Science.gov

Sample records for accurate laboratory diagnosis

  1. Laboratory diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the first major goals of the microbiology laboratory is to isolate or detect clinically significant microorganisms from an affected site and, if more than one type of microorganism is present, to isolate them in approximately the same ratio as occurs in vivo. Whether an isolate is “clinically...

  2. Laboratory Diagnosis of Pertussis.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Anneke; Schellekens, Joop F P; Mooi, Frits R

    2015-10-01

    The introduction of vaccination in the 1950s significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of pertussis. However, since the 1990s, a resurgence of pertussis has been observed in vaccinated populations, and a number of causes have been proposed for this phenomenon, including improved diagnostics, increased awareness, waning immunity, and pathogen adaptation. The resurgence of pertussis highlights the importance of standardized, sensitive, and specific laboratory diagnoses, the lack of which is responsible for the large differences in pertussis notifications between countries. Accurate laboratory diagnosis is also important for distinguishing between the several etiologic agents of pertussis-like diseases, which involve both viruses and bacteria. If pertussis is diagnosed in a timely manner, antibiotic treatment of the patient can mitigate the symptoms and prevent transmission. During an outbreak, timely diagnosis of pertussis allows prophylactic treatment of infants too young to be (fully) vaccinated, for whom pertussis is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Finally, reliable diagnosis of pertussis is required to reveal trends in the (age-specific) disease incidence, which may point to changes in vaccine efficacy, waning immunity, and the emergence of vaccine-adapted strains. Here we review current approaches to the diagnosis of pertussis and discuss their limitations and strengths. In particular, we emphasize that the optimal diagnostic procedure depends on the stage of the disease, the age of the patient, and the vaccination status of the patient.

  3. Laboratory Diagnosis of Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Joop F. P.; Mooi, Frits R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The introduction of vaccination in the 1950s significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of pertussis. However, since the 1990s, a resurgence of pertussis has been observed in vaccinated populations, and a number of causes have been proposed for this phenomenon, including improved diagnostics, increased awareness, waning immunity, and pathogen adaptation. The resurgence of pertussis highlights the importance of standardized, sensitive, and specific laboratory diagnoses, the lack of which is responsible for the large differences in pertussis notifications between countries. Accurate laboratory diagnosis is also important for distinguishing between the several etiologic agents of pertussis-like diseases, which involve both viruses and bacteria. If pertussis is diagnosed in a timely manner, antibiotic treatment of the patient can mitigate the symptoms and prevent transmission. During an outbreak, timely diagnosis of pertussis allows prophylactic treatment of infants too young to be (fully) vaccinated, for whom pertussis is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Finally, reliable diagnosis of pertussis is required to reveal trends in the (age-specific) disease incidence, which may point to changes in vaccine efficacy, waning immunity, and the emergence of vaccine-adapted strains. Here we review current approaches to the diagnosis of pertussis and discuss their limitations and strengths. In particular, we emphasize that the optimal diagnostic procedure depends on the stage of the disease, the age of the patient, and the vaccination status of the patient. PMID:26354823

  4. Laboratory diagnosis of SARS.

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, A; Heinen, P; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Gray, J; Appleton, H; Zambon, M C

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of new viral infections of man requires the development of robust diagnostic tests that can be applied in the differential diagnosis of acute illness, or to determine past exposure, so as to establish the true burden of disease. Since the recognition in April 2003 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), enormous efforts have been applied to develop molecular and serological tests for SARS which can assist rapid detection of cases, accurate diagnosis of illness and the application of control measures. International progress in the laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection during acute illness has led to internationally agreed World Health Organization criteria for the confirmation of SARS. Developments in the dissection of the human immune response to SARS indicate that serological tests on convalescent sera are essential to confirm SARS infection, given the sub-optimal predictive value of molecular detection tests performed during acute SARS illness. PMID:15306394

  5. Laboratory diagnosis of thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Brancaleoni, V; Di Pierro, E; Motta, I; Cappellini, M D

    2016-05-01

    The thalassemias can be defined as α- or β-thalassemias depending on the defective globin chain and on the underlying molecular defects. The recognition of carriers is possible by hematological tests. Both α- and β-thalassemia carriers (heterozygotes) present with microcytic hypochromic parameters with or without mild anemia. Red cell indices and morphology followed by separation and measurement of Hb fractions are the basis for identification of carriers. In addition, iron status should be ascertained by ferritin or zinc protoporphyrin measurements and the iron/total iron-binding capacity/saturation index. Mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin are markedly reduced (mean corpuscular volume: 60-70 fl; MCH: 19-23 pg) in β-thalassemia carriers, whereas a slight to relevant reduction is usually observed in α-carriers. HbA2 determination is the most decisive test for β-carrier detection although it can be disturbed by the presence of δ-thalassemia defects. In α-thalassemia, HbA2 can be lower than normal and it assumes significant value when iron deficiency is excluded. Several algorithms have been introduced to discriminate from thalassemia carriers and subjects with iron-deficient anemia; because the only discriminating parameter is the red cell counts, these formulas must be used consciously. Molecular analysis is not required to confirm the diagnosis of β-carrier, but it is necessary to confirm the α-thalassemia carrier status. The molecular diagnosis is essential to predict severe transfusion-dependent and intermediate-to-mild non-transfusion-dependent cases. DNA analysis on chorionic villi is the approach for prenatal diagnosis and the methods are the same used for mutations detection, according to the laboratory facilities and expertise.

  6. Laboratory Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that screening and treatment for toxoplasmosis during gestation result in a decrease of vertical transmission and clinical sequelae. Early treatment was associated with improved outcomes. Thus, laboratory methods should aim for early identification of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). Diagnostic approaches should include, at least, detection of Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA and a comprehensive review of maternal history, including the gestational age at which the mother was infected and treatment. Here, we review laboratory methods for the diagnosis of CT, with emphasis on serological tools. A diagnostic algorithm that takes into account maternal history is presented. PMID:27147724

  7. Laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Webster, H L

    1983-01-01

    The demonstration of abnormally high concentrations of electrolytes in eccrine sweat is still the only practical laboratory procedure available for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. Properly performed, the sweat test is very reliable, but there are many published reports that all of the methods in current use frequently generate incorrect diagnoses. Analysis of potential for error in sweat test methods shows that of the three essential phases involved, stimulation, collection, and analysis, the major cause of intrinsic inaccuracy occurs in the collection process. In this case the problem is due to condensate formation, which leads to the subsequent analysis of nonrepresentative sweat. Human error is also an important cause of false results and is a direct function of the number of critical manual operations involved in the technic. This review provides a critical examination of sweat test methods, identifying problem areas and suggesting ways to improve procedures in the interests of clinically reliable laboratory data in support of diagnosis.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L D; Fedorko, D P

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is relatively common, can progress rapidly, and can result in death or permanent debilitation. This infection justifiably elicits strong emotional reactions and, hopefully, immediate medical intervention. This review is a brief presentation of the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis and a review of current knowledge, literature, and recommendations on the subject of laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those who work in clinical microbiology laboratories should be familiar with the tests used in detecting bacteria and bacterial antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and should always have the utmost appreciation for the fact that results of such tests must always be reported immediately. Academic and practical aspects of the laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis presented in this review include the following: anatomy of the meninges; pathogenesis; changes in the composition of CSF; etiological agents; processing CSF; microscopic examination of CSF; culturing CSF; methods of detecting bacterial antigens and bacterial components in CSF (counter-immunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, latex agglutination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and gas-liquid chromatography); use of the polymerase chain reaction; and practical considerations for testing CSF for bacterial antigens. PMID:1576585

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of invasive mycoses.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Elizabeth M; Shea, Yvonne M; Witebsky, Frank G

    2003-03-01

    Rising numbers of immunocompromised patients have led to an ever-increasing population at risk of invasive fungal disease. Much has been achieved in the laboratory diagnosis of these infections, such as advances in blood culture systems, and the development of new biochemical, antigen detection assays, and molecular methodologies. More standardized susceptibility testing guidelines provide for better therapeutic interventions. In an era of economic cutbacks in health care, future challenges include the development of cost-effective and technically simplified systems, which provide early detection and identification of common and emerging fungal pathogens. It will, however, take some time to establish the clinical relevance of these new methodologies in different patient populations.

