop was conducted with Delftia acidovorans MC1 and pronounced enantiomer fractionation, but no isotope fractionation was detected. The absence of isotope fractionation can be explained by two scenarios: either the degrading enzyme has no isotopic preference, or another step in the reaction without an isotopic

  4. Enantiomeric and Isotopic Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites contain numerous compounds of interest in the study of early solar system organic chemistry and organic compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. These include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the enantiomeric and isotopic analysis of individual meteoritic compounds - primarily polyol acids. The analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison, another potentially important class of prebiotic compounds also contains enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life. Preliminary enantiomeric and isotopic (C- 13) measurements of Murchison glyceric acid show that it is indeed extraterrestrial. C-13 and D isotope analysis of meteoritic sugar alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol, etc.) has shown that they are also indigenous to the meteorite.

  5. Hg stable isotope analysis by the double-spike method.

    PubMed

    Mead, Chris; Johnson, Thomas M

    2010-06-01

    Recent publications suggest great potential for analysis of Hg stable isotope abundances to elucidate sources and/or chemical processes that control the environmental impact of mercury. We have developed a new MC-ICP-MS method for analysis of mercury isotope ratios using the double-spike approach, in which a solution containing enriched (196)Hg and (204)Hg is mixed with samples and provides a means to correct for instrumental mass bias and most isotopic fractionation that may occur during sample preparation and introduction into the instrument. Large amounts of isotopic fractionation induced by sample preparation and introduction into the instrument (e.g., by batch reactors) are corrected for. This may greatly enhance various Hg pre-concentration methods by correcting for minor fractionation that may occur during preparation and removing the need to demonstrate 100% recovery. Current precision, when ratios are normalized to the daily average, is 0.06 per thousand, 0.06 per thousand, 0.05 per thousand, and 0.05 per thousand (2sigma) for (202)Hg/(198)Hg, (201)Hg/(198)Hg, (200)Hg/(198)Hg, and (199)Hg/(198)Hg, respectively. This is slightly better than previously published methods. Additionally, this precision was attained despite the presence of large amounts of other Hg isotopes (e.g., 5.0% atom percent (198)Hg) in the spike solution; substantially better precision could be achieved if purer (196)Hg were used.

  6. Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet

    2009-04-01

    Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as “fission product other” or “actinide other”. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

  7. Accurate determination of ochratoxin A in Korean fermented soybean paste by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seonghee; Lee, Suyoung; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, has been frequently detected in doenjang, a traditional fermented soybean paste, when it is fermented under improper conditions. Reliable screening of OTA in traditional fermented soybean paste (doenjang) is a special food-safety issue in Korea. Our laboratory, the National Metrology Institute of Korea, established an isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) method as a higher-order reference method to be used for SI-traceable value-assignment of OTA in certified reference materials (CRMs). (13)C20-OTA was used as an internal standard. Sample preparation conditions and LC/MS measurement parameters were optimised for this purpose. The analytical method was validated by measuring samples fortified with OTA at various levels. Repeatability and reproducibility studies showed that the ID-LC/MS/MS method is reliable and reproducible within 2% relative standard deviation. The analytical method was applied to determine OTA in various commercial doenjang products and home-made doenjang products.

  8. An Empirical Approach to Obtaining Accurate Molecular Rotational Constants for Isotopically-Substituted Species from AB Initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Brett A.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in microwave spectroscopy, namely the development of broadband, chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers, allow the acquisition of rotational spectra of isotopically-substituted species in natural abundance. The characterization and assignment of these spectra is of particular interest as it applies to astrochemical observations of such species in the interstellar medium. Here, we demonstrate an empirical method for determining rotational constants to aid in the initial assignment of such spectra using a combination of laboratory data and ab initio calculations. The result is an increase in the accuracy of these constants by as much as two orders of magnitude versus those resulting from simple structure optimizations. We have applied this method to a variety of species including diatomic molecules (e.g. HCl), large molecules with internal motion (e.g. CH_3COOH), ions (e.g. HCO^+), clusters (e.g. H_2O\\cdotH_2O), and long carbon chain molecules (e.g. HC_7N). We present the results of these analyses and comment on the applicability of this method to other systems.

  9. High-precision, automated stable isotope analysis of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide using continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rebecca; Lowry, David; Wilkin, Owen; Sriskantharajah, Srimathy; Nisbet, Euan G

    2006-01-01

    Small-scale developments have been made to an off-the-shelf continuous-flow gas chromatography/isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (CF-GC/IRMS) system to allow high-precision isotopic analysis of methane (CH(4)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) at ambient concentrations. The repeatability (1sigma) obtainable with this system is 0.05 per thousand for delta(13)C of CH(4), 0.03 per thousand for delta(13)C of CO(2), and 0.05 per thousand for delta(18)O of CO(2) for ten consecutive analyses of a standard tank. An automated inlet system, which allows diurnal studies of CO(2) and CH(4) isotopes, is also described. The improved precision for CH(4) analysis was achieved with the use of a palladium powder on quartz wool catalyst in the combustion furnace, which increased the efficiency of oxidation of CH(4) to CO(2). The automated inlet further improved the precision for both CH(4) and CO(2) analysis by keeping the routine constant. The method described provides a fast turn-around in samples, with accurate, reproducible results, and would allow a long-term continuous record of CH(4) or CO(2) isotopes at a site to be made, providing information about changing sources of the gases both seasonally and interannually.

  10. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of {sup 85}Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10{sup {minus}10} or less of {sup 85}Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace {sup 85}Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s{sub 5} metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p{sub 6} energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s{sub 4} level with the bulk of the {sup 85}Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine {sup 85}Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below.

  11. Trophic hierarchies illuminated via amino acid isotopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Shawn A; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Horton, David R; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Singleton, Merritt E; Miliczky, Eugene; Hogg, David B; Jones, Vincent P

    2013-01-01

    Food web ecologists have long sought to characterize the trophic niches of animals using stable isotopic analysis. However, distilling trophic position from isotopic composition has been difficult, largely because of the variability associated with trophic discrimination factors (inter-trophic isotopic fractionation and routing). We circumvented much of this variability using compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA). We examined the (15)N signatures of amino acids extracted from organisms reared in pure culture at four discrete trophic levels, across two model communities. We calculated the degree of enrichment at each trophic level and found there was a consistent trophic discrimination factor (~7.6‰). The constancy of the CSIA-derived discrimination factor permitted unprecedented accuracy in the measurement of animal trophic position. Conversely, trophic position estimates generated via bulk-(15)N analysis significantly underestimated trophic position, particularly among higher-order consumers. We then examined the trophic hierarchy of a free-roaming arthropod community, revealing the highest trophic position (5.07) and longest food chain ever reported using CSIA. High accuracy in trophic position estimation brings trophic function into sharper focus, providing greater resolution to the analysis of food webs.

  12. Trophic Hierarchies Illuminated via Amino Acid Isotopic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Steffan, Shawn A.; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Horton, David R.; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Singleton, Merritt E.; Miliczky, Eugene; Hogg, David B.; Jones, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    Food web ecologists have long sought to characterize the trophic niches of animals using stable isotopic analysis. However, distilling trophic position from isotopic composition has been difficult, largely because of the variability associated with trophic discrimination factors (inter-trophic isotopic fractionation and routing). We circumvented much of this variability using compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA). We examined the 15N signatures of amino acids extracted from organisms reared in pure culture at four discrete trophic levels, across two model communities. We calculated the degree of enrichment at each trophic level and found there was a consistent trophic discrimination factor (~7.6‰). The constancy of the CSIA-derived discrimination factor permitted unprecedented accuracy in the measurement of animal trophic position. Conversely, trophic position estimates generated via bulk-15N analysis significantly underestimated trophic position, particularly among higher-order consumers. We then examined the trophic hierarchy of a free-roaming arthropod community, revealing the highest trophic position (5.07) and longest food chain ever reported using CSIA. High accuracy in trophic position estimation brings trophic function into sharper focus, providing greater resolution to the analysis of food webs. PMID:24086703

  13. Trophic spectra under the lens of amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in compound specific isotopic ratio analysis (CSIRA) have allowed researchers to measure trophic fractionation of 15N in specific amino acids, namely glutamic acid and phenylalanine. These amino acids have proven useful in food web studies because of the wide and consistent disparity...

  14. Using Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis to Distinguish Perchlorate Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-30

    Desert - natural nitrogen fertilizer 2. Mineral deposits – Death Valley, CA 3. Southwest soils and groundwater B. Other Anthropogenic 1. Fireworks 2...Herbicides Gunpowder Fireworks Road Flares Taiwanese Natural (Chile)  3 7 C l ( p e r m i l ) 18O (per mil) Forensic Isotopic Analysis: Chilean vs

  15. Stable Isotope Ratios and the Forensic Analysis of Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2007-06-01

    In the aftermath of the anthrax letters of 2001, researchers have been exploring various analytical signatures for the purpose of characterizing the production environment of microorganisms. One such signature is stable isotope ratios, which in heterotrophs are a function of nutrient and water sources. Here we discuss the use of stable isotope ratios in microbe forensics, using as a database the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of 247 separate cultures of B. subtilis 6051 spores produced on a total of 32 different culture media. In the context of using stable isotope ratios as a signature for sample matching, we present an analysis of variation between individual samples, between cultures produced in tandem, and between cultures produced in the same medium but at different times. Additionally, we correlate the stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen for growth medium nutrients or water with those of spores and show examples of how these relationships can be used to exclude nutrient or water samples as possible growth substrates for specific cultures.

  16. Discrimination of ginseng cultivation regions using light stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiwook; Song, Joo-Hyun; Heo, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Jin-Hee; Jung, In-Woo; Min, Ji-Sook

    2015-10-01

    Korean ginseng is considered to be a precious health food in Asia. Today, thieves frequently compromise ginseng farms by pervasive theft. Thus, studies regarding the characteristics of ginseng according to growth region are required in order to deter ginseng thieves and prevent theft. In this study, 6 regions were selected on the basis of Korea regional criteria (si, gun, gu), and two ginseng-farms were randomly selected from each of the 6 regions. Then 4-6 samples of ginseng were acquired from each ginseng farm. The stable isotopic compositions of H, O, C, and N of the collected ginseng samples were analyzed. As a result, differences in the hydrogen isotope ratios could be used to distinguish regional differences, and differences in the nitrogen isotope ratios yielded characteristic information regarding the farms from which the samples were obtained. Thus, stable isotope values could be used to differentiate samples according to regional differences. Therefore, stable isotope analysis serves as a powerful tool to discriminate the regional origin of Korean ginseng samples from across Korea.

  17. STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF SUBFOSSIL WOOD FROM AUSTRIAN ALPS

    PubMed Central

    KŁUSEK, MARZENA; PAWEŁCZYK, SŁAWOMIRA

    2015-01-01

    The presented studies were carried out in order to check the usefulness of subfossil wood for stable isotope analysis. The aim of research was also to define the optimal method of subfossil samples preparation. Subfossil samples used during the presented studies are a part of the multi-century dendrochronological scale. This chronology originates in an area situated around a small mountain lake — Schwarzersee, in Austria. The obtained results of stable carbon isotope measurements confirmed that the method of α-cellulose extraction by the application of acidic sodium chlorite and sodium hydroxide solutions removes resins and other mobile compounds from wood. Therefore, in the case of the analysed samples, the additional chemical process of extractives removing was found to be unnecessary. Studied wood samples contained an adequate proportion of α-cellulose similar to the values characteristic for the contemporary trees. This proved an adequate wood preservation which is essential for the conduction of isotopic research. PMID:26346297

  18. Stable isotope analysis of breath using the optogalvanic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnick, Daniel E.; Colgan, M. J.; Lie, H. P.; Stoneback, D.

    1996-05-01

    A new technique based on the optogalvanic effect has been developed for the measurement of stable isotope ratios in the carbon dioxide of exhaled breath. Data obtained before and after ingestion of harmless stable isotope labeled compounds, metabolized to carbon dioxide, can be used for sensitive noninvasive diagnostics of various disease conditions. The technique uses the specificity of laser resonance spectroscopy and achieves sensitivity and accuracy typical of sophisticated isotope ratio mass spectrometers. Using fixed frequency carbon dioxide lasers, 13C/12C ratios can be determined with a precision of 2 ppm with 100 second averaging times. Multiple samples can be analyzed simultaneously providing real time continuous calibration. In a first application, analysis of 13C/12C ratios in exhaled human breath after ingestion of 13C labeled urea is being developed as a diagnostic for the bacterium H-pylori, known to be the causative agent for most peptic and duodenal ulcers.

  19. ``Recycling'' Geophysics: Monitoring and Isotopic Analysis of Engineered Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, R.; Singh, K. P.; Ogle, N.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2010-12-01

    The emerging sub discipline of biogeophysics has provoked debate on the mechanisms of microbial processes that may contribute to geophysical signatures. At field scales geophysical signatures are often non unique due to the many parameters (physical, chemical, and biological) that are involved. It may be easier to apply geophysical techniques such as electrodic potential (EP), self potential (SP) and induced polarization (IP) to engineered biological systems where there is a degree of control over the design of the physical and chemical domain. Here we present results of a column experiment that was designed to anaerobically biodegrade dissolved organic matter in landfill leachate. The column utilises a recycled porous media (concrete) to help sequester organic carbon. Electrodic potential, self potential and induced polarisation are used in conjunction with chemical and isotopic techniques to monitor the effectiveness of this approach. Preliminary carbon and oxygen isotopic analysis on concrete from the column in contact with leachate show isotopic enrichment suggesting abiotic precipitation of carbonates.

  20. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus.

  1. Isotopic disproportionation during hydrogen isotopic analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nair, Sreejesh; Geilmann, Heike; Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Gehre, Matthias; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Brand, Willi A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale High-precision hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic materials using high-temperature conversion (HTC) techniques has proven troublesome in the past. Formation of reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) has been suspected as a possible cause of incomplete H2 yield and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Methods The classical HTC reactor setup and a modified version including elemental chromium, both operated at temperatures in excess of 1400 °C, have been compared using a selection of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds, including caffeine. A focus of the experiments was to avoid or suppress hydrogen cyanide (HCN) formation and to reach quantitative H2 yields. The technique also was optimized to provide acceptable sample throughput. Results The classical HTC reaction of a number of selected compounds exhibited H2 yields from 60 to 90 %. Yields close to 100 % were measured for the experiments with the chromium-enhanced reactor. The δ2H values also were substantially different between the two types of experiments. For the majority of the compounds studied, a highly significant relationship was observed between the amount of missing H2and the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecules, suggesting the pyrolytic formation of HCN as a byproduct. A similar linear relationship was found between the amount of missing H2 and the observed hydrogen isotopic result, reflecting isotopic fractionation. Conclusions The classical HTC technique to produce H2 from organic materials using high temperatures in the presence of glassy carbon is not suitable for nitrogen-bearing compounds. Adding chromium to the reaction zone improves the yield to 100 % in most cases. The initial formation of HCN is accompanied by a strong hydrogen isotope effect, with the observed hydrogen isotope results on H2 being substantially shifted to more negative δ2H values. The reaction can be understood as an initial disproportionation leading to H2 and HCN

  2. In Situ Oxygen Isotope Analysis of Conodonts by SIMS and Its Implication for Paleo-sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Chen, J.; Chen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Wang, R.; Tang, G.; Li, X.; Lv, J.; Zhuang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotope composition of biogenic apatite is potentially useful in paleotemperature reconstruction of contemporaneous surface seawater temperature (SST). Combined with abundant researches on their biostratigraphy, the geochemical analysis of conodonts contains more significant signatures indicating paleoenvironmental changes. However, the small size is always a limited factor for the accurate analysis. In this work, we tested the oxygen isotope of conodont using Cameca IMS-1280 secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for the first time and acquired reliable records on contemporaneous SST. We found that SST raised rapidly following the Late Permian biocrisis, implying that the rapid increase in paleo-temperature may have been one of the crucial killers responsible for the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Compared with the previous Ag3PO4 method, our analysis technique is faster with both high resolution and high spatial resolution, so we can avoid the position easily contaminated during the late diagensis and acquire the original oxygen isotopic compositions.

  3. Demonstration of compound-specific isotope analysis of hydrogen isotope ratios in chlorinated ethenes.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, Paul

    2013-02-05

    High-temperature pyrolysis conversion of organic analytes to H(2) in hydrogen isotope ratio compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is unsuitable for chlorinated compounds such as trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), due to competition from HCl formation. For this reason, the information potential of hydrogen isotope ratios of chlorinated ethenes remains untapped. We present a demonstration of an alternative approach where chlorinated analytes reacted with chromium metal to form H(2) and minor amounts of HCl. The values of δ(2)H were obtained at satisfactory precision (± 10 to 15 per thousand), however the raw data required daily calibration by TCE and/or DCE standards to correct for analytical bias that varies over time. The chromium reactor has been incorporated into a purge and trap-CSIA method that is suitable for CSIA of aqueous environmental samples. A sample data set was obtained for six specimens of commercial product TCE. The resulting values of δ(2)H were between -184 and +682 ‰, which significantly widened the range of manufactured TCE δ(2)H signatures identified by past work. The implications of this finding to the assessment of TCE contamination are discussed.

  4. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  5. Accurate and precise quantification of atmospheric nitrate in streams draining land of various uses by using triple oxygen isotopes as tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyauchi, Takanori; Ohyama, Takuya; Komatsu, Daisuke D.; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Obata, Yusuke; Sato, Keiichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Land use in a catchment area has significant impacts on nitrate eluted from the catchment, including atmospheric nitrate deposited onto the catchment area and remineralised nitrate produced within the catchment area. Although the stable isotopic compositions of nitrate eluted from a catchment can be a useful tracer to quantify the land use influences on the sources and behaviour of the nitrate, it is best to determine these for the remineralised portion of the nitrate separately from the unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to obtain a more accurate and precise quantification of the land use influences. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution and seasonal variation of stable isotopic compositions of nitrate for more than 30 streams within the same watershed, the Lake Biwa watershed in Japan, in order to use 17O excess (Δ17O) of nitrate as an additional tracer to quantify the mole fraction of atmospheric nitrate accurately and precisely. The stable isotopic compositions, including Δ17O of nitrate, in precipitation (wet deposition; n = 196) sampled at the Sado-seki monitoring station were also determined for 3 years. The deposited nitrate showed large 17O excesses similar to those already reported for midlatitudes: Δ17O values ranged from +18.6 to +32.4 ‰ with a 3-year average of +26.3 ‰. However, nitrate in each inflow stream showed small annual average Δ17O values ranging from +0.5 to +3.1 ‰, which corresponds to mole fractions of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate from (1.8 ± 0.3) to (11.8 ± 1.8) % respectively, with an average for all inflow streams of (5.1 ± 0.5) %. Although the annual average Δ17O values tended to be smaller in accordance with the increase in annual average stream nitrate concentration from 12.7 to 106.2 µmol L-1, the absolute concentrations of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate were almost stable at (2.3 ± 1.1) µmol L-1 irrespective of the changes in population density and land use in each catchment area

  6. Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotope analysis of N-nitrosodimethylamine in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Spahr, Stephanie; Bolotin, Jakov; Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; von Gunten, Urs; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2015-03-03

    Mitigation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other hazardous water disinfection byproducts (DBP) is currently hampered by a limited understanding of DBP formation mechanisms. Because variations of the stable isotope composition of NDMA can potentially reveal reaction pathways and precursor compounds, we developed a method for the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of (13)C/(12)C, (15)N/(14)N, and (2)H/(1)H ratios of NDMA by gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). Method quantification limits for the accurate isotope analysis of NDMA, N-nitrosodiethyl-, -dipropyl-, and -dibutylamine as well as N-nitrosopyrrolidine were between 0.18 to 0.60 nmol C, 0.40 to 0.80 nmol N, and 2.2 to 5.8 nmol H injected on column. Coupling solid phase extraction (SPE) to GC/IRMS enabled the precise quantification of C, N, and H isotope ratios of NDMA in aqueous samples at concentrations of 0.6 μM (45 μg L(-1)). We validated the proposed method with a laboratory experiment, in which NDMA was formed with stoichiometric yield (97 ± 4%) through chloramination of the pharmaceutical ranitidine (3 μM). δ(13)C and δ(2)H values of NDMA remained constant during NDMA formation while its δ(15)N increased due to a reaction at a N atom in the rate-limiting step of NDMA formation. The δ(2)H value of NDMA determined by SPE-GC/IRMS also corresponded well to the δ(2)H value of the N(CH3)2-group of ranitidine measured by quantitative deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This observation implies that the N(CH3)2-moiety of ranitidine is transferred to NDMA without being chemically altered and illustrates the accuracy of the proposed method.

  7. MGA (Multi-Group Analysis): A gamma-ray spectrum analysis code for determining plutonium isotopic abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnink, R

    1990-04-03

    Nondestructive measurements of x-ray and gamma-ray emissions can be used to analyze a sample for plutonium. This report describes the methods and algorithms we have developed for analyzing gamma-ray spectra obtained by using a germanium detector system to accurately determine the relative abundances of various actinide isotopes in a sample. Our methodology requires no calibrations and can be used to measure virtually any size and type of plutonium sample. Measurement times can be as short as a few minutes; measurements are frequently accurate to within 1%. Our methods have been programmed into a computerized analysis code called MGA (Multi-Group Analysis). Our current versions can be run on personal computers (IBM type) and on the DEC VAX microcomputer. Spectral analysis times are usually far less than a minute. 28 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  8. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltmann, Tim; Mandic, Magda; Stöbener, Nils; Wapelhorst, Eric; Aepfler, Rebecca; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Taubner, Heidi; Jost, Hj; Elvert, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  9. On-site isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon using an isotope ratio infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, H. J. H.; Stoltmann, T.; Stöbener, N.; Wapelhorst, E.; Mandic, M.; Aepfler, R.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Taubner, H.; Elvert, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer (IRIS) has been adapted to perform measurements of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in marine pore waters. The resulting prototype allowed highly automated analysis of δ13C isotopic ratios and CO2 concentration. We achieved a throughput of up to 70 samples per day with DIC contents as low as 1.7 μmol C. We achieved an internal precision of 0.066 ‰ and an external precision of 0.16 ‰, which is comparable to values given for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). The prototype instrument is field deployable, suitable for shipboard analysis of deep sea core pore waters. However, the validation of the prototype was centered around a field campaign in Eckernförde Bay, NW- Baltic Sea. As a proof of concept, a shallow site within an area of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and a site outside this area was investigated. We present profiles of δ13C of DIC over 50 cm exhibiting well understood methane turnover processes (anaerobic oxidation of methane). At the lowest point below the seafloor, microbial reduction of CO2 to CH4 dominates. 12CO2 is reduced preferentially over 13CO2, leading to more positive δ13C values in the remaining DIC pool; in layers closer to the surface, the oxidation of CH4 to CO2 becomes more prominent. Since the CH4 pool is enriched in 12C a shift to more negative δ13C can be observed in the DIC pool. In the upper 15 cm, the pore water DIC mixes with the sea water DIC, increasing δ13C again. Finally, we will present recent developments to further improve performance and future plans for deployments on research cruises.

  10. Automated SIMS Isotopic Analysis Of Small Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L.; Alexander, C.; Gyngard, F.; Morgand, A.; Zinner, E. K.

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic compositions of sub-μm to μm sized dust grains are of increasing interest in cosmochemistry, nuclear forensics and terrestrial aerosol research. Because of its high sensitivity and spatial resolution, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is the tool of choice for measuring isotopes in such small samples. Indeed, SIMS has enabled an entirely new sub-field of astronomy: presolar grains in meteorites. In recent years, the development of the Cameca NanoSIMS ion probe has extended the reach of isotopic measurements to particles as small as 100 nm in diameter, a regime where isotopic precision is strongly limited by the total number of atoms in the sample. Many applications require obtaining isotopic data on large numbers of particles, necessitating the development of automated techniques. One such method is isotopic imaging, wherein images of multiple isotopes are acquired, each containing multiple dispersed particles, and image processing is used to determine isotopic ratios for individual particles. This method is powerful, but relatively inefficient for raster-based imaging on the NanoSIMS. Modern computerized control of instrumentation has allowed for another approach, analogous to commercial automated SEM-EDS particle analysis systems, in which images are used solely to locate particles followed by fully automated grain-by-grain analysis. The first such system was developed on the Carnegie Institution’s Cameca ims-6f, and was used to generate large databases of presolar grains. We have recently developed a similar system for the NanoSIMS, whose high sensitivity allows for smaller grains to be analyzed with less sample consumption than is possible with the 6f system. The 6f and NanoSIMS systems are functionally identical: an image of dispersed grains is obtained with sufficient statistical precision for an algorithm to identify the positions of individual particles, the primary ion beam is deflected to each particle in turn and rastered in a small

  11. Assessing Friction Stress on a Liquid Lubricant by Stable Isotope Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-17

    multivariate data and test if significant isotopic shifts or FTIR spectral changes could be related to sliding cycles. δ13C Isotope ratios only were...chloride solvent (run alone) and exported to Matlab® for modeling and analysis. 2.4. Data Analysis Isotope ratio values were calculated and output...in spreadsheet format by IsoDAT NT software (Thermo-Fisher). Isotope ratio data for each identified peak were collated, transferred to Matlab

  12. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Marais, David J. Des

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of δ13CPDB with a precision of 0.2‰ (1σ, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of δ on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of sample handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of <1‰.

  13. Carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric methane by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Dawn A.; Hayes, J. M.; Des Marais, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Less than 15 min are required for the determination of delta C(sub PDB)-13 with a precision of 0.2 ppt(1 sigma, single measurement) in 5-mL samples of air containing CH4 at natural levels (1.7 ppm). An analytical system including a sample-introduction unit incorporating a preparative gas chromatograph (GC) column for separation of CH4 from N2, O2, and Ar is described. The 15-min procedure includes time for operation of that system, high-resolution chromatographic separation of the CH4, on-line combustion and purification of the products, and isotopic calibration. Analyses of standards demonstrate that systematic errors are absent and that there is no dependence of observed values of delta on sample size. For samples containing 100 ppm or more CH4, preconcentration is not required and the analysis time is less than 5 min. The system utilizes a commercially available, high-sensitivity isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For optimal conditions of smaple handling and combustion, performance of the system is within a factor of 2 of the shot-noise limit. The potential exists therefore for analysis of samples as small as 15 pmol CH4 with a standard deviation of less than 1 ppt.

  14. Least destructive sampling of human remains using laser drilling for Sr isotope analysis by TIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, Malte; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer; Armstrong, Richard; Kinsley, Les; McMorrow, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) measured in ancient human remains can be used to reconstruct migration patterns of ancient human populations. This application is based on the fact that different geologic regions have distinct Sr isotope signatures that are cycled through the soils, plants and rivers, and eventually enter the food cycle. Sr isotope ratios measured in skeletal remains (bones and teeth) reflect the average of dietary Sr that was consumed when the tissue was formed, allowing the investigation of human migration between geologically distinct terrains. The analysis of human remains is always a sensitive topic requiring minimal damage to the sample, while at the same time providing highly precise and accurate results. Samples can be analysed either by solution methods like thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), or by in-situ laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. For TIMS a drill is used to extract a small amount of sample, which is then digested in acid and Sr is separated out using ion exchange chromatography. This technique provides highly precise and accurate results, because any isobaric interferences are removed during chemical separation. The drawback is that drilling may cause visible damage to the sample, restricting access to precious human remains. LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis is very fast and nearly destruction free. However, the accuracy and precision of LA-MC-ICP-MS is limited by a number of factors including large instrumental mass discrimination, laser-induced isotopic and elemental fractionations and molecular interferences on 87Sr. Its application thus requires rigorous data reduction, which can introduce significant uncertainties into the analysis. This is especially true for samples with relatively low Sr concentrations such as human teeth (e.g., Woodhead et al., 2005; Horstwood et al., 2008; Vroon et al., 2008). In addition, LA-MC-ICP-MS has traditionally required a flat sample surface, thus an unbroken tooth needs to be cut, which is rather

  15. Hanford Isotope Project strategic business analysis Cesium-137 (Cs-137)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this business analysis is to address the beneficial reuse of Cesium 137 (Cs-137) in order to utilize a valuable national asset and possibly save millions of tax dollars. Food irradiation is the front runner application along with other uses. This business analysis supports the objectives of the Department of Energy National Isotope Strategy distributed in August 1994 which describes the DOE plans for the production and distribution of isotope products and services. As part of the Department`s mission as stated in that document. ``The Department of Energy will also continue to produce and distribute other radioisotopes and enriched stable isotopes for medical diagnostics and therapeutics, industrial, agricultural, and other useful applications on a businesslike basis. This is consistent with the goals and objectives of the National Performance Review. The Department will endeavor to look at opportunities for private sector to co-fund or invest in new ventures. Also, the Department will seek to divest from ventures that can more profitably or reliably be operated by the private sector.``

  16. A new method of tree xylem water extraction for isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, C.; Newton, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Sacramento Mountain Watershed Study in the southern Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico is designed to assess the forest restoration technique of tree thinning in mountain watersheds as an effective method of increasing local and regional groundwater recharge. The project is using a soil water balance approach to quantify the partitioning of local precipitation within this watershed before and after thinning trees. Understanding what sources trees extract their water from (e.g. shallow groundwater, unsaturated fractured bedrock, and soils) is difficult due to a complex hydrologic system and heterogeneous distribution of soil thicknesses. However, in order to accurately quantify the soil water balance and to assess how thinning trees will affect this water balance, it is important determine the sources from which trees extract their water. We plan to use oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopic analysis of various end member waters to identify these different sources. We are in the process of developing a new method of determining the isotopic composition of tree water that has several advantages over conventional methods. Within the tree there is the xylem which transports water from the roots to the leaves and the phloem which transports starches and sugars in a water media throughout the tree. Previous studies have shown that the isotopic composition of xylem water accurately reflects that of source water, while phloem water has undergone isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis and metabolism. The distillation of water from twigs, which is often used to extract tree water for isotopic analysis, is very labor intensive. Other disadvantages to distillation methods include possible fractionation due to phase changes and the possible extraction of fractionated phloem waters. Employing a new mixing method, the composition of the twig water (TW) can be determined by putting twigs of unknown isotopic water composition into waters of known compositions or initial

  17. Characterization of phenols biodegradation by compound specific stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xi; Gilevska, Tetyana; Wenzig, Felix; Hans, Richnow; Vogt, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    -cresol degradation and 2.2±0.3‰ for m-cresol degradation, respectively. The carbon isotope fractionation patterns of phenol degradation differed more profoundly. Oxygen-dependent monooxygenation of phenol by A.calcoaceticus as the initial reaction yielded ƐC values of -1.5±0.02‰. In contrast, the anaerobic degradation initiated by ATP-dependent carboxylation performed by Thauera aromatia DSM 6984, produced no detectable fractionation (ƐC 0±0.1‰). D. cetonica showed a slight inverse carbon isotope fractionation (ƐC 0.4±0.1‰). In conclusion, a validated method for compound specific stable isotope analysis was developed for phenolic compounds, and the first data set of carbon enrichment factors upon the biodegradation of phenol and cresols with different activation mechanisms has been obtained in the present study. Carbon isotope fractionation analysis is a potentially powerful tool to monitor phenolic compounds degradation in the environment.

  18. UNiquant, a Program for Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Using Stable Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Shen, Yulei; Liu, Miao; Huang, Lin; Zhang, Zhixin; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Chan, Wing C.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Fu, Kai; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2011-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling (SIL) methods coupled with nanoscale liquid chromatography and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry are increasingly useful for elucidation of the proteome-wide differences between multiple biological samples. Development of more effective programs for the sensitive identification of peptide pairs and accurate measurement of the relative peptide/protein abundance are essential for quantitative proteomic analysis. We developed and evaluated the performance of a new program, termed UNiquant, for analyzing quantitative proteomics data using stable isotope labeling. UNiquant was compared with two other programs, MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller, using SILAC-labeled complex proteome mixtures having either known or unknown heavy/light ratios. For the SILAC-labeled Jeko-1 cell proteome digests with known heavy/light ratios (H/L = 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10), UNiquant quantified a similar number of peptide pairs as MaxQuant for the H/L = 1:1 and 1:5 mixtures. In addition, UNiquant quantified significantly more peptides than MaxQuant and Mascot Distiller in the H/L = 1:10 mixtures. UNiquant accurately measured relative peptide/protein abundance without the need for post-measurement normalization of peptide ratios, which is required by the other programs. PMID:21158445

  19. Enantiomeric and Isotopic Analysis of Sugar Derivatives in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George; Asiyo, Cynthia; Turk, Kendra; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several classes of organic compounds are found in carbonaceous meteorites including amino acids, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Such compounds are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets and may have played a role in the origin of life. Likewise, sugar derivatives are critical to all known lifeforms. Recent analyses of the Murchison and Murray carbonaceous meteorites revealed a diverse suite of such derivatives, i.e., sugar alcohols, and sugar acids. This presentation will focus primarily on the analysis of individual sugar acids - their enantiomeric and isotopic composition. Analysis of these compounds may reveal the nature of past (or present) meteoritic sugars themselves. For example, if parent sugars decomposed (by well-known mechanisms) to give the present acids, were their enantiomeric ratios preserved? Combined with other evidence, the enantiomeric composition of such compounds as glyceric acid and (especially) rare acids may help to answer such questions. C-13 and D isotope analysis of meteoritic sugar alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol, etc.) as a group revealed that they were indigenous to the meteorite. Preliminary C-13 analysis of glyceric acid shows that it is also extraterrestrial.

  20. Stable isotope analysis of white paints and likelihood ratios.

    PubMed

    Farmer, N; Meier-Augenstein, W; Lucy, D

    2009-06-01

    Architectural paints are commonly found as trace evidence at scenes of crime. Currently the most widely used technique for the analysis of architectural paints is Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). There are, however, limitations to the forensic analysis of white paints, and the ability to discriminate between samples. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been investigated as a potential tool for the analysis of architectural white paints, where no preparation of samples prior to analysis is required. When stable isotope profiles (SIPs) are compared, there appears to be no relationship between paints from the same manufacturer, or between paints of the same type. Unlike existing techniques, IRMS does not differentiate resin samples solely on the basis of modifier or oil-type, but exploits additional factors linked to samples such as geo-location where oils added to alkyd formulations were grown. In combination with the use of likelihood ratios, IRMS shows potential, with a false positive rate of 2.6% from a total of 1275 comparisons.

  1. Methods and limitations of 'clumped' CO2 isotope (Delta47) analysis by gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huntington, K W; Eiler, J M; Affek, H P; Guo, W; Bonifacie, M; Yeung, L Y; Thiagarajan, N; Passey, B; Tripati, A; Daëron, M; Came, R

    2009-09-01

    The geochemistry of multiply substituted isotopologues ('clumped-isotope' geochemistry) examines the abundances in natural materials of molecules, formula units or moieties that contain more than one rare isotope (e.g. (13)C(18)O(16)O, (18)O(18)O, (15)N(2), (13)C(18)O(16)O(2) (2-)). Such species form the basis of carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry and undergo distinctive fractionations during a variety of natural processes, but initial reports have provided few details of their analysis. In this study, we present detailed data and arguments regarding the theoretical and practical limits of precision, methods of standardization, instrument linearity and related issues for clumped-isotope analysis by dual-inlet gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We demonstrate long-term stability and subtenth per mil precision in 47/44 ratios for counting systems consisting of a Faraday cup registered through a 10(12) ohm resistor on three Thermo-Finnigan 253 IRMS systems. Based on the analyses of heated CO(2) gases, which have a stochastic distribution of isotopes among possible isotopologues, we document and correct for (1) isotopic exchange among analyte CO(2) molecules and (2) subtle nonlinearity in the relationship between actual and measured 47/44 ratios. External precisions of approximately 0.01 per thousand are routinely achieved for measurements of the mass-47 anomaly (a measure mostly of the abundance anomaly of (13)C-(18)O bonds) and follow counting statistics. The present technical limit to precision intrinsic to our methods and instrumentation is approximately 5 parts per million (ppm), whereas precisions of measurements of heterogeneous natural materials are more typically approximately 10 ppm (both 1 s.e.). These correspond to errors in carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry of +/-1.2 degrees C and +/-2.4 degrees C, respectively.

  2. Isotopic analysis of dissolved organic carbon in produced water brines by wet chemical oxidation and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Randal; Conaway, Christopher; Saad, Nabil; Kharaka, Yousif

    2013-04-01

    Identification of fluid migration and escape from intentionally altered subsurface geologic systems, such as in hydraulic fracturing, enhanced oil recovery, and carbon sequestration activities, is an important issue for environmental regulators based on the traction that the "fracking" process is gathering across the United States. Given diverse injected fluid compositions and the potential for toxic or regulated compounds to be released, one of the most important steps in the process is accurately identifying evidence of injected fluid escape during and after injection processes. An important tool in identifying differences between the natural groundwater and injected fluid is the isotopic composition of dissolved constituents including inorganic components such as Sr and carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds. Since biological processes in the mesothermal subsurface can rapidly alter the organic composition of a fluid, stable carbon isotopes of the dissolved organic compounds (DOC) are an effective means to identify differences in the origin of two fluids, especially when coupled with inorganic compound analyses. The burgeoning field of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for isotopic analysis presents an opportunity to obtain rapid, reliable and cost-effective isotopic measurements of DOC in potentially affected groundwater for the identification of leakage or the improvement of hydrogeochemical pathway models. Here we adapt the use of the novel hyphenated TOC-CRDS carbon isotope analyzer for the analysis of DOC in produced water by wet oxidation and describe the methods to evaluate performance and obtain useful information at higher salinities. Our methods are applied to a specific field example in a CO2-enhanced EOR field in Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) as a means to demonstrate the ability to distinguish natural and injected DOC using the stable isotopic composition of the dissolved organic carbon when employing the novel TOC-CRDS instrumentation

  3. Trace determination of zinc by substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhya, D.; Priya, S.; Subramanian, M.O.S.

    1996-09-01

    A radiometric method based on substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis using 1,10-phenanthroline and a substoichiometric amount of eosin was developed for determining trace amounts of zinc. Evaluation of various metal ion interferences shows that as little as 0.2 {mu}g Zn could be determined in an aqueous-phase volume of 60 mL. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of Zn in city waste incineration ash, cadmium metal, Fourts-B tablets, Boro-plus ointment, and magnesium alloy samples. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  5. Methods for the stable isotopic analysis of chlorine in chlorate and perchlorate compounds.

    PubMed

    Ader, M; Coleman, M L; Doyle, S P; Stroud, M; Wakelin, D

    2001-10-15

    Chlorate and perchlorate compounds, used as herbicides, solid fuel propellants, and explosives, are increasingly recognized as pollutants in groundwater. Stable isotope characterization would permit both environmental monitoring of extent of remediation and forensic characterization. Stoichiometric reduction to chloride (greater than 98% yield), by Fe(II) for chlorate and alkaline fusion-decomposition for perchlorate, allows analysis by standard methods to give highly reproducible and accurate delta37Cl results (0.05/1000, 2 x standard error). Analysis of various compounds from different suppliers yielded delta37Cl values for chlorate samples near to +0.2/1000 (SMOC), but one has within-sample heterogeneity of 0.5/1000, possibly due to crystallization processes during manufacture. Results for perchlorate samples also are generally near +0.2/1000, but one is +2.3/1000 (SMOC). The initial results suggest that both forensic and environmental applications might be feasible.

  6. Tools for Accurate and Efficient Analysis of Complex Evolutionary Mechanisms in Microbial Genomes. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhleh, Luay

    2014-03-12

    I proposed to develop computationally efficient tools for accurate detection and reconstruction of microbes' complex evolutionary mechanisms, thus enabling rapid and accurate annotation, analysis and understanding of their genomes. To achieve this goal, I proposed to address three aspects. (1) Mathematical modeling. A major challenge facing the accurate detection of HGT is that of distinguishing between these two events on the one hand and other events that have similar "effects." I proposed to develop a novel mathematical approach for distinguishing among these events. Further, I proposed to develop a set of novel optimization criteria for the evolutionary analysis of microbial genomes in the presence of these complex evolutionary events. (2) Algorithm design. In this aspect of the project, I proposed to develop an array of e cient and accurate algorithms for analyzing microbial genomes based on the formulated optimization criteria. Further, I proposed to test the viability of the criteria and the accuracy of the algorithms in an experimental setting using both synthetic as well as biological data. (3) Software development. I proposed the nal outcome to be a suite of software tools which implements the mathematical models as well as the algorithms developed.

  7. Structural and Isotopic Analysis of Organic Matter in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, I.

    2003-12-01

    The most ancient organic molecules available for study in the laboratory are those carried to Earth by infalling carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. All the classes of compounds normally considered to be of biological origin are represented in carbonaceous meteorites and, aside from some terrestrial contamination; it is safe to assume that these organic species were produced by nonbiological methods of synthesis. In effect, carbonaceous chondrites are a natural laboratory containing organic molecules that are the product of ancient chemical evolution. Understanding the sources of organic molecules in meteorites and the chemical processes that led to their formation has been the primary research goal. Circumstellar space, the solar nebulae, and asteroidal meteorite parent bodies have all been suggested as environments where organic matter may have been formed. Determination of the provenance of meteoritic organic matter requires detailed structural and isotopic information, and the fall of the Murchison CM2 chondrite in 1969 enabled the first systematic organic analyses to be performed on comparatively pristine samples of extraterrestrial organic material. Prior to that, extensive work had been undertaken on the organic matter in a range of meteorite samples galvanized, in part, by the controversial debate in the early 1960s on possible evidence for former life in the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite (Fitch et al., 1962; Meinschein et al., 1963). It was eventually demonstrated that the suggested biogenic material was terrestrial contamination ( Fitch and Anders, 1963; Anders et al., 1964); however, the difficulties created by contamination have posed a continuing problem in the analysis and interpretation of organic material in meteorites (e.g., Watson et al., 2003); this has significant implications for the return of extraterrestrial samples by space missions. Hayes (1967) extensively reviewed data acquired prior to the availability of Murchison samples

  8. Flow injection analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry for bulk carbon stable isotope analysis of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Maik A; Steinmann, Dirk; Stephan, Manuel; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2009-11-25

    A new method for bulk carbon isotope ratio determination of water-soluble samples is presented that is based on flow injection analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (FIA-IRMS) using an LC IsoLink interface. Advantages of the method are that (i) only very small amounts of sample are required (2-5 microL of the sample for up to 200 possible injections), (ii) it avoids complex sample preparation procedures such as needed for EA-IRMS analysis (only sample dilution and injection,) and (iii) high throughput due to short analysis times is possible (approximately 15 min for five replicates). The method was first tested and evaluated as a fast screening method with industrially produced ethanol samples, and additionally the applicability was tested by the measurement of 81 alcoholic beverages, for example, whiskey, brandy, vodka, tequila, and others. The minimal sample concentration required for precise and reproducible measurements was around 50 microL L(-1) ethanol/water (1.71 mM carbon). The limit of repeatability was determined to be r=0.49%. FIA-IRMS represents a fast screening method for beverage authenticity control. Due to this, samples can be prescreened as a decisive criterion for more detailed investigations by HPLC-IRMS or multielement GC-IRMS measurements for a verification of adulteration.

  9. A Global Approach to Accurate and Automatic Quantitative Analysis of NMR Spectra by Complex Least-Squares Curve Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Y. L.

    The performance of quantitative analysis of 1D NMR spectra depends greatly on the choice of the NMR signal model. Complex least-squares analysis is well suited for optimizing the quantitative determination of spectra containing a limited number of signals (<30) obtained under satisfactory conditions of signal-to-noise ratio (>20). From a general point of view it is concluded, on the basis of mathematical considerations and numerical simulations, that, in the absence of truncation of the free-induction decay, complex least-squares curve fitting either in the time or in the frequency domain and linear-prediction methods are in fact nearly equivalent and give identical results. However, in the situation considered, complex least-squares analysis in the frequency domain is more flexible since it enables the quality of convergence to be appraised at every resonance position. An efficient data-processing strategy has been developed which makes use of an approximate conjugate-gradient algorithm. All spectral parameters (frequency, damping factors, amplitudes, phases, initial delay associated with intensity, and phase parameters of a baseline correction) are simultaneously managed in an integrated approach which is fully automatable. The behavior of the error as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio is theoretically estimated, and the influence of apodization is discussed. The least-squares curve fitting is theoretically proved to be the most accurate approach for quantitative analysis of 1D NMR data acquired with reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. The method enables complex spectral residuals to be sorted out. These residuals, which can be cumulated thanks to the possibility of correcting for frequency shifts and phase errors, extract systematic components, such as isotopic satellite lines, and characterize the shape and the intensity of the spectral distortion with respect to the Lorentzian model. This distortion is shown to be nearly independent of the chemical species

  10. Accurate fast method with high chemical yield for determination of uranium isotopes (234U, 235U, 238U) in granitic samples using alpha spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirguis, Laila A.; Farag, Nagdy M.; Salim, Adham K.

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to use the α-spectroscopy at Nuclear Materials Authority (NMA) of Egypt. A radiochemical technique for analysis uranium isotopes was carried out for ten mineralized granitic samples together with the International standards RGU-1 (IAEA) and St4 (NMA). Several steps of sample preparation, radiochemical separation and source preparation were performed before analysis. Uranium was separated from sample matrix with 0.2 M TOPO in cyclohexane as an extracting agent with a chemical yield 98.95% then uranium was purified from lanthanides and actinides present with 0.2 M TOA in xylene as an extracting agent. The pure fraction was electrodeposited on a mirror-polished copper disc from buffer solution (NaHSO4+H2SO4+NH4OH). Rectangle pt-electrode with an anode-cathode distance of 2 cm was used. Current was 900 mA and the electrodeposition time reach up to 120 min. The achieved results show that the chemical yield ranged between 87.9±6.8 and 98±8.6.