  10. Diagnostic limitations to accurate diagnosis of cholera.

    PubMed

    Alam, Munirul; Hasan, Nur A; Sultana, Marzia; Nair, G Balakrish; Sadique, A; Faruque, A S G; Endtz, Hubert P; Sack, R B; Huq, A; Colwell, R R; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Morita, Masatomo; Watanabe, Haruo; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2010-11-01

    The treatment regimen for diarrhea depends greatly on correct diagnosis of its etiology. Recent diarrhea outbreaks in Bangladesh showed Vibrio cholerae to be the predominant cause, although more than 40% of the suspected cases failed to show cholera etiology by conventional culture methods (CMs). In the present study, suspected cholera stools collected from every 50th patient during an acute diarrheal outbreak were analyzed extensively using different microbiological and molecular tools to determine their etiology. Of 135 stools tested, 86 (64%) produced V. cholerae O1 by CMs, while 119 (88%) tested positive for V. cholerae O1 by rapid cholera dipstick (DS) assay; all but three samples positive for V. cholerae O1 by CMs were also positive for V. cholerae O1 by DS assay. Of 49 stools that lacked CM-based cholera etiology despite most being positive for V. cholerae O1 by DS assay, 25 (51%) had coccoid V. cholerae O1 cells as confirmed by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) assay, 36 (73%) amplified primers for the genes wbe O1 and ctxA by multiplex-PCR (M-PCR), and 31 (63%) showed El Tor-specific lytic phage on plaque assay (PA). Each of these methods allowed the cholera etiology to be confirmed for 97% of the stool samples. The results suggest that suspected cholera stools that fail to show etiology by CMs during acute diarrhea outbreaks may be due to the inactivation of V. cholerae by in vivo vibriolytic action of the phage and/or nonculturability induced as a host response.

  11. Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial gastroenteritis is a disease that is pervasive in both the developing and developed worlds. While for the most part bacterial gastroenteritis is self-limiting, identification of an etiological agent by bacterial stool culture is required for the management of patients with severe or prolonged diarrhea, symptoms consistent with invasive disease, or a history that may predict a complicated course of disease. Importantly, characterization of bacterial enteropathogens from stool cultures in clinical laboratories is one of the primary means by which public health officials identify and track outbreaks of bacterial gastroenteritis. This article provides guidance for clinical microbiology laboratories that perform stool cultures. The general characteristics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of key bacterial enteropathogens are summarized. Information regarding optimal specimen collection, transport, and processing and current diagnostic tests and testing algorithms is provided. This article is an update of Cumitech 12A (P. H. Gilligan, J. M. Janda, M. A. Karmali, and J. M. Miller, Cumitech 12A, Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial diarrhea, 1992). PMID:25567220

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Fillaux, J; Magnaval, J-F

    2013-04-15

    Toxocariasis is a helminth zoonosis caused by infection with the larvae of Toxocara spp. ascarid worms. Only two species, Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, are recognised as causative agents of human disease. The best choice for serodiagnosis of the generalised forms of toxocariasis, visceral larva migrans (VLM) or covert toxocariasis, relies upon the initial use of TES-ELISA, after which any positive result should subsequently be tested by Western blotting (WB). Covert toxocariasis is mostly a benign infection, so a large majority of infected subjects are asymptomatic or have very few symptoms and therefore go undiagnosed. In this form, this helminthosis is often self-limiting, leaving residual specific antibodies. A positive serodiagnosis caused by residual antibodies that do not have any diagnostic significance can be associated with any infectious or non-infectious disease. If separated from the ongoing clinical and laboratory context, such a positive result has no diagnostic value and should be only taken into account after the possible etiologies of any observed syndromes have been ruled out. Unlike the methods used for the immunodiagnosis of bacterial, viral or protozoal (toxoplasmosis) infections, it is not possible with toxocariasis to assess the age of the presence of specific IgG using the levels of specific IgM because IgM antibodies can be found throughout the course of helminthiasis. The detection of other classes of immunoglobulins, namely IgE and IgA, the subclasses, namely IgG4 or circulating Ag was proven to be unable to discriminate between active and self-cured generalised toxocaral infections. Currently, the diagnosis of an active covert toxocariasis relies upon indirect arguments, e.g., the presence of otherwise unexplained symptoms along with blood eosinophilia and/or elevated levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). This situation is far from ideal and more research should be carried out to solve this difficult problem.

  13. Histoplasmosis and skin lesions in HIV: a safe and accurate diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Coutiño, Gabriela; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Montiel-Robles, Melisa; Sánchez-Pérez, Fiama Selene; Xicohtencatl-Cortés, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Human histoplasmosis is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. This infection can run asymptomatic or be life-threatening, depending fundamentally on the host's immune status. Immunocompromised patients can present disseminated disease to the skin, making the biopsy an accessible approach. The current diagnosis gold standard is fungal culture which takes several days or weeks to grow and must be handled in a biosafe laboratory which is avoided if we use the technique here described. We propose the use of molecular biology for diagnosis confirmation, considering it can shorten diagnosis lapse, has good specificity and sensitivity and reduces the risk of infection for the medical and laboratory personnel. Seven paraffin-embedded skin biopsy samples were included from patients with confirmed HIV and histoplasmosis diagnosis. Total DNA was isolated and molecular typing of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum. All samples were positive. This is a safe and accurate method for skin histoplasmosis diagnosis.

  14. Laboratory diagnosis of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J C; Flood, V H

    2015-05-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is considered the most common inherited bleeding disorder and may also be the most difficult to diagnose. Clinical symptoms of VWD include predominantly mild mucosal bleeding; surgical bleeding may occur with specific challenges and joint bleeding can occur in the most severe forms. A family history either of diagnosed VWD or of bleeding symptoms is typically present. Laboratory diagnosis requires a series of assays of von Willebrand factor (VWF) quantity and function, and factor VIII activity, with no single straightforward diagnostic test available to either confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Newer assays of VWF function are becoming more available and useful in determining the laboratory diagnosis of VWD.

  15. [Laboratory diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Marí, José María Navarro; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Anza, Diego Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytic meningitis, mainly those with an acute and benign course, are caused by viruses. In our area, the most commonly involved agents are enteroviruses, herpes simplex, varicella zoster and Toscana viruses. Nucleic acids amplification techniques (NAAT) are the methods of choice to diagnose viral meningitis from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. They are more rapid and sensitive, and indeed, they are not influenced by the viability of the virus in the clinical specimen as traditional methods are. The development of commercial equipments, the degree of automation, and the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems are the most important premises to choose the molecular method in each laboratory. Recently, commercial kits of real-time PCR are available for the detection of enteroviruses and herpesviruses, which are the most frequently viruses involved in meningitis. Although NAAT from the clinical sample have replaced cell culture for diagnostic purposes, the combination of both methods remain useful. When the detection of the causal agent from the CSF sample is not possible, other specimens (pharyngeal exudates, stools) or serological methods can be used. Serology is the reference method for meningitis caused by West Nile virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which are less frequently detected in our area.

  16. Imaging tests for accurate diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Şurlin, Valeriu; Săftoiu, Adrian; Dumitrescu, Daniela

    2014-11-28

    Gallstones represent the most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis in many statistics all over the world, estimated between 40%-60%. Accurate diagnosis of acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) is of outmost importance because clearance of lithiasis [gallbladder and common bile duct (CBD)] rules out recurrences. Confirmation of biliary lithiasis is done by imaging. The sensitivity of the ultrasonography (US) in the detection of gallstones is over 95% in uncomplicated cases, but in ABP, sensitivity for gallstone detection is lower, being less than 80% due to the ileus and bowel distension. Sensitivity of transabdominal ultrasonography (TUS) for choledocolithiasis varies between 50%-80%, but the specificity is high, reaching 95%. Diameter of the bile duct may be orientative for diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) seems to be a more effective tool to diagnose ABP rather than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), which should be performed only for therapeutic purposes. As the sensitivity and specificity of computerized tomography are lower as compared to state-of-the-art magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) or EUS, especially for small stones and small diameter of CBD, the later techniques are nowadays preferred for the evaluation of ABP patients. ERCP has the highest accuracy for the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis and is used as a reference standard in many studies, especially after sphincterotomy and balloon extraction of CBD stones. Laparoscopic ultrasonography is a useful tool for the intraoperative diagnosis of choledocholithiasis. Routine exploration of the CBD in cases of patients scheduled for cholecystectomy after an attack of ABP was not proven useful. A significant rate of the so-called idiopathic pancreatitis is actually caused by microlithiasis and/or biliary sludge. In conclusion, the general algorithm for CBD stone detection starts with anamnesis, serum biochemistry and then TUS, followed by EUS or MRCP. In the end

  17. Implications of laboratory diagnosis on brucellosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Nöckler, Karsten

    2011-07-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis with a huge economic impact on animal husbandry and public health. The diagnosis of human brucellosis can be protracted because the disease primarily presents as fever of unknown origin with unspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The isolation rate of the fastidious etiologic agent from blood cultures is low, and therefore laboratory diagnosis is mainly based on serologic and molecular testing. However, seronegative brucellosis patients have been described, and antibody titers of diagnostic significance are difficult to define. Whether the molecular detection of Brucella DNA in clinical samples should be followed by long-term antibiotic treatment or not is also a matter of debate. The aim of this article is to review and discuss the implications of laboratory test results in the diagnosis of human brucellosis on disease therapy.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Scabini, Roberta; Campo, Ilaria; Ottaviani, Stefania; Zorzetto, Michele; Gorrini, Marina; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2007-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has evolved over the last 40 years since the first cases of the disorder were reported. It is currently performed in specialized centers, and it requires a combination of different biochemical methods: nephelometric AAT concentration, isoelectric focusing, genotyping, and sequencing. The availability of matrices such as the dried blood spot have facilitated the implementation of laboratory analyses for AATD, but they have also challenged laboratories to develop more reliable and reproducible techniques starting from dried blood. In this article, we describe the protocols we have optimized for AATD diagnosis from dried blood spot, in an attempt to hopefully provide useful information for physicians and scientists involved in this diagnostic line. We also describe the diagnostic flowchart for AATD detection that we have developed accordingly.

  19. Accurate stone analysis: the impact on disease diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Neil S; Mandel, Ian C; Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M

    2017-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the requirements for acceptable compositional analysis of kidney stones using various biophysical methods. High-resolution X-ray powder diffraction crystallography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are the only acceptable methods in our labs for kidney stone analysis. The use of well-constructed spectral reference libraries is the basis for accurate and complete stone analysis. The literature included in this manuscript identify errors in most commercial laboratories and in some academic centers. We provide personal comments on why such errors are occurring at such high rates, and although the work load is rather large, it is very worthwhile in providing accurate stone compositions. We also provide the results of our almost 90,000 stone analyses and a breakdown of the number of components we have observed in the various stones. We also offer advice on determining the method used by the various FTIR equipment manufacturers who also provide a stone analysis library so that the FTIR users can feel comfortable in the accuracy of their reported results. Such an analysis on the accuracy of the individual reference libraries could positively influence the reduction in their respective error rates.

  20. [Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Hernández, Luis; Mena-Ribas, Ana; Niubó-Bosh, Jordi; Marín-Arriaza, Mercedes

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in developed countries, and is one of the main aetiologic agents of community diarrhea. The eruption of the hypervirulent strain BI/NAP1/027 has given rise to an increase in the morbidity and mortality of C.difficile infection (CDI). This document aims to review the main clinical pictures of CDI and the laboratory diagnosis, including sampling, transport and storage of specimens, specimen processing, diagnostic procedures, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and molecular characterisation of the isolates. The main purpose of the article is to develop a practical document that provides answers to the main questions that arise in the laboratory diagnosis of CDI.

  1. [Part V. Laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jofré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martín V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-10-01

    In this fifth part of Guidelines for Chagas disease, diagnostic techniques for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans are reviewed, the interpretation of laboratory results and an algorithm for laboratory diagnosis in immunocompetent hosts are presented. Chagas disease may be diagnosed by three kinds of techniques: direct, which allow detect the presence of the parasite in different kind of samples; indirect, based on the search of immune specific response against T. cruzi antigens and molecular, which detect parasite genetic material. Direct techniques are utilized mainly in acute phase of disease, as the parasite is present in blood of infected host. These techniques do not require be confirmed by other methods. For chronic undetermined phase and for symptomatic phase it is recommended to use indirect techniques; generally, immunoassay techniques (ELISA) that detect IgG antibodies directed against T. cruzi antigens are performed. As false positive results are possible, a positive or undetermined result must be confirmed by at least another technique (indirect immunofluorescence or indirect hemmaglutination). In Chile, confirmation of infection is performed by the Instituto de Salud Pública National Reference Laboratory or at surrogate centers. Molecular methods may be used to make the diagnosis in acute or chronic phase of infection, with more accuracy in the acute phase, and it is mainly recommended to diagnose vertical transmission of T. cruzi as early diagnosis of congenital infection increases the possibility to cure the sibling and besides it is a good marker to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment.

  2. Medical microbiology: laboratory diagnosis of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Werno, Anja M; Murdoch, David R

    2008-03-15

    The laboratory diagnosis of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) continues to rely on culture-based methods that have been used for many decades. The most significant recent developments have occurred with antigen detection assays, whereas the role of nucleic acid amplification tests has yet to be fully clarified. Despite developments in laboratory diagnostics, a microbiological diagnosis is still not made in most cases of IPD, particularly for pneumococcal pneumonia. The limitations of existing diagnostic tests impact the ability to obtain accurate IPD burden data and to assess the effectiveness of control measures, such as vaccination, in addition to the ability to diagnose IPD in individual patients. There is an urgent need for improved diagnostic tests for pneumococcal disease--especially tests that are suitable for use in underresourced countries.