  11. Quantitative analysis of volatiles in edible oils following accelerated oxidation using broad spectrum isotope standards

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Sacks, Gavin L.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of food volatiles generated by processing are widely reported but comparisons across studies is challenging in part because most reports are inherently semi-quantitative for most analytes due to limited availability of chemical standards. We recently introduced a novel strategy for creation of broad spectrum isotopic standards for accurate quantitative food chemical analysis. Here we apply the principle to quantification of 25 volatiles in seven thermally oxidized edible oils. After extended oxidation, total volatiles of high n-3 oils (flax, fish, cod liver) were 120-170 mg/kg while low n-3 vegetable oils were <50 mg/kg. Separate experiments on thermal degradation of d5-ethyl linolenate indicate that off-aroma volatiles originate throughout the n-3 molecule and not solely the n-3 terminal end. These data represent the first report using broad-spectrum isotopically labeled standards for quantitative characterization of processing-induced volatile generation across related foodstuffs, and verify the origin of specific volatiles from parent n-3 fatty acids. PMID:25529686

  12. Quantitative analysis of volatiles in edible oils following accelerated oxidation using broad spectrum isotope standards.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Sacks, Gavin L; Brenna, J Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of food volatiles generated by processing are widely reported but comparisons across studies is challenging in part because most reports are inherently semi-quantitative for most analytes due to limited availability of chemical standards. We recently introduced a novel strategy for creation of broad spectrum isotopic standards for accurate quantitative food chemical analysis. Here we apply the principle to quantification of 25 volatiles in seven thermally oxidised edible oils. After extended oxidation, total volatiles of high n-3 oils (flax, fish, cod liver) were 120-170 mg/kg while low n-3 vegetable oils were <50mg/kg. Separate experiments on thermal degradation of d5-ethyl linolenate indicate that off-aroma volatiles originate throughout the n-3 molecule and not solely the n-3 terminal end. These data represent the first report using broad-spectrum isotopically labelled standards for quantitative characterisation of processing-induced volatile generation across related foodstuffs, and verify the origin of specific volatiles from parent n-3 fatty acids.

  13. Analysis of the galactosyltransferase reaction by positional isotope exchange and secondary deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.C.; Singh, A.N.; Raushel, F.M.

    1988-11-15

    The mechanism of the galactosyltransferase-catalyzed reaction was probed using positional isotope exchange, alpha-secondary deuterium isotope effects, and inhibition studies with potential transition state analogs. Incubation of (beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O)UDP-galactose and alpha-lactalbumin with galactosyltransferase from bovine milk did not result in any positional isotope exchange. The addition of 4-deoxy-4-fluoroglucose as a dead-end inhibitor did not induce any detectable positional isotope exchange. alpha-Secondary deuterium isotope effects of 1.21 +/- 0.04 on Vmax and 1.05 +/- 0.04 on Vmax/KM were observed for (1-2H)-UDP-galactose. D-Glucono-1,5-lactone, D-galactono-1,4-lactone, D-galactono-1,5-lactone, nojirimycin, and deoxynojirimycin, did not inhibit the galactosyl transfer reaction at concentrations less than 1.0 mM. The magnitude of the secondary deuterium isotope effect supports a mechanism in which the anomeric carbon of the galactosyl moiety has substantial sp2 character in the transition state. Therefore, the cleavage of the bond between the galactose and UDP moieties in the transition state has proceeded to a much greater extent than the formation of the bond between the galactose and the incoming glucose. The lack of a positional isotope exchange reaction indicates that the beta-phosphoryl group of the UDP is not free to rotate in the absence of an acceptor substrate.

  14. Accurate analysis of planar optical waveguide devices using higher-order FDTD scheme.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanmin; Li, Kang; Liu, Xin

    2006-11-27

    A higher-order finite-difference time-domain (HO-FDTD) numerical method is proposed for the time-domain analysis of planar optical waveguide devices. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer (APML) absorbing boundary condition for the HO-FDTD scheme is implemented and the numerical dispersion of this scheme is studied. The numerical simulations for the parallel-slab directional coupler are presented and the computing results using this scheme are in highly accordance with analytical solutions. Compared with conventional FDTD method, this scheme can save considerable computational resource without sacrificing solution accuracy and especially could be applied in the accurate analysis of optical devices.

  15. Fast and accurate focusing analysis of large photon sieve using pinhole ring diffraction model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Lingjie; Wu, Yanxiong; Zhang, Jizhen; Qu, Hemeng

    2015-06-10

    In this paper, we developed a pinhole ring diffraction model for the focusing analysis of a large photon sieve. Instead of analyzing individual pinholes, we discuss the focusing of all of the pinholes in a single ring. An explicit equation for the diffracted field of individual pinhole ring has been proposed. We investigated the validity range of this generalized model and analytically describe the sufficient conditions for the validity of this pinhole ring diffraction model. A practical example and investigation reveals the high accuracy of the pinhole ring diffraction model. This simulation method could be used for fast and accurate focusing analysis of a large photon sieve.

  16. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of TNT: two-dimensional source identification.

    PubMed

    Coffin, R B; Miyares, P H; Kelley, C A; Cifuentes, L A; Reynolds, C M

    2001-12-01

    Data from a combination of laboratory and fieldwork is presented to initiate testing of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios to trace sources of TNT in contaminated soil and groundwater. Evaluation of these extraction methods resulted in 99.9 and 99.8% recovery of TNT with Soxhlet and solid-phase extraction (SPE), respectively. As a result of the high extraction efficiency, isotope fractionation did not occur, thus providing an accurate stable isotope value on TNT from laboratory and field samples. Subsequent experiments evaluated the stability of isotope signatures through incubations lasting up to four weeks with a 70% decline in the TNT concentration. During these experiments, no significant variation in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios was measured. Five different sources of TNT, compared for stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, showed a range of 4.2 and 15%, respectively. This large range in the isotope ratios suggests excellent potential to trace sources in a complex environment. Finally, a site was surveyed for concentrations and isotope values of TNT extracted from groundwaters. Values from this site were substantially different relative to the variation measured on standards and in laboratory incubation experiments. The data set indicates good potential to use stable isotopes to determine TNT sources and fate in the environment.

  17. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    PubMed

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  18. Quantitative analysis of deuterium using the isotopic effect on quaternary (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Tamim A; Yepuri, Nageshwar Rao; Holden, Peter J; James, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Quantitative analysis of specifically deuterated compounds can be achieved by a number of conventional methods, such as mass spectroscopy, or by quantifying the residual (1)H NMR signals compared to signals from internal standards. However, site specific quantification using these methods becomes challenging when dealing with non-specifically or randomly deuterated compounds that are produced by metal catalyzed hydrothermal reactions in D2O, one of the most convenient deuteration methods. In this study, deuterium-induced NMR isotope shifts of quaternary (13)C resonances neighboring deuterated sites have been utilized to quantify the degree of isotope labeling of molecular sites in non-specifically deuterated molecules. By probing (13)C NMR signals while decoupling both proton and deuterium nuclei, it is possible to resolve (13)C resonances of the different isotopologues based on the isotopic shifts and the degree of deuteration of the carbon atoms. We demonstrate that in different isotopologues, the same quaternary carbon, neighboring partially deuterated carbon atoms, are affected to an equal extent by relaxation. Decoupling both nuclei ((1)H, (2)H) resolves closely separated quaternary (13)C signals of the different isotopologues, and allows their accurate integration and quantification under short relaxation delays (D1 = 1 s) and hence fast accumulative spectral acquisition. We have performed a number of approaches to quantify the deuterium content at different specific sites to demonstrate a convenient and generic analysis method for use in randomly deuterated molecules, or in cases of specifically deuterated molecules where back-exchange processes may take place during work up.

  19. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  20. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-01

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  1. Accurate radiation temperature and chemical potential from quantitative photoluminescence analysis of hot carrier populations.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, François; Lombez, Laurent; Guillemoles, Jean-François

    2017-02-15

    In order to characterize hot carrier populations in semiconductors, photoluminescence measurement is a convenient tool, enabling us to probe the carrier thermodynamical properties in a contactless way. However, the analysis of the photoluminescence spectra is based on some assumptions which will be discussed in this work. We especially emphasize the importance of the variation of the material absorptivity that should be considered to access accurate thermodynamical properties of the carriers, especially by varying the excitation power. The proposed method enables us to obtain more accurate results of thermodynamical properties by taking into account a rigorous physical description and finds direct application in investigating hot carrier solar cells, which are an adequate concept for achieving high conversion efficiencies with a relatively simple device architecture.

  2. Oxygen isotope corrections for online δ34S analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fry, B.; Silva, S.R.; Kendall, C.; Anderson, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Elemental analyzers have been successfully coupled to stable-isotope-ratio mass spectrometers for online measurements of the δ34S isotopic composition of plants, animals and soils. We found that the online technology for automated δ34S isotopic determinations did not yield reproducible oxygen isotopic compositions in the SO2 produced, and as a result calculated δ34S values were often 1–3‰ too high versus their correct values, particularly for plant and animal samples with high C/S ratio. Here we provide empirical and analytical methods for correcting the S isotope values for oxygen isotope variations, and further detail a new SO2-SiO2 buffering method that minimizes detrimental oxygen isotope variations in SO2.

  3. Capillary absorption spectrometer and process for isotopic analysis of small samples

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Kelly, James F.; Sams, Robert L.; Moran, James J.; Newburn, Matthew K.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2016-03-29

    A capillary absorption spectrometer and process are described that provide highly sensitive and accurate stable absorption measurements of analytes in a sample gas that may include isotopologues of carbon and oxygen obtained from gas and biological samples. It further provides isotopic images of microbial communities that allow tracking of nutrients at the single cell level. It further targets naturally occurring variations in carbon and oxygen isotopes that avoids need for expensive isotopically labeled mixtures which allows study of samples taken from the field without modification. The method also permits sampling in vivo permitting real-time ambient studies of microbial communities.

  4. Multi-element compound specific stable isotope analysis of volatile organic compounds at trace levels in groundwater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Martín, Sara; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Schmidt, Marie; Wolfram, Diana; Richnow, Hans. H.; Gehre, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater pollution remains one of the major environmental and health concerns. A thorough understanding of sources, sinks and transformation processes of groundwater contaminants is needed to improve risk management evaluation, and to design efficient remediation and water treatment strategies. Isotopic tools provide unique information for an in-depth understanding of the fate of organic chemicals in the environment. During the last decades compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of complex mixtures, using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS), has gained popularity for the characterization and risk assessment of hazardous waste sites and for isotope forensics of organic contaminants. Multi-element isotope fingerprinting of organic substances provides a more robust framework for interpretation than the isotope analysis of only one element. One major challenge for application of CSIA is the analysis of trace levels of organic compounds in environmental matrices. It is necessary to inject 1 nmol carbon or 8 nmol hydrogen on column, to obtain an accurate and precise measurement of the isotope ratios, which is between two and three orders of magnitude larger than the amount of compound needed for conventional analysis of compound concentrations. Therefore, efficient extraction and pre-concentration techniques have to be integrated with GC-IRMS. Further research is urgently needed in this field, to evaluate the potential of novel and environmental-friendly sample pre-treatment techniques for CSIA to lower the detection limits and extending environmental applications. In this study, the novel coupling of a headspace autosampler (HS) with a programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV), allowing large volume injection of headspace samples, is proposed to improve the sensitivity of CSIA. This automatic, fast and solvent free strategy provides a significant increase on the sensitivity of GC-based methods maintaining the simple headspace instrumentation

  5. Comprehensive Isotopic and Elemental Analysis of a Multi-Oxide Glass By Multicollector ICP-MS in Isotope Substitution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    v, Mitroshkov; JV, Ryan

    2016-04-07

    Multicollector ICP-MS was used to comprehensively analyze different types of isotopically-modified glass created in order to investigate the processes of glass corrosion in the water. The analytical methods were developed for the analyses of synthesized, isotopically-modified solid glass and the release of glass constituents upon contact with deionized water. To validate the methods, results from an acid digestion sample of the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) showed good agreement when compared to data from multiple prior analyses on the same glass [Smith-1]. In this paper, we present the results of this comprehensive analysis from the acid digestion of six types of isotopically-modified glass and the release of glass constituents into water corrosion after one year of aqueous corrosion.

  6. Dual element ((15)N/(14)N, (13)C/(12)C) isotope analysis of glyphosate and AMPA by derivatization-gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) combined with LC/IRMS.

    PubMed

    Mogusu, Emmanuel O; Wolbert, J Benjamin; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Jochmann, Maik A; Elsner, Martin

    2015-07-01

    To assess sources and degradation of the herbicide glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine] and its metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid), concentration measurements are often inconclusive and even (13)C/(12)C analysis alone may give limited information. To advance isotope ratio analysis of an additional element, we present compound-specific (15)N/(14)N analysis of glyphosate and AMPA by a two step derivatization in combination with gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). The N-H group was derivatized with isopropyl chloroformate (iso-PCF), and remaining acidic groups were subsequently methylated with trimethylsilyldiazomethane (TMSD). Iso-PCF treatment at pH <10 gave too low (15)N/(14)N ratios indicating an incomplete derivatization; in contrast, too high (15)N/(14)N ratios at pH >10 indicated decomposition of the derivative. At pH 10, and with an excess of iso-PCF by 10-24, greatest yields and accurate (15)N/(14)N ratios were obtained (deviation from elemental analyzer-IRMS: -0.2 ± 0.9% for glyphosate; -0.4 ± 0.7% for AMPA). Limits for accurate δ(15)N analysis of glyphosate and AMPA were 150 and 250 ng injected, respectively. A combination of δ(15)N and δ(13)C analysis by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) (1) enabled an improved distinction of commercial glyphosate products and (2) showed that glyphosate isotope values during degradation by MnO2 clearly fell outside the commercial product range. This highlights the potential of combined carbon and nitrogen isotopes analysis to trace sources and degradation of glyphosate.

  7. Precise and Accurate Trace Element Analysis of Calcium Carbonate by LA-ICP-MS and its Application to Stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, K. P.; Scholz, D.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Yang, Q.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    , therefore, not be used for accurate micro-analysis at low mass resolution. As shown by many publications, non-matrix matched calibration and the so-called mass load effect may result in incorrect LA-ICP-MS data. Our investigations with different matrix materials show that the relative sensitivity factors (RSF) of most elements are within ~10%. However, the RSF of carbonate and geological samples differ by up to 40% from those of the NIST silicate glasses for the chalcophile elements Cu, Zn, Ge, Mo, Cd, Sn, Tl, Pb. We have tested a new procedure for analysis of calcite and aragonite phases of a stalagmite from the Hüttenbläserschachthöhle, Germany, by using low and medium mass resolution and appropriate RSF. Because of higher count rates, the detection limits of interference-free isotopes are much lower for low mass resolution than for medium mass resolution. For interfered mass lines the detection limits are, however, lower for medium mass resolution. For example, the detection limit for 24Mg is 0.2 μg/g for medium mass resolution compared to 500 μg/g for low mass resolution. Thus, it is possible to accurately measure the three Mg isotopes for Mg concentrations down to several μg/g.

  8. In situ analysis of silicon isotopes using UV-femtosecond laser ablation MC-ICP- MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeleff, J.; Horn, I.; Steinhoefel, G.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2006-12-01

    Here we present results from the development of a novel in situ approach to measure accurate and precise ^{30}Si/^{28}Si and ^{29}Si/^{28}Si ratios in minerals and glasses. Silicon is the most abundant non- volatile element in the solar system and after oxygen, the second most abundant in upper crust. It is the dominant solute in rivers that drain our continents, supplying 80% of the dissolved Si entering the oceans. Weathering of continents is thus providing material for the formation of clays and soils, and nutrients for the aquatic biosphere. The ratios of stable silicon isotopes fingerprint many of these processes, and them ^{30}Si/^{28}Si ratios in terrestrial reservoirs (represented as δ ^{30}Si) range from -4 to +3 per mil. To date, most silicon isotope studies have been measured by gas source MS or, more recently, MC- ICPMS after sample decomposition and Si purification. While SIMS studies have presented the first in situ- measurements, laser ablation stable isotope ratio analysis is an obvious alternative. However, principle limitations of the ablation physics introduced by the nanosecond lasers traditionally employed have prevented the measurement of accurate isotope ratios. Our in-house built 196nm UV-femtosecond laser ablation system coupled to high-resolution MC-ICPMS avoids these difficulties (Horn et al. 2006, GCA 70). We have developed an in situ-method for precise and rapid measurements of ^{29}Si/^{28}Si and ^{30}Si/^{28}Si ratios in silicates at a spatial resolution of 50 micrometers. Sample-standard bracketing is used to correct for the mass discrimination and the possible drift occurring between two measurements. δ^{30}Si is calculated with NIST NBS28 (synthetic quartz sand) as bracketing standard. Two international standards were measured and compared: IRMM017 (pure metal) gives a δ^{29}Si of -0.680±0.030 (2 sigma n=25) per mil and δ^{30}Si of -1.32±0.040 (2 sigma n=25) per mil against NBS28, which is in accordance with previous

  9. Mathematical modeling of isotope labeling experiments for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) offer a powerful methodology to perform metabolic flux analysis. However, the task of interpreting data from these experiments to evaluate flux values requires significant mathematical modeling skills. Toward this, this chapter provides background information and examples to enable the reader to (1) model metabolic networks, (2) simulate ILEs, and (3) understand the optimization and statistical methods commonly used for flux evaluation. A compartmentalized model of plant glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway illustrates the reconstruction of a typical metabolic network, whereas a simpler example network illustrates the underlying metabolite and isotopomer balancing techniques. We also discuss the salient features of commonly used flux estimation software 13CFLUX2, Metran, NMR2Flux+, FiatFlux, and OpenFLUX. Furthermore, we briefly discuss methods to improve flux estimates. A graphical checklist at the end of the chapter provides a reader a quick reference to the mathematical modeling concepts and resources.

  10. The potential for application of ink stable isotope analysis in questioned document examination.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Tipple, Brett J; Barnette, Janet E; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a novel application of stable isotope abundance analysis of nitrogen (15N), carbon (13C), hydrogen (2H), and oxygen (18O) to characterize pen ink. We focused on both ballpoint and gel pen inks. We found that the isotope ratios of ink from pens purchased together in a package were similar and within-package stable isotope ratio variability was not significantly larger than the variability of isotope reference materials used during analysis. In contrast, the isotope ratios of ink from pens of the same brand purchased in three states of the continental USA were significantly different from each other and there was isotope ratio variation among pens of the same brand but different, unknown production periods. The stable isotope ratios of inked paper were statistically distinguishable using measured δ15N values. Paper inked with different gel pens was statistically distinguishable using measured δ2H values. The capacity of stable isotope ratios to differentiate among ballpoint inks as well as gel inks shows that stable isotope analysis may be a useful and quantifiable investigative technique for questioned document examination, although current sample size requirements limit its utility. Application of the technique in casework will require the development of micro-scale sampling and analysis methods.

  11. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis Using a Time-Accurate Navier-Stokes Equations Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, Geojoe; Bartels, Robert E.; Hong, Moeljo S.; Bhatia, G.

    2007-01-01

    A method to simulate limit cycle oscillation (LCO) due to control surface freeplay using a modified CFL3D, a time-accurate Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis code with structural modeling capability, is presented. This approach can be used to analyze aeroelastic response of aircraft with structural behavior characterized by nonlinearity in the force verses displacement curve. A limited validation of the method, using very low Mach number experimental data for a three-degrees-of-freedom (pitch/plunge/flap deflection) airfoil model with flap freeplay, is also presented.

  12. Absolute peptide quantification by lutetium labeling and nanoHPLC-ICPMS with isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Rappel, Christina; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The need of analytical methods for absolute quantitative protein analysis spurred research on new developments in recent years. In this work, a novel approach was developed for accurate absolute peptide quantification based on metal labeling with lutetium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Lu-DTPA) and nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (nanoHPLC-ICP-IDMS). In a two-step procedure peptides were derivatized at amino groups with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride (DTPAA) followed by chelation of lutetium. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of the reaction product demonstrated highly specific peptide labeling. Under optimized nanoHPLC conditions the labeled peptides were baseline-separated, and the excess labeling reagent did not interfere. A 176Lu-labeled spike was continuously added to the column effluent for quantification by ICP-IDMS. The recovery of a Lu-DTPA-labeled standard peptide was close to 100% indicating high labeling efficiency and accurate absolute quantification. The precision of the entire method was 4.9%. The detection limit for Lu-DTPA-tagged peptides was 179 amol demonstrating that lutetium-specific peptide quantification was by 4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than detection by natural sulfur atoms present in cysteine or methionine residues. Furthermore, the application to peptides in insulin tryptic digest allowed the identification of interfering reagents decreasing the labeling efficiency. An additional advantage of this novel approach is the analysis of peptides, which do not naturally feature ICPMS-detectable elements.

  13. Isotopic analysis of eggs: evaluating sample collection and preparation.

    PubMed

    Rock, Luc; Rowe, Sylwia; Czerwiec, Agnieszka; Richmond, Harold

    2013-02-15

    Egg traceability/authenticity is a worldwide concern. Stable isotope techniques have been suggested as a tool to address this issue. To further validate the use of these techniques, a research project was undertaken to evaluate what effect sample collection and preparation have on the measured isotopic composition of egg components. The timing of egg collection, the timing of egg preparation after collection, and the use of pasteurisation were investigated. The C, N, O, and S isotopic compositions of egg components from 7 different production systems were measured. Two sets of eggs were collected (4 months apart). It was found that the 'isotopic fingerprint' of a particular production system was maintained over time, and that it may be possible to trace liquid egg products based on isotopic data from fresh eggs. The findings from this study support the integration of stable isotope techniques in egg traceability/authenticity systems.

  14. Analysis of organic molecules and isotopes from a Mars lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Harpold, D. N.; Niemann, H. B.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.; Israel, G.

    2003-04-01

    A key objective for several of the next set of lander missions to Mars will be a search for the location and nature of organic molecules and other disequilibrium compounds that may reveal the nature of present or ancient biotic or prebiotic processes on Mars. Ongoing development and definition of instrumentation that can carry out this analysis will be described. For example, an instrument suite presently under development to be proposed for inclusion on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory consists of an advanced gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) together with a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LD-tof-MS). This measurement suite is designated SAM (for Sample Analysis at Mars). SAM is designed to carry out analysis of both atmospheric gases and volatiles released from solid phase soils, rock samples, and ices. Volatile organic molecules and their pyrolysis products are analyzed by the GCMS and refractory organics by both the pyrolysis and the LD-tof-MS. The LD-tof-MS also provides abundances for a range of major and trace elements in collected samples. Additional measurement objectives include higher precision measurements than have been obtained to date of abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases, nitrogen, and a range of light elements. SAM can also contribute to the identification of various minerals through evolved gas analysis of stable thermal decomposition products such as H2O, CO2, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur.

  15. Stable isotope analysis of precipitation samples obtained via crowdsourcing reveals the spatiotemporal evolution of Superstorm Sandy.

    PubMed

    Good, Stephen P; Mallia, Derek V; Lin, John C; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Extra-tropical cyclones, such as 2012 Superstorm Sandy, pose a significant climatic threat to the northeastern United Sates, yet prediction of hydrologic and thermodynamic processes within such systems is complicated by their interaction with mid-latitude water patterns as they move poleward. Fortunately, the evolution of these systems is also recorded in the stable isotope ratios of storm-associated precipitation and water vapor, and isotopic analysis provides constraints on difficult-to-observe cyclone dynamics. During Superstorm Sandy, a unique crowdsourced approach enabled 685 precipitation samples to be obtained for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analysis, constituting the largest isotopic sampling of a synoptic-scale system to date. Isotopically, these waters span an enormous range of values (> 21‰ for δ(18)O, > 160‰ for δ(2)H) and exhibit strong spatiotemporal structure. Low isotope ratios occurred predominantly in the west and south quadrants of the storm, indicating robust isotopic distillation that tracked the intensity of the storm's warm core. Elevated values of deuterium-excess (> 25‰) were found primarily in the New England region after Sandy made landfall. Isotope mass balance calculations and Lagrangian back-trajectory analysis suggest that these samples reflect the moistening of dry continental air entrained from a mid-latitude trough. These results demonstrate the power of rapid-response isotope monitoring to elucidate the structure and dynamics of water cycling within synoptic-scale systems and improve our understanding of storm evolution, hydroclimatological impacts, and paleo-storm proxies.

  16. Accurate and unambiguous tag-to-gene mapping in serial analysis of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Malig, Rodrigo; Varela, Cristian; Agosin, Eduardo; Melo, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Background In this study, we present a robust and reliable computational method for tag-to-gene assignment in serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). The method relies on current genome information and annotation, incorporation of several new features, and key improvements over alternative methods, all of which are important to determine gene expression levels more accurately. The method provides a complete annotation of potential virtual SAGE tags within a genome, along with an estimation of their confidence for experimental observation that ranks tags that present multiple matches in the genome. Results We applied this method to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, producing the most thorough and accurate annotation of potential virtual SAGE tags that is available today for this organism. The usefulness of this method is exemplified by the significant reduction of ambiguous cases in existing experimental SAGE data. In addition, we report new insights from the analysis of existing SAGE data. First, we found that experimental SAGE tags mapping onto introns, intron-exon boundaries, and non-coding RNA elements are observed in all available SAGE data. Second, a significant fraction of experimental SAGE tags was found to map onto genomic regions currently annotated as intergenic. Third, a significant number of existing experimental SAGE tags for yeast has been derived from truncated cDNAs, which are synthesized through oligo-d(T) priming to internal poly-(A) regions during reverse transcription. Conclusion We conclude that an accurate and unambiguous tag mapping process is essential to increase the quality and the amount of information that can be extracted from SAGE experiments. This is supported by the results obtained here and also by the large impact that the erroneous interpretation of these data could have on downstream applications. PMID:17083742

  17. Multivariate Stable Isotope Analysis to Determine Linkages between Benzocaine Seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, H. F.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Collins, M.; Salouros, H.; Cunningham, A.; Harrison, M.

    2012-04-01

    In July 2010, a woman was jailed for nine years in the UK after the prosecution successfully argued that attempting to import a cutting agent was proof of involvement in a conspiracy to supply Cocaine. That landmark ruling provided law enforcement agencies with much greater scope to tackle those involved in this aspect of the drug trade, specifically targeting those importing the likes of benzocaine or lidocaine. Huge quantities of these compounds are imported into the UK and between May and August 2010, four shipments of Benzocaine amounting to more then 4 tons had been seized as part of Operation Kitley, a joint initiative between the UK Border Agency and the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA). By diluting cocaine, traffickers can make it go a lot further for very little cost, leading to huge profits. In recent years, dealers have moved away from inert substances, like sugar and baby milk powder, in favour of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anaesthetics like Benzocaine and Lidocaine. Both these mimic the numbing effect of cocaine, and resemble it closely in colour, texture and some chemical behaviours, making it easier to conceal the fact that the drug has been diluted. API cutting agents have helped traffickers to maintain steady supplies in the face of successful interdiction and even expand the market in the UK, particularly to young people aged from their mid teens to early twenties. From importation to street-level, the purity of the drug can be reduced up to a factor of 80 and street level cocaine can have a cocaine content as low as 1%. In view of the increasing use of Benzocaine as cutting agent for Cocaine, a study was carried out to investigate if 2H, 13C, 15N and 18O stable isotope signatures could be used in conjunction with multivariate chemometric data analysis to determine potential linkage between benzocaine exhibits seized from different locations or individuals to assist with investigation and prosecution of drug

  18. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  19. Continuous digital ECG analysis over accurate R-peak detection using adaptive wavelet technique.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, T R; Geetha, A P; Asharani, M

    2013-10-01

    Worldwide, health care segment is under a severe challenge to achieve more accurate and intelligent biomedical systems in order to assist healthcare professionals with more accurate and consistent data as well as reliability. The role of ECG in healthcare is one of the paramount importances and it has got a multitude of abnormal relations and anomalies which characterizes intricate cardiovascular performance image. Until the recent past, ECG instruments and analysis played the role of providing the PQRST signal as raw observational output either on paper or on a console or in a file having many diagnostic clues embedded in the signal left to the expert cardiologist to look out for characteristic intervals and to detect the cardiovascular abnormality. Methods and practises are required more and more, to automate this process of cardiac expertise using knowledge engineering and an intelligent systems approach. This paper presents one of the challenging R-peak detections to classify diagnosis and estimate cardio disorders in a fully automated signal processing sequence. This study used an adaptive wavelet approach to generate an appropriate wavelet for R-signal identification under noise, baseband wandering and temporal variations of R-positions. This study designed an adaptive wavelet and successfully detected R- peak variations under various ECG signal conditions. The result and analysis of this method and the ways to use it for further purposes are presented here.

  20. Hanford isotope project strategic business analysis yttrium-90 (Y-90)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to address the short-term direction for the Hanford yttrium-90 (Y-90) project. Hanford is the sole DOE producer of Y-90, and is the largest repository for its source in this country. The production of Y-90 is part of the DOE Isotope Production and Distribution (IP and D) mission. The Y-90 is ``milked`` from strontium-90 (Sr-90), a byproduct of the previous Hanford missions. The use of Sr-90 to produce Y-90 could help reduce the amount of waste material processed and the related costs incurred by the clean-up mission, while providing medical and economic benefits. The cost of producing Y-90 is being subsidized by DOE-IP and D due to its use for research, and resultant low production level. It is possible that the sales of Y-90 could produce full cost recovery within two to three years, at two curies per week. Preliminary projections place the demand at between 20,000 and 50,000 curies per year within the next ten years, assuming FDA approval of one or more of the current therapies now in clinical trials. This level of production would incentivize private firms to commercialize the operation, and allow the government to recover some of its sunk costs. There are a number of potential barriers to the success of the Y-90 project, outside the control of the Hanford Site. The key issues include: efficacy, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and medical community acceptance. There are at least three other sources for Y-90 available to the US users, but they appear to have limited resources to produce the isotope. Several companies have communicated interest in entering into agreements with Hanford for the processing and distribution of Y-90, including some of the major pharmaceutical firms in this country.

  1. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework.

  2. Lipid Correction for Carbon Stable Isotope Analysis of Deep-sea Fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lipid extraction is used prior to stable isotope analysis of fish tissues to remove variability in the carbon stable isotope ratio (d13C) caused by varying lipid content among samples. Our objective was to evaluate an application of a mass balance correction for the effect of lip...

  3. Fast and accurate sensitivity analysis of IMPT treatment plans using Polynomial Chaos Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkó, Zoltán; van der Voort, Sebastian R.; van de Water, Steven; Hartman, Charlotte M. H.; Hoogeman, Mischa; Lathouwers, Danny

    2016-06-01

    The highly conformal planned dose distribution achievable in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can severely be compromised by uncertainties in patient setup and proton range. While several robust optimization approaches have been presented to address this issue, appropriate methods to accurately estimate the robustness of treatment plans are still lacking. To fill this gap we present Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) techniques which are easily applicable and create a meta-model of the dose engine by approximating the dose in every voxel with multidimensional polynomials. This Polynomial Chaos (PC) model can be built in an automated fashion relatively cheaply and subsequently it can be used to perform comprehensive robustness analysis. We adapted PC to provide among others the expected dose, the dose variance, accurate probability distribution of dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g. minimum tumor or maximum organ dose), exact bandwidths of DVHs, and to separate the effects of random and systematic errors. We present the outcome of our verification experiments based on 6 head-and-neck (HN) patients, and exemplify the usefulness of PCE by comparing a robust and a non-robust treatment plan for a selected HN case. The results suggest that PCE is highly valuable for both research and clinical applications.

  4. Fast and accurate sensitivity analysis of IMPT treatment plans using Polynomial Chaos Expansion.

    PubMed

    Perkó, Zoltán; van der Voort, Sebastian R; van de Water, Steven; Hartman, Charlotte M H; Hoogeman, Mischa; Lathouwers, Danny

    2016-06-21

    The highly conformal planned dose distribution achievable in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) can severely be compromised by uncertainties in patient setup and proton range. While several robust optimization approaches have been presented to address this issue, appropriate methods to accurately estimate the robustness of treatment plans are still lacking. To fill this gap we present Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) techniques which are easily applicable and create a meta-model of the dose engine by approximating the dose in every voxel with multidimensional polynomials. This Polynomial Chaos (PC) model can be built in an automated fashion relatively cheaply and subsequently it can be used to perform comprehensive robustness analysis. We adapted PC to provide among others the expected dose, the dose variance, accurate probability distribution of dose-volume histogram (DVH) metrics (e.g. minimum tumor or maximum organ dose), exact bandwidths of DVHs, and to separate the effects of random and systematic errors. We present the outcome of our verification experiments based on 6 head-and-neck (HN) patients, and exemplify the usefulness of PCE by comparing a robust and a non-robust treatment plan for a selected HN case. The results suggest that PCE is highly valuable for both research and clinical applications.

  5. Accurate palm vein recognition based on wavelet scattering and spectral regression kernel discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnasir, Selma; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Farokhi, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    Palm vein recognition (PVR) is a promising new biometric that has been applied successfully as a method of access control by many organizations, which has even further potential in the field of forensics. The palm vein pattern has highly discriminative features that are difficult to forge because of its subcutaneous position in the palm. Despite considerable progress and a few practical issues, providing accurate palm vein readings has remained an unsolved issue in biometrics. We propose a robust and more accurate PVR method based on the combination of wavelet scattering (WS) with spectral regression kernel discriminant analysis (SRKDA). As the dimension of WS generated features is quite large, SRKDA is required to reduce the extracted features to enhance the discrimination. The results based on two public databases-PolyU Hyper Spectral Palmprint public database and PolyU Multi Spectral Palmprint-show the high performance of the proposed scheme in comparison with state-of-the-art methods. The proposed approach scored a 99.44% identification rate and a 99.90% verification rate [equal error rate (EER)=0.1%] for the hyperspectral database and a 99.97% identification rate and a 99.98% verification rate (EER=0.019%) for the multispectral database.

  6. Accurate and flexible calibration technique for fringe projection profilometry by using encoded points and Fourier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Andrés. L.; Contreras, Carlos R.; Meneses, Jaime E.

    2014-05-01

    In order to get measures with a high accurate, three-dimensional reconstruction systems are implemented in industrial, medical, and investigative fields. To obtain high accurate is necessary to carry out an appropriate calibration procedure. In fringe projection profilometry, this procedure allows obtaining a relation between absolute phase and three-dimensional (3D) information of the object in study; however, to execute such procedure a precise movement stage is required. A fringe projection system is formed by a projector, a digital camera and a control unit, called like a projection-acquisition unit in this paper. The calibration of the projection-acquisition unit consists in to establish the parameters that are required to transform the phase of the projected fringes to metric coordinates of the object surface. These parameters are a function of the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of both camera and projector, due to the projector is modeled as an inverse camera. For this purpose, in this paper a novel and flexible calibration method that allows calibrating any device that works with fringe projection profilometry is proposed. In this method is used a reference plane placed in random positions and the projection of an encoded pattern of control points. The camera parameters are computed using Zhang's calibration method; and the projector parameters are computed from the camera parameters and the phase of the pattern of control points, which is determined by using Fourier analysis. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the calibration method.

  7. Spent fuel temperature and age determination from the analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopics

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Mark R; Eccleston, George W; Bedell, Jeffrey J; Lockard, Chanelle M

    2009-01-01

    The capability to determine the age (time since irradiation) of spent fuel can be useful for verification and safeguards. While the age of spent fuel can be determined based on measurements of short-lived fission products, these measurements are not routinely done nor generally reported. As an alternative, age can also be determined if the uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopic values are available. Uranium isotopics are not strongly affected by fuel temperature, and bumup is determined from the {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U isotopic values. Age is calculated after estimating the {sup 241}Pu at the end of irradiation while accounting for the fuel temperature, which is determined from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 240}Pu. Burnup and age determinations are calibrated to reactor models that provide uranium and plutonium isotopics over the range of fuel irradiation. The reactor model must contain sufficient fidelity on details of the reactor type, fuel burnup, irradiation history, initial fuel enrichment and fuel temperature to obtain accurate isotopic calculations. If the latter four are unknown, they can be derived from the uranium and plutonium isotopics. Fuel temperature has a significant affect on the production of plutonium isotopics; therefore, one group cross section reactor models, such as ORIGEN, cannot be used for these calculations. Multi-group cross section set codes, such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TRITON code, must be used.

  8. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Berkman, Mert E.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed computational aeroacoustic analysis of a high-lift flow field is performed. Time-accurate Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations simulate the free shear layer that originates from the slat cusp. Both unforced and forced cases are studied. Preliminary results show that the shear layer is a good amplifier of disturbances in the low to mid-frequency range. The Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings equation is solved to determine the acoustic field using the unsteady flow data from the RANS calculations. The noise radiated from the excited shear layer has a spectral shape qualitatively similar to that obtained from measurements in a corresponding experimental study of the high-lift system.

  9. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  10. Laboratory and field methods for stable isotope analysis in human biology.

    PubMed

    Reitsema, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA; carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen) of human tissues offers a means for assessing diet among living humans. Stable isotope ratios of broad categories of food and drink food vary systematically, and stable isotope ratios in consumer tissues represent a composite of the isotopic ratios of food and drink consumed during an individual's life. Isotopic evidence for diet is independent of errors in informant recall, and accrues during time periods when researchers are absent. Beyond diet reconstruction, tissue stable isotope ratios are sensitive to excursions from homeostasis, such as starvation and rapid growth. Because of their relationship to diet, geographic location, hydration, and nutritional status, stable isotope signatures in human tissues offer a window into human biocultural adaptations, past and present. This article describes methods for SIA that may be usefully applied in studies of living humans, with emphasis placed on carbon and nitrogen. Some of the ecological, physiological, and evolutionary applications of stable isotope data among living humans are discussed. By incorporating SIA in research, human biologists facilitate a productive dialog with bioarchaeologists, who routinely use stable isotope evidence, mingling different perspectives on human biology and behavior.

  11. Non-lethal sampling of walleye for stable isotope analysis: a comparison of three tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis of fishes is often performed using muscle or organ tissues that require sacrificing animals. Non-lethal sampling provides an alternative for evaluating isotopic composition for species of concern or individuals of exceptional value. Stable isotope values of white muscle (lethal) were compared with those from fins and scales (non-lethal) in walleye, Sander vitreus (Mitchill), from multiple systems, size classes and across a range of isotopic values. Isotopic variability was also compared among populations to determine the potential of non-lethal tissues for diet-variability analyses. Muscle-derived isotope values were enriched compared with fins and depleted relative to scales. A split-sample validation technique and linear regression found that isotopic composition of walleye fins and scales was significantly related to that in muscle tissue for both δ13C and δ15N (r2 = 0.79–0.93). However, isotopic variability was significantly different between tissue types in two of six populations for δ15N and three of six populations for δ13C. Although species and population specific, these findings indicate that isotopic measures obtained from non-lethal tissues are indicative of those obtained from muscle.

  12. An algorithm for selecting the most accurate protocol for contact angle measurement by drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z N

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an error analysis is performed to study real water drop images and the corresponding numerically generated water drop profiles for three widely used static contact angle algorithms: the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms and the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) algorithm. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the numerically generated drop profiles based on the Laplace equation. A significant number of water drop profiles with different volumes, contact angles, and noise levels are generated, and the influences of the three factors on the accuracies of the three algorithms are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the above-mentioned three algorithms are complementary. In fact, the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms show low errors and are highly resistant to noise for water drops with small/medium volumes and contact angles, while for water drop with large volumes and contact angles just the ADSA-P algorithm can meet accuracy requirement. However, this algorithm introduces significant errors in the case of small volumes and contact angles because of its high sensitivity to noise. The critical water drop volumes of the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms corresponding to a certain contact angle error are obtained through a significant amount of computation. To improve the precision of the static contact angle measurement, a more accurate algorithm based on a combination of the three algorithms is proposed. Following a systematic investigation, the algorithm selection rule is described in detail, while maintaining the advantages of the three algorithms and overcoming their deficiencies. In general, static contact angles over the entire hydrophobicity range can be accurately evaluated using the proposed algorithm. The ease of erroneous judgment in static contact angle measurements is avoided. The proposed algorithm is validated by a static contact angle evaluation of real and numerically generated water drop

  13. An algorithm for selecting the most accurate protocol for contact angle measurement by drop shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. N.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an error analysis is performed to study real water drop images and the corresponding numerically generated water drop profiles for three widely used static contact angle algorithms: the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms and the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) algorithm. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the numerically generated drop profiles based on the Laplace equation. A significant number of water drop profiles with different volumes, contact angles, and noise levels are generated, and the influences of the three factors on the accuracies of the three algorithms are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the above-mentioned three algorithms are complementary. In fact, the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms show low errors and are highly resistant to noise for water drops with small/medium volumes and contact angles, while for water drop with large volumes and contact angles just the ADSA-P algorithm can meet accuracy requirement. However, this algorithm introduces significant errors in the case of small volumes and contact angles because of its high sensitivity to noise. The critical water drop volumes of the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms corresponding to a certain contact angle error are obtained through a significant amount of computation. To improve the precision of the static contact angle measurement, a more accurate algorithm based on a combination of the three algorithms is proposed. Following a systematic investigation, the algorithm selection rule is described in detail, while maintaining the advantages of the three algorithms and overcoming their deficiencies. In general, static contact angles over the entire hydrophobicity range can be accurately evaluated using the proposed algorithm. The ease of erroneous judgment in static contact angle measurements is avoided. The proposed algorithm is validated by a static contact angle evaluation of real and numerically generated water drop

  14. Experimental and theoretical oscillator strengths of Mg i for accurate abundance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehlivan Rhodin, A.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Jönsson, P.

    2017-02-01

    Context. With the aid of stellar abundance analysis, it is possible to study the galactic formation and evolution. Magnesium is an important element to trace the α-element evolution in our Galaxy. For chemical abundance analysis, such as magnesium abundance, accurate and complete atomic data are essential. Inaccurate atomic data lead to uncertain abundances and prevent discrimination between different evolution models. Aims: We study the spectrum of neutral magnesium from laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Our aim is to improve the oscillator strengths (f-values) of Mg i lines and to create a complete set of accurate atomic data, particularly for the near-IR region. Methods: We derived oscillator strengths by combining the experimental branching fractions with radiative lifetimes reported in the literature and computed in this work. A hollow cathode discharge lamp was used to produce free atoms in the plasma and a Fourier transform spectrometer recorded the intensity-calibrated high-resolution spectra. In addition, we performed theoretical calculations using the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock program ATSP2K. Results: This project provides a set of experimental and theoretical oscillator strengths. We derived 34 experimental oscillator strengths. Except from the Mg i optical triplet lines (3p 3P°0,1,2-4s 3S1), these oscillator strengths are measured for the first time. The theoretical oscillator strengths are in very good agreement with the experimental data and complement the missing transitions of the experimental data up to n = 7 from even and odd parity terms. We present an evaluated set of oscillator strengths, gf, with uncertainties as small as 5%. The new values of the Mg i optical triplet line (3p 3P°0,1,2-4s 3S1) oscillator strength values are 0.08 dex larger than the previous measurements.

  15. Further analysis of the IRIS iron isotope experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, G.; Ahlen, S. P.; Cartwright, B. G.; Solarz, M.

    1980-01-01

    The IRIS Fe isotope experiment was extended to atomic charges of Z = 19, with isotopic distributions for 500 events ranging from 18 to 28. Normalization of the detector response functions at Fe-56 produced a single well resolved peak at Sc-45, establishing the resolution and mass scale of the device over the entire charge region. The abundance distributions for the predominantly primary isotopes Ca-40, Fe-54, Fe-56, Ni-58, and Ni-60 do not indicate a large admixture of material with distinctly nonsolar abundances.

  16. Toward Sensitive and Accurate Analysis of Antibody Biotherapeutics by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable methodological advances in the past decade have expanded the application of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of biotherapeutics. Currently, LC/MS represents a promising alternative or supplement to the traditional ligand binding assay (LBA) in the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicokinetic studies of protein drugs, owing to the rapid and cost-effective method development, high specificity and reproducibility, low sample consumption, the capacity of analyzing multiple targets in one analysis, and the fact that a validated method can be readily adapted across various matrices and species. While promising, technical challenges associated with sensitivity, sample preparation, method development, and quantitative accuracy need to be addressed to enable full utilization of LC/MS. This article introduces the rationale and technical challenges of LC/MS techniques in biotherapeutics analysis and summarizes recently developed strategies to alleviate these challenges. Applications of LC/MS techniques on quantification and characterization of antibody biotherapeutics are also discussed. We speculate that despite the highly attractive features of LC/MS, it will not fully replace traditional assays such as LBA in the foreseeable future; instead, the forthcoming trend is likely the conjunction of biochemical techniques with versatile LC/MS approaches to achieve accurate, sensitive, and unbiased characterization of biotherapeutics in highly complex pharmaceutical/biologic matrices. Such combinations will constitute powerful tools to tackle the challenges posed by the rapidly growing needs for biotherapeutics development. PMID:25185260

  17. Cu isotope fractionation during bornite dissolution: An in situ X-ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Andrew J.; Mathur, Ryan; Post, Jeffrey E.; Heaney, Peter J.

    2012-10-24

    Low-temperature ore deposits exhibit a large variation in {delta}{sup 65}Cu ({approx}12{per_thousand}), and this range has been attributed, in part, to isotope fractionation during weathering reactions of primary minerals such as chalcocite and chalcopyrite. Here, we examine the fractionation of Cu isotopes during dissolution of another important Cu ore mineral, bornite, using a novel approach that combines time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) and isotope analysis of reaction products. During the initial stages of bornite oxidative dissolution by ferric sulfate (< 5 mol% of total Cu leached), dissolved Cu was enriched in isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) relative to the solid, with an average apparent isotope fractionation ({Delta}{sub aq - min} = {delta}{sup 65}Cu{sub aq} - {delta}{sup 65}Cu{sub min}{sup 0}) of 2.20 {+-} 0.25{per_thousand}. When > 20 mol% Cu was leached from the solid, the difference between the Cu isotope composition of the aqueous and mineral phases approached zero, with {Delta}{sub aq - min}{sup 0} values ranging from - 0.21 {+-} 0.61{per_thousand} to 0.92 {+-} 0.25{per_thousand}. XRD analysis allowed us to correlate changes in the atomic structure of bornite with the apparent isotope fractionation as the dissolution reaction progressed. These data revealed that the greatest degree of apparent fractionation is accompanied by a steep contraction in the unit-cell volume, which we identified as a transition from stoichiometric to non-stoichiometric bornite. We propose that the initially high {Delta}{sub aq - min} values result from isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) concentrating within Cu{sup 2+} during dissolution. The decrease in the apparent isotope fractionation as the reaction progresses occurs from the distillation of isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) during dissolution or kinetic isotope effects associated with the depletion of Cu from the surfaces of bornite particles.

  18. In Situ Analysis of Organics and Isotopes at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Demick, J.; Harpold, D. N.; Ming, D.; Niemann, H.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.; Scott, J.; Webster, C.

    2003-05-01

    The recent success of the "follow the water" imperative for Mars exploration is tempered by the fact that more than 2 decades after Viking, much remains unknown about the state of carbon at the planet's surface. Therefore, a key objective for lander missions that follow MER will be a search for the location and nature of organic molecules and other carbon containing species. Reduced or partially oxidized compounds may reveal the nature of ancient or even present biotic or prebiotic processes. Ongoing definition and development of advanced techniques and protocols to "follow the carbon" will be described. For example, an instrument suite presently under development to be proposed for inclusion on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory consists of an advanced gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) with derivatization capability coupled with a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LDMS) and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). The suite is designated SAM (for Sample Analysis at Mars) and is designed to carry out analysis of both atmospheric gases and volatiles released from solid phase soils, rock samples, and ices. Volatile organic molecules and their pyrolysis products are analyzed by the GCMS and TLS, and refractory organics and elements by the LDMS. Additional objectives include higher precision measurements than have been obtained, to date, of the abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases and a range of light elements including H, C, O, and N in both the atmosphere and soil. SAM can also contribute to geochemical objectives with the identification of various minerals through evolved gas analysis (EGA) of stable thermal decomposition products such as H2O, CO2, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur using the MS and TLS as the detector. Recent EGA studies on Mars analogue materials that illustrate this capability are described. This work is supported by funding from NASA and CNES

  19. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  20. Isotope coded protein labeling coupled immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): a novel approach for quantitative protein complex analysis from native tissue.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-05-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms--including humans--are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)(1) with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method.

  1. Accurate, Direct, and High-Throughput Analyses of a Broad Spectrum of Endogenously Generated DNA Base Modifications with Isotope-Dilution Two-Dimensional Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Possible Clinical Implication.

    PubMed

    Gackowski, Daniel; Starczak, Marta; Zarakowska, Ewelina; Modrzejewska, Martyna; Szpila, Anna; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Olinski, Ryszard

    2016-12-20

    Our hereby presented methodology is suitable for reliable assessment of the most common unavoidable DNA modifications which arise as a product of fundamental metabolic processes. 8-Oxoguanine, one of the oxidatively modified DNA bases, is a typical biomarker of oxidative stress. A noncanonical base, uracil, may be also present in small quantities in DNA. A set of ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins are involved in oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine which can be further oxidized to 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxycytosine. 5-Hydroxymethyluracil may be formed in deamination reaction of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine or can be also generated by TET enzymes. All of the aforementioned modifications seem to play some regulatory roles. We applied isotope-dilution automated online two-dimensional ultraperformance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (2D-UPLC-MS/MS) for direct measurement of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-carboxy-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, 2'-deoxyuridine, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Analyses of DNA extracted from matched human samples showed that the 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxycytidine level was 5-fold lower in colorectal carcinoma tumor in comparison with the normal one from the tumor's margin; also 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine and 5-carboxy-2'-deoxycytidine were lower in colorectal carcinoma tissue (ca. 2.5- and 3.5-fold, respectively). No such differences was found for 2'-deoxyuridine and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine. The presented methodology is suitable for fast, accurate, and complex evaluation of an array of endogenously generated DNA deoxynucleosides modifications. This novel technique could be used for monitoring of cancer and other diseases related to oxidative stress, aberrant metabolism, and environmental exposure. Furthermore, the fully automated two-dimensional separation is extremely useful for analysis of material

  2. Aberrant Water Homeostasis Detected by Stable Isotope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Shannon P.; Wende, Adam R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Enright, Lindsey E.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Abel, E. Dale; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2010-01-01

    While isotopes are frequently used as tracers in investigations of disease physiology (i.e., 14C labeled glucose), few studies have examined the impact that disease, and disease-related alterations in metabolism, may have on stable isotope ratios at natural abundance levels. The isotopic composition of body water is heavily influenced by water metabolism and dietary patterns and may provide a platform for disease detection. By utilizing a model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes as an index case of aberrant water homeostasis, we demonstrate that untreated diabetes mellitus results in distinct combinations, or signatures, of the hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope ratios in body water. Additionally, we show that the δ2H and δ18O values of body water are correlated with increased water flux, suggesting altered blood osmolality, due to hyperglycemia, as the mechanism behind this correlation. Further, we present a mathematical model describing the impact of water flux on the isotopic composition of body water and compare model predicted values with actual values. These data highlight the importance of factors such as water flux and energy expenditure on predictive models of body water and additionally provide a framework for using naturally occurring stable isotope ratios to monitor diseases that impact water homeostasis. PMID:20657736

  3. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopic analysis of atmospheric carbon monoxide using continuous-flow isotope ratio MS by isotope ratio monitoring of CO.

    PubMed

    Tsunogai, Urumu; Nakagawa, Fumiko; Komatsu, Daisuke D; Gamo, Toshitaka

    2002-11-15

    We have developed a rapid and simple measurement system for both content and stable isotopic compositions (13C and 18O) of atmospheric CO, using continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry by simultaneously monitoring the CO+ ion currents at masses 28, 29, and 30. The analytical system consisted sequentially of a sample trapping port (liquid nitrogen temperature silica gel and molecular sieve 5A), a gas dryer, a CO purification column (molecular sieve 5A), a cryofocusing unit, and a final purification column using a GC capillary. Analytical precision of 0.2 per thousand for 13C and 0.4 per thousand for 18O can be realized for samples that contain as little as 300 pmol of CO within 40 min for one sample analysis. Analytical blanks associated with the method are less than 1 pmol. The extent of analytical error in delta13C due to mass-independent fractionation of oxygen in natural CO is estimated to be less than 0.3 per thousand. Based on this system, we report herein a kinetic isotopic effect during CO consumption in soil.

  4. First stable isotope analysis of Asiatic wild ass tail hair from the Mongolian Gobi.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Sturm, Martina Burnik; Kaczensky, Petra

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study feeding ecology, water use or movement pattern in contemporary, historic and ancient species. Certain hair and teeth grow continuously, and when sampled longitudinally can provide temporally explicit information on dietary regime and movement pattern. In an initial trial, we analysed a tail sample of an Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus) from the Mongolian Gobi. We found seasonal variations in H, C and N isotope patterns, likely being the result of temporal variations in available feeds, water supply and possibly physiological status. Thus stable isotope analysis shows promise to study the comparative ecology of the three autochthonous equid species in the Mongolian Gobi.

  5. Oceanic and Climate phasing analysis across Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, G., III; McManus, J. F.; Curry, W. B.; Roberts, N. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Keigwin, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial climate oscillated between cold stadial periods similar to the Last Glacial Maximum and warmer periods more similar to today from 25,000 to 60,000 years BP, an envelop of time referred to as marine isotope stage three (MIS3). The sudden warmings (Dansgaard-Oeschger events) and ice sheet surges (Heinrich events) have long captured researchers' attention as a means of exploring significant perturbations to the climate system. The climate dynamics associated with these events have been recently elucidated throughhigh-resolution analysis of ice and sediment core archives. In particular, it has been recently demonstrated through synchronization of Greenlandic and Antarctic ice cores that abrupt climate events propagated from the Northern to Southern hemisphere. Likewise, during Heinrich events ice rafted detritus appeared in the Northern North Atlantic generally after cold stadial conditions had already been established. These results indict the ocean's conveyor as the vehicle hemispheric partitioning heat across these events. Here we test the phased response of multiple paleoproxies sensitive to circulation across these abrupt climate events through all of MIS3. Through correlation analysis of multiple paleoproxy records generated from a high accumulation sediment core taken from the Bermuda Rise, we examine the phase relationship of high latitude climate records with the kinematic circulation proxy Pa/Th, benthic d13C and d18O, SST, d18Osw, CaCO3 content, 230Th-normalized bulk and component fluxes in order to infer the sequence of change across these abrupt millennial events. We find that shifts in water mass composition precede increases in temperatures across the identified time interval, while the export of Pa relative to Th increases in tandem with changes in with Bermuda Rise SST estimates during warmings, but lags during cooling. Rapid shifts in thorium normalized carbonate flux supply secondary evidence for changes in preservation accompanying changes

  6. Accurate determination of succinimide degradation products using high fidelity trypsin digestion peptide map analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, X Christopher; Joe, Koman; Zhang, Yu; Adriano, Andrea; Wang, Yaning; Gazzano-Santoro, Helene; Keck, Rodney G; Deperalta, Galahad; Ling, Victor

    2011-08-01

    We report an efficient, high fidelity trypsin digestion method for peptide map analysis. This method minimizes artifacts caused by the sample preparation process, and we show its utility for the accurate determination of succinimide formation in a degraded monoclonal antibody product. A basic charge variant was detected by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing and was shown with reduced antigen binding and biological activity. Samples were reduced under denaturing conditions at pH 5.0, and digestion of the reduced protein with porcine trypsin was performed at pH 7.0 for 1 h. Following reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography and online mass spectrometric analysis, succinimide formation was identified at Asp30 in the light chain. This result contrasts with the observation of only iso-Asp and Asp residues under conventional sample preparation conditions, which are therefore concluded to be artificially generated. The Asp30 residue is seen in the cocrystal structure model to participate in favorable charge interaction with an antigen molecule. Formation of succinimide and the resulting loss of negative charge are therefore hypothesized to be the degradation mechanism. After treatment of the degraded antibody sample to mildly alkaline pH conditions, we observed only Asp residue as the succinimide hydrolysis product and concurrent recovery of biological activity.

  7. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data.

  8. Accurate airway segmentation based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qier; Kitsaka, Takayuki; Nimura, Yukitaka; Oda, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel airway segmentation method based on intensity structure analysis and graph-cut. Airway segmentation is an important step in analyzing chest CT volumes for computerized lung cancer detection, emphysema diagnosis, asthma diagnosis, and pre- and intra-operative bronchoscope navigation. However, obtaining a complete 3-D airway tree structure from a CT volume is quite challenging. Several researchers have proposed automated algorithms basically based on region growing and machine learning techniques. However these methods failed to detect the peripheral bronchi branches. They caused a large amount of leakage. This paper presents a novel approach that permits more accurate extraction of complex bronchial airway region. Our method are composed of three steps. First, the Hessian analysis is utilized for enhancing the line-like structure in CT volumes, then a multiscale cavity-enhancement filter is employed to detect the cavity-like structure from the previous enhanced result. In the second step, we utilize the support vector machine (SVM) to construct a classifier for removing the FP regions generated. Finally, the graph-cut algorithm is utilized to connect all of the candidate voxels to form an integrated airway tree. We applied this method to sixteen cases of 3D chest CT volumes. The results showed that the branch detection rate of this method can reach about 77.7% without leaking into the lung parenchyma areas.

  9. Heart-cutting two-dimensional gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry analysis of monoaromatic hydrocarbons in complex groundwater and gas-phase samples.

    PubMed

    Ponsin, Violaine; Buscheck, Timothy E; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2017-04-07

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is increasingly used to evaluate the origin and fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the environment. However, as samples often contain a complex mixture of compounds and the method requires a full chromatographic separation, it can be challenging to obtain accurate and precise isotope values. In this study, in order to develop a method to analyze carbon isotopes in benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in complex environmental samples, a two-dimensional heart-cutting gas chromatograph (GC) was hyphenated to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The focus was placed on benzene and toluene, which are the main compounds of concern in contaminated sites. A full separation for BTEX was successfully achieved using a 60m polar column in the first dimension and a 30m non-polar column in the second dimension. Accuracy and precision of carbon isotope measurements of standards were not impacted by the new setup compared to classic one-dimensional (1D) GC-C-IRMS. For benzene and toluene, precision remained very good (≤0.2‰) for concentrations comprised between 5 and 20μg/L. A high matrix load did not influence the precision and accuracy of isotope measurements. The method was tested on several samples from two different field sites. For all samples tested, full chromatographic baseline resolution was achieved for benzene and toluene. Spatial variability of isotopes values linked to biodegradation was evidenced for one field site. This new 2D-GC-C-IRMS method will broaden the spectrum of samples suitable for isotope analysis and will be therefore able to give new insights into attenuation processes of BTEX in contaminated sites or source fingerprinting.

  10. Characterization of phenol and cresol biodegradation by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi; Gilevska, Tetyana; Wetzig, Felix; Dorer, Conrad; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Microbial degradation of phenol and cresols can occur under oxic and anoxic conditions by different degradation pathways. One recent technique to take insight into reaction mechanisms is compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). While enzymes and reaction mechanisms of several degradation pathways have been characterized in (bio)chemical studies, associated isotope fractionation patterns have been rarely reported, possibly due to constraints in current analytical methods. In this study, carbon enrichment factors and apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIEc) of the initial steps of different aerobic and anaerobic phenol and cresols degradation pathways were analyzed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry connected with liquid chromatography (LC-IRMS). Significant isotope fractionation was detected for aerobic ring hydroxylation, anoxic side chain hydroxylation, and anoxic fumarate addition, while anoxic carboxylation reactions produced small and inconsistent fractionation. The results suggest that several microbial degradation pathways of phenol and cresols are detectable in the environment by CSIA.

  11. Development of isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometry for plutonium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.K.; Parker, J.L. ); Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Kurosawa, A.; Akiyama, T. )

    1991-01-01

    We are studying the feasibility of determining the plutonium concentration and isotopic distribution of highly radioactive, spent-fuel dissolver solutions by employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The study involves gamma-ray plutonium isotopic analysis for both dissolver and spiked dissolver solution samples, after plutonium is eluted through an ion-exchange column and absorbed in a small resin bead bag. The spike is well characterized, dry plutonium containing {approximately}98% of {sup 239}Pu. By using measured isotopic information, the concentration of elemental plutonium in the dissolver solution can be determined. Both the plutonium concentration and the isotopic composition of the dissolver solution obtained from this study agree well with values obtained by traditional isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Because it is rapid, easy to operate and maintain, and costs less, this new technique could be an alternative method to IDMS for input accountability and verification measurements in reprocessing plants. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  13. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  14. Characterization of wines according the geographical origin by analysis of isotopes and minerals and the influence of harvest on the isotope values.

    PubMed

    Dutra, S V; Adami, L; Marcon, A R; Carnieli, G J; Roani, C A; Spinelli, F R; Leonardelli, S; Vanderlinde, R

    2013-12-01

    We studied Brazilian wines produced by microvinification from Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot grapes, vintages 2007 and 2008, from the Serra Gaúcha, Campanha and Serra do Sudeste regions, in order to differentiate them according to geographical origin by using isotope and mineral element analyses. In addition, the influence of vintage production in isotope values was verified. Isotope analysis was performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and the determination of minerals was by flame atomic absorption (FAA). The best parameters to classify the wines in the 2008 vintage were Rb and Li. The results of the δ(13)C of wine ethanol, Rb and Li showed a significant difference between the varieties regardless of the region studied. The δ(18)O values of water and δ(13)C of ethanol showed significant differences, regardless of the variety. Discriminant analysis of isotope and minerals values allowed to classify approximately 80% of the wines from the three regions studied.

  15. Stable isotope dietary analysis of the Tianyuan 1 early modern human

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaowu; Shang, Hong; Tong, Haowen; Nehlich, Olaf; Liu, Wu; Zhao, Chaohong; Yu, Jincheng; Wang, Changsui; Trinkaus, Erik; Richards, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    We report here on the isotopic analysis of the diet of one of the oldest modern humans found in Eurasia, the Tianyuan 1 early modern human dating to ≈40,000 calendar years ago from Tianyuan Cave (Tianyuandong) in the Zhoukoudian region of China. Carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of the human and associated faunal remains indicate a diet high in animal protein, and the high nitrogen isotope values suggest the consumption of freshwater fish. To confirm this inference, we measured the sulfur isotope values of terrestrial and freshwater animals around the Zhoukoudian area and of the Tianyuan 1 human, which also support the interpretation of a substantial portion of the diet from freshwater fish. This analysis provides the direct evidence for the consumption of aquatic resources by early modern humans in China and has implications for early modern human subsistence and demography. PMID:19581579

  16. The accurate use of impedance analysis for the study of microbial electrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Benetton, Xochitl; Sevda, Surajbhan; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Pant, Deepak

    2012-11-07

    The present critical review aims to portray the principles and theoretical foundations that have been used for the application of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to study electron-transfer mechanisms, mass transfer phenomena and distribution of the heterogeneous properties of microbial electrochemical systems (MXCs). Over the past eight years, the application of this method has allowed major breakthroughs, especially in the field of microbial fuel cells (MFCs); however, it is still most widely extended only to the calculation of internal resistances. The use and interpretation of EIS should greatly improve since the intrinsic knowledge of this field, and efforts and current trends in this field have already allowed its understanding based on rather meaningful physical properties and not only on fitting electrical analogues. From this perspective, the use, analysis and interpretation of EIS applied to the study of MXCs are critically examined. Together with the revision of more than 150 articles directly devoted to this topic, two examples of the correct and improved analysis of EIS data are extensively presented. The first one focuses on the use of graphical methods for improving EIS analysis and the other one concentrates on the elucidation of the constant phase element (CPE) parameters. CPEs have been introduced in equivalent circuit models, sometimes without solid justification or analysis; the effective capacitance has been obtained from CPE parameters, following an unsuitable theory for the case of microbial-electrochemical interfaces. The use of CPE is reviewed in terms of meaningful physical parameters, such as biofilm thickness. The use of a finite-diffusion element is reviewed throughout estimation of accurate values for obtaining the dimensionless numbers, Schmidt and Sherwood, in the context of a dioxygen-reducing-biocathode, under different flow-rate conditions. The use and analysis of EIS in this context are still emerging, but because of

  17. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.P.; Swiler, L.P.; Trott, C.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Tucker, G.J.

    2015-03-15

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  18. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. P.; Swiler, L. P.; Trott, C. R.; Foiles, S. M.; Tucker, G. J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  19. Fully Automatic System for Accurate Localisation and Analysis of Cephalometric Landmarks in Lateral Cephalograms

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Claudia; Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Cootes, Tim F.

    2016-01-01

    Cephalometric tracing is a standard analysis tool for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fully automatic landmark annotation (FALA) system for finding cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms and its application to the classification of skeletal malformations. Digital cephalograms of 400 subjects (age range: 7–76 years) were available. All cephalograms had been manually traced by two experienced orthodontists with 19 cephalometric landmarks, and eight clinical parameters had been calculated for each subject. A FALA system to locate the 19 landmarks in lateral cephalograms was developed. The system was evaluated via comparison to the manual tracings, and the automatically located landmarks were used for classification of the clinical parameters. The system achieved an average point-to-point error of 1.2 mm, and 84.7% of landmarks were located within the clinically accepted precision range of 2.0 mm. The automatic landmark localisation performance was within the inter-observer variability between two clinical experts. The automatic classification achieved an average classification accuracy of 83.4% which was comparable to an experienced orthodontist. The FALA system rapidly and accurately locates and analyses cephalometric landmarks in lateral cephalograms, and has the potential to significantly improve the clinical work flow in orthodontic treatment. PMID:27645567

  20. Methods for Applying Accurate Digital PCR Analysis on Low Copy DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Whale, Alexandra S.; Cowen, Simon; Foy, Carole A.; Huggett, Jim F.

    2013-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is a highly accurate molecular approach, capable of precise measurements, offering a number of unique opportunities. However, in its current format dPCR can be limited by the amount of sample that can be analysed and consequently additional considerations such as performing multiplex reactions or pre-amplification can be considered. This study investigated the impact of duplexing and pre-amplification on dPCR analysis by using three different assays targeting a model template (a portion of the Arabidopsis thaliana alcohol dehydrogenase gene). We also investigated the impact of different template types (linearised plasmid clone and more complex genomic DNA) on measurement precision using dPCR. We were able to demonstrate that duplex dPCR can provide a more precise measurement than uniplex dPCR, while applying pre-amplification or varying template type can significantly decrease the precision of dPCR. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the pre-amplification step can introduce measurement bias that is not consistent between experiments for a sample or assay and so could not be compensated for during the analysis of this data set. We also describe a model for estimating the prevalence of molecular dropout and identify this as a source of dPCR imprecision. Our data have demonstrated that the precision afforded by dPCR at low sample concentration can exceed that of the same template post pre-amplification thereby negating the need for this additional step. Our findings also highlight the technical differences between different templates types containing the same sequence that must be considered if plasmid DNA is to be used to assess or control for more complex templates like genomic DNA. PMID:23472156

  1. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.; O'Connell, J.W.; Pacheco-Alvarez, J.A.; Scheinman, M.; Hattner, R.S.; Morady, F.; Faulkner, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex and then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.

  2. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  3. Application of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis for investigating abiotic transformations of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA).

    PubMed

    Kozell, Anna; Yecheskel, Yinon; Balaban, Noa; Dror, Ishai; Halicz, Ludwik; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2015-04-07

    Many of polybrominated organic compounds, used as flame retardant additives, belong to the group of persistent organic pollutants. Compound-specific isotope analysis is one of the potential analytical tools for investigating their fate in the environment. However, the isotope effects associated with transformations of brominated organic compounds are still poorly explored. In the present study, we investigated carbon and bromine isotope fractionation during degradation of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), one of the widely used flame retardant additives, in three different chemical processes: transformation in aqueous alkaline solution (pH 8); reductive dehalogenation by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) in anoxic conditions; oxidative degradation by H2O2 in the presence of CuO nanoparticles (nCuO). Two-dimensional carbon-bromine isotope plots (δ(13)C/Δ(81)Br) for each reaction gave different process-dependent isotope slopes (Λ(C/Br)): 25.2 ± 2.5 for alkaline hydrolysis (pH 8); 3.8 ± 0.5 for debromination in the presence of nZVI in anoxic conditions; ∞ in the case of catalytic oxidation by H2O2 with nCuO. The obtained isotope effects for both elements were generally in agreement with the values expected for the suggested reaction mechanisms. The results of the present study support further applications of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis as a tool for identification of reaction pathway during transformations of brominated organic compounds in the environment.

  4. An in-depth evaluation of accuracy and precision in Hg isotopic analysis via pneumatic nebulization and cold vapor generation multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rua-Ibarz, Ana; Bolea-Fernandez, Eduardo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) isotopic analysis via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can provide relevant biogeochemical information by revealing sources, pathways, and sinks of this highly toxic metal. In this work, the capabilities and limitations of two different sample introduction systems, based on pneumatic nebulization (PN) and cold vapor generation (CVG), respectively, were evaluated in the context of Hg isotopic analysis via MC-ICP-MS. The effect of (i) instrument settings and acquisition parameters, (ii) concentration of analyte element (Hg), and internal standard (Tl)-used for mass discrimination correction purposes-and (iii) different mass bias correction approaches on the accuracy and precision of Hg isotope ratio results was evaluated. The extent and stability of mass bias were assessed in a long-term study (18 months, n = 250), demonstrating a precision ≤0.006% relative standard deviation (RSD). CVG-MC-ICP-MS showed an approximately 20-fold enhancement in Hg signal intensity compared with PN-MC-ICP-MS. For CVG-MC-ICP-MS, the mass bias induced by instrumental mass discrimination was accurately corrected for by using either external correction in a sample-standard bracketing approach (SSB) or double correction, consisting of the use of Tl as internal standard in a revised version of the Russell law (Baxter approach), followed by SSB. Concomitant matrix elements did not affect CVG-ICP-MS results. Neither with PN, nor with CVG, any evidence for mass-independent discrimination effects in the instrument was observed within the experimental precision obtained. CVG-MC-ICP-MS was finally used for Hg isotopic analysis of reference materials (RMs) of relevant environmental origin. The isotopic composition of Hg in RMs of marine biological origin testified of mass-independent fractionation that affected the odd-numbered Hg isotopes. While older RMs were used for validation purposes, novel Hg isotopic data are provided for the

  5. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Diesel Fuels in a Forensic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Syahidah; Frew, Russell; Hayman, Alan

    2015-02-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers great potential as a tool to provide chemical evidence in a forensic investigation. Many attempts to trace environmental oil spills were successful where isotopic values were particularly distinct. However, difficulties arise when a large data set is analyzed and the isotopic differences between samples are subtle. In the present study, discrimination of diesel oils involved in a diesel theft case was carried out to infer the relatedness of the samples to potential source samples. This discriminatory analysis used a suite of hydrocarbon diagnostic indices, alkanes, to generate carbon and hydrogen isotopic data of the compositions of the compounds which were then processed using multivariate statistical analyses to infer the relatedness of the data set. The results from this analysis were put into context by comparing the data with the δ13C and δ2H of alkanes in commercial diesel samples obtained from various locations in the South Island of New Zealand. Based on the isotopic character of the alkanes, it is suggested that diesel fuels involved in the diesel theft case were distinguishable. This manuscript shows that CSIA when used in tandem with multivariate statistical analysis provide a defensible means to differentiate and source-apportion qualitatively similar oils at the molecular level. This approach was able to overcome confounding challenges posed by the near single-point source of origin i.e. the very subtle differences in isotopic values between the samples.

  6. Compound-specific isotope analysis of diesel fuels in a forensic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syahidah A.; Frew, Russell D.; Hayman, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers great potential as a tool to provide chemical evidence in a forensic investigation. Many attempts to trace environmental oil spills were successful where isotopic values were particularly distinct. However, difficulties arise when a large data set is analyzed and the isotopic differences between samples are subtle. In the present study, discrimination of diesel oils involved in a diesel theft case was carried out to infer the relatedness of the samples to potential source samples. This discriminatory analysis used a suite of hydrocarbon diagnostic indices, alkanes, to generate carbon and hydrogen isotopic data of the compositions of the compounds which were then processed using multivariate statistical analyses to infer the relatedness of the data set. The results from this analysis were put into context by comparing the data with the δ13C and δ2H of alkanes in commercial diesel samples obtained from various locations in the South Island of New Zealand. Based on the isotopic character of the alkanes, it is suggested that diesel fuels involved in the diesel theft case were distinguishable. This manuscript shows that CSIA when used in tandem with multivariate statistical analysis provide a defensible means to differentiate and source-apportion qualitatively similar oils at the molecular level. This approach was able to overcome confounding challenges posed by the near single-point source of origin, i.e., the very subtle differences in isotopic values between the samples. PMID:25774366

  7. Femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector ICPMS Analysis of Uranium Isotopes in NIST Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Springer, Kellen WE; Ward, Jesse D.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, John W.; Endres, Mackenzie C.; Hart, Garret L.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Oropeza, Dayana; Russo, Richard; Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Fahey, Albert J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-02-06

    We have utilized femtosecond laser ablation coupled to multi-collector inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry to measure the uranium isotopic content of NIST 61x (x=0,2,4,6) glasses. The uranium content of these glasses is a linear two-component mixing between isotopically natural uranium and the isotopically depleted spike used in preparing the glasses. Laser ablation results match extremely well, generally within a few ppm, with solution analysis following sample dissolution and chemical separation. In addition to isotopic data, sample utilization efficiency measurements indicate that over 1% of ablated uranium atoms reach a mass spectrometer detector, making this technique extremely efficient. Laser sampling also allows for spatial analysis and our data indicate that rare uranium concentration inhomogeneities exist in NIST 616 glass.

  8. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other more complex tissues such a...

  9. Generator Coordinate Method Analysis of Xe and Ba Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Koji; Yoshinaga, Naotaka; Teruya, Eri

    Nuclear structure of Xe and Ba isotopes is studied in terms of the quantum-number projected generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM reproduces well the energy levels of high-spin states as well as low-lying states. The structure of the low-lying states is analyzed through the GCM wave functions.

  10. STABLE CHLORINE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biogeochemical cycling of chlorinated organic contaminants in the environment is often difficult to understand because of the complex distributions of these compounds and variability of sources. To address these issues from an isotopic perspective, we have measured the, 37Cl...

  11. The isotopic composition of enriched Si: a data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, E.; Drozdov, M. N.; Mana, G.; Pramann, A.; Rienitz, O.; Sennikov, P.; Valkiers, S.

    2011-04-01

    To determine the Avogadro constant by counting the atoms in quasi-perfect spheres made of a silicon crystal highly enriched with 28Si, the isotopic composition of the crystal was measured in different laboratories by different measurement methods. This paper examines the consistency of the measurement results.

  12. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  13. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  14. An ultra-clean technique for accurately analysing Pb isotopes and heavy metals at high spatial resolution in ice cores with sub-pg g(-1) Pb concentrations.

    PubMed

    Burn, Laurie J; Rosman, Kevin J R; Candelone, Jean-Pierre; Vallelonga, Paul; Burton, Graeme R; Smith, Andrew M; Morgan, Vin I; Barbante, Carlo; Hong, Sungmin; Boutron, Claude F

    2009-02-23

    Measurements of Pb isotope ratios in ice containing sub-pg g(-1) concentrations are easily compromised by contamination, particularly where limited sample is available. Improved techniques are essential if Antarctic ice cores are to be analysed with sufficient spatial resolution to reveal seasonal variations due to climate. This was achieved here by using stainless steel chisels and saws and strict protocols in an ultra-clean cold room to decontaminate and section ice cores. Artificial ice cores, prepared from high purity water were used to develop and refine the procedures and quantify blanks. Ba and In, two other important elements present at pg g(-1) and fg g(-1) concentrations in Polar ice, were also measured. The final blank amounted to 0.2+/-0.2 pg of Pb with (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of 1.16+/-0.12 and 2.35+/-0.16, respectively, 1.5+/-0.4 pg of Ba and 0.6+/-2.0 fg of In, most of which probably originates from abrasion of the steel saws by the ice. The procedure was demonstrated on a Holocene Antarctic ice core section and was shown to contribute blanks of only approximately 5%, approximately 14% and approximately 0.8% to monthly resolved samples with respective Pb, Ba and In concentrations of 0.12 pg g(-1), 0.3 pg g(-1) and 2.3 fg g(-1). Uncertainties in the Pb isotopic ratio measurements were degraded by only approximately 0.2%.

  15. Three-stage mass spectrometer for isotopic analysis of radionuclides in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, J.E.

    1981-09-01

    A three-stage mass spectrometer was constructed for isotopic analysis of several radioactive as well as stable elements at environmental levels. The spectrometer is interfaced to a digital computer, which controls the operation of the spectrometer, accumulates data, reduces data, and prints a final result. The spectrometer has demonstrated the capability of measuring the isotopic composition of plutonium samples as small as 0.005 picogram and has an abundance sensitivity greater than 10/sup 8/.

  16. Isotope Analysis of Individual Aerosol Particles - a New Tool for Studying Heterogeneous Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterholler, B.; Hoppe, P.; Huth, J.; Andreae, M. O.; Foley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Sources of atmospheric sulfur and its oxidation pathways are studied by isotope analysis of sulfate particles. conventional gas mass spectrometry averages the isotopic compositions of millions of aerosol grains and, therefore, several different types of sulphur aerosol. The new Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe technique permits isotope analyses of individual aerosol particles down to 0.5 μm diameter. Combining the chemical composition and isotopic signature of individual particles enables source apportionment of non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate and elucidating mixing processes between nss sulfate and sea-salt sulfate for each sample. Results from aerosol samples collected in Mace Head (Western Ireland) are presented. These samples represent different airmass types, such as clean marine boundary layer air, moderately polluted air and strongly polluted air transported from the continent. Fresh aerosol preserves the original isotopic signature of sea-salt and nss sulfate in separate particles, the latter being present predominantly in the form of ammonium sulfate. This enables us to identify oxidation of nss sulfate in deliquescent sea salt particles by means of their sulfur isotope ratio. Cloud processing however, leads to a complete homogenization as far as the sulfur isotopic signature is concerned.

  17. Analysis of acrylamide in coffee and cocoa by isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aguas, Patricia C; Fitzhenry, Matthew J; Giannikopoulos, Georgina; Varelis, Peter

    2006-08-01

    An accurate and precise method for the quantification of acrylamide using stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed and used to measure acrylamide in coffee and cocoa samples. The sample preparation involved extraction of the analyte and its internal standard, 13C3-acrylamide, into water and subsequent defatting of the aqueous extract with dichloromethane. An aliquot of the resulting aqueous extract was then azeotropically dried under reduced pressure and subsequently purified using an aminopropyl-bonded silica cartridge. The purified extracts were then chromatographed on a 5-microm 2.1 x 150 mm Hypercarb column, the effluent of which was monitored for the analyte and its internal standard using positive-ion APCI-selected reaction monitoring. The intra-laboratory reproducibility of the method, expressed as a relative coefficient of variation (%, n=5), was determined at four levels of concentration (12.3, 42.3, 139.3 and 464.8 microg kg(-1)) and was found to vary between 0.6-2.5%. The accuracy of the method was assessed using a reference sample of coffee. The average result obtained using our method differed from the assigned value of the reference material by less than 1%. An analysis of a cocoa sample revealed that the method is capable of precisely estimating acrylamide in challenging matrices down to a level of at least 12.3 microg kg(-1).

  18. Degradation and Volatilization of Chlorofluorocarbons in Contaminated Groundwater Explored by Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are ozone depleting compounds whose production was phased out by the regulations of the Montreal Protocol (1987). Accidental release and disposal also led to contamination of groundwater at many locations, however, and this legacy persists. Although very stable, CFCs may degrade via abiotic and biotic pathways. Quantification of the degree of transformation of CFCs has been challenging due to other processes such as dilution, sorption and volatilization. Compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) has been successfully applied for a variety of priority pollutants to distinguish degradation from other processes and to quantify transformation rates. A Purge & Trap - CSIA method developed in our lab was applied to determine the stable carbon isotopic signature of CFCs and HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons) in groundwater samples from a contaminated site. Preliminary results suggest that degradation of CFCs and HCFCs may result in enriched δ13C values, consistent with fractionation during bond breakage as has been reported for many other hydrocarbon pollutants. The effect of volatile loss during sampling on the isotopic signatures of CFCs was examined in laboratory experiments. Volatilization from pure phase CFCs showed a small inverse isotope effect during open system volatilization, opposite to the normal isotope effect generally observed during biodegradation. For volatilization of CFCs dissolved in water a much smaller isotope effect was observed. An important result from this work is that any volatile loss may introduce only a small change in CFC isotopic signatures in groundwater, and importantly, due to the opposite direction of isotope effects associated with volatilization versus degradation, any effects of volatile loss on the isotopic signatures cannot be confused with transformation of CFCs. At most, volatilization might contribute to a conservative estimate of the extent of degradation.

  19. Degradation and Volatilization of Chlorofluorocarbons in Contaminated Groundwater Explored by Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, S.; Pijnenburg, R. P.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Bakker, E.; Samuelson, J. E.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are ozone depleting compounds whose production was phased out by the regulations of the Montreal Protocol (1987). Accidental release and disposal also led to contamination of groundwater at many locations, however, and this legacy persists. Although very stable, CFCs may degrade via abiotic and biotic pathways. Quantification of the degree of transformation of CFCs has been challenging due to other processes such as dilution, sorption and volatilization. Compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis (CSIA) has been successfully applied for a variety of priority pollutants to distinguish degradation from other processes and to quantify transformation rates. A Purge & Trap - CSIA method developed in our lab was applied to determine the stable carbon isotopic signature of CFCs and HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons) in groundwater samples from a contaminated site. Preliminary results suggest that degradation of CFCs and HCFCs may result in enriched δ13C values, consistent with fractionation during bond breakage as has been reported for many other hydrocarbon pollutants. The effect of volatile loss during sampling on the isotopic signatures of CFCs was examined in laboratory experiments. Volatilization from pure phase CFCs showed a small inverse isotope effect during open system volatilization, opposite to the normal isotope effect generally observed during biodegradation. For volatilization of CFCs dissolved in water a much smaller isotope effect was observed. An important result from this work is that any volatile loss may introduce only a small change in CFC isotopic signatures in groundwater, and importantly, due to the opposite direction of isotope effects associated with volatilization versus degradation, any effects of volatile loss on the isotopic signatures cannot be confused with transformation of CFCs. At most, volatilization might contribute to a conservative estimate of the extent of degradation.

  20. Carbon and chlorine isotope analysis to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-12-16

    This study investigates dual C-Cl isotope fractionation during 1,1,1-TCA transformation by heat-activated persulfate (PS), hydrolysis/dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH) and Fe(0). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,1,1-TCA was performed for the first time, and transformation-associated isotope fractionation ε bulk C and ε bulk Cl values were -4.0 ± 0.2‰ and no chlorine isotope fractionation with PS, -1.6 ± 0.2‰ and -4.7 ± 0.1‰ for HY/DH, -7.8 ± 0.4‰ and -5.2 ± 0.2‰ with Fe(0). Distinctly different dual isotope slopes (Δδ13C/Δδ37Cl): ∞ with PS, 0.33 ± 0.04 for HY/DH and 1.5 ± 0.1 with Fe(0) highlight the potential of this approach to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in the field. The trend observed with PS agreed with a C-H bond oxidation mechanism in the first reaction step. For HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways, different slopes were obtained although both pathways involve cleavage of a C-Cl bond in their initial reaction step. In contrast to the expected larger primary carbon isotope effects relative to chlorine for C-Cl bond cleavage, ε bulk C < ε bulk Cl was observed for HY/DH and in a similar range for reduction by Fe(0), suggesting the contribution of secondary chlorine isotope effects. Therefore, different magnitude of secondary chlorine isotope effects could at least be partly responsible for the distinct slopes between HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways. Following this dual isotope approach, abiotic transformation processes can unambiguously be identified and quantified.

  1. Assessing connectivity of estuarine fishes based on stable isotope ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzka, Sharon Z.

    2005-07-01

    Assessing connectivity is fundamental to understanding the population dynamics of fishes. I propose that isotopic analyses can greatly contribute to studies of connectivity in estuarine fishes due to the high diversity of isotopic signatures found among estuarine habitats and the fact that variations in isotopic composition at the base of a food web are reflected in the tissues of consumers. Isotopic analysis can be used for identifying nursery habitats and estimating their contribution to adult populations. If movement to a new habitat is accompanied by a shift to foods of distinct isotopic composition, recent immigrants and residents can be distinguished based on their isotopic ratios. Movement patterns thus can be reconstructed based on information obtained from individuals. A key consideration is the rate of isotopic turnover, which determines the length of time that an immigrant to a given habitat will be distinguishable from a longtime resident. A literature survey indicated that few studies have measured turnover rates in fishes and that these have focused on larvae and juveniles. These studies reveal that biomass gain is the primary process driving turnover rates, while metabolic turnover is either minimal or undetectable. Using a simple dilution model and biomass-specific growth rates, I estimated that young fishes with fast growth rates will reflect the isotopic composition of a new diet within days or weeks. Older or slower-growing individuals may take years or never fully equilibrate. Future studies should evaluate the factors that influence turnover rates in fishes during various stages of the life cycle and in different tissues, as well as explore the potential for combining stable isotope and otolith microstructure analyses to examine the relationship between demographic parameters, movement and connectivity.

  2. The Conflict between Cheetahs and Humans on Namibian Farmland Elucidated by Stable Isotope Diet Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Christian C.; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Blanc, Anne-Sophie; Jago, Mark; Wachter, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Large areas of Namibia are covered by farmland, which is also used by game and predator species. Because it can cause conflicts with farmers when predators, such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), hunt livestock, we assessed whether livestock constitutes a significant part of the cheetah diet by analysing the stable isotope composition of blood and tissue samples of cheetahs and their potential prey species. According to isotopic similarities, we defined three isotopic categories of potential prey: members of a C4 food web with high δ15N values (gemsbok, cattle, springhare and guinea fowl) and those with low δ15N values (hartebeest, warthog), and members of a C3 food web, namely browsers (eland, kudu, springbok, steenbok and scrub hare). We quantified the trophic discrimination of heavy isotopes in cheetah muscle in 9 captive individuals and measured an enrichment for 15N (3.2‰) but not for 13C in relation to food. We captured 53 free-ranging cheetahs of which 23 were members of groups. Cheetahs of the same group were isotopically distinct from members of other groups, indicating that group members shared their prey. Solitary males (n = 21) and males in a bachelor groups (n = 11) fed mostly on hartebeest and warthogs, followed by browsers in case of solitary males, and by grazers with high δ15N values in case of bachelor groups. Female cheetahs (n = 9) predominantly fed on browsers and used also hartebeest and warthogs. Mixing models suggested that the isotopic prey category that included cattle was only important, if at all, for males living in bachelor groups. Stable isotope analysis of fur, muscle, red blood cells and blood plasma in 9 free-ranging cheetahs identified most individuals as isotopic specialists, focussing on isotopically distinct prey categories as their food. PMID:25162403

  3. The conflict between cheetahs and humans on Namibian farmland elucidated by stable isotope diet analysis.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christian C; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Blanc, Anne-Sophie; Jago, Mark; Wachter, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Large areas of Namibia are covered by farmland, which is also used by game and predator species. Because it can cause conflicts with farmers when predators, such as cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), hunt livestock, we assessed whether livestock constitutes a significant part of the cheetah diet by analysing the stable isotope composition of blood and tissue samples of cheetahs and their potential prey species. According to isotopic similarities, we defined three isotopic categories of potential prey: members of a C4 food web with high δ15N values (gemsbok, cattle, springhare and guinea fowl) and those with low δ15N values (hartebeest, warthog), and members of a C3 food web, namely browsers (eland, kudu, springbok, steenbok and scrub hare). We quantified the trophic discrimination of heavy isotopes in cheetah muscle in 9 captive individuals and measured an enrichment for 15N (3.2‰) but not for 13C in relation to food. We captured 53 free-ranging cheetahs of which 23 were members of groups. Cheetahs of the same group were isotopically distinct from members of other groups, indicating that group members shared their prey. Solitary males (n = 21) and males in a bachelor groups (n = 11) fed mostly on hartebeest and warthogs, followed by browsers in case of solitary males, and by grazers with high δ15N values in case of bachelor groups. Female cheetahs (n = 9) predominantly fed on browsers and used also hartebeest and warthogs. Mixing models suggested that the isotopic prey category that included cattle was only important, if at all, for males living in bachelor groups. Stable isotope analysis of fur, muscle, red blood cells and blood plasma in 9 free-ranging cheetahs identified most individuals as isotopic specialists, focussing on isotopically distinct prey categories as their food.

  4. MS fragment isotope ratio analysis for evaluation of citrus essential oils by HRGC-MS.

    PubMed

    Satake, Atsushi; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Takao; Ukeda, Hiroyuki; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the origin of citrus essential oils, the isotope ratio of fragment peaks on HRGC-MS of the volatile compounds from various citrus oils was measured. The MS fragment ratio was found by the ratio of fragment peak intensity, m+1/m (m/z). This ratio reflects the isotope effect of volatile compounds, that is, it provides information about locality, quality, and species for essential oils. Multivariate analysis based on the MS fragment ratio of monoterpene hydrocarbons clearly distinguished three citrus species, yuzu, lemon, and lime. The carbonyl fractions were also extracted from citrus essential oils by the sodium hydrogensulfite method. The isotope ratio of MS fragments of octanal, nonanal, and decanal was also examined. The results suggest that there was no significant difference in the individual fragment isotope ratios of the three aldehydes.

  5. Isotope ratio analysis by HRGC-MS of monoterpene hydrocarbons from citrus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Satake, Atsushi; Une, Akitoshi; Ueno, Takao; Ukeda, Hiroyuki; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2003-03-01

    The isotope ratio of monoterpene hydrocarbons in citrus essential oils of different origins was measured by ordinary high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). The isotope ratio (Ir) was determined by the ratio of the isotope peak intensity (m/z 137) to the molecular mass peak intensity (m/z 136) of the monoterpene hydrocarbons. The accuracy of Ir was examined by measuring monoterpene hydrocarbon standards and 13C-labeled compounds. The isotope fingerprints based on the values of monoterpene hydrocarbons from lemon, lime and yuzu essential oils were determined. These citrus essential oils were also discriminated by a principal component analysis of their Ir data. The characteristic vectors showed that alpha-terpinene, beta-pinene and beta-phellandrene were important components for distinguishing between the citrus species. It is suggested that this technique will be applicable to evaluate the quality, genuineness and origin of citrus fruits and their products.

  6. Trophic partitioning in tropical rain forest birds: insights from stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L Gerardo; Hobson, Keith A; Rodríguez, Malinalli; Hernandez, Patricia

    2003-08-01

    Bird communities reach their highest taxonomic and trophic diversity in tropical rain forest, but the use of different foraging strategies to meet food requirements in such competitive environments is poorly understood. Conventional dietary analyses are poorly suited to investigate dietary patterns in complex systems. We used stable carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) isotope analysis of whole blood to examine avian trophic patterns and sources of diet in the tropical rain forest of Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico. We used stable nitrogen isotope analysis to delineate trophic levels, and stable carbon isotope analysis to distinguish the relative contribution of C-3 and CAM/C-4 ultimate sources of proteins to diets. There was large inter- and intraspecific variation in whole blood delta(13)C and delta(15)N values in 23 species of birds. Stable nitrogen isotope analysis separated birds into several trophic levels, including species that obtained their dietary protein mostly from plants, insects or a combination of both food sources. Stable carbon isotope analysis showed that most birds fed on C3-based foods but Stub-tailed Spadebills (Platyrinchus cancrominus) included C-3- and C-4/CAM-specialist individuals. Our analyses provided insights into the nutritional contribution of plant and animal sources of protein and distinguish their photosynthetic origin over relatively long average time periods.