  3. Management of granulomatous amebic encephalitis: Laboratory diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Parija, Subhash Chandra; Dinoop, KP; Venugopal, Hrudya

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous amebic encephalitis is a life-threatening central nervous system (CNS) infection caused by the free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris and Sappinia pedata. The disease has a subacute to chronic onset affecting commonly the immunocompromised population with high mortality rate. The diagnosis of this disease entity requires high suspicion with appropriate sample collection and testing by the laboratory experts. Radiological investigations are nonspecific and commonly confused with CNS tuberculosis, neurocysticercosis, disseminated encephalomyelitis, viral encephalitis etc., delaying the accurate diagnosis of these cases. Early diagnosis plays a crucial role in the survival of these cases since appropriate management can be initiated. No single drug is effective; hence multiple antibiotics targeting various proteins or receptors are required for successful treatment. A combination of surgical and medical interventions involving multiple specialty experts is required to prevent death and morbidity in survivors. PMID:25709949

  4. Advances in laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Farias, Mariela Granero

    2016-11-12

    Among the red cell membrane disorders, hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common causes of inherited hemolytic anemia. HS results from the deficiency or dysfunction of red blood cell membrane proteins, such as α spectrin, β spectrin, ankyrin, anion channel protein (Band-3 protein), protein 4.1 and protein 4.2. Conventionally, HS diagnosis is established through a series of tests, which include spherocytes identification in peripheral smear, reticulocyte count, osmotic fragility, etc. Currently, different hematological analyzers provide erythrocyte indicators that estimate the presence of spherocytes and correlate that with HS, which can be useful for disease screening. The most traditional method is the osmotic fragility (OF) test, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming to perform and presents low sensitivity and specificity values. Thus, new methods have been developed for HS diagnosis, such as flow cytometry. Current guidelines recommend the use of flow cytometry as a screening test for HS diagnosis using the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test. Thus, HS diagnosis is the result of a collaboration between clinicians and laboratories, who should take into account the family history and the exclusion of other causes of secondary spherocytosis.

  5. Expert recommendations for the laboratory diagnosis of MPS VI.

    PubMed

    Wood, T; Bodamer, O A; Burin, M G; D'Almeida, V; Fietz, M; Giugliani, R; Hawley, S M; Hendriksz, C J; Hwu, W L; Ketteridge, D; Lukacs, Z; Mendelsohn, N J; Miller, N; Pasquali, M; Schenone, A; Schoonderwoerd, K; Winchester, B; Harmatz, P

    2012-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (arylsulfatase B, ASB). This enzyme is required for the degradation of dermatan sulfate. In its absence, dermatan sulfate accumulates in cells and is excreted in large quantities in urine. Specific therapeutic intervention is available; however, accurate and timely diagnosis is crucial for maximal benefit. To better understand the current practices for diagnosis and to establish diagnostic guidelines, an international MPS VI laboratory diagnostics scientific summit was held in February of 2011 in Miami, Florida. The various steps in the diagnosis of MPS VI were discussed including urinary glycosaminoglycan (uGAG) analysis, enzyme activity analysis, and molecular analysis. The following conclusions were reached. Dilute urine samples pose a significant problem for uGAG analysis and MPS VI patients can be missed by quantitative uGAG testing alone as dermatan sulfate may not always be excreted in large quantities. Enzyme activity analysis is universally acknowledged as a key component of diagnosis; however, several caveats must be considered and the appropriate use of reference enzymes is essential. Molecular analysis supports enzyme activity test results and is essential for carrier testing, subsequent genetic counseling, and prenatal testing. Overall the expert panel recommends caution in the use of uGAG screening alone to rule out or confirm the diagnosis of MPS VI and acknowledges enzyme activity analysis as a critical component of diagnosis. Measurement of another sulfatase enzyme to exclude multiple sulfatase deficiency was recommended prior to the initiation of therapy. When feasible, the use of molecular testing as part of the diagnosis is encouraged. A diagnostic algorithm for MPS VI is provided.

  6. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Delmée, M

    2001-08-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is based on culture and toxin detection in fecal specimens. Culture is performed on a commercially available selective media. C. difficile colony morphology is typical when viewed under a dissecting microscope. Definitive identification is best obtained by gas liquid chromatography. Culture is very sensitive but, when used alone without toxin testing, it leads to low specificity and misdiagnosis of CDAD when high rates of asymptomatic carriage exist. Toxin detection by a tissue culture cytotoxin assay followed by neutralisation with specific antiserum is often considered the standard. However, this approach lacks sensitivity and has not detected up to 30% of patients with confirmed CDAD. Multiple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been introduced by various manufacturers for the detection of toxin A alone or for both toxins A and B. Some of these are designed to give results in less than 1 h. Comparative studies of EIA kits reported that the sensitivity and specificity are slightly lower than cytotoxin assays. Toxigenic culture tests C. difficile isolates for toxin production: colonies isolated on selective media are tested for in-vitro toxin production either by a cytotoxicity assay or by direct EIA. It has higher sensitivity than the cytotoxicity assay and equivalent specificity. In the routine laboratory, culture and toxin detection should be performed on every specimen and, in culture-positive and fecal toxin-negative cases, toxigenic cultures should be performed on isolated colonies.

  7. Development and Validation of a Highly Accurate Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William L.; Chadwick, Sean G.; Toner, Geoffrey; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E.; Aguin, Tina J.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common gynecological infection in the United States. Diagnosis based on Amsel's criteria can be challenging and can be aided by laboratory-based testing. A standard method for diagnosis in research studies is enumeration of bacterial morphotypes of a Gram-stained vaginal smear (i.e., Nugent scoring). However, this technique is subjective, requires specialized training, and is not widely available. Therefore, a highly accurate molecular assay for the diagnosis of BV would be of great utility. We analyzed 385 vaginal specimens collected prospectively from subjects who were evaluated for BV by clinical signs and Nugent scoring. We analyzed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays on DNA extracted from these specimens to quantify nine organisms associated with vaginal health or disease: Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, BV-associated bacteria 2 (BVAB2, an uncultured member of the order Clostridiales), Megasphaera phylotype 1 or 2, Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Lactobacillus jensenii. We generated a logistic regression model that identified G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, and Megasphaera phylotypes 1 and 2 as the organisms for which quantification provided the most accurate diagnosis of symptomatic BV, as defined by Amsel's criteria and Nugent scoring, with 92% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 94% negative predictive value. The inclusion of Lactobacillus spp. did not contribute sufficiently to the quantitative model for symptomatic BV detection. This molecular assay is a highly accurate laboratory tool to assist in the diagnosis of symptomatic BV. PMID:26818677

  8. Accurate diagnosis of Giardia spp and proper fecal examination procedures.

    PubMed

    Dryden, M W; Payne, P A; Smith, V

    2006-01-01

    A series of investigations evaluated the ability of different testing methods - a swing-head centrifugation technique using two flotation solutions (1.18-specific gravity zinc sulfate and 1.27-specific gravity Sheather's sugar solution), a passive commercial flotation technique, and the SNAP Giardia Test Kit from IDEXX Laboratories - to identify Giardia-positive dogs and recover the eggs of other intestinal parasites. It was determined that the SNAP Giardia test can improve a practice's ability to identify Giardia-infected dogs. Because of its higher specific gravity, the sugar solution was better for recovering heavy parasite eggs, such as Taenia spp, and thus is the flotation solution of choice when conducting routine centrifugation fecal examinations.

  9. Accurate telemonitoring of Parkinson's disease diagnosis using robust inference system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Indrajit; Sairam, N

    2013-05-01

    This work presents more precise computational methods for improving the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease based on the detection of dysphonia. New methods are presented for enhanced evaluation and recognize Parkinson's disease affected patients at early stage. Analysis is performed with significant level of error tolerance rate and established our results with corrected T-test. Here new ensembles and other machine learning methods consisting of multinomial logistic regression classifier with Haar wavelets transformation as projection filter that outperform logistic regression is used. Finally a novel and reliable inference system is presented for early recognition of people affected by this disease and presents a new measure of the severity of the disease. Feature selection method is based on Support Vector Machines and ranker search method. Performance analysis of each model is compared to the existing methods and examines the main advancements and concludes with propitious results. Reliable methods are proposed for treating Parkinson's disease that includes sparse multinomial logistic regression, Bayesian network, Support Vector Machines, Artificial Neural Networks, Boosting methods and their ensembles. The study aim at improving the quality of Parkinson's disease treatment by tracking them and reinforce the viability of cost effective, regular and precise telemonitoring application.