  7. In situ analysis of carbon isotopes in North American diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rythoven, A. D.; Hauri, E. H.; Wang, J.; McCandless, T.; Shirey, S. B.; Schulze, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Diamonds from three North American kimberlite occurrences were investigated with cathodoluminescence (CL) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to determine their growth history and carbon isotope composition. Diamonds analyzed include fourteen from Lynx (Quebec), twelve from Kelsey Lake (Colorado) and eleven from A154 South (Diavik mine, Northwest Territories). Growth histories for the diamonds vary from simple to highly complex based on their CL images and depending on the individual stone. Deformation laminae are evident in CL images of the Lynx diamonds that typically are brownish in color. Two to five points per diamond were analyzed by SIMS for carbon isotope composition. Sample heterogeneity is minimal in terms of δ13C (vs. PDB) values. Points within single diamond had a maximum range of approximately 1 ‰. The results for the A154 South (-6.4 to -3 ‰) and Kelsey Lake (-11.2 to -2.6 ‰) stones were in accordance with earlier reported values. The Lynx kimberlite stones have anomalously high ratios and range from -3.5 to +0.2 ‰ (average: -1.4 ‰). No previous carbon isotope analyses on diamonds from Lynx or any other eastern Superior craton occurrence have been published. The diamonds possess carbon isotope ratios higher than those for the only other reported analyses of Superior craton diamonds at Wawa, Ontario (-5.5 to -1.1 ‰). In global terms, the only published analyses of diamonds that consistently contain even higher values are those from New South Wales (Australia). However, these diamonds are alluvial and contain eclogitic and/or exotic mineral inclusions. The Lynx diamonds are entirely peridotitic and from a primary deposit. The unusually low (i.e. >-5‰) δ13C values of the Lynx (and Wawa) diamonds may indicate a different carbon reservoir for the Superior craton mantle as compared to other cratons.

  8. Isotopic analysis of Bothrops atrox in Amazonian forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. G.; Silva, A. M.; Chalkidis, H.; de Oliveira Júnior, R. C.; Camargo, P. B.

    2012-12-01

    The poisoning of snakes is considered a public health problem, especially in populations from rural areas of tropical and subtropical countries. In Brazil, the 26,000 snakebites, 90% are of the genus Bothrops, and Bothrops atrox species predominant in the Amazon region including all the Brazilian Amazon. Research shows that using stable isotopes, we can verify the isotopic composition of tissues of animals that depend mainly on food, water ingested and inhaled gases. For this study, samples taken from Bothrops atrox (B. atrox), in forest using pitfall traps and fall ("Pitt-fall traps with drift fence"). The analyzes were performed by mass spectrometry, where the analytical error is 0.3‰ for carbon and 0.5‰ to nitrogen. The results of the forest animals are significantly different from results of animal vivarium. The average values of the tissues and venoms of snakes of the forest for carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 are: δ13C = -24.68‰ and δ15N = 14.22‰ and mean values of tissue and poisons snakes vivarium (Instituto Butantan) to carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 are δ13C = -20.47‰ and δ15N = 8.36‰, with a significantly different due to different sources of food animals. Based on all results isotopic δ13C and δ15N, we can suggest that changes as the power of the serpent, (nature and captivity), changes occur in relation to diet and environment as the means of the isotopic data are quite distinct, showing that these changes can also cause metabolic changes in the body of the animal itself and the different periods of turnover of each tissue analyzed.

  9. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids for Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie; Elsila, Jamie E.; Stern J. C.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    Significant portions of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory , including amino acids, could have been delivered to the Earth's sur face by comets and their fragments. Analysis of comets via spectrosc opic observations has identified many organic molecules, including me thane, ethane, arnmonia, cyanic acid, formaldehyde, formamide, acetal ehyde, acetonitrile, and methanol. Reactions between these identifie d molecules could allow the formation of more complex organics such a s amino acids. Isotopic analysis could reveal whether an extraterrest rial signature is present in the Stardust-exposed amines and amino ac ids. Although bulk isotopic analysis would be dominated by the EACA contaminant's terrestrial signature, compoundspecific isotope analysi s (CSIA) could determine the signature of each of the other individua l amines. Here, we report on progress made towards CSIA of the amino acids glycine and EACA in Stardustreturned samples.

  10. Is it really organic?--multi-isotopic analysis as a tool to discriminate between organic and conventional plants.

    PubMed

    Laursen, K H; Mihailova, A; Kelly, S D; Epov, V N; Bérail, S; Schjoerring, J K; Donard, O F X; Larsen, E H; Pedentchouk, N; Marca-Bell, A D; Halekoh, U; Olesen, J E; Husted, S

    2013-12-01

    Novel procedures for analytical authentication of organic plant products are urgently needed. Here we present the first study encompassing stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium and sulphur as well as compound-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate for discrimination of organically and conventionally grown plants. The study was based on wheat, barley, faba bean and potato produced in rigorously controlled long-term field trials comprising 144 experimental plots. Nitrogen isotope analysis revealed the use of animal manure, but was unable to discriminate between plants that were fertilised with synthetic nitrogen fertilisers or green manures from atmospheric nitrogen fixing legumes. This limitation was bypassed using oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate in potato tubers, while hydrogen isotope analysis allowed complete discrimination of organic and conventional wheat and barley grains. It is concluded, that multi-isotopic analysis has the potential to disclose fraudulent substitutions of organic with conventionally cultivated plants.

  11. Development of an on-line flow injection Sr/matrix separation method for accurate, high-throughput determination of Sr isotope ratios by multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galler, Patrick; Limbeck, Andreas; Boulyga, Sergei F; Stingeder, Gerhard; Hirata, Takafumi; Prohaska, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    This work introduces a newly developed on-line flow injection (FI) Sr/Rb separation method as an alternative to the common, manual Sr/matrix batch separation procedure, since total analysis time is often limited by sample preparation despite the fast rate of data acquisition possible by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometers (ICPMS). Separation columns containing approximately 100 muL of Sr-specific resin were used for on-line FI Sr/matrix separation with subsequent determination of (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios by multiple collector ICPMS. The occurrence of memory effects exhibited by the Sr-specific resin, a major restriction to the repetitive use of this costly material, could successfully be overcome. The method was fully validated by means of certified reference materials. A set of two biological and six geological Sr- and Rb-bearing samples was successfully characterized for its (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios with precisions of 0.01-0.04% 2 RSD (n = 5-10). Based on our measurements we suggest (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios of 0.713 15 +/- 0.000 16 (2 SD) and 0.709 31 +/- 0.000 06 (2 SD) for the NIST SRM 1400 bone ash and the NIST SRM 1486 bone meal, respectively. Measured (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope ratios for five basalt samples are in excellent agreement with published data with deviations from the published value ranging from 0 to 0.03%. A mica sample with a Rb/Sr ratio of approximately 1 was successfully characterized for its (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope signature to be 0.718 24 +/- 0.000 29 (2 SD) by the proposed method. Synthetic samples with Rb/Sr ratios of up to 10/1 could successfully be measured without significant interferences on mass 87, which would otherwise bias the accuracy and uncertainty of the obtained data.

  12. Accurate Ab Initio Calculation of the Isotopic Exchange Equilibrium 10B(OH)3 + 11B(OH)4- = 11B(OH)3 + 10B(OH)4- In Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    For more than a decade the B isotopic compositions of marine carbonates have been used as paleo-pH proxies for seawater and to reconstruct paleo-[CO2] concentrations in the atmosphere. A necessary step is this process is the accurate determination of the equilibrium constant, K, for the reaction shown in the title above. This equilibrium constant has been recently calculated using ab initio quantum chemical methods applied to nanoclusters containing the solutes B(OH)3 and B(OH)4- coordinated by large numbers of explicit solvent molecules, a computationally difficult procedure. To obtain the most accurate possible value for K the calculated vibrational frequencies were scaled to best fit the limited experimental data available. The value of K obtained (@ 25°C) was 1.027 (significantly larger than the long used value of 1.0194). Even more recently a purely experimental value of K= 1.0265 ± 0.0015 has been obtained through an accurate spectrophotometric determination of the difference of pKa's of commercially available bulk samples of >99% enriched 10B(OH)3(s) and 11B(OH)3 (s). Since we now know the correct experimental value and have a calculation, admittedly a difficult and slightly parameterized one, which matches the experimental result (which was obtained after the calculation), it is worthwhile to analyze the steps in the theoretical calculation of K in more detail. We need to establish a general procedure which can yield accurate K values for other similar aqueous species even if we have no accurate experimental value for K and no vibrational spectral data. To this end we will examine the dependence of the calculated values of vibrational frequencies, isotopomer frequency differences and K values on a number of factors, including (a) the quantum mechanical level (basis set and treatment of electron correlation) used for the free solutes, (b) the incorporation of aqueous medium effects, (c) the effects of vibrational anharmonicity, (d) incorporation of the

  13. Linking cases of illegal shootings of the endangered California condor using stable lead isotope analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Myra E.; Kuspa, Zeka E.; Welch, Alacia; Eng, Curtis; Clark, Michael; Burnett, Joseph; Smith, Donald R.

    2014-10-15

    Lead poisoning is preventing the recovery of the critically endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) and lead isotope analyses have demonstrated that ingestion of spent lead ammunition is the principal source of lead poisoning in condors. Over an 8 month period in 2009, three lead-poisoned condors were independently presented with birdshot embedded in their tissues, evidencing they had been shot. No information connecting these illegal shooting events existed and the timing of the shooting(s) was unknown. Using lead concentration and stable lead isotope analyses of feathers, blood, and recovered birdshot, we observed that: i) lead isotope ratios of embedded shot from all three birds were measurably indistinguishable from each other, suggesting a common source; ii) lead exposure histories re-constructed from feather analysis suggested that the shooting(s) occurred within the same timeframe; and iii) two of the three condors were lead poisoned from a lead source isotopically indistinguishable from the embedded birdshot, implicating ingestion of this type of birdshot as the source of poisoning. One of the condors was subsequently lead poisoned the following year from ingestion of a lead buckshot (blood lead 556 µg/dL), illustrating that ingested shot possess a substantially greater lead poisoning risk compared to embedded shot retained in tissue (blood lead ∼20 µg/dL). To our knowledge, this is the first study to use lead isotopes as a tool to retrospectively link wildlife shooting events. - Highlights: • We conducted a case-based analysis of illegal shootings of California condors. • Blood and feather Pb isotopes were used to reconstruct the illegal shooting events. • Embedded birdshot from the three condors had the same Pb isotope ratios. • Feather and blood Pb isotopes indicated that the condors were shot in a common event. • Ingested shot causes substantially greater lead exposure compared to embedded shot.

  14. Diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum) in Arizona as indicated by fecal analysis and stable isotopes

    EPA Science Inventory

    We assessed diet of spotted bats (Euderma maculatum (J.A. Allen, 1891)) by visual analysis of bat feces and stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of bat feces, wing, hair, and insect prey. We collected 33 fecal samples from spotted bats and trapped 3755 insect...

  15. Field-based stable isotope analysis of carbon dioxide by mid-infrared laser spectroscopy for carbon capture and storage monitoring.

    PubMed

    van Geldern, Robert; Nowak, Martin E; Zimmer, Martin; Szizybalski, Alexandra; Myrttinen, Anssi; Barth, Johannes A C; Jost, Hans-Jürg

    2014-12-16

    A newly developed isotope ratio laser spectrometer for CO2 analyses has been tested during a tracer experiment at the Ketzin pilot site (northern Germany) for CO2 storage. For the experiment, 500 tons of CO2 from a natural CO2 reservoir was injected in supercritical state into the reservoir. The carbon stable isotope value (δ(13)C) of injected CO2 was significantly different from background values. In order to observe the breakthrough of the isotope tracer continuously, the new instruments were connected to a stainless steel riser tube that was installed in an observation well. The laser instrument is based on tunable laser direct absorption in the mid-infrared. The instrument recorded a continuous 10 day carbon stable isotope data set with 30 min resolution directly on-site in a field-based laboratory container during a tracer experiment. To test the instruments performance and accuracy the monitoring campaign was accompanied by daily CO2 sampling for laboratory analyses with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The carbon stable isotope ratios measured by conventional IRMS technique and by the new mid-infrared laser spectrometer agree remarkably well within analytical precision. This proves the capability of the new mid-infrared direct absorption technique to measure high precision and accurate real-time stable isotope data directly in the field. The laser spectroscopy data revealed for the first time a prior to this experiment unknown, intensive dynamic with fast changing δ(13)C values. The arrival pattern of the tracer suggest that the observed fluctuations were probably caused by migration along separate and distinct preferential flow paths between injection well and observation well. The short-term variances as observed in this study might have been missed during previous works that applied laboratory-based IRMS analysis. The new technique could contribute to a better tracing of the migration of the underground CO2 plume and help to ensure the long

  16. Trial application of oxygen and carbon isotope analysis in tooth enamel for identification of past-war victims for discriminating between Japanese and US soldiers.

    PubMed

    Someda, Hidetoshi; Gakuhari, Takashi; Akai, Junko; Araki, Yoshiyuki; Kodera, Tsutomu; Tsumatori, Gentaro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Matsunaga, Satoru; Abe, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Masatsugu; Saito, Megumi; Yoneda, Minoru; Ishida, Hajime

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotope analysis has undergone rapid development in recent years and yielded significant results in the field of forensic sciences. In particular, carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios in tooth enamel obtained from human remains can provide useful information for the crosschecking of morphological and DNA analyses and facilitate rapid on-site prescreening for the identification of remains. This study analyzes carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios in the tooth enamel of Japanese people born between 1878 and 1930, in order to obtain data for methodological differentiation of Japanese and American remains from the Second World War. The carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios in the tooth enamel of the examined Japanese individuals are compared to previously reported data for American individuals (born post WWII), and statistical analysis is conducted using a discrimination method based on a logistic regression analysis. The discrimination between the Japanese and US populations, including Alaska and Hawaii, is found to be highly accurate. Thus, the present method has potential as a discrimination technique for both populations for use in the examination of mixed remains comprising Japanese and American fallen soldiers.

  17. Stable isotope dilution analysis of hydrologic samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Taylor, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is employed in the determination of Ni, Cu, Sr, Cd, Ba, Ti, and Pb in nonsaline, natural water samples by stable isotope dilution analysis. Hydrologic samples were directly analyzed without any unusual pretreatment. Interference effects related to overlapping isobars, formation of metal oxide and multiply charged ions, and matrix composition were identified and suitable methods of correction evaluated. A comparability study snowed that single-element isotope dilution analysis was only marginally better than sequential multielement isotope dilution analysis. Accuracy and precision of the single-element method were determined on the basis of results obtained for standard reference materials. The instrumental technique was shown to be ideally suited for programs associated with certification of standard reference materials.

  18. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  19. Stable isotope fractionation analysis as a tool to monitor biodegradation in contaminated acquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Morasch, Barbara; Griebler, Christian; Richnow, Hans H.

    2004-12-01

    The assessment of biodegradation in contaminated aquifers has become an issue of increasing importance in the recent years. To some extent, this can be related to the acceptance of intrinsic bioremediation or monitored natural attenuation as a means to manage contaminated sites. Among the few existing methods to detect biodegradation in the subsurface, stable isotope fractionation analysis (SIFA) is one of the most promising approaches which is pronounced by the drastically increasing number of applications. This review covers the recent laboratory and field studies assessing biodegradation of contaminants via stable isotope analysis. Stable isotope enrichment factors have been found that vary from no fractionation for dioxygenase reactions converting aromatic hydrocarbons over moderate fractionation by monooxygenase reactions ( ɛ=-3‰) and some anaerobic studies on microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons ( ɛ=-1.7‰) to larger fractionations by anaerobic dehalogenation reactions of chlorinated solvents ( ɛ=between -5‰ and -30‰). The different isotope enrichment factors can be related to the respective biochemical reactions. Based on that knowledge, we discuss under what circumstances SIFA can be used for a qualitative or even a quantitative assessment of biodegradation in the environment. In a steadily increasing number of cases, it was possible to explain biodegradation processes in the field based on isotope enrichment factors obtained from laboratory experiments with pure cultures and measured isotope values from the field. The review will focus on the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents as the major contaminants of groundwater. Advances in the instrumental development for stable isotope analysis are only mentioned if it is important for the understanding of the application.

  20. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zemin; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xi-Chang; Liu, Weiping; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-09-15

    To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days' incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to -29.14 ± 0.22‰ and -29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = -1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  1. Validation of Chlorine and Oxygen Isotope Ratio Analysis to Differentiate Perchlorate Sources and to Document Perchlorate Biodegradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Guidance Document Validation of Chlorine and Oxygen Isotope Ratio Analysis To Differentiate Perchlorate Sources and to Document Perchlorate...Manual for Forensic Analysis of Perchlorate in Grotmdwater using W912-HQ-0 5-C-0022 Chlorine and Oxygen Isotopic Analyses 5b. GRANT NUMBER NA 5c...natural. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses of perchlorate provide the primaty direct approach whereby different sources of perchlorate can be

  2. Sr Isotope Analysis of Lacustrine Fossils Reveals Paleohydrological Reorganisation in the Turkana Basin Through the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonhof, H.; Lubbe, J. V. D.; Joordens, J. J.; Feibel, C. S.; Junginger, A.; Garcin, Y.; Krause-Nehring, J.; Beck, C.; Johnson, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Turkana in northern Kenya is one of the largest lakes in the East African Rift System (EARS) that experienced significant climate-driven lake level variation over the Holocene. Arguably the most important feature of Holocene climate change in the EARS is the termination of the African Humid Period (AHP), that caused a ~70 meter lake level drop in Lake Turkana. The precise hydrological response to the termination of the AHP is potentially complex, because Lake Turkana lies at the cross roads of two large atmospheric convection systems; the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the Congo Air Boundary (CAB). Shifting of these atmospheric systems around the end of the AHP dramatically rearranged spatial rainfall patterns in the Turkana Basin catchment, causing changes in relative runoff contributions from the different sub-catchments in the Turkana Basin. We here present a Holocene Turkana lake water Sr-isotope reconstruction, based on the analysis of well-dated lacustrine ostracods and shells. This reconstruction reveals consistently high Sr isotope values for the early Holocene, followed by a remarkable drop of Sr isotope ratios around the AHP termination. We interpret this pattern to represent a westward shift in the location of the CAB, leading to the reduction and eventual shutdown of runoff contribution from the Chew Bahir Basin to the Turkana Basin at the end of the AHP. The record demonstrates the exceptional suitability of Sr isotope data for this type of paleohydrological reconstructions. This is mainly due to the chemically conservative Sr-isotope mass balance in EARS lake systems, which is insensitive to environmental change at seasonal timescales that so often overprints the longer term climate signal in stable (oxygen and carbon) isotope records of these lakes. Furthermore, when Sr-isotope signatures of the contributing sub-catchments are known, the observed Sr isotope trends can be interpreted in terms of spatial shifts in climate driven runoff

  3. Revisit to three-dimensional percolation theory: Accurate analysis for highly stretchable conductive composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Seongdae; Oh, Eunho; Byun, Junghwan; Kim, Hyunjong; Lee, Byeongmoon; Lee, Seunghwan; Hong, Yongtaek

    2016-01-01

    A percolation theory based on variation of conductive filler fraction has been widely used to explain the behavior of conductive composite materials under both small and large deformation conditions. However, it typically fails in properly analyzing the materials under the large deformation since the assumption may not be valid in such a case. Therefore, we proposed a new three-dimensional percolation theory by considering three key factors: nonlinear elasticity, precisely measured strain-dependent Poisson’s ratio, and strain-dependent percolation threshold. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to determine actual Poisson’s ratios at various strain levels, which were used to accurately estimate variation of conductive filler volume fraction under deformation. We also adopted strain-dependent percolation threshold caused by the filler re-location with deformation. When three key factors were considered, electrical performance change was accurately analyzed for composite materials with both isotropic and anisotropic mechanical properties. PMID:27694856

  4. Revisit to three-dimensional percolation theory: Accurate analysis for highly stretchable conductive composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Seongdae; Oh, Eunho; Byun, Junghwan; Kim, Hyunjong; Lee, Byeongmoon; Lee, Seunghwan; Hong, Yongtaek

    2016-10-01

    A percolation theory based on variation of conductive filler fraction has been widely used to explain the behavior of conductive composite materials under both small and large deformation conditions. However, it typically fails in properly analyzing the materials under the large deformation since the assumption may not be valid in such a case. Therefore, we proposed a new three-dimensional percolation theory by considering three key factors: nonlinear elasticity, precisely measured strain-dependent Poisson’s ratio, and strain-dependent percolation threshold. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to determine actual Poisson’s ratios at various strain levels, which were used to accurately estimate variation of conductive filler volume fraction under deformation. We also adopted strain-dependent percolation threshold caused by the filler re-location with deformation. When three key factors were considered, electrical performance change was accurately analyzed for composite materials with both isotropic and anisotropic mechanical properties.

  5. Recent developments in application of stable isotope analysis on agro-product authenticity and traceability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Gang; Chen, Ailiang; Yang, Shuming; Ye, Zhihua

    2014-02-15

    With the globalisation of agro-product markets and convenient transportation of food across countries and continents, the potential for distribution of mis-labelled products increases accordingly, highlighting the need for measures to identify the origin of food. High quality food with identified geographic origin is a concern not only for consumers, but also for agriculture farmers, retailers and administrative authorities. Currently, stable isotope ratio analysis in combination with other chemical methods gradually becomes a promising approach for agro-product authenticity and traceability. In the last five years, a growing number of research papers have been published on tracing agro-products by stable isotope ratio analysis and techniques combining with other instruments. In these reports, the global variety of stable isotope compositions has been investigated, including light elements such as C, N, H, O and S, and heavy isotopes variation such as Sr and B. Several factors also have been considered, including the latitude, altitude, evaporation and climate conditions. In the present paper, an overview is provided on the authenticity and traceability of the agro-products from both animal and plant sources by stable isotope ratio analysis.

  6. Compound specific isotope analysis to investigate pesticide degradation in lysimeter experiments at field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabenko, Evgenia; Elsner, Martin; Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas; Torrento, Clara; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The frequent detection of organic micropollutants such as pesticides, consumer care products or pharmaceuticals in water is an increasing concern for human and ecosystem health. Degradation analysis of these compounds can be challenging in complex systems due to the fact that metabolites are not always found and mass balances frequently cannot be closed. Many abiotic and biotic degradation pathways cause, however, distinct isotope fractionation, where light isotopes are transferred preferentially from the reactant to the product pool (normal isotope fractionation). Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of multiple elements is a particularly powerful method to evaluate organic micropollutant transformation, because it can even give pathway-specific isotope fractionation (1,2). Available CSIA field studies, however, have focused almost exclusively on volatile petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are present in high concentrations in the environment and can be extracted easily from water for GC-IRMS analysis. In the case of micropollutants, such as pesticides, CSIA in more challenging since it needs to be conducted at lower concentrations and requires pre-concentration, purification and high chromatographic performance (3). In this study we used lysimeters experiments to analyze transformation of atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and chloridazone by studying associated isotope fractionation. The project combines a) analytical method development for CSIA, b) identification of pathways of micropollutant degradation and c) quantification of transformation processes under field condition. The pesticides were applied both, at the soil surface and below the top soil under field-relevant concentrations in May 2014. After typical irrigation of the lysimeters, seepage water was collected in 50L bottles and stored for further SPE and CSIA. Here we present the very first result of a) analytical method development, b) improvement of SPE methods for complex pesticide

  7. A Technique Using Calibrated Photography and Photoshop for Accurate Shade Analysis and Communication.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Edward A; Figueira, Johan; Goldstein, Ronald E

    2017-02-01

    This article reviews the critical aspects of controlling the shade-taking environment and discusses various modalities introduced throughout the years to acquire and communicate shade information. Demonstrating a highly calibrated digital photographic technique for capturing shade information, this article shows how to use Photoshop® to standardize images and extract color information from the tooth and shade tab for use by a ceramist for an accurate shade-matching restoration.

  8. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  9. Microcalorimeter Q-spectroscopy for rapid isotopic analysis of trace actinide samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, M. P.; Bond, E. M.; Hoover, A. S.; Kunde, G. J.; Mocko, V.; Rabin, M. W.; Weisse-Bernstein, N. R.; Wolfsberg, L. E.; Bennett, D. A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters that are optimized for rapid isotopic analysis of trace actinide samples by Q-spectroscopy. By designing mechanically robust TESs and simplified detector assembly methods, we have developed a detector for Q-spectroscopy of actinides that can be assembled in minutes. We have characterized the effects of each simplification and present the results. Finally, we show results of isotopic analysis of plutonium samples with Q-spectroscopy detectors and compare the results to mass spectrometry.

  10. Stable isotope analysis of the karst hydrological systems in the Bay of Kvarner (Croatia).

    PubMed

    Mance, D; Hunjak, T; Lenac, D; Rubinić, J; Roller-Lutz, Z

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the results of the first systematic analysis of the stable isotope composition of the karst hydrological systems in the Bay of Kvarner. Gaussian mixture modelling, time series analysis and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) modelling were applied using the stable isotope compositions of the karst groundwater. This study revealed that the recharge is dominated by winter precipitation, the dual-porosity system is dominated by baseflow, the hinterlands of the individual springs have different degrees of karstification and the springs within the Rječina River catchment have higher recharge elevations than the springs in the Bakar Bay catchment.

  11. Optimization of automated gas sample collection and isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis of delta(13)C of CO(2) in air.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Matthias J; Werner, Roland A; Eugster, Werner; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Wehrle, Günther; Mohn, Joachim; Buchmann, Nina

    2008-12-01

    The application of (13)C/(12)C in ecosystem-scale tracer models for CO(2) in air requires accurate measurements of the mixing ratios and stable isotope ratios of CO(2). To increase measurement reliability and data intercomparability, as well as to shorten analysis times, we have improved an existing field sampling setup with portable air sampling units and developed a laboratory setup for the analysis of the delta(13)C of CO(2) in air by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The changes consist of (a) optimization of sample and standard gas flow paths, (b) additional software configuration, and (c) automation of liquid nitrogen refilling for the cryogenic trap. We achieved a precision better than 0.1 per thousand and an accuracy of 0.11 +/- 0.04 per thousand for the measurement of delta(13)C of CO(2) in air and unattended operation of measurement sequences up to 12 h.

  12. Essentials of iron, chromium, and calcium isotope analysis of natural materials by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fantle, M.S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of isotopes to understand the behavior of metals in geological, hydrological, and biological systems has rapidly expanded in recent years. One of the mass spectrometric techniques used to analyze metal isotopes is thermal ionization mass spectrometry, or TIMS. While TIMS has been a useful analytical technique for the measurement of isotopic composition for decades and TIMS instruments are widely distributed, there are significant difficulties associated with using TIMS to analyze isotopes of the lighter alkaline earth elements and transition metals. Overcoming these difficulties to produce relatively long-lived and stable ion beams from microgram-sized samples is a non-trivial task. We focus here on TIMS analysis of three geologically and environmentally important elements (Fe, Cr, and Ca) and present an in-depth look at several key aspects that we feel have the greatest potential to trouble new users. Our discussion includes accessible descriptions of different analytical approaches and issues, including filament loading procedures, collector cup configurations, peak shapes and interferences, and the use of isotopic double spikes and related error estimation. Building on previous work, we present quantitative simulations, applied specifically in this study to Fe and Ca, that explore the effects of (1) time-variable evaporation of isotopically homogeneous spots from a filament and (2) interferences on the isotope ratios derived from a double spike subtraction routine. We discuss how and to what extent interferences at spike masses, as well as at other measured masses, affect the double spike-subtracted isotope ratio of interest (44Ca/40Ca in the case presented, though a similar analysis can be used to evaluate 56Fe/54Fe and 53Cr/52Cr). The conclusions of these simulations are neither intuitive nor immediately obvious, making this examination useful for those who are developing new methodologies. While all simulations are carried out in the context of a

  13. Maintaining high precision of isotope ratio analysis over extended periods of time.

    PubMed

    Brand, Willi A

    2009-06-01

    Stable isotope ratios are reliable and long lasting process tracers. In order to compare data from different locations or different sampling times at a high level of precision, a measurement strategy must include reliable traceability to an international stable isotope scale via a reference material (RM). Since these international RMs are available in low quantities only, we have developed our own analysis schemes involving laboratory working RM. In addition, quality assurance RMs are used to control the long-term performance of the delta-value assignments. The analysis schemes allow the construction of quality assurance performance charts over years of operation. In this contribution, the performance of three typical techniques established in IsoLab at the MPI-BGC in Jena is discussed. The techniques are (1) isotope ratio mass spectrometry with an elemental analyser for delta(15)N and delta(13)C analysis of bulk (organic) material, (2) high precision delta(13)C and delta(18)O analysis of CO(2) in clean-air samples, and (3) stable isotope analysis of water samples using a high-temperature reaction with carbon. In addition, reference strategies on a laser ablation system for high spatial resolution delta(13)C analysis in tree rings is exemplified briefly.

  14. A method for carbon stable isotope analysis of methyl halides and chlorofluorocarbons at pptv concentrations.

    PubMed

    Archbold, Marie E; Redeker, Kelly R; Davis, Simon; Elliot, Trevor; Kalin, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    A pre-concentration system has been validated for use with a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC/MS/IRMS) to determine ambient air (13)C/(12)C ratios for methyl halides (MeCl and MeBr) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The isotopic composition of specific compounds can provide useful information on their atmospheric budgets and biogeochemistry that cannot be ascertained from abundance measurements alone. Although pre-concentration systems have been previously used with a GC/MS/IRMS for atmospheric trace gas analysis, this is the first study also to report system validation tests. Validation results indicate that the pre-concentration system and subsequent separation technologies do not significantly alter the stable isotopic ratios of the target methyl halides, CFC-12 (CCl(2)F(2)) and CFC-113 (C(2)Cl(3)F(3)). Significant, but consistent, isotopic shifts of -27.5 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand do occur within the system for CFC-11 (CCl(3)F), although the shift is correctible. The method presented has the capacity to separate these target halocarbons from more than 50 other compounds in ambient air samples. Separation allows for the determination of stable carbon isotope ratios of five of these six target trace atmospheric constituents within ambient air for large volume samples (isotope results similar to published values for (13)C/(12)C analysis of MeCl (-39.1 per thousand) and CFC-113 (-28.1 per thousand). However, this is the first paper reporting stable carbon isotope signatures for CFC-11 (-29.4 per thousand) and CFC-12 (-37.0 per thousand).

  15. Use of isotopic analysis of vertebrae in reconstructing ontogenetic feeding ecology in white sharks.

    PubMed

    Estrada, James A; Rice, Aaron N; Natanson, Lisa J; Skomal, Gregory B

    2006-04-01

    We conducted stable 13C and 15N analysis on white shark vertebrae and demonstrated that incremental analysis of isotopes along the radius of a vertebral centrum produces a chronological record of dietary information, allowing for reconstruction of an individual's trophic history. Isotopic data showed significant enrichments in 15N with increasing sampling distance from the centrum center, indicating a correlation between body size and trophic level. Additionally, isotopic values verified two distinct ontogenetic trophic shifts in the white shark: one following parturition, marking a dietary switch from yolk to fish; and one at a total length of >341 cm, representing a known diet shift from fish to marine mammals. Retrospective trophic-level reconstruction using vertebral tissue will have broad applications in future studies on the ecology of threatened, endangered, or extinct species to determine life-long feeding patterns, which would be impossible through other methods.

  16. Isotopic composition analysis and age dating of uranium samples by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, A. I.; Pantelica, A.; Sima, O.; Fugaru, V.

    2016-09-01

    Non-destructive methods were applied to determine the isotopic composition and the time elapsed since last chemical purification of nine uranium samples. The applied methods are based on measuring gamma and X radiations of uranium samples by high resolution low energy gamma spectrometric system with planar high purity germanium detector and low background gamma spectrometric system with coaxial high purity germanium detector. The ;Multigroup γ-ray Analysis Method for Uranium; (MGAU) code was used for the precise determination of samples' isotopic composition. The age of the samples was determined from the isotopic ratio 214Bi/234U. This ratio was calculated from the analyzed spectra of each uranium sample, using relative detection efficiency. Special attention is paid to the coincidence summing corrections that have to be taken into account when performing this type of analysis. In addition, an alternative approach for the age determination using full energy peak efficiencies obtained by Monte Carlo simulations with the GESPECOR code is described.

  17. Potential of the compound specific isotope analysis of individual amino acid for studying past nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bohyung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    The nitrogen isotope ratio of bulk sediment has been widely used for studying nitrogen cycle in the marine environment. However, since organic nitrogen in sediment is regarded as a mixture of organic matter, it is challenging to identify its exact sources. Recently, compound specific nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acid (CSIA AAs) has been introduced as a potential tool for complement of bulk nitrogen isotope since amino acid more directly reflects information on primary producer and trophic position. However, studies on CSIA of amino acid in sediments are scarce due to the complexities of the analytical method and relatively high analytica costl. In this study, we established a method of the CSIA AAs which is more suitable for the analysis of sediments and accessed if the CSIA AAs can be used for the study of past nitrogen cycle.

  18. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/− 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/− 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0–1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LC-MS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate measurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/− 1 ppm and elution time measurements within +/− 0.01 NET. PMID:15979333

  19. Monitoring of the aerobe biodegradation of chlorinated organic solvents by stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Anikó; Futó, István; Palcsu, László

    2014-05-01

    Our chemical-biological basic research aims to eliminate chlorinated environmental contaminants from aquifers around industrial areas in the frame of research program supported by the European Social Fund (TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0043). The most careful and simplest way includes the in situ biodegradation with the help of cultured and compound specific strains. Numerous members of Pseudomonas bacteria are famous about function of bioremediation. They can metabolism the environmental hazardous chemicals like gas oils, dyes, and organic solvents. Our research based on the Pseudomonas putida F1 strain, because its ability to degrade halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene. Several methods were investigated to estimate the rate of biodegradation, such as the measurement of the concentration of the pollutant along the contamination pathway, the microcosm's studies or the compound specific stable isotope analysis. In this area in the Transcarpathian basin we are pioneers in the stable isotope monitoring of biodegradation. The main goal is to find stable isotope fractionation factors by stable isotope analysis, which can help us to estimate the rate and effectiveness of the biodegradation. The subsequent research period includes the investigation of the method, testing its feasibility and adaptation in the environment. Last but not least, the research gives an opportunity to identify the producer of the contaminant based on the stable isotope composition of the contaminant.

  20. Investigation of Nebular Processes Through Oxygen Isotopic Analysis of Primitive Meteorite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, Laurie

    2002-01-01

    As a direct result of support provided by this grant, precise and accurate determination of delta(18)O and delta(17)O in silicates (and other minerals) by ion microprobe (both IMS 6f and IMS 1270) are now being carried out in several laboratories, and these analyses, combined with application of laser fluorination techniques, have led to a proliferation of oxygen isotopic data in the past approx. 3 years. The applications of these techniques in cosmochemical research have been myriad, from understanding the most refractory objects in the nebula (CAIs) to the low temperature alteration processes on meteorite parent bodies. Here, we describe our progress in understanding the oxygen isotopic microdistributions in primitive meteorite materials, as directly supported by this Origins grant.

  1. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for accurate analysis of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in drug resistance tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wang, Linlin; Shangguan, Dihua; Wei, Yanbo; Han, Juanjuan; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2015-02-13

    Glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are important signaling molecules which are involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Here we reported an effective method for accurate analysis of these lipids by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The methanol method was adopted for extraction of lipids due to its simplicity and high efficiency. It was found that two subclasses of sphingolipids, sulfatide (ST) and cerebroside (CB), were heat labile, so a decreased temperature in the ion source of MS might be necessary for these compounds analysis. In addition, it was found that the isobaric interferences were commonly existent, for example, the m/z of 16:0/18:1 PC containing two (13)C isotope being identical to that of 16:0/18:0 PC determined by a unit mass resolution mass spectrometer; therefore, a baseline separation of interferential species was required to maintain selectivity and accuracy of analysis. In this work, an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-based method was developed for separation of interferential species. Moreover, in order to deal with the characteristics of different polarity and wide dynamic range of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in biological systems, three detecting conditions were combined together for comprehensive and rational analysis of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. The method was utilized to profile glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids in drug resistant tumor cells. Our results showed that many lipids were significantly changed in drug resistant tumor cells compared to paired drug sensitive tumor cells. This is a systematic report about the isobaric interferences and heat labile compounds interferences when analyzing glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids by ESI-MS/MS, which aids in ruling out one potential source of systematic error to ensure the accuracy of analysis.

  2. Time-Accurate Simulations and Acoustic Analysis of Slat Free-Shear-Layer. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Singer, Bart A.; Lockard, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Unsteady computational simulations of a multi-element, high-lift configuration are performed. Emphasis is placed on accurate spatiotemporal resolution of the free shear layer in the slat-cove region. The excessive dissipative effects of the turbulence model, so prevalent in previous simulations, are circumvented by switching off the turbulence-production term in the slat cove region. The justifications and physical arguments for taking such a step are explained in detail. The removal of this excess damping allows the shear layer to amplify large-scale structures, to achieve a proper non-linear saturation state, and to permit vortex merging. The large-scale disturbances are self-excited, and unlike our prior fully turbulent simulations, no external forcing of the shear layer is required. To obtain the farfield acoustics, the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is evaluated numerically using the simulated time-accurate flow data. The present comparison between the computed and measured farfield acoustic spectra shows much better agreement for the amplitude and frequency content than past calculations. The effect of the angle-of-attack on the slat's flow features radiated acoustic field are also simulated presented.

  3. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-07

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing.

  4. High-precision isotopic analysis of palmitoylcarnitine by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, ZengKui; Yarasheski, Kevin; Jensen, Michael D

    2006-01-01

    Single quadrupole gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been widely used for isotopic analysis in metabolic investigations using stable isotopes as tracers. However, its inherent shortcomings prohibit it from broader use, including low isotopic precision and the need for chemical derivatization of the analyte. In order to improve isotopic detection power, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-itMS2) has been evaluated for its isotopic precision and chemical sensitivity for the analysis of [13C]palmitoylcarnitine. Over the enrichment range of 0.4-10 MPE (molar % excess), the isotopic response of LC/ESI-itMS2 to [13C]palmitoylcarnitine was linear (r = 1.00) and the average isotopic precision (standard deviation, SD) was 0.11 MPE with an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 5.6%. At the lower end of isotopic enrichments (0.4-0.9 MPE), the isotopic precision was 0.05 MPE (CV = 8%). Routine analysis of rat skeletal muscle [13C4]palmitoylcarnitine demonstrated an isotopic precision of 0.03 MPE for gastrocnemius (n = 16) and of 0.02 MPE for tibialis anterior (n = 16). The high precision enabled the detection of a small (0.08 MPE) but significant (P = 0.01) difference in [13C4]palmitoylcarnitine enrichments between the two muscles, 0.51 MPE (CV = 5.8%) and 0.43 MPE (CV = 4.6%), respectively. Therefore, the system demonstrated an isotopic lower detection limit (LDL) of < or =0.1 MPE (2 x SD) that has been impossible previously with other organic mass spectrometry instruments. LC/ESI-itMS2 systems have the potential to advance metabolic investigations using stable isotopes to a new level by significantly increasing the isotopic solving power.

  5. Isotopic analysis of uranium in natural waters by alpha spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, K.W.

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of U234/U238 activity ratios for uranium present in natural waters. The uranium is coprecipitated from solution with aluminum phosphate, extracted into ethyl acetate, further purified by ion exchange, and finally electroplated on a titanium disc for counting. The individual isotopes are determined by measurement of the alpha-particle energy spectrum using a high resolution low-background alpha spectrometer. Overall chemical recovery of about 90 percent and a counting efficiency of 25 percent allow analyses of water samples containing as little as 0.10 ?g/l of uranium. The accuracy of the method is limited, on most samples, primarily by counting statistics.

  6. Accurate quantification of the mercapturic acids of acrylonitrile and its genotoxic metabolite cyanoethylene-epoxide in human urine by isotope-dilution LC-ESI/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Schettgen, T; Bertram, J; Kraus, T

    2012-08-30

    Acrylonitrile is a highly important industrial chemical with a high production volume worldwide, especially in the plastics industry. It is classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC group 2B). During metabolism of acrylonitrile, the genotoxic metabolite cyanoethylene-epoxide is formed. The urinary mercapturic acids of acrylonitrile, namely N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-L-cysteine (CEMA) and cyanoethylene-epoxide, namely N-acetyl-S-(1-cyano-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (CHEMA) are specific biomarkers for the determination of individual internal exposure to acrylonitrile and its highly reactive metabolite. We have developed and validated a sensitive method for the accurate determination of CEMA and CHEMA in human urine with a multidimensional LC/MS/MS-method using deuterium-labelled analogues for both analytes as internal standards. Analytes were stripped from urinary matrix by online extraction on a restricted access material, transferred to the analytical column and determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for CEMA and CHEMA was 1 μg/L urine and allowed to quantify the background exposure of the (smoking) general population. Precision within and between series for CHEMA ranged from 2.6 to 8.0% at four concentrations ranging from 8.3 to 86 μg/L urine, mean accuracy was between 94 and 100%. For CEMA, precision within and between series ranged from 2.4 to 14.5% at four concentrations ranging from 15.1 to 196 μg/L urine, mean accuracy was between 91 and 104%. We applied the method to spot urine samples of 83 subjects of the general population with no known occupational exposure to acrylonitrile. Median levels (range) for CEMA and CHEMA in urine samples of non-smokers (n=47) were 1.9 μg/L (<1-16.4 μg/L) and<1 μg/L (<1-3 μg/L), while in urine samples of smokers (n=36), median levels were 184 μg/L (2-907 μg/L) and 29.3 μg/L (<1-147 μg/L), respectively. Smokers showed a

  7. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Nitroaromatic Contaminant Transformations by Nitroarene Dioxygenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Sarah G.; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2014-05-01

    Dioxygenation is an important biochemical reaction that often initiates the mineralization of recalcitrant organic contaminants such as nitroaromatic explosives, chlorinated benzenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. However, to assess the extent of dioxygenation in contaminated environments is difficult because of competing transformation processes and further reactions of the dioxygenation products. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers a new approach to reliably quantify biodegradation initiated by dioxygenation based on changes in stable isotope ratios of the pollutant. For CSIA it is essential to know the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) pertinent to the dioxygenation mechanism of organic contaminants. Unfortunately, the range of KIEs of such reactions is poorly constrained although many dioxygenase enzymes with a broad substrate specificity have been reported. Dioxygenase enzymes usually exhibit complex reaction kinetics involving multiple substrates and substrate-specific binding modes which makes the determination of KIEs challenging. The goal of this study was to explore the magnitude and variability of 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of one contaminant class, that is nitroaromatic contaminants (NACs). To this end, we investigated the C, H, and N isotope fractionation during the dioxygenation of nitrobenzene (NB), 2-nitrotoluene (2-NT), and 3-nitrotoluene (3-NT) by pure cultures, E. coli clones, cell extracts, and purified enzymes. From isotope fractionations measured in the substrates and reaction products, we determined dioxygenation KIEs for different combinations of the three substrates with nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) and 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase (2NTDO). The 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of NB by NBDO were consistent for all experimental systems considered (i.e., Comamonas sp. Strain JS765, E. coli clones, cell extracts of E. coli clones, and purified NBDO). This observation suggests that the isotope

  8. Development and validation of an universal interface for compound-specific stable isotope analysis of chlorine (37Cl/35Cl) by GC-high-temperature conversion (HTC)-MS/IRMS.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Gilevska, Tetyana; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2015-03-03

    A universal application of compound-specific isotope analysis of chlorine was thus far limited by the availability of suitable analysis techniques. In this study, gas chromatography in combination with a high-temperature conversion interface (GC-HTC), converting organic chlorine in the presence of H2 to gaseous HCl, was coupled to a dual-detection system, combining an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) and isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The combination of the MS/IRMS detection enabled a detailed characterization, optimization, and online monitoring of the high-temperature conversion process via ion trap MS as well as a simultaneous chlorine isotope analysis by the IRMS. Using GC-HTC-MS/IRMS, chlorine isotope analysis at optimized conversion conditions resulted in very accurate isotope values (δ(37)Cl(SMOC)) for measured reference material with known isotope composition, including chlorinated ethylene, chloromethane, hexachlorocyclohexane, and trichloroacetic acids methyl ester. Respective detection limits were determined to be <15 nmol Cl on column with achieved precision of <0.3‰.

  9. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, Janet E.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NOthat introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured δ18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO. These procedures are demonstrated for SO isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SOsources and reaction mechanisms.

  10. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered samples by radiofrequency pulsed glow discharge time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Toral, Aitor; Fernandez, Beatriz; Malherbe, Julien; Claverie, Fanny; Molloy, John L; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    In recent years particular effort is being devoted to the development of pulsed glow discharges (PGDs) for mass spectrometry because this powering operation mode could offer important ionization analytical advantages. However, the capabilities of radiofrequency (RF) PGD coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) for accurate isotope ratio measurements have not been demonstrated yet. This work is focused on investigating different time positions along the pulse profile for the accurate measurement of isotope ratios. As a result, a method has been developed for the direct and simultaneous multielement determination of trace elements in powdered geological samples by RF-PGD-ToFMS in combination with isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) as an absolute measurement method directly traceable to the International System of Units. Optimized operating conditions were 70 W of applied radiofrequency power, 250 Pa of pressure, 2 ms of pulse width and 4 ms of pulse period, being argon the plasma gas used. To homogeneously distribute the added isotopically-enriched standards, lithium borate fusion of powdered solid samples was used as sample preparation approach. In this way, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb were successfully determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) in two NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRM 2586 and SRM 2780) representing two different matrices of geological interest (soil and rock samples). Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb concentrations determined by RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) were well in agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence interval and precisions below 12% relative standard deviation were observed for three independent analyses. Elemental concentrations investigated were in the range of 81-5770 mg/kg, demonstrating the potential of RF-PGD-ToF(IDMS) for a sensitive, accurate and robust analysis of powdered samples.