  10. [A mobile express laboratory for the diagnosis of venereal diseases].

    PubMed

    Khangel'dov, A E; Shukurov, S A; Ergashev, D S; Khangel'dov, E L

    1990-01-01

    An original design of a laboratory disposed in a motor vehicle is described. The laboratory is equipped with everything necessary for a purposeful screening of large numbers of people and is thus contributing to sexually transmitted diseases control. The advantages of this laboratory are mobility and rapid diagnosis.

  11. [Laboratory diagnosis of pertussis. Role of serology].

    PubMed

    Sanz Moreno, Juan Carlos; De Ory Manchón, Fernando; González Alonso, Julia; de La Torre, José Luis; Salmerón, Francisco; Limia, Aurora; Tello, Odorina; Pachón, Isabel; Amela, Carmen; Vázquez, Julio; de Ory, Fernando; Sanz, Juan Carlos

    2002-05-01

    Culture is the reference method for the diagnosis of infection by Bordetella pertussis. Nevertheless, delayed sample collection and previous antibiotic treatment can limit culture sensitivity. In principle, direct immunofluorescence provides immediate diagnosis. It is, however, a subjective procedure that shows low sensitivity and specificity. PCR techniques increase culture sensitivity while maintaining high specificity, but their performance decreases along the evolution of the disease. Serologic methods are the main alternative for cases in which diagnosis is delayed. Current recommendations center on ELISA techniques that include purified antigens, such as filamentous hemaglutinin, and particularly, pertussis toxin. Traditionally, serological diagnosis requires confirmation by demonstrated seroconversion, but now the possibility of diagnosis based on titration of a single serum sample is being evaluated.

  12. Development and Validation of a Highly Accurate Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, David W; Smith, William L; Chadwick, Sean G; Toner, Geoffrey; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E; Aguin, Tina J; Sobel, Jack D; Gygax, Scott E

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common gynecological infection in the United States. Diagnosis based on Amsel's criteria can be challenging and can be aided by laboratory-based testing. A standard method for diagnosis in research studies is enumeration of bacterial morphotypes of a Gram-stained vaginal smear (i.e., Nugent scoring). However, this technique is subjective, requires specialized training, and is not widely available. Therefore, a highly accurate molecular assay for the diagnosis of BV would be of great utility. We analyzed 385 vaginal specimens collected prospectively from subjects who were evaluated for BV by clinical signs and Nugent scoring. We analyzed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays on DNA extracted from these specimens to quantify nine organisms associated with vaginal health or disease:Gardnerella vaginalis,Atopobium vaginae, BV-associated bacteria 2 (BVAB2, an uncultured member of the orderClostridiales),Megasphaeraphylotype 1 or 2,Lactobacillus iners,Lactobacillus crispatus,Lactobacillus gasseri, andLactobacillus jensenii We generated a logistic regression model that identifiedG. vaginalis,A. vaginae, andMegasphaeraphylotypes 1 and 2 as the organisms for which quantification provided the most accurate diagnosis of symptomatic BV, as defined by Amsel's criteria and Nugent scoring, with 92% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 94% negative predictive value. The inclusion ofLactobacillusspp. did not contribute sufficiently to the quantitative model for symptomatic BV detection. This molecular assay is a highly accurate laboratory tool to assist in the diagnosis of symptomatic BV.

  13. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a group of encephalitis syndromes that cause altered mentality, memory decline, or seizures in association with the presence of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) autoantibodies (auto-Abs). An early diagnosis enables early treatments. The detection of auto-Abs is a confirmatory diagnosis. Tissue-based assay, cell-based immunoassay, and immunoblotting are used to detect various autoantibodies. The CSF test for the presence of antibodies is important because it is more sensitive and reflects disease activity in many autoimmune encephalitis, although antibody tests can be negative even in the presence of autoimmune encephalitis. EEG is often abnormal, but nonspecific. A unilateral or bilateral medial temporal T2 high signal is a common finding in MRI. Fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is sometimes useful for diagnosis in patients with normal MRI. PMID:28101474

  14. Laboratory diagnosis of human chlamydial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, R C

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a human pathogen that causes ocular disease (trachoma and inclusion conjunctivitis), genital disease (cervicitis, urethritis, salpingitis, and lymphogranuloma venereum), and respiratory disease (infant pneumonitis). Respiratory chlamydioses also occur with infection by avian strains of C. psittaci or infection by the newly described TWAR agent. Diagnosis of most acute C. trachomatis infections relies on detection of the infecting agent by cell culture, fluorescent antibody, immunoassay, cytopathologic, or nucleic acid hybridization methods. Individual non-culture tests for C. trachomatis are less sensitive and specific than the best chlamydial cell culture system but offer the advantages of reduced technology and simple transport of clinical specimens. Currently available nonculture tests for C. trachomatis perform adequately as screening tests in populations in which the prevalence of infection is greater than 10%. A negative culture or nonculture test for C. trachomatis does not, however, exclude infection. The predictive value of a positive nonculture test may be unsatisfactory when populations of low infection prevalence are tested. Tests that detect antibody responses to chlamydial infection have limited utility in diagnosis of acute chlamydial infection because of the high prevalence of persistent antibody in healthy adults and the cross-reactivity due to infection by the highly prevalent C. trachomatis and TWAR agents. Assays for changes in antibody titer to the chlamydial genus antigen are used for the diagnosis of respiratory chlamydioses. A single serum sample that is negative for chlamydial antibody excludes the diagnosis of lymphogranuloma venereum. PMID:2650858

  15. Bacteriophage: laboratorial diagnosis and phage therapy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joas L. Da; Hirata, Rosario D.C.; Hirata, Mario H.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been researched as a new alternative to antibiotics. These viruses inject their genetic material into bacteria and use their host machinery to multiply themselves. The research of bacteriophages in Brazil will certainly provide low-cost treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria, new microbiological diagnosis and advantages for the Brazilian food industry. PMID:24031398

  16. Laboratory diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Erika; Farkas, Ágnes; Kucsera, István

    2016-09-01

    Acanthamoeba species are free-living amebae that can be found in almost every range of environments. Within this genus, numerous species are recognized as human pathogens, potentially causing Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). AK is a corneal disease that is predominantly associated with contact lens use, the epidemiology of which is related to the specific genotype of Acanthamoeba. This study reports seven (7/16; 43.75%) positive cases. Detection of Acanthamoeba in corneal scrapings is based on cultivation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with the molecular taxonomic identification method. By PCR, seven samples were positive; cultivation was successful for five samples, probably because of the low quantity of samples. Genotype identification was carried out with a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR assay based on sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene, and sensitivity and specificity were evaluated in comparison with traditional parasitological techniques. All seven detected Acanthamoeba strains belonged to the T4 genotype, the main AK-related genotype worldwide. These results confirmed the importance of a complete diagnostic protocol, including a PCR assay, for the clinical diagnosis of AK from human samples. Genotyping allowed the identification of all isolates in the T4 group, thus demonstrating the prevalence of this genotype in Hungary.

  17. Application of PCR-based methods for diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Jaco J

    2014-12-01

    For many years PCR- and other DNA-based methods of pathogen detection have been available in most clinical microbiology laboratories; however, until recently these tools were not routinely exploited for the diagnosis of parasitic infections. Laboratories were initially reluctant to implement PCR as incorporation of such assays within the algorithm of tools available for the most accurate diagnosis of a large variety of parasites was unclear. With regard to diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections, the diversity of parasites that one can expect in most settings is far less than the parasitological textbooks would have you believe, hence developing a simplified diagnostic triage is feasible. Therefore the classical algorithm based on population, patient groups, use of immuno-suppressive drugs, travel history etc. is also applicable to decide when to perform and which additional techniques are to be used, if a multiplex PCR panel is used as a first-line screening diagnostic.

  18. Are clinical laboratories in California accurately reporting vancomycin-resistant enterococci?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J; Tenover, F C; Wong, J; Jarvis, W; Vugia, D J

    1997-10-01

    In order to determine whether hospital-based clinical laboratories conducting active surveillance for vancomycin-resistant enterococci in three San Francisco Bay area counties (San Francisco, Alameda, and Contra Costa counties) were accurately reporting vancomycin resistance, five vancomycin-resistant enterococcal strains and one vancomycin-susceptible beta-lactamase-producing enterococcus were sent to 31 of 32 (97%) laboratories conducting surveillance. Each strain was tested by the laboratory's routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing method. An Enterococcus faecium strain with high-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC, 512 microg/ml) was correctly reported as resistant by 100% of laboratories; an E. faecium strain with moderate-level resistance (MIC, 64 microg/ml) was correctly reported as resistant by 91% of laboratories; two Enterococcus faecalis strains with low-level resistance (MICs, 32 microg/ml) were correctly reported as resistant by 97 and 56% of laboratories, respectively. An Enterococcus gallinarum strain with intrinsic low-level resistance (MIC, 8 microg/ml) was correctly reported as intermediate by 50% of laboratories. A beta-lactamase-producing E. faecalis isolate was correctly identified as susceptible to vancomycin by 100% of laboratories and as resistant to penicillin and ampicillin by 68 and 44% of laboratories, respectively; all 23 (74%) laboratories that tested for beta-lactamase recognized that it was a beta-lactamase producer. This survey indicated that for clinically significant enterococcal isolates, laboratories in the San Francisco Bay area have problems in detecting low- to moderate-level but not high-level vancomycin resistance. Increasing accuracy of detection and prompt reporting of these isolates and investigation of cases are the next steps in the battle for control of the spread of vancomycin resistance.

  19. Odontoma-associated tooth impaction: accurate diagnosis with simple methods? Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Troeltzsch, Matthias; Liedtke, Jan; Troeltzsch, Volker; Frankenberger, Roland; Steiner, Timm; Troeltzsch, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Odontomas account for the largest fraction of odontogenic tumors and are frequent causes of tooth impaction. A case of a 13-year-old female patient with an odontoma-associated impaction of a mandibular molar is presented with a review of the literature. Preoperative planning involved simple and convenient methods such as clinical examination and panoramic radiography, which led to a diagnosis of complex odontoma and warranted surgical removal. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed histologically. Multidisciplinary consultation may enable the clinician to find the accurate diagnosis and appropriate therapy based on the clinical and radiographic appearance. Modern radiologic methods such as cone-beam computed tomography or computed tomography should be applied only for special cases, to decrease radiation.

  20. The Laboratorial Diagnosis of Dengue: Applications and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Nina Rocha; de Paula, Marília Barbosa; de Oliveira, Michelle Dias; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; De Paula, Sérgio Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of infection by the dengue virus relies, in most cases, on the clinical judgment of the patient, since only a few major centers have clinical laboratories that offer diagnostic tests to confirm the clinical impressions of an infection. At present, routine laboratory diagnosis is done by different kinds of testing. Among them are the methods of serological research, virus isolation, detection of viral antigens, and detection of viral genomes. The continued development of diagnostic tests, which are cheap, sensitive, specific, easy to perform, and capable of giving early diagnosis of the dengue virus infection is still a need. There are also other obstacles that are not specifically related to the technological development of diagnostic methods. For instance, infrastructure of the laboratories, the training of personnel, and the capacity of research of these laboratories are still limited in many parts of Brazil and the world, where dengue is endemic. Clinical laboratories, especially the ones that serve regions with a high incidence of dengue, should be aware of all the diagnostic methods available for routine these days, and choose the one that best suit their working conditions and populations served, in order to save lives. PMID:20300385

  1. Current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-03-07

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that is the principal etiologic agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Infection with C. difficile (CDI) is characterized by diarrhea in clinical syndromes that vary from self-limited to mild or severe. Since its initial recognition as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis, C. difficile has spread around the world. CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Due to extensive antibiotic usage, the number of CDIs has increased. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with the disease, mainly with regards to antibiotic management. The diagnosis of CDI is primarily based on the clinical signs and symptoms and is only confirmed by laboratory testing. Despite the high burden of CDI and the increasing interest in the disease, episodes of CDI are often misdiagnosed. The reasons for misdiagnosis are the lack of clinical suspicion or the use of inappropriate tests. The proper diagnosis of CDI reduces transmission, prevents inadequate or unnecessary treatments, and assures best antibiotic treatment. We review the options for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI within the settings of the most accepted guidelines for CDI diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of CDI.

  2. Current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Meléndez, Adrián; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a spore-forming, toxin-producing, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that is the principal etiologic agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Infection with C. difficile (CDI) is characterized by diarrhea in clinical syndromes that vary from self-limited to mild or severe. Since its initial recognition as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis, C. difficile has spread around the world. CDI is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among older adult hospitalized patients. Due to extensive antibiotic usage, the number of CDIs has increased. Diagnosis of CDI is often difficult and has a substantial impact on the management of patients with the disease, mainly with regards to antibiotic management. The diagnosis of CDI is primarily based on the clinical signs and symptoms and is only confirmed by laboratory testing. Despite the high burden of CDI and the increasing interest in the disease, episodes of CDI are often misdiagnosed. The reasons for misdiagnosis are the lack of clinical suspicion or the use of inappropriate tests. The proper diagnosis of CDI reduces transmission, prevents inadequate or unnecessary treatments, and assures best antibiotic treatment. We review the options for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI within the settings of the most accepted guidelines for CDI diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of CDI. PMID:28321156

  3. [New diagnosis tools for tuberculosis laboratory network in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Barrera, Lucía; Montoro, Ernesto

    2007-01-01

    Feasibility of rapid and sustainable diagnostic methods that provide useful and timely results to guide the clinical control of tuberculosis patients was analyzed. However, policies guiding the insertion of new diagnostics in the laboratory services that support the tuberculosis control are lacking in developing countries. The introduction of these methods in developing countries laboratories requires rational policies guiding the application of these technologies. In the last few years, some automated systems for culture and molecular testing in laboratory services for tuberculosis diagnosis, which offered accuracy and speed, have been reported. However, their implementation is restricted because of costly resources, logistics and infrastructure. Recently, various economically feasible tests have demonstrated to be applicable in poor-resource labs. The detection of adenosine desaminase (ADA) in pleural fluid is a valuable low-cost approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis. On the other hand, the microscopic detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using thin layer agar is a moderate cost alternative method. Drug susceptibility testing to antituberculous drugs can be expedited by the nitrate reduction assay in tuberculosis laboratories using routine procedures for tuberculosis diagnosis.