  11. Enhanced understanding of ectoparasite: host trophic linkages on coral reefs through stable isotope analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Sikkel, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism, although the most common type of ecological interaction, is usually ignored in food web models and studies of trophic connectivity. Stable isotope analysis is widely used in assessing the flow of energy in ecological communities and thus is a potentially valuable tool in understanding the cryptic trophic relationships mediated by parasites. In an effort to assess the utility of stable isotope analysis in understanding the role of parasites in complex coral-reef trophic systems, we performed stable isotope analysis on three common Caribbean reef fish hosts and two kinds of ectoparasitic isopods: temporarily parasitic gnathiids (Gnathia marleyi) and permanently parasitic cymothoids (Anilocra). To further track the transfer of fish-derived carbon (energy) from parasites to parasite consumers, gnathiids from host fish were also fed to captive Pederson shrimp (Ancylomenes pedersoni) for at least 1 month. Parasitic isopods had δ13C and δ15N values similar to their host, comparable with results from the small number of other host–parasite studies that have employed stable isotopes. Adult gnathiids were enriched in 15N and depleted in13C relative to juvenile gnathiids, providing insights into the potential isotopic fractionation associated with blood-meal assimilation and subsequent metamorphosis. Gnathiid-fed Pedersen shrimp also had δ13C values consistent with their food source and enriched in 15N as predicted due to trophic fractionation. These results further indicate that stable isotopes can be an effective tool in deciphering cryptic feeding relationships involving parasites and their consumers, and the role of parasites and cleaners in carbon transfer in coral-reef ecosystems specifically.

  12. Enhanced understanding of ectoparasite–host trophic linkages on coral reefs through stable isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Sikkel, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism, although the most common type of ecological interaction, is usually ignored in food web models and studies of trophic connectivity. Stable isotope analysis is widely used in assessing the flow of energy in ecological communities and thus is a potentially valuable tool in understanding the cryptic trophic relationships mediated by parasites. In an effort to assess the utility of stable isotope analysis in understanding the role of parasites in complex coral-reef trophic systems, we performed stable isotope analysis on three common Caribbean reef fish hosts and two kinds of ectoparasitic isopods: temporarily parasitic gnathiids (Gnathia marleyi) and permanently parasitic cymothoids (Anilocra). To further track the transfer of fish-derived carbon (energy) from parasites to parasite consumers, gnathiids from host fish were also fed to captive Pederson shrimp (Ancylomenes pedersoni) for at least 1 month. Parasitic isopods had δ13C and δ15N values similar to their host, comparable with results from the small number of other host–parasite studies that have employed stable isotopes. Adult gnathiids were enriched in 15N and depleted in 13C relative to juvenile gnathiids, providing insights into the potential isotopic fractionation associated with blood-meal assimilation and subsequent metamorphosis. Gnathiid-fed Pedersen shrimp also had δ13C values consistent with their food source and enriched in 15N as predicted due to trophic fractionation. These results further indicate that stable isotopes can be an effective tool in deciphering cryptic feeding relationships involving parasites and their consumers, and the role of parasites and cleaners in carbon transfer in coral-reef ecosystems specifically. PMID:25830112

  13. Simultaneous measurement of denitrification and nitrogen fixation using isotope pairing with membrane inlet mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    An, S; Gardner, W S; Kana, T

    2001-03-01

    A method for estimating denitrification and nitrogen fixation simultaneously in coastal sediments was developed. An isotope-pairing technique was applied to dissolved gas measurements with a membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS). The relative fluxes of three N(2) gas species ((28)N(2), (29)N(2), and (30)N(2)) were monitored during incubation experiments after the addition of (15)NO(3)(-). Formulas were developed to estimate the production (denitrification) and consumption (N(2) fixation) of N(2) gas from the fluxes of the different isotopic forms of N(2). Proportions of the three isotopic forms produced from (15)NO(3)(-) and (14)NO(3)(-) agreed with expectations in a sediment slurry incubation experiment designed to optimize conditions for denitrification. Nitrogen fixation rates from an algal mat measured with intact sediment cores ranged from 32 to 390 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1). They were enhanced by light and organic matter enrichment. In this environment of high nitrogen fixation, low N(2) production rates due to denitrification could be separated from high N(2) consumption rates due to nitrogen fixation. Denitrification and nitrogen fixation rates were estimated in April 2000 on sediments from a Texas sea grass bed (Laguna Madre). Denitrification rates (average, 20 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1)) were lower than nitrogen fixation rates (average, 60 microg-atoms of N m(-2) h(-1)). The developed method benefits from simple and accurate dissolved-gas measurement by the MIMS system. By adding the N(2) isotope capability, it was possible to do isotope-pairing experiments with the MIMS system.

  14. Chemical Imaging and Stable Isotope Analysis of Atmospheric Particles by NanoSIMS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, B.; Harris, E. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Wiedemann, K. T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Tilgner, A.; Fomba, K. W.; Schneider, J.; Roth, A.; Gnauk, T.; Fahlbusch, B.; Mertes, S.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Gunthe, S. S.; Smith, M.; Artaxo, P. P.; Gilles, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L.; Moffet, R.; Weigand, M.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical imaging analysis of the internal distribution of chemical compounds by a combination of SEM-EDX, and NanoSIMS allows investigating the physico-chemical properties and isotopic composition of individual aerosol particles. Stable sulphur isotope analysis provides insight into the sources, sinks and oxidation pathways of SO2 in the environment. Oxidation by OH radicals, O3 and H2O2 enriches the heavier isotope in the product sulphate, whereas oxidation by transition metal ions (TMI), hypohalites and hypohalous acids depletes the heavier isotope in the product sulphate. The isotope fractionation during SO2 oxidation by stabilized Criegee Intermediate radicals is unknown. We studied the relationship between aerosol chemical composition and predominant sulphate formation pathways in continental clouds in Central Europe and during the wet season in the Amazon rain forest. Sulphate formation in continental clouds in Central Europe was studied during HCCT-2010, a lagrangian-type field experiment, during which an orographic cloud was used as a natural flow-through reactor to study in-cloud aerosol processing (Harris et al. 2013). Sulphur isotopic compositions in SO2 and H2SO4 gas and particulate sulphate were measured and changes in the sulphur isotope composition of SO2 between the upwind and downwind measurement sites were used to determine the dominant SO2 chemical removal process occurring in the cloud. Changes in the isotopic composition of particulate sulphate revealed that transition metal catalysis pathway was the dominant SO2 oxidation pathway. This reaction occurred primarily on coarse mineral dust particles. Thus, sulphate produced due to in-cloud SO2 oxidation is removed relatively quickly from the atmosphere and has a minor climatic effect. The aerosol samples from the Amazonian rainforest, a pristine tropical environment, were collected during the rainy season. The samples were found to be dominated by SOA particles in the fine mode and primary

  15. Kinetic isotope effect of the {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions: Dominant role of reactive resonances revealed by an accurate time-dependent quantum wavepacket study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhigang Yu, Dequan; Xie, Wenbo; Hou, Jiayi; Dawes, Richard; Guo, Hua

    2015-05-07

    The O + O{sub 2} isotope exchange reactions play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic composition of a number of trace gases in the atmosphere, and their temperature dependence and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) provide important constraints on our understanding of the origin and mechanism of these and other unusual oxygen KIEs important in the atmosphere. This work reports a quantum dynamics study of the title reactions on the newly constructed Dawes-Lolur-Li-Jiang-Guo (DLLJG) potential energy surface (PES). The thermal reaction rate coefficients of both the {sup 18}O + {sup 32}O{sub 2} and {sup 16}O + {sup 36}O{sub 2} reactions obtained using the DLLJG PES exhibit a clear negative temperature dependence, in sharp contrast with the positive temperature dependence obtained using the earlier modified Siebert-Schinke-Bittererova (mSSB) PES. In addition, the calculated KIE shows an improved agreement with the experiment. These results strongly support the absence of the “reef” structure in the entrance/exit channels of the DLLJG PES, which is present in the mSSB PES. The quantum dynamics results on both PESs attribute the marked KIE to strong near-threshold reactive resonances, presumably stemming from the mass differences and/or zero point energy difference between the diatomic reactant and product. The accurate characterization of the reactivity for these near-thermoneutral reactions immediately above the reaction threshold is important for correct characterization of the thermal reaction rate coefficients.

  16. Oxygen isotope analysis of fossil organic matter by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartèse, Romain; Chaussidon, Marc; Gurenko, Andrey; Delarue, Frédéric; Robert, François

    2016-06-01

    We have developed an analytical procedure for the measurement of oxygen isotope composition of fossil organic matter by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) at the sub-per mill level, with a spatial resolution of 20-30 μm. The oxygen isotope composition of coal and kerogen samples determined by SIMS are on average consistent with the bulk oxygen isotope compositions determined by temperature conversion elemental analysis - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TC/EA-IRMS), but display large spreads of δ18O of ∼5-10‰, attributed to mixing of remnants of organic compounds with distinct δ18O signatures. Most of the δ18O values obtained on two kerogen residues extracted from the Eocene Clarno and Early Devonian Rhynie continental chert samples and on two immature coal samples range between ∼10‰ and ∼25‰. Based on the average δ18O values of these samples, and on the O isotope composition of water processed by plants that now constitute the Eocene Clarno kerogen, we estimated δ18Owater values ranging between around -11‰ and -1‰, which overall correspond well within the range of O isotope compositions for present-day continental waters. SIMS analyses of cyanobacteria-derived organic matter from the Silurian Zdanow chert sample yielded δ18O values in the range 12-20‰. Based on the O isotope composition measured on recent cyanobacteria from the hypersaline Lake Natron (Tanzania), and on the O isotope composition of the lake waters in which they lived, we propose that δ18O values of cyanobacteria remnants are enriched by about ∼18 ± 2‰ to 22 ± 2‰ relative to coeval waters. This relationship suggests that deep ocean waters in which the Zdanow cyanobacteria lived during Early Silurian times were characterised by δ18O values of around -5 ± 4‰. This study, establishing the feasibility of micro-analysis of Phanerozoic fossil organic matter samples by SIMS, opens the way for future investigations of kerogens preserved in Archean cherts and of the

  17. Mucus: A new tissue fraction for rapid determination of fish diet switching using stable isotope analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope analysis of diet switching by fishes often is hampered by slow turnover rates of the tissues analyzed (usually muscle or fins). We examined epidermal mucus as a potentially faster turnover “tissue” that might provide a more rapid assessment of diet switching. In a ...

  18. GRPAUT: a program for Pu isotopic analysis (a user's guide). ISPO task A. 76

    SciTech Connect

    Fleissner, J G

    1981-01-30

    GRPAUT is a modular program for performing automated Pu isotopic analysis supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) per ISPO Task A.76. Section I of this user's guide for GRPAUT presents an overview of the various programs and disk files that are used in performing a Pu isotopic analysis. Section II describes the program GRFEDT which is used in creating and editing the analysis parameter file that contains all the spectroscopic information needed at runtime by GRPAUT. An example of the dialog and output of GRFEDT is shown in Appendix B. Section III describes the operation of the various GRPAUT modules: GRPNL2, the peak stripping module; EFFCH2, the efficiency calculation module; and ISOAUT, the isotopic calculation module. (A description of the peak fitting methodology employed by GRPNL2 is presented in Appendix A.) Finally, Section IV outlines the procedure for determining the peak shape constants for a detector system and describes the operation of the program used to create and edit the peak shape parameter files. An output of GRPAUT, showing an example of a complete isotopic analysis, is presented in Appendix C. Source listings of all the Fortran programs supplied to the Agency under ISPO Task A.76 are contained in Appendix E.

  19. Linking ramped pyrolysis isotope data to oil content through PAH analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendergraft, Matthew A.; Dincer, Zeynep; Sericano, José L.; Wade, Terry L.; Kolasinski, Joanna; Rosenheim, Brad E.

    2013-12-01

    Ramped pyrolysis isotope (13C and 14C) analysis coupled with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) analysis demonstrates the utility of ramped pyrolysis in screening for oil content in sediments. Here, sediments from Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA that were contaminated by oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon spill display relationships between oil contamination, pyrolysis profiles, and isotopic composition. Sediment samples with low PAH concentrations are thermochemically stable until higher temperatures, while samples containing high concentrations of PAHs pyrolyze at low temperatures. High PAH samples are also depleted in radiocarbon (14C), especially in the fractions that pyrolyze at low temperatures. This lack of radiocarbon in low temperature pyrolyzates is indicative of thermochemically unstable, 14C-free oil content. This study presents a proof of concept that oil contamination can be identified by changes in thermochemical stability in organic material and corroborated by isotope analysis of individual pyrolyzates, thereby providing a basis for application of ramped pyrolysis isotope analysis to samples deposited in different environments for different lengths of time.

  20. Grazing food web view from compound-specific stable isotope analysis of amino acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the trophic position (TP) of organisms in food webs allows ecologists to track energy flow and trophic linkages among organisms in complex networks of ecosystems. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of amino acids has been employed as a relatively new method with the high p...

  1. Analysis of tarnished plant bug movement using carbon and nitrogen isotopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is the primary pest of cotton across the Midsouth of the United States. Movement into cotton fields occurs during the summer from other host plants, both cultivated and wild. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) has been used in other studies to ...

  2. Mucus: a new tissue fraction for rapid determination of fish diet switching using stable isotope analysis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable isotope analysis of diet switching by fishes is often hampered by slow turnover rates of the tissues analyzed (usually muscle or fins). We examined epidermal mucus as a potentially faster turnover “tissue” that might provide a more rapid assessment of diet switching. In a controlled hatchery...

  3. Isotopic Dilution Analysis and Secular Equilibrium Study: Two Complementary Radiochemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Lipford, Levin C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a complementary pair of radiochemistry experiments for instruction of isotopic dilution analysis and secular equilibrium. Both experiments use the readily available cesium-137 nuclide and the simple precipitation technique for cesium with the tetraphenylborate anion. Procedures used and typical results obtained are provided and…

  4. A Very Much Faster and More Sensitive In Situ Stable Isotope Analysis Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M.; Christensen, L. E.; Kriesel, J. M.; Kelly, J. F.; Moran, J. J.; Vance, S.

    2016-10-01

    We are developing, Capillary Absorption Spectrometry (CAS) for H and O stable isotope analyses, giving > 4 orders of magnitude improved sensitivity, allowing analysis of 5 nano-moles of water and coupled to laser sampling to free water from hydrated minerals and ice.

  5. Colocalization analysis in fluorescence micrographs: verification of a more accurate calculation of pearson's correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Andrew L; Macleod, Alasdair; Noppen, Samuel; Sanderson, Jeremy; Guérin, Christopher J

    2010-12-01

    One of the most routine uses of fluorescence microscopy is colocalization, i.e., the demonstration of a relationship between pairs of biological molecules. Frequently this is presented simplistically by the use of overlays of red and green images, with areas of yellow indicating colocalization of the molecules. Colocalization data are rarely quantified and can be misleading. Our results from both synthetic and biological datasets demonstrate that the generation of Pearson's correlation coefficient between pairs of images can overestimate positive correlation and fail to demonstrate negative correlation. We have demonstrated that the calculation of a thresholded Pearson's correlation coefficient using only intensity values over a determined threshold in both channels produces numerical values that more accurately describe both synthetic datasets and biological examples. Its use will bring clarity and accuracy to colocalization studies using fluorescent microscopy.

  6. Easy Leaf Area: Automated digital image analysis for rapid and accurate measurement of leaf area1

    PubMed Central

    Easlon, Hsien Ming; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Measurement of leaf areas from digital photographs has traditionally required significant user input unless backgrounds are carefully masked. Easy Leaf Area was developed to batch process hundreds of Arabidopsis rosette images in minutes, removing background artifacts and saving results to a spreadsheet-ready CSV file. • Methods and Results: Easy Leaf Area uses the color ratios of each pixel to distinguish leaves and calibration areas from their background and compares leaf pixel counts to a red calibration area to eliminate the need for camera distance calculations or manual ruler scale measurement that other software methods typically require. Leaf areas estimated by this software from images taken with a camera phone were more accurate than ImageJ estimates from flatbed scanner images. • Conclusions: Easy Leaf Area provides an easy-to-use method for rapid measurement of leaf area and nondestructive estimation of canopy area from digital images. PMID:25202639

  7. Accurate size measurement of monosize calibration spheres by differential mobility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, George W.; Fernandez, Marco

    1998-11-24

    A differential mobility analyzer was used to measure the mean particle size of three monosize suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. Key features of the experiment to minimize the uncertainty in the results include developing a recirculating flow to ensure equal flows into and out of the classifier, an accurate divider circuit for calibrating the electrode voltage, and use of the 100.7 nm NIST SRM for calibrating the flow of the classifier. The measured average sizes and expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of 2 are 92.4 nm{+-}1.1 nm, 126.9 nm{+-}1.4 nm, and 217.7 nm{+-}3.4 nm. These calibration sizes were characterized by NIST to improve the calibration of scanning surface inspection systems.

  8. Importance of accurate spectral simulations for the analysis of terahertz spectra: citric acid anhydrate and monohydrate.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Davis, Eric A; Smith, Tiffany M; Korter, Timothy M

    2011-10-13

    The terahertz (THz) spectra of crystalline solids are typically uniquely sensitive to the molecular packing configurations, allowing for the detection of polymorphs and hydrates by THz spectroscopic techniques. It is possible, however, that coincident absorptions may be observed between related crystal forms, in which case careful assessment of the lattice vibrations of each system must be performed. Presented here is a THz spectroscopic investigation of citric acid in its anhydrous and monohydrate phases. Remarkably similar features were observed in the THz spectra of both systems, requiring the accurate calculation of the low-frequency vibrational modes by solid-state density functional theory to determine the origins of these spectral features. The results of the simulations demonstrate the necessity of reliable and rigorous methods for THz vibrational modes to ensure the proper evaluation of the THz spectra of molecular solids.

  9. Methods for accurate analysis of galaxy clustering on non-linear scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of galaxy clustering with the low-redshift galaxy surveys provide sensitive probe of cosmology and growth of structure. Parameter inference with galaxy clustering relies on computation of likelihood functions which requires estimation of the covariance matrix of the observables used in our analyses. Therefore, accurate estimation of the covariance matrices serves as one of the key ingredients in precise cosmological parameter inference. This requires generation of a large number of independent galaxy mock catalogs that accurately describe the statistical distribution of galaxies in a wide range of physical scales. We present a fast method based on low-resolution N-body simulations and approximate galaxy biasing technique for generating mock catalogs. Using a reference catalog that was created using the high resolution Big-MultiDark N-body simulation, we show that our method is able to produce catalogs that describe galaxy clustering at a percentage-level accuracy down to highly non-linear scales in both real-space and redshift-space.In most large-scale structure analyses, modeling of galaxy bias on non-linear scales is performed assuming a halo model. Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as assembly bias. Standard large-scale structure studies assume that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. However, modeling of galaxy bias can face systematic effects if the number of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution N-body simulation and the clustering measurements of Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of galaxy bias on halo concentration can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering.

  10. Relativistic astrophysics. [design analysis and performance tests of Cerenkov counters for detection of iron isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The design, experimental testing, and calibration (error analysis) of a high resolution Cerenkov-scintillation detector is presented. The detector is capable of detecting iron isotopes and heavy ions of cosmic rays, and of performing direct measurements of individual neighboring isotopes at charge resolution 26. It utilizes Lexan (trademark) sheets, and has been used in flight packages of balloons and on the Skylab. The detector will be able to provide more information on violet astrophysical processes, such as thermonuclear reactions on neutron stars. Ground support and display equipment which are to be used in conjunction with the detector are also discussed.

  11. INCA: a computational platform for isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D

    2014-05-01

    13C flux analysis studies have become an essential component of metabolic engineering research. The scope of these studies has gradually expanded to include both isotopically steady-state and transient labeling experiments, the latter of which are uniquely applicable to photosynthetic organisms and slow-to-label mammalian cell cultures. Isotopomer network compartmental analysis (INCA) is the first publicly available software package that can perform both steady-state metabolic flux analysis and isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis. The software provides a framework for comprehensive analysis of metabolic networks using mass balances and elementary metabolite unit balances. The generation of balance equations and their computational solution is completely automated and can be performed on networks of arbitrary complexity.

  12. Linking cases of illegal shootings of the endangered California condor using stable lead isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Myra E; Kuspa, Zeka E; Welch, Alacia; Eng, Curtis; Clark, Michael; Burnett, Joseph; Smith, Donald R

    2014-10-01

    Lead poisoning is preventing the recovery of the critically endangered California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) and lead isotope analyses have demonstrated that ingestion of spent lead ammunition is the principal source of lead poisoning in condors. Over an 8 month period in 2009, three lead-poisoned condors were independently presented with birdshot embedded in their tissues, evidencing they had been shot. No information connecting these illegal shooting events existed and the timing of the shooting(s) was unknown. Using lead concentration and stable lead isotope analyses of feathers, blood, and recovered birdshot, we observed that: i) lead isotope ratios of embedded shot from all three birds were measurably indistinguishable from each other, suggesting a common source; ii) lead exposure histories re-constructed from feather analysis suggested that the shooting(s) occurred within the same timeframe; and iii) two of the three condors were lead poisoned from a lead source isotopically indistinguishable from the embedded birdshot, implicating ingestion of this type of birdshot as the source of poisoning. One of the condors was subsequently lead poisoned the following year from ingestion of a lead buckshot (blood lead 556 µg/dL), illustrating that ingested shot possess a substantially greater lead poisoning risk compared to embedded shot retained in tissue (blood lead ~20 µg/dL). To our knowledge, this is the first study to use lead isotopes as a tool to retrospectively link wildlife shooting events.

  13. Compound Specific Isotope Analysis of Fatty Acids in Southern African Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmark, K. A.; Macko, S. A.; Swap, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    This study, conducted as a part of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), applied compound specific isotope analysis to describe aerosols at source regions and rural locations. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual fatty acids were determined for aerosol samples collected at four sites throughout southern Africa. Mongu, Zambia and Skukuza, South Africa were chosen for their location within intense seasonal Miombo woodland savanna and bushveld savanna biomass burning source regions, respectively. Urban aerosols were collected at Johannesburg, South Africa and rural samples were collected at Sua Pan, Botswana. Fatty acid isotopic compositions varied temporally. Urban aerosols showed significant isotopic enrichment of selected short chain fatty acids (C < 20) compared to aerosols produced during biomass combustion. Sua Pan short chain fatty acid signatures were significantly different from the other non-urban sites, which suggests that sources other than biomass combustion products, such as organic eolian material, impact the Sua Pan aerosol profile. However, a high degree of correlation between Sua Pan and Skukuza long chain fatty acid δ 13C values confirm atmospheric linkages between the two areas and that isotopic signatures of combusted fatty acids are unaltered during atmospheric transport highlighting their potential for use as a conservative tracer.

  14. Stable carbon isotope analysis of coprocessing materials: Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Lancet, M.S.

    1989-03-01

    Consol R and D will develop and demonstrate stable carbon isotope analysis as a method to quantitatively distinguish coal-derived and petroleum-derived carbon in products from coal/petroleum coprocessing. The approach taken will be to develop the method, then demonstrate its application on authentic continuous-unit products. The significance of selective isotopic fractionation will be determined and, if necessary, corrections will be applied to account for it. Precision, accuracy and range of applicability will be defined. The value of accessory analytical techniques will also be assessed. Results achieved this quarter include: feed and product fractions from hydroprocessing bench unit runs at the Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) were received, and samples from a Kentucky tar sand bitumen-only run were analyzed for carbon isotope ratios. Repeat carbon isotope analyses of seven samples from HRI Coprocessing Run 227-53 resulted in improved carbon balances for one run period. Athabasca ASB, Cold Lake ASB and Maya ASB were fractionated by distillation and solubility fractionation to determine the homogeneity of each petroleum with respect to carbon isotope ratios. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Collection of NO and NO2 for isotopic analysis of NO(x) emissions.

    PubMed

    Fibiger, Dorothy L; Hastings, Meredith G; Lew, Audrey F; Peltier, Richard E

    2014-12-16

    There have been several measurements made of the nitrogen isotopic composition of gaseous NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) from various emission sources, utilizing a wide variety of methods to collect the NOx in solution as nitrate or nitrite. However, previous collection techniques have not been verified for complete or efficient capture of NOx such that the isotopic composition of NOx remains unaltered during collection. Here, we present a method of collecting NOx (NO + NO2) in solution as nitrate to evaluate the nitrogen isotopic composition of the NOx (δ(15)N-NOx). Using a 0.25 M KMnO4 and 0.5 M NaOH solution, quantitative NOx collection was achieved under a variety of conditions in laboratory and field settings, allowing for isotopic analysis without correcting for fractionations. The uncertainty across the entire analytic procedure is ±1.5‰ (1σ). With this method, a more robust inventory of NOx source isotopic composition is possible, which has implications for studies of air quality and acid deposition.

  16. Tellurium Stable Isotope Fractionation in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, M. A.; Hammond, S. J.; Parkinson, I. J.

    2014-09-01

    New Te double spike procedures were set up to obtain high-precision accurate Te stable isotope data. Tellurium stable isotope data for 16 chondrite falls are presented, providing evidence for significant Te stable isotope fractionation.

  17. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

  18. Understanding N2O sources and sinks with laser based isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the strongest stratospheric ozone-destroying substance released in the 21st century. Main N2O emissions are linked to different microbial pathways, therefore sources are disperse and highly variable, complicating their interpretation. Isotopic measurements have great potential to distinguish between individual source and sink processes. Developments in laser spectroscopy allow both the intramolecular distribution of 15N substitutions (15N14N16O versus 14N15N16O) and the oxygen isotopic composition of N2O to be measured in real-time, at high precision and in excellent compatibility to IRMS [1]. In a number of laboratory and pilot plant studies we investigated the isotopic signature of distinct microbial and abiotic N2O production and consumption pathways in soil and aqueous solution [e.g. 2-4]. Specific pathways were favoured by selection of the nitrogen substrates and process conditions and their isotopic signatures identified by real-time laser spectroscopic analysis. Results from our laboratory studies are in accordance with pure culture experiments and can therefore be applied to other ecosystems. High precision isotopic analysis at ambient N2O concentration is feasible by combining laser spectroscopy with automated preconcentration. Field deployment was demonstrated by real-time monitoring of the isotopic composition of N2O emissions above an intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland. The responses of the N2O isotopic signatures were analysed with respect to management events and climatic conditions [5]. In a follow-up project we combine real-time N2O isotopic analysis at a tall tower in central Switzerland with atmospheric transport simulations and a biogeochemical model of surface fluxes of N2O isotopomers. The working hypothesis is that this approach will allow us to quantify regional N2O sources, identify emission hot spots, and constrain source processes, which will significantly advance our

  19. The ALHAMBRA survey: accurate merger fractions derived by PDF analysis of photometrically close pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J.; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; Molino, A.; Benítez, N.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Ascaso, B.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; Pović, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Del Olmo, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: Our goal is to develop and test a novel methodology to compute accurate close-pair fractions with photometric redshifts. Methods: We improved the currently used methodologies to estimate the merger fraction fm from photometric redshifts by (i) using the full probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the sources in redshift space; (ii) including the variation in the luminosity of the sources with z in both the sample selection and the luminosity ratio constrain; and (iii) splitting individual PDFs into red and blue spectral templates to reliably work with colour selections. We tested the performance of our new methodology with the PDFs provided by the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. Results: The merger fractions and rates from the ALHAMBRA survey agree excellently well with those from spectroscopic work for both the general population and red and blue galaxies. With the merger rate of bright (MB ≤ -20-1.1z) galaxies evolving as (1 + z)n, the power-law index n is higher for blue galaxies (n = 2.7 ± 0.5) than for red galaxies (n = 1.3 ± 0.4), confirming previous results. Integrating the merger rate over cosmic time, we find that the average number of mergers per galaxy since z = 1 is Nmred = 0.57 ± 0.05 for red galaxies and Nmblue = 0.26 ± 0.02 for blue galaxies. Conclusions: Our new methodology statistically exploits all the available information provided by photometric redshift codes and yields accurate measurements of the merger fraction by close pairs from using photometric redshifts alone. Current and future photometric surveys will benefit from this new methodology. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) at Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).The catalogues, probabilities, and figures of the ALHAMBRA close pairs detected in Sect. 5.1 are available at http://https://cloud.iaa.csic.es/alhambra/catalogues/ClosePairs

  20. Studies on accuracy of trichothecene multitoxin analysis using stable isotope dilution assays.

    PubMed

    Asam, S; Rychlik, M

    2007-12-01

    Critical parameters in mycotoxin analysis were examined by using stable isotope-labelled tricho-thecenes. Sample weight was downsized to 1 g without loosing precision when sufficiently homogenized samples were taken for analysis. Complete extraction of trichothecenes could be achieved with a solvent mixture of acetonitrile+water (84+16; v+v) even without the use of stable isotope labelled standards. However, in particular for the analysis of deoxynivalenol the absolute amount of water in the solvent volume used for extraction appeared critical. Depending on the matrix a low water amount resulted in too low quantitative values when no stable isotope-labelled standards are applied to correct for incomplete extraction. In this case the used extraction volume had to be at least 10 ml for 1 g sample when acetonitrile + water (84+16; v+v) was used as extraction solvent.Losses during sample preparation using two different clean-up columns were not observed. On the contrary, matrix suppression in the ESI-interface of the LC-MS equipment was found to be a serious problem. Depending on the matrix, the latter effect resulted in considerably lower values for trichothecenes when no stable isotope-labelled standards were used to counterbalance this suppression.

  1. Quantitative, Time-Resolved Proteomic Analysis by Combining Bioorthogonal Noncanonical Amino Acid Tagging and Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Bagert, John D.; Xie, Yushu J.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Qi, Yutao; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to proteomic analysis that combines bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) and pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (pSILAC) provides accurate quantitative information about rates of cellular protein synthesis on time scales of minutes. The method is capable of quantifying 1400 proteins produced by HeLa cells during a 30 min interval, a time scale that is inaccessible to isotope labeling techniques alone. Potential artifacts in protein quantification can be reduced to insignificant levels by limiting the extent of noncanonical amino acid tagging. We find no evidence for artifacts in protein identification in experiments that combine the BONCAT and pSILAC methods. PMID:24563536

  2. Groundwater and Wetland Contributions to Stream Acidification: An Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wels, Christoph; Cornett, R. Jack; Lazerte, Bruce D.

    1990-12-01

    Stream water pH may be influenced by (1) the flow paths and (2) the residence time of water that contributes to streamflow, when these hydrologic factors interact with the biogeochemical processes that neutralize H+ ions in the catchment. This paper presents measures of the volumes of groundwater contributing to streamflow, the groundwater residence times, and the sources of stream water acidity found during spring runoff in three basins on the Canadian Shield. Isotopic hydrograph separations were used to estimate the relative contributions of groundwater to spring runoff. The contributions of old (premelt) groundwater to spring runoff were greater (60%) in a well-buffered, third-order basin than in a more acidic first-order basin (49%). Using a simple mixing model, a larger groundwater reservoir (420 mm unit depth) and longer residence time (162 days) were estimated in the third-order basin. The lowest stream pH (4.8) was observed in a second-order basin with a wetland that collects drainage from about 79% of the basin. In this basin the principal source of H+ ions was the conifer-sphagnum wetland. We conclude that the hypotheses that the pH of these streams was proportional to (1) a fraction of streamflow contributed by groundwater or (2) the residence time of water in a basin are rejected. More attention must be focused upon the source of acidity generated in wetlands, since these are ubiquitous in small basins.

  3. Frontiers of QC Laser spectroscopy for high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim; Harris, Eliza; Eyer, Simon; Ibraim, Erkan; Tuzson, Béla

    2016-04-01

    An important milestone for laser spectroscopy was achieved when isotope ratios of greenhouse gases were reported at precision levels that allow addressing research questions in environmental sciences. Real-time data with high temporal resolution at moderate cost and instrument size make the optical approach highly attractive, complementary to the well-established isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry (IRMS) method. Especially appealing, in comparison to IRMS, is the inherent specificity to structural isomers having the same molecular mass. Direct absorption in the MIR in single or dual QCL configuration has proven highly reliable for the sta-ble isotopes of CO2, N2O and CH4. The longest time series of real-time measurements is currently available for δ13C and δ18O in CO2 at the high-alpine station Jung-fraujoch. At this well-equipped site, QCL based direct absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) measurements are ongoing since 2008 1,2. Applications of QCLAS for N2O and CH4 stable isotopes are considerably more challenging because of the lower atmospheric mixing ratios, especially for the less abundant species, such as N218O and CH3D. For high precision (< 0.1 ‰) measurements in ambient air, QCLAS may be combined with a fully automated preconcentration unit yielding an up to 500 times concentration increase and the capability to separate the target gas from spectral interferants by se-quential desorption 3. Here, we review our recent developments on high precision isotope ratio analysis of greenhouse gases, with special focus on the isotopic species of N2O and CH4. Furthermore, we show environ-mental applications illustrating the highly valuable information that isotope ratios of atmospheric trace gases can carry. For example, the intramolecular distribution of 15N in N2O gives important information on the geochemical cycle of N2O4-6, while the analysis of δ13C and δ D in CH4 may be applied to disentangle microbial, fossil and landfill sources 7. 1 Sturm, P., Tuzson, B

  4. Coordinated Mineralogical and Isotopic Analysis of a Cosmic Symplectite Identified in a Stardust Terminal Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Berger, E. L.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust spacecraft contain a chemically diverse mixture of material, underscoring the complex nature of comets. Studies of entire Stardust aerogel tracks afford the opportunity to examine the fine-grained particle fragments distributed along the length of the track as well as the terminal particles. Previous TEM characterization of a terminal particle (TP) in track #147 revealed a symplectically intergrown iron sulfide and oxide assemblage. Mineralogically similar assemblages, known as cosmic symplectites (COS, formerly termed "new-PCP"), have only been identified in the primitive carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094. Meteoritic COS have isotopically heavy O compositions (delta (sup 17), O-18 = 180per mille) that point to interactions with early solar system primordial water. In this study we report mineralogical and O isotopic measurements of the Wild-2 COS assemblage. Experimental: Track #147 is a "bulbous"-type track (4600 microns long) containing 7 terminal particles. The TPs were removed from the track, embedded in epoxy, and ultramicrotomed. A JEOL 2500SE 200 keV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope was used to obtain quantitative elemental maps and detailed mineralogical characterization. Following TEM analysis, two thin sections of TP4 (12 microns) were analyzed for O isotopes by raster ion imaging with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L. All three O isotopes were measured simultaneously using electron multipliers. San Carlos olivine grains were used as isotopic standards. Results and Discussion: The COS in the Wild-2 track #147 TP4 sample consists of symplectically intergrown pentlandite and nanocrystalline maghemite which coexists with high-Ca pyroxene with Na and Cr (kosmochlor component). This kosmochlor component could have a nebular origin and be precursors to type II chondrules in ordinary chondrites. Yet pentlandite is not a stable phase in the nebula. The COS in Acfer 094 also consists of pentlandite, but

  5. An integrative variant analysis pipeline for accurate genotype/haplotype inference in population NGS data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lu, James; Yu, Jin; Gibbs, Richard A; Yu, Fuli

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful approach for discovering genetic variation. Sensitive variant calling and haplotype inference from population sequencing data remain challenging. We describe methods for high-quality discovery, genotyping, and phasing of SNPs for low-coverage (approximately 5×) sequencing of populations, implemented in a pipeline called SNPTools. Our pipeline contains several innovations that specifically address challenges caused by low-coverage population sequencing: (1) effective base depth (EBD), a nonparametric statistic that enables more accurate statistical modeling of sequencing data; (2) variance ratio scoring, a variance-based statistic that discovers polymorphic loci with high sensitivity and specificity; and (3) BAM-specific binomial mixture modeling (BBMM), a clustering algorithm that generates robust genotype likelihoods from heterogeneous sequencing data. Last, we develop an imputation engine that refines raw genotype likelihoods to produce high-quality phased genotypes/haplotypes. Designed for large population studies, SNPTools' input/output (I/O) and storage aware design leads to improved computing performance on large sequencing data sets. We apply SNPTools to the International 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) Phase 1 low-coverage data set and obtain genotyping accuracy comparable to that of SNP microarray.

  6. High-accurate optical vector analysis based on optical single-sideband modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Min; Pan, Shilong

    2016-11-01

    Most of the efforts devoted to the area of optical communications were on the improvement of the optical spectral efficiency. Varies innovative optical devices are thus developed to finely manipulate the optical spectrum. Knowing the spectral responses of these devices, including the magnitude, phase and polarization responses, is of great importance for their fabrication and application. To achieve high-resolution characterization, optical vector analyzers (OVAs) based on optical single-sideband (OSSB) modulation have been proposed and developed. Benefiting from the mature and highresolution microwave technologies, the OSSB-based OVA can potentially achieve a resolution of sub-Hz. However, the accuracy is restricted by the measurement errors induced by the unwanted first-order sideband and the high-order sidebands in the OSSB signal, since electrical-to-optical conversion and optical-to-electrical conversion are essentially required to achieve high-resolution frequency sweeping and extract the magnitude and phase information in the electrical domain. Recently, great efforts have been devoted to improve the accuracy of the OSSB-based OVA. In this paper, the influence of the unwanted-sideband induced measurement errors and techniques for implementing high-accurate OSSB-based OVAs are discussed.

  7. Design of an accurate wireless data logger for vibration analysis with Android interface.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J R; Menéndez, J; Ferrero, F J; Campo, J C; Valledor, M

    2016-12-01

    In this work a new accurate wireless data logger using the Android interface was developed to monitor vibrations at low-cost. The new data logger is completely autonomous and extremely reduced in size. This instrument enables data collection wirelessly and the ability to display it on any tablet or smartphone with operating system Android. The prototype allows the monitoring of any industrial system with minimal investment in material and installation costs. The data logger is capable of making 12.8 kSPS enough to sample up to 5 kHz signals. The basic specification of the data logger includes a high resolution 1-axis piezoelectric accelerometer with a working range of ±30 G. In addition to the acceleration measurements, temperature can also be recorded. The data logger was tested during a 6-month period in industrial environments. The details of the specific hardware and software design are described. The proposed technology can be easily transferred to many other areas of industrial monitoring.

  8. Design of an accurate wireless data logger for vibration analysis with Android interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, J. R.; Menéndez, J.; Ferrero, F. J.; Campo, J. C.; Valledor, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this work a new accurate wireless data logger using the Android interface was developed to monitor vibrations at low-cost. The new data logger is completely autonomous and extremely reduced in size. This instrument enables data collection wirelessly and the ability to display it on any tablet or smartphone with operating system Android. The prototype allows the monitoring of any industrial system with minimal investment in material and installation costs. The data logger is capable of making 12.8 kSPS enough to sample up to 5 kHz signals. The basic specification of the data logger includes a high resolution 1-axis piezoelectric accelerometer with a working range of ±30 G. In addition to the acceleration measurements, temperature can also be recorded. The data logger was tested during a 6-month period in industrial environments. The details of the specific hardware and software design are described. The proposed technology can be easily transferred to many other areas of industrial monitoring.

  9. Determination of geographic provenance of cotton fibres using multi-isotope profiles and multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeid, N. Nic; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of cotton fibres can be particularly challenging within a forensic science context where discrimination of one fibre from another is of importance. Normally cotton fibre analysis examines the morphological structure of the recovered material and compares this with that of a known fibre from a particular source of interest. However, the conventional microscopic and chemical analysis of fibres and any associated dyes is generally unsuccessful because of the similar morphology of the fibres. Analysis of the dyes which may have been applied to the cotton fibre can also be undertaken though this can be difficult and unproductive in terms of discriminating one fibre from another. In the study presented here we have explored the potential for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) to be utilised as an additional tool for cotton fibre analysis in an attempt to reveal further discriminatory information. This work has concentrated on un-dyed cotton fibres of known origin in order to expose the potential of the analytical technique. We report the results of a pilot study aimed at testing the hypothesis that multi-element stable isotope analysis of cotton fibres in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis of the resulting isotopic abundance data using well established chemometric techniques permits sample provenancing based on the determination of where the cotton was grown and as such will facilitate sample discrimination. To date there is no recorded literature of this type of application of IRMS to cotton samples, which may be of forensic science relevance.

  10. Enhanced forensic discrimination of pollutants by position-specific isotope analysis using isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Höhener, Patrick; Parinet, Julien; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2016-01-15

    In forensic environmental investigations the main issue concerns the inference of the original source of the pollutant for determining the liable party. Isotope measurements in geochemistry, combined with complimentary techniques for contaminant identification, have contributed significantly to source determination at polluted sites. In this work we have determined the intramolecular (13)C profiles of several molecules well-known as pollutants. By giving additional analytical parameters, position-specific isotope analysis performed by isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry gives new information to help in answering the major question: what is the origin of the detected contaminant? We have shown that isotope profiling of the core of a molecule reveals both the raw materials and the process used in its manufacture. It also can reveal processes occurring between the contamination site 'source' and the sampling site. Thus, irm-(13)C NMR is shown to be a very good complement to compound-specific isotope analysis currently performed by mass spectrometry for assessing polluted sites involving substantial spills of pollutant.

  11. Development of high through-put Sr isotope analysis for monitoring reservoir integrity for CO{sub 2} storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Andy; Jain, Jinesh; Stewart, Brian; Capo, Rosemary; Hakala, Alexandra J.; Hammack, Richard; Guthrie, George

    2012-01-01

    Recent innovations in multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have allowed for rapid and precise measurements of isotope ratios in geological samples. Naturally occurring Sr isotopes has the potential for use in Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) associated with geologic CO2 storage. Sr isotopes can be useful for: Sensitive tracking of brine migration; Determining seal rock leakage; Studying fluid/rock reactions. We have optimized separation chemistry procedures that will allow operators to prepare samples for Sr isotope analysis off site using rapid, low cost methods.

  12. Analysis of plasma histamine: a modification of the enzymatic isotopic assay

    SciTech Connect

    Rauls, D.O.; Ting, S.; Lund, M.

    1986-05-01

    The enzymatic isotopic analysis of histamine requires extraction and concentration of (/sup 3/H)-1-methylhistamine from the reaction mixture. The assay was modified to include enzymatic reaction at 0 degrees C to reduce blank values and direct application of protein-free reaction mixture to a thin-layer chromatography plate for isolating of the product. The analysis was quantitative down to 100 pg/ml of histamine, adequate for monitoring plasma histamine content.

  13. Documenting the diet in ancient human populations through stable isotope analysis of hair.

    PubMed Central

    Macko, S A; Engel, M H; Andrusevich, V; Lubec, G; O'Connell, T C; Hedges, R E

    1999-01-01

    Fundamental to the understanding of human history is the ability to make interpretations based on artefacts and other remains which are used to gather information about an ancient population. Sequestered in the organic matrices of these remains can be information, for example, concerning incidence of disease, genetic defects and diet. Stable isotopic compositions, especially those made on isolates of collagen from bones, have been used to help suggest principal dietary components. A significant problem in the use of collagen is its long-term stability, and the possibility of isotopic alteration during early diagenesis, or through contaminating condensation reactions. In this study, we suggest that a commonly overlooked material, human hair, may represent an ideal material to be used in addressing human diets of ancient civilizations. Through the analysis of the amino-acid composition of modern hair, as well as samples that were subjected to radiation (thus simulating ageing of the hair) and hair from humans that is up to 5200 years old, we have observed little in the way of chemical change. The principal amino acids observed in all of these samples are essentially identical in relative abundances and content. Dominating the compositions are serine, glutamic acid, threonine, glycine and leucine, respectively accounting for approximately 15%, 17%, 10%, 8% and 8% of the total hydrolysable amino acids. Even minor components (for example, alanine, valine, isoleucine) show similar constancy between the samples of different ages. This constancy clearly indicates minimal alteration of the amino-acid composition of the hair. Further, it would indicate that hair is well preserved and is amenable to isotopic analysis as a tool for distinguishing sources of nutrition. Based on this observation, we have isotopically characterized modern individuals for whom the diet has been documented. Both stable nitrogen and carbon isotope compositions were assessed, and together provide an

  14. Isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine for stable isotope analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    A method for the isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine is described that allows stable isotope determinations of taurine to be made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation procedure can be applied to 0.1 ml of plasma; the recovery of plasma taurine was 70 to 80%. For gc separation, taurine was converted to its dimethylaminomethylene methyl ester derivative which could not be detected by hydrogen flame ionization, but could be monitored readily by NH/sub 3/ chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The derivatization reaction occurred partially on-column and required optimization of injection conditions. Using stable isotope ratiometry multiple ion detection, (M + 2 + H)/sup +//(M + H)/sup +/ ion ratio of natural abundance taurine was determined with a standard deviation of less than +-0.07% of the ratio. The (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine/taurine mole ratios of standard mixtures could be accurately determined to 0.001. This stable isotope gc-ms method is suitable for studying the plasma kinetics of (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine in infants who are at risk with respect to taurine depletion.

  15. Electrochemical valveless flow microsystems for ultra fast and accurate analysis of total isoflavones with integrated calibration.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Antonio Javier; Crevillén, Agustín González; de la Fuente, Pedro; González, María Cristina; Escarpa, Alberto

    2007-04-01

    A novel strategy integrating methodological calibration and analysis on board on a planar first-generation microfluidics system for the determination of total isoflavones in soy samples is proposed. The analytical strategy is conceptually proposed and successfully demonstrated on the basis of (i) the microchip design (with the possibility to use both reservoirs), (ii) the analytical characteristics of the developed method (statically zero intercept and excellent robustness between calibration slopes, RSDs < 5%), (iii) the irreversible electrochemical behaviour of isoflavone oxidation (no significant electrode fouling effect was observed between calibration and analysis runs) and (iv) the inherent versatility of the electrochemical end-channel configurations (possibility of use different pumping and detection media). Repeatability obtained in both standard (calibration) and real soy samples (analysis) with values of RSD less than 1% for the migration times indicated the stability of electroosmotic flow (EOF) during both integrated operations. The accuracy (an error of less than 6%) is demonstrated for the first time in these microsystems using a documented secondary standard from the Drug Master File (SW/1211/03) as reference material. Ultra fast calibration and analysis of total isoflavones in soy samples was integrated successfully employing 60 s each; enhancing notably the analytical performance of these microdevices with an important decrease in overall analysis times (less than 120 s) and with an increase in accuracy by a factor of 3.