  4. Diagnostic yield of blood clot culture in the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever and human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mantur, Basappa G; Bidari, Laxman H; Akki, Aravind S; Mulimani, Mallanna S; Tikare, Nitin V

    2007-01-01

    Culture of blood is the most frequent, accurate means of diagnosing bacteremia in enteric fever and brucellosis. However, conventional blood culturing is slow in isolating bacteria causing these diseases. In this work, we evaluated the performance of blood clot culture and conventional whole blood cultures in the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever (253 cases) and human brucellosis (71cases). The blood clot culture was found to be much more sensitive for both Salmonella (more by 34.4%, P< 0.001) and Brucella (more by 22.6%, P<0.001) than whole blood culture. Bacterial growth was significantly faster in cultures of blood clot compared to whole blood (1.1 versus 2.6 days for Salmonella, 3.1 versus 8.2 days for Brucella melitensis, respectively). The rapid confirmation of the etiological agent would facilitate an early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, thereby reducing clinical morbidity especially in an endemic population. It is worthwile practicing blood clot culture for the accurate diagnosis of enteric fever and brucellosis in developing countries where diagnostic facilities by advanced technologies like automated culture systems and PCR are not available.

  5. Open lung biopsy: a safe, reliable and accurate method for diagnosis in diffuse lung disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, S S; Tsang, V; Goldstraw, P

    1992-01-01

    The ideal method for obtaining lung tissue for diagnosis should provide high diagnostic yield with low morbidity and mortality. We reviewed all 432 patients (mean age 55 years) who underwent an open lung biopsy at this hospital over a 10-year period. Twenty-four patients (5.5%) were immunocompromised. One hundred and twenty-five patients were on steroid therapy at the time of operation. Open lung biopsy provided a firm diagnosis in 410 cases overall (94.9%) and in 20 out of 24 patients in the immunocompromised group (83.3%). The commonest diagnosis was cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (173 patients). Twenty-two patients (5.1%) suffered complications following the procedure: wound infection 11 patients, pneumothorax 9 patients and haemothorax 1 patient. Thirteen patients (3.0%) died following open lung biopsy, but in only 1 patient was the death attributable to the procedure itself. We conclude that open lung biopsy is an accurate and safe method for establishing a diagnosis in diffuse lung disease with a high yield and minimal risk.

  6. MicroRNA-200 Family Profile: A Promising Ancillary Tool for Accurate Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Xie, Botao; Li, Hao; Shen, Jihong; Chen, Jianheng

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most threatening diseases in the world and great interests have been paid to discover accurate and noninvasive methods for cancer diagnosis. The value of microRNA-200 (miRNA-200, miR-200) family has been revealed in many studies. However, the results from various studies were inconsistent, and thus a meta-analysis was designed and performed to assess the overall value of miRNA200 in cancer diagnosis. Relevant studies were searched electronically from the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Keyword combined with "miR-200," "cancer," and "diagnosis" in any fields was used for searching relevant studies. Then, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), and partial AUC were calculated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity among individual studies was also explored by subgroup analyses. A total of 28 studies from 18 articles with an overall sample size of 3676 subjects (2097 patients and 1579 controls) were included in this meta-analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) are 0.709 (95% CI: 0.657-0.755) and 0.667 (95% CI: 0.617-0.713), respectively. Additionally, AUC and partial AUC for the pooled data is 0.735 and 0.627, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed that using miRNA-200 family for cancer diagnosis is more effective in white than in Asian ethnic groups. In addition, cancer diagnosis by miRNA using circulating specimen is more effective than that using noncirculating specimen. Finally, miRNA is more accurate in diagnosing endometrial cancer than other types of cancer, and some miRNA family members (miR-200b and miR-429) have superior diagnostic accuracy than other miR-200 family members. In conclusion, the profiling of miRNA-200 family is likely to be a valuable tool in cancer detection and diagnosis.

  7. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Clinical and laboratory criteria for its diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2015-07-07

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic progressive cholestatic granulomatous, and destructive inflammatory lesion of small intralobular and septal bile ducts, which is likely to be caused by an autoimmune mechanism with a the presence of serum antimitochondrial antibodies and a potential tendency to progress to cirrhosis. Despite the fact that the etiology of this disease has been unknown so far, there has been a considerable body of scientific evidence that can reveal the clinical and laboratory signs of PBC and the individual components of its pathogenesis and elaborate diagnostic criteria for the disease and its symptomatic therapy. Deficiencies in autoimmune tolerance are critical factors for the initiation and perpetuation of the disease. The purpose of this review is to summarize the data available in the literature and the author's findings on clinical and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of PBC. This review describes the major clinical manifestations of the disease and the mechanisms of its development. It presents the immunological, biochemical, and morphological signs of PBC and their significance for its diagnosis. A great deal of novel scientific evidence for the problem of PBC has been accumulated. However, the inadequate efficiency of therapy for the disease lends impetus to the quest for its etiological factors and to further investigations of its pathogenetic mechanisms and, on this basis, to searches for new methods for its early diagnosis.

  8. Detailed behavioral assessment promotes accurate diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Gilutz, Yael; Lazary, Avraham; Karpin, Hana; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; Misha, Tamar; Fortinsky, Hadassah; Sharon, Haggai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Assessing the awareness level in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) is made on the basis of exhibited behaviors. However, since motor signs of awareness (i.e., non-reflex motor responses) can be very subtle, differentiating the vegetative from minimally conscious states (which is in itself not clear-cut) is often challenging. Even the careful clinician relying on standardized scales may arrive at a wrong diagnosis. Aim: To report our experience in tackling this problem by using two in-house use assessment procedures developed at Reuth Rehabilitation Hospital, and demonstrate their clinical significance by reviewing two cases. Methods: (1) Reuth DOC Response Assessment (RDOC-RA) –administered in addition to the standardized tools, and emphasizes the importance of assessing a wide range of motor responses. In our experience, in some patients the only evidence for awareness may be a private specific movement that is not assessed by standard assessment tools. (2) Reuth DOC Periodic Intervention Model (RDOC-PIM) – current literature regarding assessment and diagnosis in DOC refers mostly to the acute phase of up to 1 year post injury. However, we have found major changes in responsiveness occurring 1 year or more post-injury in many patients. Therefore, we conduct periodic assessments at predetermined times points to ensure patients are not misdiagnosed or neurological changes overlooked. Results: In the first case the RDOC-RA promoted a more accurate diagnosis than that based on standardized scales alone. The second case shows how the RDOC-PIM allowed us to recognize late recovery and promoted reinstatement of treatment with good results. Conclusion: Adding a detailed periodic assessment of DOC patients to existing scales can yield critical information, promoting better diagnosis, treatment, and clinical outcomes. We discuss the implications of this observation for the future development and validation of assessment tools in DOC patients

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of mucormycosis: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Michaela; Caramalho, Rita; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections caused by members of the Mucorales order are rapidly progressing and fatal. The importance of mucormycosis has grown in recent years as the number of patients with predisposing factors has increased dramatically. Clinical symptoms are elusive and conventional techniques are often insensitive and unspecific; in particular, cultures are often negative even though direct microscopy is positive. For early diagnosis of the causative agent of disease and subsequently guiding therapy to improving patients' outcome, molecular assays are promising add-ons. This article provides an overview on current laboratory methods for diagnosing mucormycosis with a special focus on new molecular-based tools. We aim to highlight the pros and cons of various techniques at hand. Given the increase in number and the severity of these infections, molecular approaches for improved diagnosis are highly warranted.

  10. [Clinical laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis in patients with internal diseases].