  16. In-situ Isotopic Analysis at Nanoscale using Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry: A Powerful New Paradigm for Correlative Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yedra, Lluís; Eswara, Santhana; Dowsett, David; Wirtz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis is of paramount importance across the entire gamut of scientific research. To advance the frontiers of knowledge, a technique for nanoscale isotopic analysis is indispensable. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is a well-established technique for analyzing isotopes, but its spatial-resolution is fundamentally limited. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is a well-known method for high-resolution imaging down to the atomic scale. However, isotopic analysis in TEM is not possible. Here, we introduce a powerful new paradigm for in-situ correlative microscopy called the Parallel Ion Electron Spectrometry by synergizing SIMS with TEM. We demonstrate this technique by distinguishing lithium carbonate nanoparticles according to the isotopic label of lithium, viz. 6Li and 7Li and imaging them at high-resolution by TEM, adding a new dimension to correlative microscopy. PMID:27350565

  17. Accurate and noninvasive embryos screening during in vitro fertilization (IVF) assisted by Raman analysis of embryos culture medium Accurate and noninvasive embryos screening during IVF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, A. G.; Peng, J.; Zhao, Q. H.; Su, L.; Wang, X. H.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, J.

    2012-04-01

    In combination with morphological evaluation tests, we employ Raman spectroscopy to select higher potential reproductive embryos during in vitro fertilization (IVF) based on chemical composition of embryos culture medium. In this study, 57 Raman spectra are acquired from both higher and lower quality embryos culture medium (ECM) from 10 patients which have been preliminarily confirmed by clinical assay. Data are fit by using a linear combination model of least squares method in which 12 basis spectra represent the chemical features of ECM. The final fitting coefficients provide insight into the chemical compositions of culture medium samples and are subsequently used as criterion to evaluate the quality of embryos. The relative fitting coefficients ratios of sodium pyruvate/albumin and phenylalanine/albumin seem act as key roles in the embryo screening, attaining 85.7% accuracy in comparison with clinical pregnancy. The good results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy therefore is an important candidate for an accurate and noninvasive screening of higher quality embryos, which potentially decrease the time-consuming clinical trials during IVF.

  18. Precise Analysis of Gallium Isotopic Composition by MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Jiu Bin; Birck, Jean-Louis; Yin, Zuo Ying; Yuan, Sheng Liu; Cai, Hong Ming; Wang, Zhong Wei; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Zhu Hong

    2016-10-04

    Though an isotope approach could be beneficial for better understanding the biogeochemical cycle of gallium (Ga), an analogue of the monoisotopic element aluminum (Al), the geochemistry of Ga isotopes has not been widely elaborated. We developed a two-step method for purifying Ga from geological (biological) samples for precise measurement of Ga isotope ratio using multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Ga was thoroughly separated from other matrix elements using two chromatographic columns loaded with AG 1-X4 and Ln-spec resin, respectively. The separation method was carefully calibrated using both synthetic and natural samples and validated by assessing the extraction yield (99.8 ± 0.8%, 2SD, n = 23) and the reproducibility (2SD uncertainty better than 0.05‰, n = 116) of the measured isotopic ratio (expressed as δ(71)Ga). The validation of the whole protocol, together with instrumental analysis, was confirmed by the investigation of the matrix effect, the result of a standard addition experiment, and the comparison of Ga isotope measurement on two mass spectrometers-Nu Plasma II and Neptune Plus. Although the measurements using the sample-standard bracketing (SSB) correction method on both instruments resulted in identical δ(71)Ga values for reference materials, the modified empirical external normalization (MEEN) method gave relatively better precision compared to SSB on Neptune. Our preliminary results showed large variation of δ(71)Ga (up to 1.83‰) for 10 standards, with higher values in industrially produced materials, implying potential application of Ga isotopes.

  19. Testing isosource: stable isotope analysis of a tropical fishery with diverse organic matter sources.

    PubMed

    Benstead, Jonathan P; March, James G; Fry, Brian; Ewel, Katherine C; Pringle, Catherine M

    2006-02-01

    We sampled consumers and organic matter sources (mangrove litter, freshwater swamp-forest litter, seagrasses, seagrass epiphytes, and marine particulate organic matter [MPOM]) from four estuaries on Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia for stable isotope (sigma13C and sigma34S) analysis. Unique mixing solutions cannot be calculated in a dual-isotope, five-endmember scenario, so we tested IsoSource, a recently developed statistical procedure that calculates ranges in source contributions (i.e., minimum and maximum possible). Relatively high minimum contributions indicate significant sources, while low maxima indicate otherwise. Litter from the two forest types was isotopically distinguishable but had low average minimum contributions (0-8% for mangrove litter and 0% for swamp-forest litter among estuaries). Minimum contribution of MPOM was also low, averaging 0-13% among estuaries. Instead, local marine sources dominated contributions to consumers. Minimum contributions of seagrasses averaged 8-47% among estuaries (range 0-88% among species). Minimum contributions of seagrass epiphytes averaged 5-27% among estuaries (range 0-69% among species). IsoSource enabled inclusion of five organic matter sources in our dual-isotope analysis, ranking trophic importance as follows: seagrasses > seagrass epiphytes > MPOM > mangrove forest > freshwater swamp-forest. IsoSource is thus a useful step toward understanding which of multiple organic matter sources support food webs; more detailed work is necessary to identify unique solutions.

  20. Analysis of growth and tissue replacement rates by stable sulfur isotope turnover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneson, L. S.; Macko, S. A.; Macavoy, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study animal ecology. Analysis of stable isotope ratios of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, hydrogen, oxygen and others have been used to trace migratory routes, reconstruct dietary sources and determine the physiological condition of individual animals. The isotopes most commonly used are carbon, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and nitrogen, due to the approximately 3% enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although all cells express sulfur-containing compounds, such as cysteine, methionine, and coenzyme A, the turnover rate of sulfur in tissues has not been examined in most studies, owing to the difficulty in determining the δ 34S signature. In this study, we have assessed the rate of sulfur isotopic turnover in mouse tissues following a diet change from terrestrial (7%) to marine (19%) source. Turnover models reflecting both growth rate and metabolic tissue replacement will be developed for blood, liver, fat and muscle tissues.

  1. Keratin decomposition by trogid beetles: evidence from a feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    The decomposition of vertebrate carcasses is an important ecosystem function. Soft tissues of dead vertebrates are rapidly decomposed by diverse animals. However, decomposition of hard tissues such as hairs and feathers is much slower because only a few animals can digest keratin, a protein that is concentrated in hairs and feathers. Although beetles of the family Trogidae are considered keratin feeders, their ecological function has rarely been explored. Here, we investigated the keratin-decomposition function of trogid beetles in heron-breeding colonies where keratin was frequently supplied as feathers. Three trogid species were collected from the colonies and observed feeding on heron feathers under laboratory conditions. We also measured the nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) stable isotope ratios of two trogid species that were maintained on a constant diet (feathers from one heron individual) during 70 days under laboratory conditions. We compared the isotopic signatures of the trogids with the feathers to investigate isotopic shifts from the feathers to the consumers for δ15N and δ13C. We used mixing models (MixSIR and SIAR) to estimate the main diets of individual field-collected trogid beetles. The analysis indicated that heron feathers were more important as food for trogid beetles than were soft tissues under field conditions. Together, the feeding experiment and stable isotope analysis provided strong evidence of keratin decomposition by trogid beetles.

  2. IsoWeb: a bayesian isotope mixing model for diet analysis of the whole food web.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Taku; Osada, Yutaka; Takimoto, Gaku

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative description of food webs provides fundamental information for the understanding of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics. Recently, stable isotope mixing models have been widely used to quantify dietary proportions of different food resources to a focal consumer. Here we propose a novel mixing model (IsoWeb) that estimates diet proportions of all consumers in a food web based on stable isotope information. IsoWeb requires a topological description of a food web, and stable isotope signatures of all consumers and resources in the web. A merit of IsoWeb is that it takes into account variation in trophic enrichment factors among different consumer-resource links. Sensitivity analysis using realistic hypothetical food webs suggests that IsoWeb is applicable to a wide variety of food webs differing in the number of species, connectance, sample size, and data variability. Sensitivity analysis based on real topological webs showed that IsoWeb can allow for a certain level of topological uncertainty in target food webs, including erroneously assuming false links, omission of existent links and species, and trophic aggregation into trophospecies. Moreover, using an illustrative application to a real food web, we demonstrated that IsoWeb can compare the plausibility of different candidate topologies for a focal web. These results suggest that IsoWeb provides a powerful tool to analyze food-web structure from stable isotope data. We provide R and BUGS codes to aid efficient applications of IsoWeb.

  3. Stable isotope analysis of molecular oxygen from silicates and oxides using CO2 laser extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Eugene

    1996-01-01

    A laser-excited system for determination of the oxygen isotope composition of small quantities of silicate and oxide minerals was constructed and tested at JSC. This device is the first reported to use a commercially available helium cryostat to transfer and purify oxygen gas quantitatively within the system. The system uses oxygen gas instead of the conventional CO2 for mass spectrometer analyses. This modification of technique permits determination of all three stable oxygen isotopes, an essential requirement for oxygen isotope analysis of meteoritic material. Tests of the system included analysis of standard silicate materials NBS 28 and UWMG2 garnet, six SNC meteorites, and inclusions and chondrules from the Allende meteorite. Calibration with terrestrial standards was excellent. Meteorite values are close to published values and show no evidence of terrestrial oxygen contamination. The one limitation observed is that, in some runs on fine-grained SNC matrix material, sample results were affected by other samples in the sample holder within the reaction chamber. This reemphasizes the need for special precautions in dealing with fine-grained, reactive samples. Performance of the JSC instrument compares favorably with that of any other instrument currently producing published oxygen isotope data.

  4. Method for the purification of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment for compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Hong; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Hua-Shan; Chen, She-Jun; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2013-07-15

    A purification method for lower polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, from tri- to hexa-BDE) in sediment for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was developed in this study. The compounds were extracted using a Soxhlet apparatus with addition of activated alumina and Florisil in the paper tube during the Soxhlet extraction provided for less complex extracts. Then, the extract was isolated from polar compounds using a multi-layer silica gel column, separated into different fractions using alumina/silica (Al/Si) gel columns and finally purified using a Florisil column. The mean recoveries of the major PBDE congeners in the spiked samples ranged from 76.2% to 82.4%. The purity of the samples was verified by GC-MS in full scan mode. The stable isotopic integrity of the spiked samples after the purification was tested by comparing the stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) of the processed and the unprocessed standard materials. The differences in the δ(13)C values for each compound between the processed and unprocessed standards were less than 0.5‰, with the exception of BDE100 (0.54‰). Finally, the purification and isotope analysis method was successfully applied to measure the δ(13)C of PBDEs in sediments. This application of the method indicated that CSIA seems to be a promising method for providing intrinsic characteristics for further environmental fate studies of PBDEs.

  5. How to Construct More Accurate Student Models: Comparing and Optimizing Knowledge Tracing and Performance Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong, Yue; Beck, Joseph E.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    Student modeling is a fundamental concept applicable to a variety of intelligent tutoring systems (ITS). However, there is not a lot of practical guidance on how to construct and train such models. This paper compares two approaches for student modeling, Knowledge Tracing (KT) and Performance Factors Analysis (PFA), by evaluating their predictive…

  6. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  7. Compound-Specific Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis of Chlorofluorocarbons in Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Horst, Axel; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2015-10-20

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), controlled substances due to their role in stratospheric ozone loss, also occur as dissolved contaminants in groundwaters. Stable carbon isotopic signatures may provide valuable new information on the fate of these compounds as has been seen for other priority hydrocarbon contaminants, but to date no method for extraction and isotopic analysis of dissolved CFCs from groundwaters has been developed. Here we describe a cryogenic purge and trap system coupled to continuous flow compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis mass spectrometry for concentrations as low as 35 μg/L. The method is validated by comparing isotopic signatures from water extracted CFCs against a new suite of isotopic CFC standards. Fractionation of CFCs in volatilization experiments from pure-phase CFC-11 and CFC-113 resulted in enrichment factors (ε) of +1.7 ± 0.1‰ and +1.1 ± 0.1‰, respectively, indicating that such volatile loss, if significant, would produce a more (13)C depleted signature in the remaining CFCs. Importantly, no significant fractionation was observed during volatile extraction of dissolved CFCs from aqueous solutions. δ(13)C values for groundwaters from a CFC-contaminated site were, on average, more enriched than δ(13)C values for pure compounds. Such enriched δ(13)C values have been seen in other hydrocarbon contaminants such as chlorinated ethenes and ethanes due to in situ degradation, but definitive interpretation of such enriched signatures in field samples requires additional experiments to characterize fractionation of CFCs during biodegradation. The establishment of a robust and sensitive method of extraction and analysis, as described here, provides the foundation for such future directions.

  8. Practical implementation of an accurate method for multilevel design sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.

    1987-01-01

    Solution techniques for handling large scale engineering optimization problems are reviewed. Potentials for practical applications as well as their limited capabilities are discussed. A new solution algorithm for design sensitivity is proposed. The algorithm is based upon the multilevel substructuring concept to be coupled with the adjoint method of sensitivity analysis. There are no approximations involved in the present algorithm except the usual approximations introduced due to the discretization of the finite element model. Results from the six- and thirty-bar planar truss problems show that the proposed multilevel scheme for sensitivity analysis is more effective (in terms of computer incore memory and the total CPU time) than a conventional (one level) scheme even on small problems. The new algorithm is expected to perform better for larger problems and its applications on the new generation of computer hardwares with 'parallel processing' capability is very promising.

  9. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  10. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, K.K.; Wielandt, D.; Schiller, M.; Bizzarro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr3+, CrCl2+ and CrCl2+) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ~1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr3+, intermediates in CrCl2+ and the lightest in CrCl2+/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ~25% Cr (in the form of Cr3+) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected 53Cr/52Cr (μ53 Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and 54Cr/52Cr (μ54Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr3+ by >5 days exposure to HNO3 —H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >~98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a chromatographic elution strategy that

  11. Isotopic Analysis of Fingernails as a USGS Open House Demonstration of the Use of Stable Isotopes in Foodweb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Choy, D.

    2011-12-01

    The USGS Isotope Tracers Project uses stable isotopes and tritium to add a unique dimension of chemical information to a wide range of environmental investigations. The use and application of isotopes is usually an unfamiliar and even esoteric topic to the general public. Therefore during three USGS open house events, as a public outreach effort, we demonstrated the use of stable isotopes by analyzing nitrogen and carbon isotopes from very small fragments of fingernail from willing participants. We titled the exhibit "You Are What You Eat". The results from all participants were plotted on a graph indicating the general influence of different food groups on the composition of body tissues as represented by fingernails. All participants were assigned a number and no personal-identification information was collected. A subset of participants provided us with an estimate of the number of days a week various foods were eaten and if they were vegetarians, vegans or non-vegetarians. Volunteers from our research group were on hand to explain and discuss fundamental concepts such as how foods attain their isotopic composition, the difference between C3 and C4 plants, the effects of assimilation, trophic enrichment, and the various uses of stable isotopes in environmental studies. The results of the fingernail analyses showed the variation of the range of isotopic compositions among about 400 people at each event, the distinct influence of C4 plants (mainly corn and cane sugar) on our carbon isotopic composition, and the isotopic differences between vegetarians and non vegetarians among other details (http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/projects/fingernails/). A poll of visitors attending the open house event in 2006 indicated that "You Are What You Eat" was among the most popular exhibits. Following the first two open house events we were contacted by a group of researchers from Brazil who had completed a very similar study. Our collaboration resulted in a publication in

  12. Isotopic Analysis of the Explosive Urea Nitrate and Its Component Ions for Forensic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, R.; Stern, L. A.; McCormick, M. C.; Mothershead, R. F.; Barrow, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Urea nitrate (UN) is an explosive used in improvised explosive devices. UN (CH5N2O+NO3-) can be synthesized from readily available chemicals and was the main explosive used in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center. Isotopic analysis of this explosive has the potential to elucidate the isotopic ratios of the starting materials and geographic information on the location of synthesis. However, depending on the synthesis of the explosive, variable amounts of residual nitric acid may remain, yielding differing contributions of the components to the bulk UN δ15N values. Since δ15N nitrate values cannot be extrapolated from a single component and the bulk value, it is critical to separate the explosive into urea° and potassium nitrate. Therefore, we developed a method to isolate the components of UN for isotopic analysis through the neutralization of urea and separation via methanol washes. The urea in the explosive is neutralized with a 1.1:1 mole ratio of potassium hydroxide:urea in water resulting in urea° and potassium nitrate. The solution is then dried and the urea and potassium nitrate are separated using methanol. Urea and nitrate were isolated from samples of pre-blast UN and the completeness of the extraction was confirmed with a urease assay and a nitrate detection assay on the appropriate components. Isotopic analysis of the isolated urea and potassium nitrate were performed using an EA-IRMS, with the addition of sucrose to the potassium nitrate to aid combustion. For samples of relatively pure UN, the bulk UN δ15N value is stoichiometrically equivalent to the measured δ15N values of the isolated urea and nitrate in a 2:1 ratio. However, some explosive samples contained an excess of nitric acid due to poor preparation. As a result, the bulk UN δ15N values were biased towards the δ15N value of the nitrate. We are conducting experiments to compare the isotopic values of the initial starting reactants in the UN synthesis and the isotopic composition

  13. Isotope analysis of sulfur, bromine, and chlorine in individual anionic species by ion chromatography/multicollector-ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2014-07-01

    We developed an analytical method for precise and accurate analysis of δ(34)S, δ(81)Br, and δ(37)Cl in individual anionic species by coupled ion chromatography (IC) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). The method is based on the online separation and purification of ions by IC prior to their isotope analysis by MC-ICPMS. The developed technique significantly simplifies δ(34)S, δ(81)Br, and δ(37)Cl analysis in environmental samples. In cases when several anionic species of the same element are present in the sample, they might be analyzed in a single analytical run. Major isobaric interferences for the analyzed elements were reduced by using "dry" plasma conditions and applying sufficient mass resolution power. The sample-standard bracketing technique was used for instrumental drift correction. In the case of δ(34)S analysis, precisions up to 0.15‰ (1sd) have been achieved for analytes containing down to 5 nmol of S; for δ(81)Br, the attained precision was 0.1‰ (1sd) for analytes containing down to 0.6 nmol of Br. Precisions of 0.2‰ have been obtained for δ(37)Cl with analytes containing 0.7 μmol of Cl. Robustness of the developed analytical method, as well as high precisions and accuracies, has been demonstrated for the laboratory standard solutions and for environmental samples.

  14. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation in isotopic equilibrium: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Pure CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on characterization of vaterite at equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~ 0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.5 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥ 94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield of up to 235 mg relative to a total dissolved CaCO3 amount of 370 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  15. Understanding N2O sources and sinks with laser based isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, Joachim; Harris, Eliza; Tuzson, Béla; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the strongest ozone-destroying substance. The main emissions of N2O are linked to different microbial processes, therefore the sources are disperse and highly variable, complicating the development of effective mitigation strategies. Isotopic measurements have great potential to unravel spatial and temporal variations in sources, sinks and chemistry of N2O. Recent developments in quantum cascade laser spectroscopy (QCLAS) [1] allow both the intermolecular distribution of 15N substitutions ('site preference'; 15N14N16O versus 14N15N16O) and the oxygen isotopic composition (d18O) of N2O to be measured in real-time and at high precision of <0.2 ‰ [2]. Additionally, N2O isotopic analysis by QCLAS has demonstrated excellent compatibility to the standard technique isotope-ratio mass-spectrometry [3]. In a number of laboratory and pilot plant studies we investigated the isotopic signature of distinct microbial and abiotic N2O production and consumption pathways in soil and aqueous solution [e.g. 4]. Specific pathways were favoured by selection of the nitrogen substrates and process conditions and their isotopic signatures identified by real-time laser spectroscopic analysis. Results from our laboratory studies are in accordance with pure culture experiments and can therefore be applied to other ecosystems. Recently, high precision isotopic analysis at ambient N2O is also feasible by combining laser spectroscopy with automated preconcentration [5]. The field deployment was demonstrated by real-time monitoring isotopic composition of N2O emissions from an intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland for three months. The responses of the N2O isotopic signatures were analysed with respect to management events and weather influences [2]. In a follow-up project we intend to combine real-time N2O isotopic analysis at a tall tower in central Switzerland with atmospheric transport simulations and a biogeochemical model

  16. Apparatus for use in rapid and accurate controlled-potential coulometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Frazzini, Thomas L.; Holland, Michael K.; Pietri, Charles E.; Weiss, Jon R.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus for controlled-potential coulometric analysis of a solution includes a cell to contain the solution to be analyzed and a plurality of electrodes to contact the solution in the cell. Means are provided to stir the solution and to control the atmosphere above it. A potentiostat connected to the electrodes controls potential differences among the electrodes. An electronic circuit connected to the potentiostat provides analog-to-digital conversion and displays a precise count of charge transfer during a desired chemical process. This count provides a measure of the amount of an unknown substance in the solution.

  17. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  18. Tritium speciation in nuclear reactor bioshield concrete and its impact on accurate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Ji; E Warwick, Phillip; Croudace, Ian W

    2008-07-15

    Tritium ((3)H) is produced in nuclear reactors via several neutron-induced reactions [(2)H(n, gamma)(3)H, (6)Li(n, alpha)(3)H, (10)B(n, 2alpha)(3)H, (14)N(n, (3)H)(12)C, and ternary fission (fission yield <0.01%)]. Typically, (3)H is present as tritiated water (HTO) and can become adsorbed into structural concrete from the surface inward where it will be held in a weakly bound form. However, a systematic analysis of a sequence of subsamples taken from a reactor bioshield using combustion and liquid scintillation analysis has identified two forms of (3)H, one weakly bound and one strongly bound. The strongly bound tritium, which originates from neutron capture on trace lithium ((6)Li) within mineral phases, requires temperatures in excess of 350 degrees C to achieve quantitative recovery. The weakly bound form of tritium can be liberated at significantly lower temperatures (100 degrees C) as HTO and is associated with dehydration of hydrous mineral components. Without an appreciation that two forms of tritium can exist in reactor bioshields, the (3)H content of samples may be severely underestimated using conventional analytical approaches. These findings exemplify the need to develop robust radioactive waste characterization procedures in support of nuclear decommissioning programs.

  19. Toward a highly accurate ambulatory system for clinical gait analysis via UWB radios.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Heba A; Abou el-Nasr, Mohamad; Buehrer, R Michael

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we propose and investigate a low-cost and low-complexity wireless ambulatory human locomotion tracking system that provides a high ranging accuracy (intersensor distance) suitable for the assessment of clinical gait analysis using wearable ultra wideband (UWB) transceivers. The system design and transceiver performance are presented in additive-white-gaussian noise and realistic channels, using industry accepted channel models for body area networks. The proposed system is theoretically capable of providing a ranging accuracy of 0.11 cm error at distances equivalent to interarker distances, at an 18 dB SNR in realistic on-body UWB channels. Based on real measurements, it provides the target ranging accuracy at an SNR = 20 dB. The achievable accuracy is ten times better than the accuracy reported in the literature for the intermarker-distance measurement. This makes it suitable for use in clinical gait analysis, and for the characterization and assessment of unstable mobility diseases, such as Parkinson's disease.

  20. Smartphone-Based Accurate Analysis of Retinal Vasculature towards Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiayu; Ding, Wenxiang; Wang, Xuemin; Cao, Ruofan; Zhang, Maiye; Lv, Peilin; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vasculature analysis is important for the early diagnostics of various eye and systemic diseases, making it a potentially useful biomarker, especially for resource-limited regions and countries. Here we developed a smartphone-based retinal image analysis system for point-of-care diagnostics that is able to load a fundus image, segment retinal vessels, analyze individual vessel width, and store or uplink results. The proposed system was not only evaluated on widely used public databases and compared with the state-of-the-art methods, but also validated on clinical images directly acquired with a smartphone. An Android app is also developed to facilitate on-site application of the proposed methods. Both visual assessment and quantitative assessment showed that the proposed methods achieved comparable results to the state-of-the-art methods that require high-standard workstations. The proposed system holds great potential for the early diagnostics of various diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, for resource-limited regions and countries. PMID:27698369

  1. Automated system for fast and accurate analysis of SF6 injected in the surface ocean.

    PubMed

    Koo, Chul-Min; Lee, Kitack; Kim, Miok; Kim, Dae-Ok

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes an automated sampling and analysis system for the shipboard measurement of dissolved sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in surface marine environments into which SF6 has been deliberately released. This underway system includes a gas chromatograph associated with an electron capture detector, a fast and highly efficient SF6-extraction device, a global positioning system, and a data acquisition system based on Visual Basic 6.0/C 6.0. This work is distinct from previous studies in that it quantifies the efficiency of the SF6-extraction device and its carryover effect and examines the effect of surfactant on the SF6-extraction efficiency. Measurements can be continuously performed on seawater samples taken from a seawater line installed onboard a research vessel. The system runs on an hourly cycle during which one set of four SF6 standards is measured and SF6 derived from the seawater stream is subsequently analyzed for the rest of each 1 h period. This state-of-art system was successfully used to trace a water mass carrying Cochlodinium polykrikoides, which causes harmful algal blooms (HAB) in the coastal waters of southern Korea. The successful application of this analysis system in tracing the HAB-infected water mass suggests that the SF6 detection method described in this paper will improve the quality of the future study of biogeochemical processes in the marine environment.

  2. Stable isotope tracer analysis in isolated mitochondria from mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Andrzejewski, Sylvia; Avizonis, Daina; St-Pierre, Julie

    2014-04-10

    Mitochondria are a focal point in metabolism, given that they play fundamental roles in catabolic, as well as anabolic reactions. Alterations in mitochondrial functions are often studied in whole cells, and metabolomics experiments using 13C-labeled substrates, coupled with mass isotopomer distribution analyses, represent a powerful approach to study global changes in cellular metabolic activities. However, little is known regarding the assessment of metabolic activities in isolated mitochondria using this technology. Studies on isolated mitochondria permit the evaluation of whether changes in cellular metabolic activities are due to modifications in the intrinsic properties of the mitochondria. Here, we present a streamlined approach to accurately determine 13C, as well as 12C enrichments in isolated mitochondria from mammalian tissues or cultured cells by GC/MS. We demonstrate the relevance of this experimental approach by assessing the effects of drugs perturbing mitochondrial functions on the mass isotopomer enrichment of metabolic intermediates. Furthermore, we investigate 13C and 12C enrichments in mitochondria isolated from cancer cells given the emerging role of metabolic alterations in supporting tumor growth. This original method will provide a very sensitive tool to perform metabolomics studies on isolated mitochondria.

  3. Multi-Isotope Analysis as a Natural Reaction Probe of Biodegradation Mechanisms of 1,2- Dichloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, S. K.; Dinglasan-Panlilio, M.; Edwards, E. A.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2006-12-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon, is an EPA priority pollutant and a widespread groundwater contaminant. Stable isotope fractionation during biodegradation of 1,2-DCA occurs due to differences in the reaction rates of heavy versus light atoms present at a reacting bond in the 1,2-DCA molecule. In general, light isotopic bonds react more quickly, producing a relative enrichment in the heavy isotope in the remaining contaminant pool. Compound specific isotope analysis has the potential to demonstrate the occurrence and extent of biodegradation at chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater sites. In this study, stable carbon isotope fractionation was used as a novel reaction probe to provide information about the mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation. Isotopic fractionation was measured during 1,2-DCA degradation by a microbial culture capable of degrading 1,2-DCA under O2-reducing and NO3-reducing conditions. The microbial culture produced isotopic enrichment values that are not only large and reproducible, but are the same whether O2 or NO3 was used as an electron acceptor. The mean isotopic enrichment value of -25.8 permil measured for the microbial culture during 1,2-DCA degradation under both O2 and NO3- reducing conditions can be converted into a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value to relate the observed isotopic fractionation to the mechanism of degradation. This KIE value (1.05) is consistent with degradation via a hydrolysis (SN2) reaction under both electron-accepting conditions. Isotope analysis was able to provide a first line of evidence for the reaction mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation by the microbial culture. Using a multi-isotope approach incorporating both carbon and hydrogen isotopic data, compound specific isotope analysis also has the potential to determine degradation mechanisms for 1,2-DCA under aerobic conditions where 1,2-DCA is known to be degraded by two distinct enzymatic pathways. Biodegradation of 1

  4. Preparation of starch and other carbon fractions from higher plant leaves for stable carbon isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Wanek, W; Heintel, S; Richter, A

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the carbon isotope composition of starch and cellulose still relies on chemical isolation of these water-insoluble plant constituents and subsequent elemental analysis by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) of the purified fractions, while delta(13)C values of low-molecular-weight organic compounds are now routinely measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). Here we report a simple and reliable method for processing milligram quantities of dried plant material for the analysis of the carbon isotope composition of lipids, soluble sugars, starch and cellulose from the same sample. We evaluated three different starch preparation methods, namely (1) enzymatic hydrolysis by alpha-amylase, (2) solubilization by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) followed by precipitation with ethanol, and (3) partial hydrolysis by HCl followed by precipitation of the resulting dextrins by ethanol. Starch recovery for three commercially available native starches (from potato, rice and wheat) varied from 48 to 81% for the techniques based on precipitation, whereas the enzymatic technique exhibited yields between 99 and 105%. In addition, the DMSO and HCl techniques introduced a significant (13)C fractionation of up to 1.9 per thousand, while the carbon isotope composition of native starches analyzed after enzymatic digestion did not show any significant difference from that of untreated samples. The enzymatic starch preparation method was then incorporated into a protocol for determination of delta(13)C signatures of lipids, soluble carbohydrates, starch and crude cellulose. The procedure is based on methanol/chloroform/water extraction of dried and ground leaf material. After recovery of the chloroform phase (lipid fraction), the methanol/water phase was deionized by ion exchange (soluble carbohydrate fraction) and the pellet treated with heat-stable alpha-amylase (starch fraction). The remaining insoluble material was subjected

  5. A refined sampling strategy for intra-tooth stable isotope analysis of mammalian enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazzo, A.; Bendrey, R.; Vella, D.; Moloney, A. P.; Monahan, F. J.; Schmidt, O.

    2012-05-01

    Serial sampling and stable isotope analysis performed along the growth axis of vertebrate tooth enamel records differences attributed to seasonal variation in diet, climate or animal movement. Because several months are required to obtain mature enamel in large mammals, modifications in the isotopic composition of environmental parameters are not instantaneously recorded, and stable isotope analysis of tooth enamel returns a time-averaged signal attenuated in its amplitude relative to the input signal. For convenience, stable isotope profiles are usually determined on the side of the tooth where enamel is thickest. Here we investigate the possibility of improving the time resolution by targeting the side of the tooth where enamel is thinnest. Observation of developing third molars (M3) in sheep shows that the tooth growth rate is not constant but decreases exponentially, while the angle between the first layer of enamel deposited and the enamel-dentine junction increases as a tooth approaches its maximal length. We also noted differences in thickness and geometry of enamel growth between the mesial side (i.e., the side facing the M2) and the buccal side (i.e., the side facing the cheek) of the M3. Carbon and oxygen isotope variations were measured along the M3 teeth from eight sheep raised under controlled conditions. Intra-tooth variability was systematically larger along the mesial side and the difference in amplitude between the two sides was proportional to the time of exposure to the input signal. Although attenuated, the mesial side records variations in the environmental signal more faithfully than the buccal side. This approach can be adapted to other mammals whose teeth show lateral variation in enamel thickness and could potentially be used as an internal check for diagenesis.

  6. Light Isotopes and Trace Organics Analysis of Mars Samples with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Niemann, Hasso (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precision measurement of light isotopes in Mars surface minerals and comparison of this isotopic composition with atmospheric gas and other, well-mixed reservoirs such as surface dust are necessary to understand the history of atmospheric evolution from a possibly warmer and wetter Martian surface to the present state. Atmospheric sources and sinks that set these ratios are volcanism, solar wind sputtering, photochemical processes, and weathering. Measurement of a range of trace organic species with a particular focus on species such as amino acids that are the building blocks of terrestrial life are likewise important to address the questions of prebiotic and present or past biological activity on Mars. The workshop topics "isotopic mineralogy" and "biology and pre-biotic chemistry" will be addressed from the point of view of the capabilities and limitations of insitu mass spectrometry (MS) techniques such as thermally evolved gas analysis (TEGA) and gas chromatography (GC) surface experiments using MS, in both cases, as a final chemical and isotopic composition detector. Insitu experiments using straightforward adaptations of existing space proven hardware can provide a substantial improvement in the precision and accuracy of our present knowledge of isotopic composition both in molecular and atomic species in the atmosphere and those chemically bound in rocks and soils. Likewise, detection of trace organic species with greatly improved sensitivity from the Viking GCMS experiment is possible using gas enrichment techniques. The limits to precision and accuracy of presently feasible insitu techniques compared to laboratory analysis of returned samples will be explored. The insitu techniques are sufficiently powerful that they can provide a high fidelity method of screening samples obtained from a diverse set of surface locations such as the subsurface or the interior of rocks for selection of those that are the most interesting for return to Earth.

  7. Analysis of Concentrated Uranium Ores Using Stable Isotopes and Elemental Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. L.; Riciputi, L. R.; Buerger, S.; Horita, J.; Bostick, D.

    2006-12-01

    The illicit trafficking of nuclear materials presents a continuing threat to national and international security. Various geochemical characteristics of yellowcake (concentrated uranium ore) could potentially provide information on the geologic, geographic, and processing origin of the ore. We have been focusing on investigating the potential of stable isotope analyses, namely carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, to provide "forensic" information about ore environment and artificial processing methods used to concentrate the uranium ore. Stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen was performed using a Costech elemental analyzer (EA) attached to a Finnigan Mat 252 mass spectrometer. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes can be characteristic of the processing agents used to concentrate the uranium ore. Oxygen analysis was performed using a ThermoFinnigan thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) attached to a Finnigan Mat 252 mass spectrometer at ORNL. In addition to the stable isotope analyses, elemental concentrations were analyzed using time-of-flight ICP-MS, and uranium isotope composition measured using MC-ICP-MS. Results from a number of yellowcake samples will be presented, illustrating the potential of geochemical characteristics to distinguish among different types of samples. Research sponsored by the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), U.S. Department of Energy, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed and operated by UT-Battelle, LLC. The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes.

  8. Quantifying Inter-Laboratory Variability in Stable Isotope Analysis of Ancient Skeletal Remains

    PubMed Central

    Pestle, William J.; Crowley, Brooke E.; Weirauch, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past forty years, stable isotope analysis of bone (and tooth) collagen and hydroxyapatite has become a mainstay of archaeological and paleoanthropological reconstructions of paleodiet and paleoenvironment. Despite this method's frequent use across anthropological subdisciplines (and beyond), the present work represents the first attempt at gauging the effects of inter-laboratory variability engendered by differences in a) sample preparation, and b) analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration). Replicate analyses of a 14C-dated ancient human bone by twenty-one archaeological and paleoecological stable isotope laboratories revealed significant inter-laboratory isotopic variation for both collagen and carbonate. For bone collagen, we found a sizeable range of 1.8‰ for δ13Ccol and 1.9‰ for δ15Ncol among laboratories, but an interpretatively insignificant average pairwise difference of 0.2‰ and 0.4‰ for δ13Ccol and δ15Ncol respectively. For bone hydroxyapatite the observed range increased to a troublingly large 3.5‰ for δ13Cap and 6.7‰ for δ18Oap, with average pairwise differences of 0.6‰ for δ13Cap and a disquieting 2.0‰ for δ18Oap. In order to assess the effects of preparation versus analysis on isotopic variability among laboratories, a subset of the samples prepared by the participating laboratories were analyzed a second time on the same instrument. Based on this duplicate analysis, it was determined that roughly half of the isotopic variability among laboratories could be attributed to differences in sample preparation, with the other half resulting from differences in analysis (instrumentation, working standards, and data calibration). These findings have serious implications for choices made in the preparation and extraction of target biomolecules, the comparison of results obtained from different laboratories, and the interpretation of small differences in bone collagen and hydroxyapatite isotope values

  9. Combining multiple regression and principal component analysis for accurate predictions for column ozone in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2013-06-01

    This study encompasses columnar ozone modelling in the peninsular Malaysia. Data of eight atmospheric parameters [air surface temperature (AST), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), water vapour (H2Ovapour), skin surface temperature (SSKT), atmosphere temperature (AT), relative humidity (RH), and mean surface pressure (MSP)] data set, retrieved from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), for the entire period (2003-2008) was employed to develop models to predict the value of columnar ozone (O3) in study area. The combined method, which is based on using both multiple regressions combined with principal component analysis (PCA) modelling, was used to predict columnar ozone. This combined approach was utilized to improve the prediction accuracy of columnar ozone. Separate analysis was carried out for north east monsoon (NEM) and south west monsoon (SWM) seasons. The O3 was negatively correlated with CH4, H2Ovapour, RH, and MSP, whereas it was positively correlated with CO, AST, SSKT, and AT during both the NEM and SWM season periods. Multiple regression analysis was used to fit the columnar ozone data using the atmospheric parameter's variables as predictors. A variable selection method based on high loading of varimax rotated principal components was used to acquire subsets of the predictor variables to be comprised in the linear regression model of the atmospheric parameter's variables. It was found that the increase in columnar O3 value is associated with an increase in the values of AST, SSKT, AT, and CO and with a drop in the levels of CH4, H2Ovapour, RH, and MSP. The result of fitting the best models for the columnar O3 value using eight of the independent variables gave about the same values of the R (≈0.93) and R2 (≈0.86) for both the NEM and SWM seasons. The common variables that appeared in both regression equations were SSKT, CH4 and RH, and the principal precursor of the columnar O3 value in both the NEM and SWM seasons was SSKT.

  10. Duplicate portion sampling combined with spectrophotometric analysis affords the most accurate results when assessing daily dietary phosphorus intake.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Alarcon, Miguel; Zambrano, Esmeralda; Moreno-Montoro, Miriam; Agil, Ahmad; Olalla, Manuel

    2012-08-01

    The assessment of daily dietary phosphorus (P) intake is a major concern in human nutrition because of its relationship with Ca and Mg metabolism and osteoporosis. Within this context, we hypothesized that several of the methods available for the assessment of daily dietary intake of P are equally accurate and reliable, although few studies have been conducted to confirm this. The aim of this study then was to evaluate daily dietary P intake, which we did by 3 methods: duplicate portion sampling of 108 hospital meals, combined either with spectrophotometric analysis or the use of food composition tables, and 24-hour dietary recall for 3 consecutive days plus the use of food composition tables. The mean P daily dietary intakes found were 1106 ± 221, 1480 ± 221, and 1515 ± 223 mg/d, respectively. Daily dietary intake of P determined by spectrophotometric analysis was significantly lower (P < .001) and closer to dietary reference intakes for adolescents aged from 14 to 18 years (88.5%) and adult subjects (158.1%) compared with the other 2 methods. Duplicate portion sampling with P analysis takes into account the influence of technological and cooking processes on the P content of foods and meals and therefore afforded the most accurate and reliable P daily dietary intakes. The use of referred food composition tables overestimated daily dietary P intake. No adverse effects in relation to P nutrition (deficiencies or toxic effects) were encountered.

  11. Simulating Expert Clinical Comprehension: Adapting Latent Semantic Analysis to Accurately Extract Clinical Concepts from Psychiatric Narrative

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor; Blatter, Brett; Patel, Vimla

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive studies reveal that less-than-expert clinicians are less able to recognize meaningful patterns of data in clinical narratives. Accordingly, psychiatric residents early in training fail to attend to information that is relevant to diagnosis and the assessment of dangerousness. This manuscript presents cognitively motivated methodology for the simulation of expert ability to organize relevant findings supporting intermediate diagnostic hypotheses. Latent Semantic Analysis is used to generate a semantic space from which meaningful associations between psychiatric terms are derived. Diagnostically meaningful clusters are modeled as geometric structures within this space and compared to elements of psychiatric narrative text using semantic distance measures. A learning algorithm is defined that alters components of these geometric structures in response to labeled training data. Extraction and classification of relevant text segments is evaluated against expert annotation, with system-rater agreement approximating rater-rater agreement. A range of biomedical informatics applications for these methods are suggested. PMID:18455483

  12. Computer-implemented system and method for automated and highly accurate plaque analysis, reporting, and visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, James Herbert (Inventor); Talukder, Ashit (Inventor); Lambert, James (Inventor); Lam, Raymond (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A computer-implemented system and method of intra-oral analysis for measuring plaque removal is disclosed. The system includes hardware for real-time image acquisition and software to store the acquired images on a patient-by-patient basis. The system implements algorithms to segment teeth of interest from surrounding gum, and uses a real-time image-based morphing procedure to automatically overlay a grid onto each segmented tooth. Pattern recognition methods are used to classify plaque from surrounding gum and enamel, while ignoring glare effects due to the reflection of camera light and ambient light from enamel regions. The system integrates these components into a single software suite with an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) that allows users to do an end-to-end run of a patient record, including tooth segmentation of all teeth, grid morphing of each segmented tooth, and plaque classification of each tooth image.

  13. An Accurate Method for Free Vibration Analysis of Structures with Application to Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KEVORKIAN, S.; PASCAL, M.

    2001-10-01

    In this work, the continuous element method which has been used as an alternative to the finite element method of vibration analysis of frames is applied to more general structures like 3-D continuum and rectangular plates. The method is based on the concept of the so-called impedance matrix giving in the frequency domain, the linear relation between the generalized displacements of the boundaries and the generalized forces exerted on these boundaries. For a 3-D continuum, the concept of impedance matrix is introduced assuming a particular kind of boundary conditions. For rectangular plates, this new development leads to the solution of vibration problems for boundary conditions other than the simply supported ones.

  14. Accurate wavelength calibration in the near-infrared for multielement analysis without the need for reference spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Asimellis, George; Giannoudakos, Aggelos; Kompitsas, Michael

    2006-12-10

    A new technique has been developed for an instant, precise, and accurate wavelength calibration over a wide pixel array for simultaneous, multielement spectral analysis based on an inverse numerical solution to the grating dispersion function.This technique is applicable to multielement analytical applications such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), particularly when using high-density gratings in the upper visible and in the near-infrared, where nonmetallic elements are detected.This application overcomes the need to use reference spectra for each window of observation and is tested on a commercially available LIBS instrument.

  15. Restriction Site Tiling Analysis: accurate discovery and quantitative genotyping of genome-wide polymorphisms using nucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genotype data can be used to identify genes important for local adaptation in wild populations, phenotypes in lab stocks, or disease-related traits in human medicine. Here we advance microarray-based genotyping for population genomics with Restriction Site Tiling Analysis. The approach simultaneously discovers polymorphisms and provides quantitative genotype data at 10,000s of loci. It is highly accurate and free from ascertainment bias. We apply the approach to uncover genomic differentiation in the purple sea urchin. PMID:20403197

  16. Entropy analysis of stable isotopes in precipitation: tracing the monsoon systems in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiansheng; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Due to the complexity of monsoon systems and random behaviors of isotope tracers, conventional methods are not adequate for uncovering detailed information about monsoon activities from typically limited precipitation isotope data. We developed a new approach based on the entropy theory to analyze such data with a focus on the monsoon systems in China, dealing with the complexity of these systems and data deficiency. Using precipitation isotope data from 42 selected stations in and around China within the GNIP network, we computed entropies associated with D and 18O. These entropies were found to relate linearly to each other with a proportionality factor close to unity. The spatial variations of the D and 18O entropy in the study area revealed the origins, extents and pathways of the Chinese monsoon systems, as well as their interactions. While further investigation is needed at a greater (global) scale, this study has demonstrated how the entropy theory enables an in-depth analysis of precipitation isotope data to trace the pathway and determine the range of a monsoon system. PMID:27507656

  17. Entropy analysis of stable isotopes in precipitation: tracing the monsoon systems in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiansheng; Li, Ling

    2016-08-10

    Due to the complexity of monsoon systems and random behaviors of isotope tracers, conventional methods are not adequate for uncovering detailed information about monsoon activities from typically limited precipitation isotope data. We developed a new approach based on the entropy theory to analyze such data with a focus on the monsoon systems in China, dealing with the complexity of these systems and data deficiency. Using precipitation isotope data from 42 selected stations in and around China within the GNIP network, we computed entropies associated with D and (18)O. These entropies were found to relate linearly to each other with a proportionality factor close to unity. The spatial variations of the D and (18)O entropy in the study area revealed the origins, extents and pathways of the Chinese monsoon systems, as well as their interactions. While further investigation is needed at a greater (global) scale, this study has demonstrated how the entropy theory enables an in-depth analysis of precipitation isotope data to trace the pathway and determine the range of a monsoon system.

  18. Ancient bronze coins from Mediterranean basin: LAMQS potentiality for lead isotopes comparative analysis with former mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Italiano, A.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-11-01

    Bronze coins coming from the area of the Mediterranean basin, dated back the II-X Cent. A.D., were analyzed using different physical analytical techniques. Characteristic X-ray fluorescence was used with electrons and photons, in order to investigate the elemental composition of both the surface layers and bulk. Moreover, the quadrupole mass spectrometry coupled to laser ablation (LAMQS technique) in high vacuum was used to analyse typical material compounds from surface contamination. Mass spectrometry, at high resolution and sensitivity, extended up to 300 amu, allowed measuring the 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb isotopic ratios into the coins. Quantitative relative analyses of these isotopic ratios identify the coin composition such as a ;fingerprint; depending on the mineral used to extract the lead. Isotopic ratios in coins can be compared to those of the possible minerals used to produce the bronze alloy. A comparison between the measured isotope ratios in the analyzed coins and the literature database, related to the mineral containing Pb as a function of its geological and geophysical extraction mine, is presented. The analysis, restricted to old coins and the mines of the Mediterranean basin, indicates a possible correlation between the coin compositions and the possible geological sites of the extracted mineral.

  19. A Cost-Benefit and Accurate Method for Assessing Microalbuminuria: Single versus Frequent Urine Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Roholla; Gharipour, Mojgan; Khosravi, Alireza; Jozan, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to answer the question whether a single testing for microalbuminuria results in a reliable conclusion leading costs saving. Methods. This current cross-sectional study included a total of 126 consecutive persons. Microalbuminuria was assessed by collection of two fasting random urine specimens on arrival to the clinic as well as one week later in the morning. Results. In overall, 17 out of 126 participants suffered from microalbuminuria that, among them, 12 subjects were also diagnosed as microalbuminuria once assessing this factor with a sensitivity of 70.6%, a specificity of 100%, a PPV of 100%, a NPV of 95.6%, and an accuracy of 96.0%. The measured sensitivity, specificity, PVV, NPV, and accuracy in hypertensive patients were 73.3%, 100%, 100%, 94.8%, and 95.5%, respectively. Also, these rates in nonhypertensive groups were 50.0%, 100%, 100%, 97.3%, and 97.4%, respectively. According to the ROC curve analysis, a single measurement of UACR had a high value for discriminating defected from normal renal function state (c = 0.989). Urinary albumin concentration in a single measurement had also high discriminative value for diagnosis of damaged kidney (c = 0.995). Conclusion. The single testing of both UACR and urine albumin level rather frequent testing leads to high diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy as well as high predictive values in total population and also in hypertensive subgroups.

  20. Integrative subcellular proteomic analysis allows accurate prediction of human disease-causing genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Yiyun; Bajaj, Amol Onkar; Eblimit, Aiden; Xu, Mingchu; Soens, Zachry T.; Wang, Feng; Ge, Zhongqi; Jung, Sung Yun; He, Feng; Li, Yumei; Wensel, Theodore G.; Qin, Jun; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic profiling on subcellular fractions provides invaluable information regarding both protein abundance and subcellular localization. When integrated with other data sets, it can greatly enhance our ability to predict gene function genome-wide. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis on the light-sensing compartment of photoreceptors called the outer segment (OS). By comparing with the protein profile obtained from the retina tissue depleted of OS, an enrichment score for each protein is calculated to quantify protein subcellular localization, and 84% accuracy is achieved compared with experimental data. By integrating the protein OS enrichment score, the protein abundance, and the retina transcriptome, the probability of a gene playing an essential function in photoreceptor cells is derived with high specificity and sensitivity. As a result, a list of genes that will likely result in human retinal disease when mutated was identified and validated by previous literature and/or animal model studies. Therefore, this new methodology demonstrates the synergy of combining subcellular fractionation proteomics with other omics data sets and is generally applicable to other tissues and diseases. PMID:26912414

  1. Laser-Ablation Sampling for Accurate Analysis of Sulfur in Edible Salts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yonghoon; Chirinos, Jose; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Oropeza, Dayana; Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Yoo, Jonghyun; Russo, Richard E

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of laser ablation analysis techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser ablation inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), in comparison with that of ICP-OES using aqueous solutions for the quantification of sulfur (S) in edible salts from different geographical origins. We found that the laser ablation based sampling techniques were not influenced by loss of S, which was observed in ICP-OES with aqueous solutions for a certain salt upon their dissolution in aqueous solutions, originating from the formation of volatile species and precipitates upon their dilution in water. Although detection of S using direct laser sampling with LA-ICP-MS has well-known isobaric and polyatomic interferences, LIBS and LA-ICP-OES showed good accuracy in the detection of S for all salts. LIBS also provided the ability to identify the dominant chemical form in which S is present in salts. Correlation between S and oxygen, observed in LIBS spectra, provided chemical information about the presence of S(2-) or [Formula: see text], which are associated with the origin and quality of edible salts.

  2. Accurate analysis of taurine, anserine, carnosine and free amino acids in a cattle muscle biopsy sample.

    PubMed

    Imanari, Mai; Higuchi, Mikito; Shiba, Nobuya; Watanabe, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We have established an analysis method for some free amino acids (FAAs), as well as taurine (Tau), anserine (Ans) and carnosine (Car), in a fresh biopsy sample from cattle muscle. A series of model biopsy samples, corresponding to the mixtures of lean meat, fat and connective tissue, was prepared and showed high correlation coefficients between the compound concentration and the 3-methylhistidine (3-MeHis) content derived from hydrolysis of the biopsy sample (r = 0.74-0.95, P < 0.01). Interference from blood contamination could not be neglected, because the concentration of some FAAs in blood was comparable to that in muscle. However, it was possible to control the contamination of Tau, Ans, Car, glutamic acid, glutamine, asparatic acid and alanine to less than 5.0% when the blood contamination was controlled to less than 23%.These results suggest the necessity of measuring 3-MeHis as an index of lean meat and hemoglobin as an index of blood contamination when compounds in muscle biopsy samples are evaluated. We have carried out a series of these analyses using one biopsy sample and reveal differences in Tau, Ans, Car and some FAAs in beef muscle after different feeding regimes.

  3. Accurate determination of the diffusion coefficient of proteins by Fourier analysis with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Zarabadi, Atefeh S; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-02-17

    Analysis in the frequency domain is considered a powerful tool to elicit precise information from spectroscopic signals. In this study, the Fourier transformation technique is employed to determine the diffusion coefficient (D) of a number of proteins in the frequency domain. Analytical approaches are investigated for determination of D from both experimental and data treatment viewpoints. The diffusion process is modeled to calculate diffusion coefficients based on the Fourier transformation solution to Fick's law equation, and its results are compared to time domain results. The simulations characterize optimum spatial and temporal conditions and demonstrate the noise tolerance of the method. The proposed model is validated by its application for the electropherograms from the diffusion path of a set of proteins. Real-time dynamic scanning is conducted to monitor dispersion by employing whole column imaging detection technology in combination with capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) and the imaging plug flow (iPF) experiment. These experimental techniques provide different peak shapes, which are utilized to demonstrate the Fourier transformation ability in extracting diffusion coefficients out of irregular shape signals. Experimental results confirmed that the Fourier transformation procedure substantially enhanced the accuracy of the determined values compared to those obtained in the time domain.

  4. Accurate modeling of antennas for radiating short pulses, FDTD analysis and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.

    1993-01-01

    Antennas used to radiate short pulses often require different design rules that those that are used to radiate essentially time-harmonic signals. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a very flexible numerical approach that can be used to treat a variety of electromagnetic problems in the time domain. It is well suited to the analysis and design of antennas for radiating short pulses; however, several advances had to be made before the method could be applied to this problem. In this paper, we will illustrate the use of the FDTD method with two antennas designed for the radiation of short pulses. The first is a simple, two-dimensional geometry, and open-ended parallel-plate waveguide, while the second is a three-dimensional, rotationally symmetric geometry, a conical monopole fed through an image by a coaxial transmission line. Both antennas are 'optimized' according to given criteria by adjusting geometrical parameters and including resistive loading that varies continuously with position along the antenna. The predicted performance for the conical monopole antenna is compared with experimental measurements; this verifies the optimization and demonstrates the practicality of the design.

  5. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results.

  6. Review of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells as determined through isotopic labeling and network analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wentao; Keibler, Mark A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-02-10

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an indispensable part of contemporary cancer research. During the past 10 years, the use of stable isotopic tracers and network analysis have unveiled a number of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells. Here, we review such pathways along with the particular tracers and labeling observations that led to the discovery of their rewiring in cancer cells. The list of such pathways comprises the reductive metabolism of glutamine, altered glycolysis, serine and glycine metabolism, mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) induced reprogramming and the onset of acetate metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate the critical role of isotopic labeling and network analysis in identifying these pathways. The alterations described in this review do not constitute a complete list, and future research using these powerful tools is likely to discover other cancer-related pathways and new metabolic targets for cancer therapy.

  7. Preoperative misdiagnosis analysis and accurate distinguish intrathymic cyst from small thymoma on computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Han, Xingpeng; Sun, Wei; Wang, Meng; Jing, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in preoperative diagnosis of intrathymic cyst and small thymoma, and determine the best CT threshold for distinguish intrathymic cyst from small thymoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients (17 intrathymic cyst and 13 small thymoma) who had undergone mediastinal masses resection (with diameter less than 3 cm) under thoracoscope between January 2014 and July 2015 at our hospital. Clinical and CT features were compared and receiver-operating characteristics curve (ROC) analysis was performed. Results The CT value of small thymoma [39.5 HU (IQR, 33.7–42.2 HU)] was significantly higher than intrathymic cyst [25.8 HU (IQR, 22.3–29.3 HU), P=0.004]. When CT value was 31.2 HU, it could act as a threshold for identification of small thymoma and intrathymic cyst (the sensitivity and specificity was 92.3% and 82.4%, respectively). The ΔCT value of enhanced CT value with the non-enhanced CT value was significantly different between small thymoma [18.7 HU (IQR, 10.9–19.0 HU)] and intrathymic cyst [4.3 HU (IQR, 3.0–11.7 HU), P=0.04]. The density was more homogenous in intrathymic cyst than small thymoma, and the contour of the intrathymic cyst was more smoothly than small thymoma. Conclusions Preoperative CT scans could help clinicians to identify intrathymic cyst and small thymoma, and we recommend 31.2 HU as the best thresholds. Contrast-enhanced CT scans is useful for further identification of the two diseases. PMID:27621863

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis Accurately Predicts Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes in Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S; Tyson, G H; Chen, Y; Li, C; Mukherjee, S; Young, S; Lam, C; Folster, J P; Whichard, J M; McDermott, P F

    2015-10-30

    The objectives of this study were to identify antimicrobial resistance genotypes for Campylobacter and to evaluate the correlation between resistance phenotypes and genotypes using in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). A total of 114 Campylobacter species isolates (82 C. coli and 32 C. jejuni) obtained from 2000 to 2013 from humans, retail meats, and cecal samples from food production animals in the United States as part of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System were selected for study. Resistance phenotypes were determined using broth microdilution of nine antimicrobials. Genomic DNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform, and resistance genotypes were identified using assembled WGS sequences through blastx analysis. Eighteen resistance genes, including tet(O), blaOXA-61, catA, lnu(C), aph(2″)-Ib, aph(2″)-Ic, aph(2')-If, aph(2″)-Ig, aph(2″)-Ih, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-If, aac(6')-Im, aadE, sat4, ant(6'), aad9, aph(3')-Ic, and aph(3')-IIIa, and mutations in two housekeeping genes (gyrA and 23S rRNA) were identified. There was a high degree of correlation between phenotypic resistance to a given drug and the presence of one or more corresponding resistance genes. Phenotypic and genotypic correlation was 100% for tetracycline, ciprofloxacin/nalidixic acid, and erythromycin, and correlations ranged from 95.4% to 98.7% for gentamicin, azithromycin, clindamycin, and telithromycin. All isolates were susceptible to florfenicol, and no genes associated with florfenicol resistance were detected. There was a strong correlation (99.2%) between resistance genotypes and phenotypes, suggesting that WGS is a reliable indicator of resistance to the nine antimicrobial agents assayed in this study. WGS has the potential to be a powerful tool for antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs.

  9. Evaluating gull diets: A comparison of conventional methods and stable isotope analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiser, E.L.; Powell, A.N.

    2011-01-01

    Samples such as regurgitated pellets and food remains have traditionally been used in studies of bird diets, but these can produce biased estimates depending on the digestibility of different foods. Stable isotope analysis has been developed as a method for assessing bird diets that is not biased by digestibility. These two methods may provide complementary or conflicting information on diets of birds, but are rarely compared directly. We analyzed carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of feathers of Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) chicks from eight breeding colonies in northern Alaska, and used a Bayesian mixing model to generate a probability distribution for the contribution of each food group to diets. We compared these model results with probability distributions from conventional diet samples (pellets and food remains) from the same colonies and time periods. Relative to the stable isotope estimates, conventional analysis often overestimated the contributions of birds and small mammals to gull diets and often underestimated the contributions of fish and zooplankton. Both methods gave similar estimates for the contributions of scavenged caribou, miscellaneous marine foods, and garbage to diets. Pellets and food remains therefore may be useful for assessing the importance of garbage relative to certain other foods in diets of gulls and similar birds, but are clearly inappropriate for estimating the potential impact of gulls on birds, small mammals, or fish. However, conventional samples provide more species-level information than stable isotope analysis, so a combined approach would be most useful for diet analysis and assessing a predator's impact on particular prey groups. ?? 2011 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  10. Measurement of labile Cu in soil using stable isotope dilution and isotope ratio analysis by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Annette L; Ma, Yibing; Lombi, Enzo; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2004-11-01

    Isotope dilution is a useful technique to measure the labile metal pool, which is the amount of metal in soil in rapid equilibrium (<7 days) with the soil solution. This is normally performed by equilibrating soil with a metal isotope, and sampling the labile metal pool by using an extraction (E value), or by growing plants (L value). For Cu, this procedure is problematic for E values, and impossible for L values, due to the short half-life of the 64Cu radioisotope (12.4 h), which makes access and handling very difficult. We therefore developed a technique using enriched 65Cu stable isotope and measurement of 63Cu/65Cu ratios by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to measure labile pools of Cu in soils using E value techniques. Mass spectral interferences in detection of 63Cu/65Cu ratios in soil extracts were found to be minimal. Isotope ratios determined by quadrupole ICP-MS compared well to those determined by high-resolution (magnetic sector) ICP-MS. E values determined using the stable isotope technique compared well to those determined using the radioisotope for both uncontaminated and Cu-contaminated soils.

  11. Whole-Genome Sequencing Analysis Accurately Predicts Antimicrobial Resistance Phenotypes in Campylobacter spp.

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, G. H.; Chen, Y.; Li, C.; Mukherjee, S.; Young, S.; Lam, C.; Folster, J. P.; Whichard, J. M.; McDermott, P. F.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify antimicrobial resistance genotypes for Campylobacter and to evaluate the correlation between resistance phenotypes and genotypes using in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). A total of 114 Campylobacter species isolates (82 C. coli and 32 C. jejuni) obtained from 2000 to 2013 from humans, retail meats, and cecal samples from food production animals in the United States as part of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System were selected for study. Resistance phenotypes were determined using broth microdilution of nine antimicrobials. Genomic DNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform, and resistance genotypes were identified using assembled WGS sequences through blastx analysis. Eighteen resistance genes, including tet(O), blaOXA-61, catA, lnu(C), aph(2″)-Ib, aph(2″)-Ic, aph(2′)-If, aph(2″)-Ig, aph(2″)-Ih, aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia, aac(6′)-Ie-aph(2″)-If, aac(6′)-Im, aadE, sat4, ant(6′), aad9, aph(3′)-Ic, and aph(3′)-IIIa, and mutations in two housekeeping genes (gyrA and 23S rRNA) were identified. There was a high degree of correlation between phenotypic resistance to a given drug and the presence of one or more corresponding resistance genes. Phenotypic and genotypic correlation was 100% for tetracycline, ciprofloxacin/nalidixic acid, and erythromycin, and correlations ranged from 95.4% to 98.7% for gentamicin, azithromycin, clindamycin, and telithromycin. All isolates were susceptible to florfenicol, and no genes associated with florfenicol resistance were detected. There was a strong correlation (99.2%) between resistance genotypes and phenotypes, suggesting that WGS is a reliable indicator of resistance to the nine antimicrobial agents assayed in this study. WGS has the potential to be a powerful tool for antimicrobial resistance surveillance programs. PMID:26519386

  12. Use of Ga for mass bias correction for the accurate determination of copper isotope ratio in the NIST SRM 3114 Cu standard and geological samples by MC-ICP MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Zhou, L.; Tong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The absolute determination of the Cu isotope ratio in NIST SRM 3114 based on a regression mass bias correction model is performed for the first time with NIST SRM 944 Ga as the calibrant. A value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for the 65Cu/63Cu ratio was obtained with a value of +0.18±0.04 ‰ (2SD, n=5) for δ65Cu relative to NIST 976.The availability of the NIST SRM 3114 material, now with the absolute value of the 65Cu/63Cu ratio and a δ65Cu value relative to NIST 976 makes it suitable as a new candidate reference material for Cu isotope studies. In addition, a protocol is described for the accurate and precise determination of δ65Cu values of geological reference materials. Purification of Cu from the sample matrix was performed using the AG MP-1M Bio-Rad resin. The column recovery for geological samples was found to be 100±2% (2SD, n=15).A modified method of standard-sample bracketing with internal normalization for mass bias correction was employed by adding natural Ga to both the sample and the solution of NIST SRM 3114, which was used as the bracketing standard. An absolute value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for 65Cu/63Cu quantified in this study was used to calibrate the 69Ga/71Ga ratio in the two adjacent bracketing standards of SRM 3114,their average value of 69Ga/71Ga was then used to correct the 65Cu/63Cu ratio in the sample. Measured δ65Cu values of 0.18±0.04‰ (2SD, n=20),0.13±0.04‰ (2SD, n=9),0.08±0.03‰ (2SD, n=6),0.01±0.06‰(2SD, n=4) and 0.26±0.04‰ (2SD, n=7) were obtained for five geological reference materials of BCR-2,BHVO-2,AGV-2,BIR-1a,and GSP-2,respectively,in agreement with values obtained in previous studies.

  13. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The δ13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  14. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-01-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from δ13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  15. Validation of multi-element isotope dilution ICPMS for the analysis of basalts.

    PubMed

    Willbold, M; Jochum, K P; Raczek, I; Amini, M A; Stoll, B; Hofmann, A W

    2003-09-01

    In this study we have validated a newly developed multi-element isotope dilution (ID) ICPMS method for the simultaneous analysis of up to 12 trace elements in geological samples. By evaluating the analytical uncertainty of individual components using certified reference materials we have quantified the overall analytical uncertainty of the multi-element ID ICPMS method at 1-2%. Individual components include sampling/weighing, purity of reagents, purity of spike solutions, calibration of spikes, determination of isotopic ratios, instrumental sources of error, correction of mass discrimination effect, values of constants, and operator bias. We have used the ID-determined trace elements for internal standardization to improve indirectly the analysis of 14 other (mainly mono-isotopic trace elements) by external calibration. The overall analytical uncertainty for those data is about 2-3%. In addition, we have analyzed USGS and MPI-DING geological reference materials (BHVO-1, BHVO-2, KL2-G, ML3B-G) to quantify the overall bias of the measurement procedure. Trace element analysis of geological reference materials yielded results that agree mostly within about 2-3% relative to the reference values. Since these results match the conclusions obtained by the investigation of the overall analytical uncertainty, we take this as a measure for the validity of multi-element ID ICPMS.

  16. ArrayExplorer, a program in Visual Basic for robust and accurate filter cDNA array analysis.

    PubMed

    Patriotis, P C; Querec, T D; Gruver, B N; Brown, T R; Patriotis, C

    2001-10-01

    Determining the dynamics in the global regulation of gene expression holds the promise of bringing a better understanding of the processes that govern physiological cell growth regulation and its disruption during the development of disease. The advent for cDNA arrays has created the possibility for the parallel analysis of expression of thousands of genes in a given cell population, simultaneously. The level of expression of a given set of genes within the studied tissue corresponds to the intensity of a labeled cDNA probe synthesized from the studied tissue RNA and bound specifically to the cDNAs of the genes spotted on the array. The accurate extraction of gene expression intensity values is essential for further data analysis and the interpretation of the obtained results. Here, we describe a new array image-processing software developed in Microsoft Visual Basic, the ArrayExplorer, which provides a user-friendly, multiple-window interface and a number of automatic and manual features that facilitate a reliable, robust, and accurate extraction of gene intensity values from filter-array images.

  17. Stable carbon isotope analysis in a South Texas cave: Investigating sources of CO2 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Reece

    Studies of interactions between modern local climate, cave atmosphere, and ?13C ratios are needed to determine sources of CO2 in caves, and the cycles of seasonal variations that alter karst geochemistry. A seasonal study, focusing on the analysis of stable isotopes collected from a modern cave system, was conducted in Robber Baron Cave (RBC) in order to identify sources of CO2 in its atmosphere. Determining what conditions affect cave morphology and the transfer path of carbon through a cave system is necessary in order to assess the role of caves in the carbon cycle and correctly interpret past ecological changes. This study investigates the extent that stable isotopic values of carbon in CO2 are affected by CO2 sourced from soils, bedrock, atmospheric air, and vegetation, and how ?13C signals are transmitted in a modern cave system. This study also measures how ventilation affects CO2 concentration and ?13C on seasonal scales. In-cave air grab samples were collected monthly at various transects located in RBC in order to measure CO2 composition in addition to factors such as temperature, and barometric pressure. Soil gas and limestone bedrock were also collected and tested for ?13C composition. Air samples were analyzed using an Ambient Air-Model G2101-I Picarro Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Analyzer for both the concentration and ?13C isotopic value of CO2. These values were then compared to isotopic values of known sources of CO2 in order to determine possible sources of CO2 that result in high CO2 concentrations found in RBC. The background stable isotopic value of carbon from CO2 measured in RBC is -19.1‰ VPDB.

  18. Tracing fetal and childhood exposure to lead using isotope analysis of deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Thomas J; Dirks, Wendy; Roberts, Nick M W; Patel, Jaiminkumar G; Hodgson, Susan; Pless-Mulloli, Tanja; Walton, Pamela; Parrish, Randall R

    2016-04-01

    We report progress in using the isotopic composition and concentration of Pb in the dentine and enamel of deciduous teeth to provide a high resolution time frame of exposure to Pb during fetal development and early childhood. Isotope measurements (total Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb, (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios) were acquired by laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry at contiguous 100 micron intervals across thin sections of the teeth; from the outer enamel surface to the pulp cavity. Teeth samples (n=10) were selected from two cohorts of children, aged 5-8 years, living in NE England. By integrating the isotope data with histological analysis of the teeth, using the daily incremental lines in dentine, we were able to assign true estimated ages to each ablation point (first 2-3 years for molars, first 1-2 years for incisors+pre-natal growth). Significant differences were observed in the isotope composition and concentration of Pb between children, reflecting differences in the timing and sources of exposure during early childhood. Those born in 2000, after the withdrawal of leaded petrol in 1999, have the lowest dentine Pb levels (<0.2µgPb/g) with (208)Pb/(206)Pb (mean ±2σ: 2.126-2.079) (208)Pb/(206)Pb (mean ±2σ: 0.879-0.856) ratios that correlate very closely with modern day Western European industrial aerosols (PM10, PM2.5) suggesting that diffuse airborne pollution was probably the primary source and exposure pathway. Legacy lead, if present, is insignificant. For those born in 1997, dentine lead levels are typically higher (>0.4µgPb/g) with (208)Pb/(206)Pb (mean ±2σ: 2.145-2.117) (208)Pb/(206)Pb (mean ±2σ: 0.898-0.882) ratios that can be modelled as a binary mix between industrial aerosols and leaded petrol emissions. Short duration, high intensity exposure events (1-2 months) were readily identified, together with evidence that dentine provides a good proxy for childhood changes in the isotope composition of blood Pb. Our pilot study confirms that

  19. Barcoding T Cell Calcium Response Diversity with Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS)

    PubMed Central

    Sergé, Arnauld; Bernard, Anne-Marie; Phélipot, Marie-Claire; Bertaux, Nicolas; Fallet, Mathieu; Grenot, Pierre; Marguet, Didier; He, Hai-Tao; Hamon, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS), a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells. PMID:24086124

  20. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation for isotopic studies: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as an additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Anhydrous CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on the characterization of vaterite under equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.4 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield per experiment of up to 235 mg relative to the initially dissolved CaCO3 amount of on average 360 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between the mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  1. Diagnosis of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency by stable isotope dilution analysis of urinary acylglycines: Retrospective and prospective studies, and comparison of its accuracy to acylcarnitine identification by FAB/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo, P.; O'Shea, J.J.; Welch, R.D.; Tanaka, K. )

    1990-01-01

    In summary, we have demonstrated that the accurate quantitation of urinary HG and PPG by stable isotope dilution analysis is currently the most reliable method for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency. This method is particularly useful for testing random samples from asymptomatic patients without any provocative test, and it is suitable to widely survey a fairly large population, such as patients with episodic manifestations and families with a history of SIDS.

  2. Automated CO2 extraction from air for clumped isotope analysis in the atmo- and biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Magdalena; Ziegler, Martin; Pons, Thijs; Lourens, Lucas; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The conventional stable isotope ratios 13C/12C and 18O/16O in atmospheric CO2 are a powerful tool for unraveling the global carbon cycle. In recent years, it has been suggested that the abundance of the very rare isotopologue 13C18O16O on m/z 47 might be a promising tracer to complement conventional stable isotope analysis of atmospheric CO2 [Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al. 2007; Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Yeung et al., 2009]. Here we present an automated analytical system that is designed for clumped isotope analysis of atmo- and biospheric CO2. The carbon dioxide gas is quantitatively extracted from about 1.5L of air (ATP). The automated stainless steel extraction and purification line consists of three main components: (i) a drying unit (a magnesium perchlorate unit and a cryogenic water trap), (ii) two CO2 traps cooled with liquid nitrogen [Werner et al., 2001] and (iii) a GC column packed with Porapak Q that can be cooled with liquid nitrogen to -30°C during purification and heated up to 230°C in-between two extraction runs. After CO2 extraction and purification, the CO2 is automatically transferred to the mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometric analysis of the 13C18O16O abundance is carried out in dual inlet mode on a MAT 253 mass spectrometer. Each analysis generally consists of 80 change-over-cycles. Three additional Faraday cups were added to the mass spectrometer for simultaneous analysis of the mass-to-charge ratios 44, 45, 46, 47, 48 and 49. The reproducibility for δ13C, δ18O and Δ47 for repeated CO2 extractions from air is in the range of 0.11o (SD), 0.18o (SD) and 0.02 (SD)o respectively. This automated CO2 extraction and purification system will be used to analyse the clumped isotopic signature in atmospheric CO2 (tall tower, Cabauw, Netherlands) and to study the clumped isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis (leaf chamber experiments) and soil respiration. References Affek, H. P., Xu, X. & Eiler, J. M., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 5033

  3. Improved methodologies for continuous-flow analysis of stable water isotopes in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tyler R.; White, James W. C.; Steig, Eric J.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; Morris, Valerie; Gkinis, Vasileios; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.

    2017-02-01

    Water isotopes in ice cores are used as a climate proxy for local temperature and regional atmospheric circulation as well as evaporative conditions in moisture source regions. Traditional measurements of water isotopes have been achieved using magnetic sector isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, a number of recent studies have shown that laser absorption spectrometry (LAS) performs as well or better than IRMS. The new LAS technology has been combined with continuous-flow analysis (CFA) to improve data density and sample throughput in numerous prior ice coring projects. Here, we present a comparable semi-automated LAS-CFA system for measuring high-resolution water isotopes of ice cores. We outline new methods for partitioning both system precision and mixing length into liquid and vapor components - useful measures for defining and improving the overall performance of the system. Critically, these methods take into account the uncertainty of depth registration that is not present in IRMS nor fully accounted for in other CFA studies. These analyses are achieved using samples from a South Pole firn core, a Greenland ice core, and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. The measurement system utilizes a 16-position carousel contained in a freezer to consecutively deliver ˜ 1 m × 1.3 cm2 ice sticks to a temperature-controlled melt head, where the ice is converted to a continuous liquid stream and eventually vaporized using a concentric nebulizer for isotopic analysis. An integrated delivery system for water isotope standards is used for calibration to the Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW) scale, and depth registration is achieved using a precise overhead laser distance device with an uncertainty of ±0.2 mm. As an added check on the system, we perform inter-lab LAS comparisons using WAIS Divide ice samples, a corroboratory step not taken in prior CFA studies. The overall results are important for substantiating data obtained from LAS

  4. Absorption spectroscopy of uranium plasma for remote isotope analysis of next-generation nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Ohba, H.; Tampo, M.; Wakaida, I.

    2013-07-01

    To determine experimental conditions suitable for isotope analysis, we studied the plume dynamics of uranium. A uranium oxide sample was ablated by 2nd harmonic radiation from a Nd:YAG laser at a fluence of 0.5 J/cm2. The temporal evolution of the ablation plume was investigated in vacuum and helium environments. In vacuum, the flow velocity perpendicular to the sample surface was determined to be 2.7 km/s for neutral atoms and 4.0 km/s for singly charged atoms. These velocities are about 20 % lower than those of cerium measured under similar conditions. From the evolution of the plume in helium, we found that an observation time of 3-5 μs and an observation height of about 2.5 mm are most suited for obtaining higher sensitivity. Observation times less than 3 μs were unsuitable for precise isotope analysis since the spectral modifications arising from the Doppler splitting effect are different between the two uranium isotopes. Using the established conditions, we evaluated the calibration curve linearity, limit of detection, and precision for three samples having different abundances of 235U.

  5. A rapid method for the sampling of atmospheric water vapour for isotopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Leon I; Yakir, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture is widely applied in the environmental sciences. Traditional methods for obtaining isotopic compositional data from ambient moisture have required complicated sampling procedures, expensive and sophisticated distillation lines, hazardous consumables, and lengthy treatments prior to analysis. Newer laser-based techniques are expensive and usually not suitable for large-scale field campaigns, especially in cases where access to mains power is not feasible or high spatial coverage is required. Here we outline the construction and usage of a novel vapour-sampling system based on a battery-operated Stirling cycle cooler, which is simple to operate, does not require any consumables, or post-collection distillation, and is light-weight and highly portable. We demonstrate the ability of this system to reproduce delta(18)O isotopic compositions of ambient water vapour, with samples taken simultaneously by a traditional cryogenic collection technique. Samples were collected over 1 h directly into autosampler vials and were analysed by mass spectrometry after pyrolysis of 1 microL aliquots to CO. This yielded an average error of < +/-0.5 per thousand, approximately equal to the signal-to-noise ratio of traditional approaches. This new system provides a rapid and reliable alternative to conventional cryogenic techniques, particularly in cases requiring high sample throughput or where access to distillation lines, slurry maintenance or mains power is not feasible.

  6. Isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: complex yet highly informative.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) using isotopic tracers aims at the experimental determination of in vivo reaction rates (fluxes). In recent years, the well-established 13C-MFA method based on metabolic and isotopic steady state was extended to INST-MFA (isotopically non-stationary MFA), which is performed in a transient labeling state. INST-MFA offers short-time experiments with a maximal information gain, and can moreover be applied to a wider range of growth conditions or organisms. Some of these conditions are not accessible by conventional methods. This comes at the price of significant methodological complexity involving high-frequency sampling and quenching, precise analysis of many samples and an extraordinary computational effort. This review gives a brief overview of basic principles, experimental workflows, and recent progress in this field. Special emphasis is laid on the trade-off between total effort and information gain, particularly on the suitability of INST-MFA for certain types of biological questions. In order to integrate INST-MFA as a viable method into the toolbox of MFA, some major challenges must be addressed in the coming years. These are discussed in the outlook.

  7. Recent developments in stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis with special regard to Alternaria toxins.

    PubMed

    Asam, Stefan; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) are becoming ever commoner in mycotoxin analysis, and the number of synthesized or commercially available isotopically labelled compounds has greatly increased in the 7 years since our last review dealing with this topic. Thus, this review is conceived as an update for new applications or improvements of SIDAs for compounds discussed earlier, but the main focus is on newly introduced labelled substances and the development of SIDAs for, for example, fusarin C, moniliformin or the enniatins. Mycotoxin research has concentrated on the emerging group of Alternaria toxins in recent years, and a series of SIDAs have been developed, including ones for tenuazonic acid, alternariol, altertoxins and tentoxin that are discussed in detail in this review. Information about synthetic routes, isotopic purity and mass-spectrometric characterization of labelled compounds is given, as well as about the development and validation of SIDAs and their application to foods, feeds or biological samples. As the number of commercially available labelled standards is increasing continuously, a general tendency for the use of analytical methods based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry capable of identifying a series of mycotoxins simultaneously ("multimethods") and using one or more labelled internal standards can be observed. An overview of these applications is given, thus demonstrating that SIDAs are increasingly being used in routine analysis.

  8. A new correction scheme and standards for the analysis of oxygen isotopes in garnet by ion microprobe (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, F.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Improvements in technique and instrumentation for analysis of oxygen isotopes by ion microprobe have dramatically increased analytical precision, creating the capability and need for better standardization. Accurate ion microprobe analysis of oxygen isotope ratios is possible only if appropriate standards are employed to correct for instrumental bias. In minerals with solid solutions, a component of the bias depends on the cation chemistry of the analyzed mineral; because garnets have a wide variety of solid solutions, a broad range of standards is required. Although the first δ18O(Gt) analyses by ion microprobe were made in Ca-rich garnets with variable Fe3+/Al ratios, at present the majority of published garnet standards are Ca-poor, and current Ca-rich standards yield conflicting results. Here we examine 13 existing garnet standards that span the compositional range of pyrope, almandine, grossular and spessartine, and introduce 14 new standards with variable Ca content including 6 standards along the grossular-andradite join. Bias due to cation composition in garnet is found to correlate with grossular content in pyralspite garnets and with andradite in ugrandite garnets. Instrumental bias is correlated with molar volume in garnets of all compositions in this study, however, there is substantial scatter about this linear relationship, particularly among grossular-rich standards. Although this correlation can be used as a correction scheme for bias, a more accurate method based on a 2nd-order polynomial relationship between X(grossular) in pyralspite or X(andradite) in ugrandite and bias is proposed. This correction reproduces instrumental bias in all but one of the 27 standards to within ±0.4‰. Thus accuracy approaches the spot-to-spot reproducibility of analyses (±0.3‰, 2 S.D.) of the homogeneous master garnet standard UWG-2. The new correction scheme successfully reproduces laser fluorination analyses along a traverse of a polymetamorphic, zoned skarn

  9. Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Ehleringer, James R

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) stable isotope analysis is useful when tracing the origin of water in beverages, but traditional analytical techniques are limited to pure or extracted waters. We measured the isotopic composition of extracted beverage water using both isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS; specifically, wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We also analyzed beer, sodas, juices, and milk 'as is' using IRIS. For IRIS analysis, four sequential injections of each sample were measured and data were corrected for sample-to-sample memory using injections (a) 1-4, (b) 2-4, and (c) 3-4. The variation between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values calculated using the three correction methods was larger for unextracted (i.e., complex) beverages than for waters. The memory correction was smallest when using injections 3-4. Beverage water δ(2)H and δ(18)O values generally fit the Global Meteoric Water Line, with the exception of water from fruit juices. The beverage water stable isotope ratios measured using IRIS agreed well with the IRMS data and fit 1:1 lines, with the exception of sodas and juices (δ(2)H values) and beers (δ(18)O values). The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of waters extracted from beer, soda, juice, and milk were correlated with complex beverage δ(2)H and δ(18)O values (r = 0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and generally fit 1:1 lines. We conclude that it is possible to analyze complex beverages, without water extraction, using IRIS although caution is needed when analyzing beverages containing sugars, which can clog the syringe and increase memory, or alcohol, a known spectral interference.

  10. Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of a contaminant plume in Kingsford, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.; Silva, S.R.; Bemis, B.; Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.

    2001-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis was used to study a contaminated site near Kingsford, Michigan, USA. Organic compounds at three of the sites studied had similar ??13C values indicating that the contaminant source is the same for all sites. At a fourth site, chemical and ??13C values had evolved due to microbial degradation of organics, with the ??13C being much heavier than the starting materials. A microcosm experiment was run to observe isotopic changes with time in the methane evolved and in compounds remaining in the water during degradation. The ??13C values of the methane became heavier during the initial period of the run when volatile fatty acids were being consumed. There was an abrupt decrease in the ??13C values when fatty acids had been consumed and phenols began to be utilized. The ??13C value of the propionate remaining in solution also increased, similar to the results found in the field.

  11. Analysis of mitochondrial metabolism in situ: Combining stable isotope labeling with selective permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Palorini, Roberta; d'Herouël, Aymeric Fouquier; Krämer, Lisa; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Chiaradonna, Ferdinando; Skupin, Alexander; Wegner, Andre; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-12-15

    To date, it is well-established that mitochondrial dysfunction does not only play a vital role in cancer but also in other pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases and inflammation. An important tool for the analysis of cellular metabolism is the application of stable isotope labeled substrates, which allow for the tracing of atoms throughout metabolic networks. While such analyses yield very detailed information about intracellular fluxes, the determination of compartment specific fluxes is far more challenging. Most approaches for the deconvolution of compartmented metabolism use computational models whereas experimental methods are rare. Here, we developed an experimental setup based on selective permeabilization of the cytosolic membrane that allows for the administration of stable isotope labeled substrates directly to mitochondria. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to infer metabolic changes in mitochondria induced by either chemical or genetic perturbations and give an outlook on its potential applications.

  12. INTERACTION BETWEEN INLAND AND SEA THROUGH RAUSU RIVER USING ISOTOPE ANALYSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynur, Abliz; Nakayama, Keisuke; Maruya, Yasuyuki; Kuwae, Tomohiro; Okada, Tomonari; Ishida, Tetsuya

    The Shiretoko is a pennusla where a unique interaction occurs between the terrestrial and oceanic systems, which are linked by nutrient exchange processes. Nutrient rich floating sea ice is transported to the coast from the Okhotsk Sea and salmon and trout move upstream and feed inland animals, such as bears and birds. Conversely, nutrients flow into the ocean through rivers. It has been reported that this unique nutrient circulation is being disrupted by climate change and it is thus important to understand what mechanisms drive nutrient circulation in Shiretoko and maintain a unique ecological system. In this study, stable isotope analysis is used in combination to determine the contribution of land-derived (LDN) and marine-derived nutrients (MDN) in the Rausu River basin. Stable isotopes ratios, δ13C and δ15N, show a higher contribution of MDN before the snow-melt floods, and that MDN are distributed largely in the downstream region of the basin.

  13. Analysis of longitudinal momentum distribution data of 26-29P isotopes in stripping reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Singh, Pardeep; Kumar, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    The orbital occupancy of the stripped proton in the phosphors isotopes with mass number 26-29 have been determined through the analysis of longitudinal momentum distributions (LMDs) of 25-28Si core fragments coming from 9Be(26-28P,25-27Si)X and 12C(29P,28Si)Y stripping reactions at high energies. It has been found that the probability of occupying d-orbital by the stripped proton is 40-60%, 30-50%, 30-50% and 0-20% in 26-29P isotopes, respectively. The effects of Coulomb barrier for the possibility of halo structure in proton-rich nuclei has also been examined and found that it decreases the chance of possessing halo structure in proton-rich nuclei.

  14. Production and analysis of mass-deficient neptunium and plutonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, B.

    1984-06-01

    Neptunium-235, 236Pu and 237Pu are produced by cyclotron-irradiation of high-enrichment 238U or 235U targets. Plutonium-236 may be directly assayed and partially analysed by means of alpha-counting and spectrometry techniques, but 235Np and 237Pu are assayed indirectly by their 235U and 237Np ground-state X-ray and gamma emissions, respectively. For 235Np combined alpha, gamma and X-ray analysis is necessary to positively identify and quantify this isotope since 234Np produces an identical X-ray spectrum. The need for new nuclear-data measurements of 237Pu absolute gamma intensities, 235Np alpha branching, and 235Np half-life is stressed. Product isotopic purity is discussed in the context of target material purity and beam energy.

  15. Isotopic analysis of island House Martins Delichon urbica indicates marine provenance of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Adam D P; Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas; Österblom, Henrik; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The presence of one of the largest colonies of House Martins in Europe on the small island of Stora Karlsö, Sweden, led us to investigate the source of their food by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Carbon isotopic values of House Martin nestlings were the same as those of Common Guillemot Uria aalge nestlings fed on marine fish, but differed from local Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis nestlings fed on woodland insects. We infer that these House Martins fed their chicks almost exclusively on insects that had used nutrients derived from seabirds, indicating a dependence on the presence of a large seabird colony. We suggest by extension that some populations of island passerines of high conservation importance may also be dependent on nutrient subsidies from seabird colonies. PMID:25866414

  16. Isotopic analysis of island House Martins Delichon urbica indicates marine provenance of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Cross, Adam D P; Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas; Österblom, Henrik; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    The presence of one of the largest colonies of House Martins in Europe on the small island of Stora Karlsö, Sweden, led us to investigate the source of their food by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Carbon isotopic values of House Martin nestlings were the same as those of Common Guillemot Uria aalge nestlings fed on marine fish, but differed from local Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis nestlings fed on woodland insects. We infer that these House Martins fed their chicks almost exclusively on insects that had used nutrients derived from seabirds, indicating a dependence on the presence of a large seabird colony. We suggest by extension that some populations of island passerines of high conservation importance may also be dependent on nutrient subsidies from seabird colonies.

  17. Analysis of Pu Isotopes in Melted Fuel by Neutron Resonance Transmission: Examination by Linear Absorption Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatani, F.; Harada, H.; Takamine, J.; Kureta, M.; Seya, M.

    2014-04-01

    We have been studying the feasibility of neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) for quantifying nuclear materials (Pu/U isotopes) in particle-like debris of melted fuel for nuclear material accountability and safeguards. The achievable measurement accuracy of NRTA was examined using a linear absorption model for the sample which contain substances other than nuclear fuel materials, such as boron and iron. The impurities (boron and iron etc.) in melted fuel are from the support structure and criticality control materials of the reactor core, and should be included to study the feasibility of NRTA for actual application. Neutron transmission spectra were calculated using the total neutron cross-sections in JENDL-4.0. The transmission spectra together with their uncertainties were evaluated. The study showed quantitatively that the statistical uncertainty in the determination of atomic number density of each isotope depends on the impurity density in the sample. The optimal thickness of the sample was determined for various impurity densities.

  18. Quantitative analysis of menthol in human urine using solid phase microextraction and stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenlin; Blount, Benjamin C; Watson, Clifford H; Watson, Christina; Chambers, David M

    2017-02-15

    To accurately measure menthol levels in human urine, we developed a method using gas chromatography/electron ionization mass spectrometry with menthol-d4 stable isotope internal standardization. We used solid phase microextraction (SPME) headspace sampling for collection, preconcentration and automation. Conjugated forms of menthol were released using β-glucuronidase/sulfatase to allow for measuring total menthol. Additionally, we processed the specimens without using β-glucuronidase/sulfatase to quantify the levels of unconjugated (free) menthol in urine. This method was developed to verify mentholated cigarette smoking status to study the influence of menthol on smoking behaviour and exposure. This objective was accomplished with this method, which has no carryover or memory from the SPME fiber assembly, a method detection limit of 0.0017μg/mL, a broad linear range of 0.002-0.5μg/mL for free menthol and 0.01-10μg/mL for total menthol, a 7.6% precision and 88.5% accuracy, and an analysis runtime of 17min. We applied this method in analysis of urine specimens collected from cigarette smokers who smoke either mentholated or non-mentholated cigarettes. Among these smokers, the average total urinary menthol levels was three-fold higher (p<0.001) among mentholated cigarette smokers compared with non-mentholated cigarette smokers.

  19. Quantifying in situ transformation rates of chlorinated ethenes by combining compound-specific stable isotope analysis, groundwater dating, and carbon isotope mass balances.

    PubMed

    Aeppli, Christoph; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Amaral, Helena I F; Kipfer, Rolf; Schwarzenbach, René P; Berg, Michael

    2010-05-15

    We determined in situ reductive transformation rates of tetrachloroethene (PCE) in a contaminated aquifer by combining compound-specific carbon stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of the contaminants with tracer-based ((3)H-(3)He) groundwater dating. With increasing distance from the source, PCE was gradually transformed to trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). Using the in situ determined carbon isotopic enrichment factor of -3.3 +/- 1.2 per thousand allowed for quantification of the PCE-to-TCE transformation based on isotopic (delta(13)C) shifts. By combining these estimates of the extent of PCE transformation with measured groundwater residence times (between 16 and 36 years) we calculated half-lives of 2.8 +/- 0.8 years (k = 0.27 +/- 0.09 yr(-1)) for the PCE-to-TCE transformation. Carbon isotope mass balances including the chloroethenes PCE, TCE, cDCE, and VC (delta(13)C(Sigma(CEs))) enabled an assessment of complete PCE dechlorination to nonchlorinated products. Shifts of delta(13)C(Sigma(CEs)) at the fringe of the plume of more than 25 per thousand pointed to dechlorination beyond VC of up to 55 +/- 17% of the chloroethene mass. Calculated rates for this multistep dechlorination were highly variable throughout the aquifer (k = 0.4 +/- 0.4 yr(-1)), suggesting that PCE reduction to nonchlorinated products occurred only in locally restricted zones of the investigated site.

  20. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-06-28

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  1. An accurate retrieval of leaf water content from mid to thermal infrared spectra using continuous wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Saleem; Skidmore, Andrew K; Naeem, Mohammad; Schlerf, Martin

    2012-10-15

    Leaf water content determines plant health, vitality, photosynthetic efficiency and is an important indicator of drought assessment. The retrieval of leaf water content from the visible to shortwave infrared spectra is well known. Here for the first time, we estimated leaf water content from the mid to thermal infrared (2.5-14.0 μm) spectra, based on continuous wavelet analysis. The dataset comprised 394 spectra from nine plant species, with different water contents achieved through progressive drying. To identify the spectral feature most sensitive to the variations in leaf water content, first the Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR) spectra were transformed into a wavelet power scalogram, and then linear relations were established between the wavelet power scalogram and leaf water content. The six individual wavelet features identified in the mid infrared yielded high correlations with leaf water content (R(2)=0.86 maximum, 0.83 minimum), as well as low RMSE (minimum 8.56%, maximum 9.27%). The combination of four wavelet features produced the most accurate model (R(2)=0.88, RMSE=8.00%). The models were consistent in terms of accuracy estimation for both calibration and validation datasets, indicating that leaf water content can be accurately retrieved from the mid to thermal infrared domain of the electromagnetic radiation.

  2. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  3. A new method of accurate broken rotor bar diagnosis based on modulation signal bispectrum analysis of motor current signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, F.; Wang, T.; Alwodai, A.; Tian, X.; Shao, Y.; Ball, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) has been an effective way of monitoring electrical machines for many years. However, inadequate accuracy in diagnosing incipient broken rotor bars (BRB) has motivated many studies into improving this method. In this paper a modulation signal bispectrum (MSB) analysis is applied to motor currents from different broken bar cases and a new MSB based sideband estimator (MSB-SE) and sideband amplitude estimator are introduced for obtaining the amplitude at (1 ± 2 s)fs (s is the rotor slip and fs is the fundamental supply frequency) with high accuracy. As the MSB-SE has a good performance of noise suppression, the new estimator produces more accurate results in predicting the number of BRB, compared with conventional power spectrum analysis. Moreover, the paper has also developed an improved model for motor current signals under rotor fault conditions and an effective method to decouple the BRB current which interferes with that of speed oscillations associated with BRB. These provide theoretical supports for the new estimators and clarify the issues in using conventional bispectrum analysis.

  4. Stable-isotope dilution LC–MS for quantitative biomarker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciccimaro, Eugene; Blair, Ian A

    2010-01-01

    The ability to conduct validated analyses of biomarkers is critically important in order to establish the sensitivity and selectivity of the biomarker in identifying a particular disease. The use of stable-isotope dilution (SID) methodology in combination with LC–MS/MS provides the highest possible analytical specificity for quantitative determinations. This methodology is now widely used in the discovery and validation of putative exposure and disease biomarkers. This review will describe the application of SID LC–MS methodology for the analysis of small-molecule and protein biomarkers. It will also discuss potential future directions for the use of this methodology for rigorous biomarker analysis. PMID:20352077

  5. Detection of Human Sewage in Urban Stormwater Using DNA Based Methods and Stable Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, S. L.; Malet, N.; Sauer, E.; Mueller-Spitz, S.; Borchardt, M.

    2008-12-01

    related to the mixed organic matter sources in polluted stormwater runoff, and that this signal will distinct from untreated sanitary sewage. Stable isotope signatures of stormwater and untreated sewage were determined and compared with the rivers. Isotopic values of stormwater was delta 15N = 1.1 ± 2 %; delta 13C = -25.5 ± 3 % and sewage was delta 15N = -1.9 ± 0.2 %; delta 13C = -23.6 ± 0.3. Suspended particular organic matter (SPOM) of Milwaukee River showed depleted delta 13C (-28.6 ± 1.6 %) and enriched delta 15N (7.7 ± 1.9 %) values. SPOM of the KK River exhibited the most depleted delta 15N (0.2 ± 1.6 %) and enriched delta 13C (-24.8 ± 1.8 %) isotopic values. Menomonee River SPOM showed intermediate isotopic values. The delta 13C values of each river and the estuary enriched significantly throughout the summer storm periods. The isotope signals in the KK and Menomonee were indicative of stormwater runoff and sewage contamination. These results suggest that unrecognized sewage inputs are chronically present and may be delivered through urban stormwater systems. DNA based methods combined with isotope analysis may provide a useful tool for urban watershed assessments and to identify sewage inputs. Delineating the relative contribution of stormwater and sewage to overall degraded water quality might give the first indication of the impact of these sources on the Michigan Lake waters.

  6. In situ SIMS oxygen isotope analysis of olivine in the Tibetan mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhidan; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Liu, Dong; Mo, Xuanxue

    2016-04-01

    Although the mantle-derived xenoliths from Lhasa terrane provide a means of directly investigating the mantle underlying the southern part of the plateau, they were rarely found in the region. The only case of mantle xenoliths came from the Sailipu ultrapotassic volcanic rocks, erupted at ˜17 Ma, which have indicated that the subcontinental mantle of southern Tibetan Plateau is hot and strongly influenced by metasomatism (Zhao et al., 2008a, b; Liu et al., 2011). A further study by Liu et al.(2014) of in-situ oxygen isotope of olivine crystals in Sailipu mantle xenoliths identify a metasomatized mantle reservoir that interpreted as the sub-arc lithospheric mantle, with anomalously enriched oxygen isotopes (δ18O=8.03). Here we present oxygen isotopes data on the Sailipu mantle xenolith olivines, using different method of sample preparation. Mantle xenoliths (less than 1 cm in diameter) together originally with their host volcanic rocks were prepared in epoxy adjacent to grains of a San Carlos olivine intralaboratory standard and then polished to a flat and smooth surface. Oxygen isotope compositions of olivines occurs both in mantle xenolith and as phenocryst in the host rock, were analyzed in situ using CAMECA SIMS-1280 ion microprobe at the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. We also performed traditional oxygen isotope analysis on three olivine phenocrysts separates from the host lava. Our new data show: (1) The mantle xenolith olivines have typical mantle oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O=4.8-8.0‰ with average of 5.5±0.2‰ n=105) with variety Fo#(78-90), (2) Oxygen isotopes of situ olivine phenocrysts in the Sailipu lavas (δ18O=7.1-9.2‰ Fo#=70-84, n=66), are similar to that of the whole rock (δ18O=7.0-9.4‰ Fo#=64-74, n=8, Zhao et al., 2009), and three olivine phenocryst grains (δ18O=7.2-7.8); (3) The intralaboratory standard of San Carlos olivine can be a suitable standard using for analyzing olivines with Fo not only

  7. Accurate Enumeration of Aspergillus brasiliensis in Hair Color and Mascara by Time-Lapse Shadow Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Hideaki; Saito, Mikako

    2015-01-01

    The growth of black mold (Aspergillus brasiliensis) in black-colored samples such as hair color and mascara was measured with an automatic count system based on time-lapse shadow image analysis (TSIA). A. brasiliensis suspended in a lecithin and polysorbate (LP) solution of each sample (hair color or mascara) was spread on a potato dextrose agar medium plate containing LP. The background image darkness of the agar plate could be adjusted to attain accurate colony counts. 95 colonies in hair color and 22 colonies in mascara could be automatically determined at 48 h. The accuracy of the colony counts could be confirmed from the timelapse image data. In contrast, conventional visual counting at a specified time could not determine the number of colonies or led to false colony counts.

  8. Simple, fast, and accurate methodology for quantitative analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with bio-hybrid fuel cell examples.

    PubMed

    Mackie, David M; Jahnke, Justin P; Benyamin, Marcus S; Sumner, James J

    2016-01-01

    The standard methodologies for quantitative analysis (QA) of mixtures using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) instruments have evolved until they are now more complicated than necessary for many users' purposes. We present a simpler methodology, suitable for widespread adoption of FTIR QA as a standard laboratory technique across disciplines by occasional users.•Algorithm is straightforward and intuitive, yet it is also fast, accurate, and robust.•Relies on component spectra, minimization of errors, and local adaptive mesh refinement.•Tested successfully on real mixtures of up to nine components. We show that our methodology is robust to challenging experimental conditions such as similar substances, component percentages differing by three orders of magnitude, and imperfect (noisy) spectra. As examples, we analyze biological, chemical, and physical aspects of bio-hybrid fuel cells.

  9. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA from noninvasive samples for accurate microsatellite genotyping of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus).

    PubMed

    Morin, P A; Chambers, K E; Boesch, C; Vigilant, L

    2001-07-01

    Noninvasive samples are useful for molecular genetic analyses of wild animal populations. However, the low DNA content of such samples makes DNA amplification difficult, and there is the potential for erroneous results when one of two alleles at heterozygous microsatellite loci fails to be amplified. In this study we describe an assay designed to measure the amount of amplifiable nuclear DNA in low DNA concentration extracts from noninvasive samples. We describe the range of DNA amounts obtained from chimpanzee faeces and shed hair samples and formulate a new efficient approach for accurate microsatellite genotyping. Prescreening of extracts for DNA quantity is recommended for sorting of samples for likely success and reliability. Repetition of results remains extensive for analysis of microsatellite amplifications beginning from low starting amounts of DNA, but is reduced for those with higher DNA content.

  10. Identification of Importin 8 (IPO8) as the most accurate reference gene for the clinicopathological analysis of lung specimens

    PubMed Central

    Nguewa, Paul A; Agorreta, Jackeline; Blanco, David; Lozano, Maria Dolores; Gomez-Roman, Javier; Sanchez, Blas A; Valles, Iñaki; Pajares, Maria J; Pio, Ruben; Rodriguez, Maria Jose; Montuenga, Luis M; Calvo, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Background The accurate normalization of differentially expressed genes in lung cancer is essential for the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers by real time RT-PCR and microarrays. Although classical "housekeeping" genes, such as GAPDH, HPRT1, and beta-actin have been widely used in the past, their accuracy as reference genes for lung tissues has not been proven. Results We have conducted a thorough analysis of a panel of 16 candidate reference genes for lung specimens and lung cell lines. Gene expression was measured by quantitative real time RT-PCR and expression stability was analyzed with the softwares GeNorm and NormFinder, mean of |ΔCt| (= |Ct Normal-Ct tumor|) ± SEM, and correlation coefficients among genes. Systematic comparison between candidates led us to the identification of a subset of suitable reference genes for clinical samples: IPO8, ACTB, POLR2A, 18S, and PPIA. Further analysis showed that IPO8 had a very low mean of |ΔCt| (0.70 ± 0.09), with no statistically significant differences between normal and malignant samples and with excellent expression stability. Conclusion Our data show that IPO8 is the most accurate reference gene for clinical lung specimens. In addition, we demonstrate that the commonly used genes GAPDH and HPRT1 are inappropriate to normalize data derived from lung biopsies, although they are suitable as reference genes for lung cell lines. We thus propose IPO8 as a novel reference gene for lung cancer samples. PMID:19014639

  11. Test of variational transition state theory and multidimensional semiclassical transmission coefficient methods against accurate quantal rate constants for H + H/sub 2//HD, D + H/sub 2/, and O + H/sub 2//D/sub 2//HD, including intra- and intermolecular kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Schatz, G.C.

    1986-05-28

    Rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the title reactions have been calculated by using accurate quantum dynamical methods and used to test the accuracy of corresponding rate constants from conventional and variational transition state theory. The quantum dynamical rate constants are estimated to be within 35% of the exact rate constants for the potential surfaces chosen for this comparison. For all the reactions considered, the conventional and variational transition state theory rate constants with unit transmission coefficient are found to be very close to each other (better than 7%) but in poor agreement with the accurate quantum results (off by factors of 6-22 at 300 K). This indicates that although variational effects are small, tunnelling makes a very important contribution to the rate constants, and it is found that this tunnelling contribution is described quantitatively for all the reactions considered with use of the least action ground state (LAG) transmission coefficient. The combination of improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) and LAG yields rate constants which have an average error (considering all the reactions and temperatures studied) of 15% compared to the accurate quantum rate constants, and in only one case (D + H/sub 2/ at 200 K) does the ICVT/LAG rate constant differ by more than 35% from the accurate value. The comparison of ICVT/LAG kinetic isotope effects is found to be similarly good, with the worst comparisons occurring for intramolecular (X + HD) isotope ratios.

  12. Test of variational transition-state theory and multidimensional semiclassical transmission coefficient methods against accurate quantal rate constants for H + H/sub 2//HD, D + H/sub 2/, and O + H/sub 2//D/sub 2//HD, including intra- and intermolecular kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Schatz, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    Rate constants and kinetic isotope effects for the title reactions were calculated using accurate quantum-dynamical methods, and used to test the accuracy of corresponding rate constants from conventional and variational transition-state theory. The quantum-dynamical rate constants are estimated to be within 35% of the exact rate constants for the potential energy surfaces chosen for this comparison. For all the reactions considered, the conventional and variational transition-state theory rate constants with unit transmission coefficient are found to be very close to each other (better than 7%), but in poor agreement with the accurate quantum results (off by factors of 6-22 at 300K). This indicates that although variational effects are small, tunneling makes a very important contribution to the rate constants, and it is found that the tunneling contribution is described quantitatively for all the reactions considered using the least-action ground state (LAG) transmission coefficient. The combination of improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) and LAG yields rate constants that have an average error (considering all the reactions and temperatures studied) of only 15% compared to the accurate quantal rate constants, and in only one case (D + H/sub 2/ at 200K) does the ICVT/LAG rate constant differ by more than 35% from the accurate value. The comparison of ICVT/LAG kinetic isotope effects is found to be similarly good, with worst comparisons occurring for intramolecular (X+HD) isotope ratios.

  13. Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs - CSIA Protocol for Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Vapor Intrusion Version 2 Investigations July 2014 13 4.0 DATA INTERPRETATION The measured isotope ratios for the subsurface samples and for...Results for Single Isotope If two isotope ratios are analyzed, the data interpretation is as follows (Figure 5): Indoor Source Range CSIA...GUIDANCE DOCUMENT Use of Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis to Distinguish Between Vapor Intrusion and Indoor Sources of VOCs

  14. First compound-specific chlorine-isotope analysis of environmentally-bioaccumulated organochlorines indicates a degradation-relatable kinetic isotope effect for DDT.

    PubMed

    Holmstrand, Henry; Mandalakis, Manolis; Zencak, Zdenek; Andersson, Per; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2007-11-01

    Compound-specific chlorine-isotope analysis (CSIA-Cl) of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethene (p,p'-DDE) in blubber from Baltic Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) was performed in order to investigate if a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) could be observed concomitant to environmental degradation of DDT. The delta(37)Cl of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE were -0.69 +/- 0.21 per thousand and -2.98 +/- 0.57 per thousand (1s igma, n = 3), respectively. Both samples were enriched relative to the hypothesized initial isotope composition (-4.34 per thousand), thus indicating a composite KIE associated with the degradation mechanisms pertaining to DDT. An isotope fractionation factor for degradation of dichloromethane, from the literature, was adapted and modified for use in the calculation of DDT degradation. A subsequent simplified Rayleigh distillation model of the DDT chlorine-isotope composition yielded an estimated fraction (f) of 7 +/- 2% of released DDT presently remaining as undegraded compound in the environment. The consistency between the result of the Rayleigh model (f approximately 7%) and the use of the DDT/(DDT + DDE) ratio as a measure of DDT degradation ( approximately 10% undegraded DDT) suggests that the KIE of DDT degradation may be significant, and that the novel approach of CSIA-Cl may be a valuable tool for degradation/persistence studies of lipophilic organochlorines in the environment.

  15. Two-Pronged Approach to Overcome Spectroscopically Interfering Organic Compounds with Isotopic Water Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Nabil; Hsiao, Gregor; Chapellet-Volpini, London; Vu, Danthu

    2013-04-01

    The ability to measure the stable isotopes of hydrogen (dD) and oxygen (d18O) has become much more accessible with the advent of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) laser optical devices. These small and inexpensive analyzers have led to a significant increase in the acquisition of data from a variety of studies in the fields of groundwater, watershed, and other water source applications. However for some samples, such as those linked to fracking, mining, and other activities where higher than normal concentrations of organic materials are to be found, optical spectroscopy may require an adaptation from current methodologies in order to ensure data confidence. That is because CRDS is able to measure all the components within a spectral region - which will include the spectral characteristics of the isotopologues of water as well as the available features from interfering organic molecules. Although, at the first level, the information from the organic material provides spectral overlaps that can perturb the isotopic ratios, a more thorough review shows that these features are a source of information that will be inherently useful. This presentation will examine the approaches developed within the past year to allow for more accurate analyses of such samples by optical methods. The first approach uses an advanced spectroscopic model to flag the presence of organic material in the sample. Signals from known interfering compounds (i.e., alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, short-chain hydrocarbons, etc.) are incorporated into the overall fit of the measured spectra used to calculate the concentration of the individual isotopes. The second approach uses physical treatment of the sample to break down the organic molecules into non-interfering species. The vaporized liquid or solid sample travels through a cartridge packed with an oxidation catalyst. The interfering organic molecules will undergo high temperature oxidation using O2 present in the air carrier gas stream prior

  16. Compound-Specific Stable Isotope Analysis: Implications in Hexachlorocyclohexane in-vitro and Field Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Puneet; Richnow, Hans H; Lal, Rup

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of biotic and abiotic degradation reactions by studying the variation in stable isotopic compositions of organic contaminants in contaminated soil and aquifers is being increasingly considered during the last two decades with development of Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) technique. CSIA has been recognized as a potential tool for evaluating both qualitative and quantitative degradation with measurement of shifts in isotope ratios of contaminants and their degradation products as its basis. Amongst a wide variety of environmental pollutants including monoaromatics, chlorinated ethenes and benzenes etc., it is only recently that its efficacy is being tested for assessing biodegradation of a noxious pollutant namely hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), by pure microbial cultures as well as directly at the field site. Anticipating the increase in demand of this technique for monitoring the microbial degradation along with natural attenuation, this review highlights the basic problems associated with HCH contamination emphasizing the applicability of emerging CSIA technique to absolve the major bottlenecks in assessment of HCH. To this end, the review also provides a brief overview of this technique with summarizing the recent revelations put forward by both in vitro and in situ studies by CSIA in monitoring HCH biodegradation.

  17. Identifying source correlation parameters for hydrocarbon wastes using compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Hough, Rupert L; Whittaker, Martin; Fallick, Anthony E; Preston, Tom; Farmer, John G; Pollard, Simon J T

    2006-10-01

    A preliminary evaluation of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) as a novel, alternative method for identifying source correlation compounds in soils contaminated with residual heavy or weathered petroleum wastes is presented. Oil-contaminated soil microcosms were established using soil (sandy-loam, non-carbonaceous cley) amended with ballast-, crude- or No.6 fuel oil. Microcosms were periodically sampled over 256 days and delta(13)C values (which express the ratio of (13)C to (12)C) determined at each time point for five n-alkanes and the isoprenoid norpristane using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). Although some temporal variation was observed, no significant temporal shifts in the delta(13)C values for the five n-alkanes were measured in all three oils. Isoprenoid isotope ratios (delta(13)C) appeared to be least affected by biotransformation, especially in the No.6 fuel oil. The research suggests that the delta(13)C of isoprenoids such as norpristane, may be of use as source correlation parameters.

  18. Stable isotope analysis of 1987-1991 zooplankton samples and bowhead whale tissues. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    Stable isotope analyses of bowhead whale tissue samples and bowhead whale prey organisms collected over the years 1987 to 1991 were used to provide detail on the isotope ratio gradients evident in the arctic Alaskan zooplankton and to verify previous findings regarding the growth rates and age determination techniques developed for bowhead whales. Zooplankton of the Bering and Chukchi seas are enriched in (13)C relative to the eastern Beaufort Sea. The analysis of baleen from bowhead whales taken between 1987 to 1990 indicate that the whales are slow-growing and the young animals between year one and about six to seven years of age, undergo a period of little or no linear growth. The authors estimate that bowheads require 16-18 years to reach the length of sexual maturity, i.e., 13-14 m. From baleen Delta(13C) cycles, a 20 year record of the isotope ratios in the phytoplankton of the northern Bering and Chukchi seas was constructed. The long-term record has been compared with the temperature anomalies in surface waters of the Bering Sea. The Delta(13C) of the zooplankton is inversely correlated with temperature and refutes current models attempting to relate ocean temperature, and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels with the Delta(13C) of ocean sediment organic matter.

  19. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Aaron B; Goldman, Kenneth J; Litvin, Steven Y; Madigan, Daniel J; Bigman, Jennifer S; Swithenbank, Alan M; Kline, Thomas C; Block, Barbara A

    2015-01-22

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny.

  20. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Aaron B.; Goldman, Kenneth J.; Litvin, Steven Y.; Madigan, Daniel J.; Bigman, Jennifer S.; Swithenbank, Alan M.; Kline, Thomas C.; Block, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny. PMID:25621332

  1. Quantitative approaches to the analysis of stable isotope food web data.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stephanie N; Olden, Julian D; Solomon, Christopher T; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2007-11-01

    Ecologists use stable isotopes (delta13C, delta15N) to better understand food webs and explore trophic interactions in ecosystems. Traditionally, delta13C vs. delta15N bi-plots have been used to describe food web structure for a single time period or ecosystem. Comparisons of food webs across time and space are increasing, but development of statistical approaches for testing hypotheses regarding food web change has lagged behind. Here we present statistical methodologies for quantitatively comparing stable isotope food web data. We demonstrate the utility of circular statistics and hypothesis tests for quantifying directional food web differences using two case studies: an arthropod salt marsh community across a habitat gradient and a freshwater fish community from Lake Tahoe, USA, over a 120-year time period. We calculated magnitude and mean angle of change (theta) for each species in food web space using mean delta13C and delta15N of each species as the x, y coordinates. In the coastal salt marsh, arthropod consumers exhibited a significant shift toward dependence on Spartina, progressing from a habitat invaded by Phragmites to a restored Spartina habitat. In Lake Tahoe, we found that all species from the freshwater fish community shifted in the same direction in food web space toward more pelagic-based production with the introduction of nonnative Mysis relicta and onset of cultural eutrophication. Using circular statistics to quantitatively analyze stable isotope food web data, we were able to gain significant insight into patterns and changes in food web structure that were not evident from qualitative comparisons. As more ecologists incorporate a food web perspective into ecosystem analysis, these statistical tools can provide a basis for quantifying directional food web differences from standard isotope data.

  2. Stable hydrogen isotopic analysis of nanomolar molecular hydrogen by automatic multi-step gas chromatographic separation.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Daisuke D; Tsunogai, Urumu; Kamimura, Kanae; Konno, Uta; Ishimura, Toyoho; Nakagawa, Fumiko

    2011-11-15

    We have developed a new automated analytical system that employs a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer to determine the stable hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of nanomolar quantities of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) in an air sample. This method improves previous methods to attain simpler and lower-cost analyses, especially by avoiding the use of expensive or special devices, such as a Toepler pump, a cryogenic refrigerator, and a special evacuation system to keep the temperature of a coolant under reduced pressure. Instead, the system allows H(2) purification from the air matrix via automatic multi-step gas chromatographic separation using the coolants of both liquid nitrogen (77 K) and liquid nitrogen + ethanol (158 K) under 1 atm pressure. The analytical precision of the δD determination using the developed method was better than 4‰ for >5 nmol injections (250 mL STP for 500 ppbv air sample) and better than 15‰ for 1 nmol injections, regardless of the δD value, within 1 h for one sample analysis. Using the developed system, the δD values of H(2) can be quantified for atmospheric samples as well as samples of representative sources and sinks including those containing small quantities of H(2) , such as H(2) in soil pores or aqueous environments, for which there is currently little δD data available. As an example of such trace H(2) analyses, we report here the isotope fractionations during H(2) uptake by soils in a static chamber. The δD values of H(2) in these H(2)-depleted environments can be useful in constraining the budgets of atmospheric H(2) by applying an isotope mass balance model.

  3. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities. Annual Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, Steven R.; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2011-08-24

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner.

  4. Spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of a hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in north-central Washington. High rates of evapotranspiration coupled with its location in an endorrheic basin contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate; hypolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M magnesium sulfate concentrations. In addition to extreme salinity, horizons within the lake seasonally exceed 50 °C, in part due to the enhanced light absorption by magnesium sulfate-saturated water. Despite extreme and highly variable seasonal conditions (salinity, temperature, photon flux), dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and bacterial heterotroph populations develop annually at the lake. These mats may exceed 5 mm in thickness and display stratification observable by eye associated with dominant bacterial phototrophic pigments. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer followed by green and purple layers at increasing depth into the mat. Carbonates including aragonite and magnesite are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial activities. While not exclusively limited to the green stratum in the mat, maximum carbonate content is within this layer. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling within the system. Namely, we seek to understand the rates of carbon accumulation in the mat and associated sediments and the various forms this carbon takes (organic or inorganic species). We are assessing mat development, community composition, and carbon accumulation in pre-cleaned devices installed at the lake as they are colonized by native mat. We are using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) to provide spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of mat cross-sections. Currently, this technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within the thickness of each major layer of the mat. We

  5. Quantitative Metabolome Analysis Based on Chromatographic Peak Reconstruction in Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Li, Liang

    2015-07-21

    Generating precise and accurate quantitative information on metabolomic changes in comparative samples is important for metabolomics research where technical variations in the metabolomic data should be minimized in order to reveal biological changes. We report a method and software program, IsoMS-Quant, for extracting quantitative information from a metabolomic data set generated by chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Unlike previous work of relying on mass spectral peak ratio of the highest intensity peak pair to measure relative quantity difference of a differentially labeled metabolite, this new program reconstructs the chromatographic peaks of the light- and heavy-labeled metabolite pair and then calculates the ratio of their peak areas to represent the relative concentration difference in two comparative samples. Using chromatographic peaks to perform relative quantification is shown to be more precise and accurate. IsoMS-Quant is integrated with IsoMS for picking peak pairs and Zero-fill for retrieving missing peak pairs in the initial peak pairs table generated by IsoMS to form a complete tool for processing CIL LC-MS data. This program can be freely downloaded from the www.MyCompoundID.org web site for noncommercial use.

  6. Job/task analysis for I C (Instrumentation and Controls) instrument technicians at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, L.L.

    1989-09-01

    To comply with Department of Energy Order 5480.XX (Draft), a job/task analysis was initiated by the Maintenance Management Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The analysis was applicable to instrument technicians working at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This document presents the procedures and results of that analysis. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Coenzyme F430, quantification and isotope analysis from the Eel River Basin California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, L. R.; Fulton, J. M.; Dawson, K.; Orphan, V. J.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    Large amounts of methane are oxidized by communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, preventing this greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere (Orphan et al., 2001; Scheller et al., 2010). Methyl-coenzyme M reductase, an enzyme traditionally associated with methanogenesis, has recently been linked to the anaerobic oxidation of methane suggesting methane oxidation follows a pathway similar to reverse methanogenesis. Coenzyme F430, a tetrapyrrole-nickel complex within the active site of methyl-coenzyme M, is used in methanogenesis and is hypothesized to play a key role in archaeal methanotrophy (Scheller et al., 2010). We recently developed a method to extract and isolate F430 from natural sediments so it can be purified for carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis. Sediments are extracted using an ultrasonic homogenizer, first in water (pH 7), then twice in dilute formic acid (pH 3). The combined extract is neutralized and the F430-containing fraction is isolated using Sephadex and Amberlite column chromatography. Further purification is performed using two dimensional high performance liquid chromatography, first with a reverse phase C-18 column followed by separation on a ThermoFisher Hypercarb column. F430 is then quantified using photo diode array detection with fractions collected for isotope analysis using a nano-scale elemental analyzer isotope ratio mass spectrometer (nano-EA-IRMS; Polissar et al., 2009). Compound identity and purity are confirmed using molar C:N ratios, UV absorbance and MSn detection of the parent ion (m/z 905). Here, we report F430 concentrations and isotopic data determined from active seep sediment cores from the Eel River Basin (California), a site where the anoxic oxidation of methane occurs. A spike in the concentration of F430 is observed at the 3-6 cm depth horizon corresponding with peak abundance in ANME-2/Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus aggregate counts. Carbon isotope values of F430 are significantly

  8. Radioimmunoassay and liquid-chromatographic analysis for free cortisol in urine compared with isotope dilution-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lantto, O.

    1982-05-01

    Three different routine methods for analysis for urinary cortisol with those by a highly specific reference method based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (I) were compared. A ''high-performance'' liquid-chromatographic method (II) gave the most comparable results (regression coefficient 0.86, intercept 9 nmol/L). For some urines much lower values were obtained by I than by II. Two radioimmunoassay (III) methods, one involving direct assay and one involving extraction, gave less-accurate results (regression coefficients of 1.87 and 1.52 and intercepts of 86 and 12 nmol/L, respectively), although values obtained by III and by I correlated well (r = 0.95-0.99), indicating a relation between the free cortisol and the compounds interfering in III. The apparent accuracy for the extraction method was improved by using as calibration standards urine samples previously assayed by I (regression coefficient 0.90, intercept 6 nmol/L). All four methods investigated showed a statistically significant sex-related difference in 24-h urinary cortisol excretion; evidently such a finding should be a prerequisite in any such method proposed for routine use.

  9. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of heteroatom-bearing compounds via gas chromatography-chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC)-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Kümmel, Steffen; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Gehre, Matthias

    2015-09-15

    The traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) approach toward compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of hydrogen for heteroatom-bearing (i.e., N, Cl, S) compounds has been afflicted by fractionation bias due to formation of byproducts HCN, HCl, and H2S. This study presents a chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC) approach for organic compounds containing nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur. Following peak separation along a gas chromatographic (GC) column, the use of thermally stable ceramic Cr/HTC reactors at 1100-1500 °C and chemical sequestration of N, Cl, and S by chromium result in quantitative conversion of compound-specific organic hydrogen to H2 analyte gas. The overall hydrogen isotope analysis via GC-Cr/HTC-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) achieved a precision of better than ± 5 mUr along the VSMOW-SLAP scale. The accuracy of GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS was validated with organic reference materials (RM) in comparison with online EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS and offline dual-inlet IRMS. The utility and reliability of the GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS system were documented during the routine measurement of more than 500 heteroatom-bearing organic samples spanning a δ(2)H range of -181 mUr to 629 mUr.

  10. Accurate Analysis of the Change in Volume, Location, and Shape of Metastatic Cervical Lymph Nodes During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Seishin; Tadano, Shigeru; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Koichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikawa, Masayori; Bengua, Gerard; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a method for the accurate acquisition and analysis of the variations in tumor volume, location, and three-dimensional (3D) shape of tumors during radiotherapy in the era of image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Finite element models of lymph nodes were developed based on computed tomography (CT) images taken before the start of treatment and every week during the treatment period. A surface geometry map with a volumetric scale was adopted and used for the analysis. Six metastatic cervical lymph nodes, 3.5 to 55.1 cm{sup 3} before treatment, in 6 patients with head and neck carcinomas were analyzed in this study. Three fiducial markers implanted in mouthpieces were used for the fusion of CT images. Changes in the location of the lymph nodes were measured on the basis of these fiducial markers. Results: The surface geometry maps showed convex regions in red and concave regions in blue to ensure that the characteristics of the 3D tumor geometries are simply understood visually. After the irradiation of 66 to 70 Gy in 2 Gy daily doses, the patterns of the colors had not changed significantly, and the maps before and during treatment were strongly correlated (average correlation coefficient was 0.808), suggesting that the tumors shrank uniformly, maintaining the original characteristics of the shapes in all 6 patients. The movement of the gravitational center of the lymph nodes during the treatment period was everywhere less than {+-}5 mm except in 1 patient, in whom the change reached nearly 10 mm. Conclusions: The surface geometry map was useful for an accurate evaluation of the changes in volume and 3D shapes of metastatic lymph nodes. The fusion of the initial and follow-up CT images based on fiducial markers enabled an analysis of changes in the location of the targets. Metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients were suggested to decrease in size without significant changes in the 3D shape during radiotherapy. The movements of the

  11. Biodilution of heavy metals in a stream macroinvertebrate food web: evidence from stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kozo; Monaghan, Michael T; Takemon, Yasuhiro; Omura, Tatsuo

    2008-05-01

    Analysis of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N) stable isotopes provides an increasingly important means of understanding the complex trophic structure of macroinvertebrate communities in streams. We coupled a stable isotope approach with a contaminant analysis of six metals (Pb, Ag, Zn, Hg, Cu, As) to trace the accumulation and dilution of metals from an abandoned mine across trophic levels of the benthic community in Ginzan Creek, Japan. The delta15N signature increased with trophic level, with mean increases of 4.70 per thousand from producers to primary consumers and 3.06 per thousand from primary to secondary consumers. Tissue Pb and Ag concentrations were negatively correlated with delta15N, indicating biodilution of both metals through the food web. Although macroinvertebrate taxon body mass was negatively correlated with tissue metal concentration at several sites, it did not increase with trophic level (as delta15N) in any of the sites, suggesting that changes in body mass were not the cause of biodilution. Our findings suggest invertebrates at higher trophic levels may exhibit increasingly efficient excretion of metals. Autotrophic epilithon (mean delta13C= -21.3 per thousand) had a much higher concentration of mined metals than did riparian vegetation (mean delta13C= -29.3 per thousand); nonetheless, a carbon-mixing model indicated that taxa feeding on autochthonous carbon sources did not accumulate more metal than allochthonous feeders. It is likely that the notably high metal concentration of allochthonous FPOM plays an important role in the trophic transfer of metals. Our data suggest the strong potential for stable isotope analysis to enhance our understanding of metal transfer through stream macroinvertebrate food webs.

  12. Could organic phosphorus compounds contaminate the analysis of phosphate oxygen isotopes in freshwater matrices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ceri; Surridge, Ben; Gooddy, Daren

    2014-05-01

    Variation in the stable isotope composition of oxygen within dissolved phosphate (δ18Op) represents a novel and potentially powerful environmental tracer, providing insights into the sources of phosphorus and the extent to which phosphorus from different sources is metabolised. The analysis of δ18Opwithin freshwater matrices requires isolation of the phosphate ion from possible sources of contaminant oxygen within the bulk matrix, prior to pyrolysis (usually of a silver phosphate precipitate) and analysis of the oxygen isotope composition. The majority of published research uses co-precipitation of phosphate with brucite (Mg(OH)2) as an initial step in the isolation of the phosphate ion. However, freshwater matrices also contain a wide range of organic phosphorus compounds, including adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and phosphonates such as 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid. In this paper, we initially examine the potential for co-precipitation of organic phosphorus compounds with brucite. Our data indicate that ATP, sodium pyrophosphate and inositol hexakisphosphate are almost entirely removed from solution through co-precipitation with brucite, whilst glucose-6-phosphate and 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid are less readily co-precipitated. Subsequently, we assessed the potential for acid-hydrolysis of organic phosphorus compounds during re-dissolution of the brucite precipitate, using a range of acid systems. Our data indicate that up to 17% of ATP and up to 5% of sodium pyrophosphate can be hydrolysed by concentrated acetic acid, yielding fresh phosphate ions in solution. Our findings have potentially significant implications for analysis of δ18Opbecause the fresh phosphate ions produced following acid hydrolysis will be subjected to inheritance and kinetic isotope fractionations, likely altering the bulk δ18Op within a freshwater sample.

  13. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-02

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  14. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  15. In situ carbon isotope analysis of Archean organic matter with SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Ushikubo, T.; Lepot, K.; Hallmann, C.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to μm). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of the analyte and associated minerals prior to isotopic analysis, and (3) reveals patterns of variability homogenized by bulk techniques. Here we present new methods for in situ organic carbon isotope analysis with sub-permil precision and spatial resolution to 1 μm using SIMS, as well as new data acquired from a suite of Archean rocks. Three analytical protocols were developed for the CAMECA ims1280 at WiscSIMS to analyze domains of varying size and carbon concentration. Average reproducibility (at 2SD) using a 6 μm spot size with two Faraday cup detectors was 0.4%, and 0.8% for analyses using 1 μm and 3 μm spot sizes with a Faraday cup (for 12C) and an electron multiplier (for 13C). Eight coals, two ambers, a shungite, and a graphite were evaluated for μm-scale isotopic heterogeneity, and LCNN anthracite (δ13C = -23.56 ± 0.1%, 2SD) was chosen as the working standard. Correlation between instrumental bias and H/C was observed and calibrated for each analytical session using organic materials with H/C between 0.1 and 1.5 (atomic), allowing a correction based upon a 13CH/13C measurement included in every analysis and a 12CH measurement made immediately after every analysis. The total range of the H/C effect observed for the Archean samples analyzed was < 3%. Analyses of Archean OM domains for which 12C count rate varies with the proportions of organic carbon, carbonate carbon, and quartz suggest that instrumental bias is consistent for 12C count

  16. 2H Stable Isotope Analysis of Tooth Enamel: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holobinko, Anastasia; Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Prowse, Tracy; Ford, Susan

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope analysis of biogenic tissues such as tooth enamel and bone mineral has become a well recognized and increasingly important method for determining provenance of human remains, and has been used successfully in bioarchaeological studies as well as forensic investigations (Lee-Thorp, 2008; Meier-Augenstein and Fraser, 2008). Particularly, 18O and 2H stable isotopes are well established proxies as environmental indicators of climate (temperature) and source water and are therefore considered as indicators of geographic life trajectories of animals and humans (Hobson et al., 2004; Schwarcz and Walker, 2006). While methodology for 2H analysis of human hair, fingernails, and bone collagen is currently used to determine geographic origin and identify possible migration patterns, studies involving the analysis of 2H in tooth enamel appear to be nonexistent in the scientific literature. The apparent lack of research in this area is believed to have two main reasons. (1) Compared to the mineral calcium hydroxylapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, in tooth enamel forming bio-apatite carbonate ions replace some of the hydroxyl ions at a rate of one CO32 replacing two OH, yet published figures for the degree of substitution vary (Wopenka and Pasteris, 2005). (2) Most probably due to the aforementioned no published protocols exist for sample preparation and analytical method to obtain δ2H-values from the hydroxyl fraction of tooth enamel. This dilemma has been addressed through a pilot study to establish feasibility of 2H stable isotope analysis of ground tooth enamel by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) coupled on-line to a high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer (TC/EA). An array of archaeological and modern teeth has been analyzed under different experimental conditions, and results from this pilot study are being presented. References: Lee-Thorp, J.A. (2008) Archaeometry, 50, 925-950 Meier-Augenstein, W. and Fraser, I. (2008) Science & Justice

  17. Evolution of the Cerenkov x total-energy telescope for isotopic analysis of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Simpson, G. A.; Lezniak, J. A.; Kish, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the Cerenkov x total energy technique for isotopic analysis of cosmic rays as developed by the University of New Hampshire. This technique is generally restricted to particles with Z greater than 6, and the best mass resolution is achieved over a relatively narrow energy range just above the Cerenkov threshold. State-of-the-art mass resolution is now 0.3-0.4 AMU throughout the charge range z = 8-28 and over an energy range varying from about 40 MeV/n at lower Z to about 200 MeV/n for Fe.

  18. [Applications of stable isotope analysis in the trophic ecology studies of cephalopods].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Kai; Gong, Yi; Chen, Xin-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Cephalopods play an important role in marine food webs, however, knowledge about their complex life history, especially their feeding ecology, remains limited. With the rapidly increasing use of stable isotope analysis (SIA) in ecology, it becomes a powerful tool and complement of traditional methods for investigating the trophic ecology and migration patterns of invertebrates. Here, after summarizing the current methods for trophic ecology investigation of cephalopods, applications of SIA in studying the trophic ecology of cephalopods were reviewed, including the key issues such as standardization of available tissues for SIA analyzing, diet shift and migration patterns of cephalopods, with the aim of advancing its application in the biology of cephalopods in the future.

  19. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  20. Field applicability of Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) for characterization and quantification of in situ contaminant degradation in aquifers.

    PubMed

    Braeckevelt, M; Fischer, A; Kästner, M

    2012-06-01

    Microbial processes govern the fate of organic contaminants in aquifers to a major extent. Therefore, the evaluation of in situ biodegradation is essential for the implementation of Natural Attenuation (NA) concepts in groundwater management. Laboratory degradation experiments and biogeochemical approaches are often biased and provide only indirect evidence of in situ degradation potential. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) is at present among the most promising tools for assessment of the in situ contaminant degradation within aquifers. One- and two-dimensional (2D) CSIA provides qualitative and quantitative information on in situ contaminant transformation; it is applicable for proving in situ degradation and characterizing degradation conditions and reaction mechanisms. However, field application of CSIA is challenging due to a number of influencing factors, namely those affecting the observed isotope fractionation during biodegradation (e.g., non-isotope-fractionating rate-limiting steps, limited bioavailability), potential isotope effects caused by processes other than biodegradation (e.g., sorption, volatilization, diffusion), as well as non-isotope-fractionating physical processes such as dispersion and dilution. This mini-review aims at guiding practical users towards the sound interpretation of CSIA field data for the characterization of in situ contaminant degradation. It focuses on the relevance of various constraints and influencing factors in CSIA field applications and provides advice on when and how to account for these constraints. We first evaluate factors that can influence isotope fractionation during biodegradation, as well as potential isotope-fractionating and non-isotope-fractionating physical processes governing observed isotope fractionation in the field. Finally, the potentials of the CSIA approach for site characterization and the proper ways to account for various constraints are illustrated by means of a comprehensive CSIA field

  1. In-situ Strontium Isotopes Analysis on Single Conodont Apatite by LA-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Zhang, L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Ma, D.; Qiu, H.; Lv, Z.; Hu, Z.; Wang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Strontium isotope played an important role in stratigraphic chronology and sedimentary geochemistry research (McArthur et al., 2001). Conodonts is a kind of extinct species of marine animals and widely distributed in marine sediments all over the world. Rich in radiogenic Sr contents and difficulty to be affected during diagenesis alteration makes conodonts a good choice in seawater Sr isotope composition studies (John et al., 2008). Conodont samples were collected from 24th to 39th layer across Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan D section (GSSP), Zhejiang Province, South China (Yin et al., 2001). Conodonts was originated from fresh limestone and only conodont elements with CAI<2 were chosen for in-situ strontium isotope analysis using laser-ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). Conodont samples are from totally 25 layers in seven conodont zones making it possible for a high resolution 87Sr/ 86Sr curve reconstruction during the Permian-Triassic transition. 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio kept a relatively high value (0.70752) in the middle part of the Clarkina yini zone and a lower value (0.70634) in the upperpart of Clarkina taylorae zone. Of which, 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio emerged a rapid decrease within the Clarkina taylorae zone. After a subsequent increase, 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio dropped to 0.70777 in the Isarcicella staeschei zone. These results helps providing reference data for the biological mass extinction events during the Permian-Triassic transition. Our study also makes is possible for high resolution 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio testing on the single conodont apatite and riched the in-situ studies on the conodont apatite, which of great significance for the future conodont Sr isotope research (Zhao et al., 2009; Zhao et al., 2013). Keywords: Conodonts, Strontium isotope, LA-MC-ICP-MS, Permian-Triassic transition, Meishan D section [1] John et al., 2008 3P[2] McArthur et al., 2001 J. of Geology [3] Yin et al., 2001 Episodes [4] Zhao et al

  2. Fingerprinting TCE in a bedrock aquifer using compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Lojkasek-Lima, Paulo; Aravena, Ramon; Parker, Beth L; Cherry, John A

    2012-01-01

    A dual isotope approach based on compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) was used to identify sources of persistent trichloroethylene (TCE) that caused the shut-down in 1994 of a municipal well in an extensive fractured dolostone aquifer beneath Guelph, Ontario. Several nearby industrial properties have known subsurface TCE contamination; however, only one has created a comprehensive monitoring network in the bedrock. The impacted municipal well and many monitoring wells were sampled for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic parameters, and CSIA. A wide range in isotope values was observed at the study site. The TCE varies between -35.6‰ and -21.8‰ and from 1.6‰ to 3.2‰ for δ(13) C and δ(37) Cl, respectively. In case of cis-1,2-dichloroethene, the isotope values range between -36.3‰ and -18.9‰ and from 2.4‰ to 4.7‰ for δ(13) C and δ(37) Cl, respectively. The dual isotope approach represented by a plot of δ(13) C vs. δ(37) Cl shows the municipal well samples grouped in a domain clearly separate from all other samples from the property with the comprehensive well network. The CSIA results collected under non-pumping and short-term pumping conditions thus indicate that this particular property, which has been studied intensively for several years, is not a substantial contributor of the TCE presently in the municipal well under non-pumping conditions. This case study demonstrates that CSIA signatures would have been useful much earlier in the quest to examine sources of the TCE in the municipal well if bedrock monitoring wells had been located at several depths beneath each of the potential TCE-contributing properties. Moreover, the CSIA results show that microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE occurs in some parts of the bedrock aquifer. At this site, the use of CSIA for C and Cl in combination with analyses of VOC and redox parameters proved to be important due to the complexity introduced by

  3. Stable isotope analysis of energy dynamics in aquatic ecosystems suggests trophic shifts following severe wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, A. M.; Silins, U.; Bladon, K. D.; Williams, C.; Wagner, M. J.; Luchkow, E.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfire alters landscapes and can have significant impacts on stream ecosystems. The 2003 Lost Creek wildfire was one of the most severe on Alberta's eastern rocky mountain slopes, resulting in elevated sediment production and nutrient (phosphorus, nitrogen, and carbon) export in impacted streams. These resulted in increased algal productivity and macroinvertebrate abundance and diversity, and as a result, fish in watersheds draining wildfire affected catchments were larger than those in the same age class from reference (unburned) watersheds. In the present investigation, stable isotope analysis of C and N was utilized to evaluate ecosystem energy dynamics and describe trophic relationships in those watersheds. Aquatic invertebrates from burned catchments showed enrichment in δ13C and δ15N relative to algae suggesting a reliance on algae (autochthony) as a primary source of energy. Invertebrates from unburned systems were depleted in δ13C relative to algae indicating reliance on allochthonous or terrestrial primary energy sources. Preliminary analysis of δ15N in macroinvertebrates showed slight enrichment in burned catchments suggesting a trophic shift. More comprehensive macroinvertebrate sampling and identification has been conducted; isotopic analysis will provide greater resolution of how specific families within feeding guilds have been affected by wildfire. This will provide more robust insights into how wildfires may impact stream ecology in mountain environments.

  4. Spatially Resolved, In Situ Carbon Isotope Analysis of Archean Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williford, Kenneth H.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Lepot, Kevin; Hallmann, Christian; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Summons, Roger E.; Valley, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Spatiotemporal variability in the carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) preserves information about the evolution of the biosphere and of the exogenic carbon cycle as a whole. Primary compositions, and imprints of the post-depositional processes that obscure them, exist at the scale of individual sedimentary grains (mm to micron). Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) (1) enables analysis at these scales and in petrographic context, (2) permits morphological and compositional characterization of