    PubMed

    Siuch, N I; Riumin, D V; Lashenkova, N N

    2010-01-01

    Urogenital trichomoniasis is an infectious inflammatory disease of the urogenital system caused by protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis and characterized by rapid dissemination and development of complications. Because laboratory diagnosis by microscopic methods encounters difficulty, we undertook detection of T. vaginalis by microscopic study of native and stained (methylene blue, acridine orange, Gram, Romanovsky-Giemsa) uretheral scrapings. 69 patients having no clinical signs of the disease were examined after sexual contacts with women suffering infection of the urogenital tract. Staining with acridine orange and by Romanovsky-Giemsa method proved the most informative methods for diagnosis of torpid trichomoniasis (85.5 and 75.4% respectively). The study of native samples is of little informative value (5.8%). The data obtained were used to develop an algorithm of microscopic investigation for the examination of patients with urogenital acute, subacute or chronic trichomoniasis and carriers of T. vaginalis.

  11. Clinical symptoms and laboratory findings supporting early diagnosis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Pourhossein, Behzad; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2014-07-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic disease, which is usually transmitted to humans by tick bites or contact with blood or other infected tissues of livestock. Patients suffering from CCHF demonstrate an extensive spectrum of clinical symptoms. As it can take considerable time from suspecting the disease in hospital until reaching a definitive diagnosis in the laboratory, understanding the clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of CCHF patients is of paramount importance for clinicians. The data were collected from patients who were referred to the Laboratory of Arboviruses and Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers at the Pasteur institute of Iran with a primary diagnosis of CCHF between 1999 and 2012 and were assessed by molecular and serologic tests. Referred patients were divided into two groups: patients with a CCHF positive result and patients with a CCHF negative result. The laboratory and clinical findings of these two groups were then compared. Two-thousand five hundred thirty-six probable cases of CCHF were referred to the laboratory, of which 871 cases (34.3%) were confirmed to be CCHF. Contact with infected humans and animals increased the CCHF infection risk (P < 0.001). A tick bite was not a risk factor. Fever; bleeding, vomiting, leucopoenia, thrombocytopenia, and increases in alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels were also indicative of CCHF infection. Accurate and speedy diagnosis of CCHF and appropriate treatment play an important role in patient survival and the application of the findings of this study can prove helpful as a key for early diagnosis.

  12. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10(-3) for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10(-)2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL.

  13. Simple, rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia by loop mediated amplification technology

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Rigo, Francesca; Zanghì, Pamela; D'Agostini, Elena; Amicarelli, Giulia; Colotta, Francesco; Divona, Mariadomenica; Ciardi, Claudia; Coco, Francesco Lo; Minnucci, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) includes the cytogenetic demonstration of the t(15;17) translocation and/or the PML-RARA chimeric transcript by RQ-PCR or RT-PCR. This latter assays provide suitable results in 3-6 hours. We describe here two new, rapid and specific assays that detect PML-RARA transcripts, based on the RT-QLAMP (Reverse Transcription-Quenching Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification) technology in which RNA retrotranscription and cDNA amplification are carried out in a single tube with one enzyme at one temperature, in fluorescence and real time format. A single tube triplex assay detects bcr1 and bcr3 PML-RARA transcripts along with GUS housekeeping gene. A single tube duplex assay detects bcr2 and GUSB. In 73 APL cases, these assays detected in 16 minutes bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 transcripts. All 81 non-APL samples were negative by RT-QLAMP for chimeric transcripts whereas GUSB was detectable. In 11 APL patients in which RT-PCR yielded equivocal breakpoint type results, RT-QLAMP assays unequivocally and accurately defined the breakpoint type (as confirmed by sequencing). Furthermore, RT-QLAMP could amplify two bcr2 transcripts with particularly extended PML exon 6 deletions not amplified by RQ-PCR. RT-QLAMP reproducible sensitivity is 10−3 for bcr1 and bcr3 and 10−2 for bcr2 thus making this assay particularly attractive at diagnosis and leaving RQ-PCR for the molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease during the follow up. In conclusion, PML-RARA RT-QLAMP compared to RT-PCR or RQ-PCR is a valid improvement to perform rapid, simple and accurate molecular diagnosis of APL. PMID:25815362

  14. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the breast: does frozen section give an accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Mueller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Frede, Thomas; Daniaux, Martin; Ban, Michael; Taucher, Susanne; Schneitter, Alois; Zeimet, Alain G; Marth, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Reducing the period of uncertainty between the discovery of a breast tumor and histological diagnosis alleviates the psychological impact of breast cancer to an important degree. We aimed to verify whether histological results obtained with frozen sections of core needle biopsies (CNBs) offer an accurate and reliable tool for minimising this period. In 2619 cases we compared histological diagnosis on frozen sections with those on paraffin sections of CNB and finally with the results of open biopsies. Of the cases 49% were proved malignant and 51% benign. In 99.3% of the malignant lesions preceding CNB was correctly classified as B5 (n = 1185, 92.9%) or at least B4 (n = 82, 6.4%) in frozen and in paraffin sections. There were seven false-negative cases in frozen (false-negative rate = 0.5%) and five false-negative cases (false-negative rate = 0.4%) in paraffin sections of CNB. On frozen sections complete sensitivity was 99.5% and the positive predictive value of B5 was 99.9%. There was one false-positive case in frozen sections and one in paraffin sections. False-positive rate = 0.08%, negative predictive value for B2 = 99.4% for frozen and 99.6% for paraffin sections; full specificity was 85.9 for frozen and 85.8 for paraffin sections of CNBs. Immediate investigation of CNB in frozen sections is an accurate diagnostic method and an important step in reducing psychological strain on patients with breast tumors and may be offered by specialised Breast Assessment Units.

  15. Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis of Human Intestinal Spirochetosis by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedel, Dinah; Epple, Hans-Jörg; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Ignatius, Ralf; Wagner, Jutta; Hammer, Bettina; Petrich, Annett; Stein, Harald; Göbel, Ulf B.; Schneider, Thomas; Moter, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Human intestinal spirochetosis (HIS) is associated with overgrowth of the large intestine by spirochetes of the genus Brachyspira. The microbiological diagnosis of HIS is hampered by the fastidious nature and slow growth of Brachyspira spp. In clinical practice, HIS is diagnosed histopathologically, and a significant portion of cases may be missed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular method that allows the visualization and identification of single bacteria within tissue sections. In this study, we analyzed intestinal biopsy samples from five patients with possible HIS. All specimens yielded positive results by histopathological techniques. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were performed. Sequences of two isolates clustered in the group of Brachyspira aalborgi, whereas in three cases, the sequences were highly similar to that of Brachyspira pilosicoli. Three phylotypes showed mismatches at distinct nucleotide positions with Brachyspira sp. sequences published previously. In addition, culture for Brachyspira was successful in three cases. On the basis of these data, we designed and evaluated a Brachyspira genus-specific 16S rRNA-directed FISH probe that detects all of the Brachyspira spp. published to date. FISH of biopsy samples resulted in strong, unequivocal signals of brush-like formations at the crypt surfaces. This technique allowed simultaneous visualization of single spirochetes and their identification as Brachyspira spp. In conclusion, FISH provides a fast and accurate technique for the visualization and identification of intestinal spirochetes in tissue sections. It therefore represents a valuable tool for routine diagnosis of HIS. PMID:19279178

  16. Review: Laboratory diagnosis and surveillance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu-Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2015-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a representative human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy associated with central nervous system degeneration. Prions, the causative agents of CJD, are composed of misfolded prion proteins and are able to self-replicate. While CJD is a rare disease affecting only 1-1.5 people per million worldwide annually, it has attracted both scientific and public attention as a threatening disease since an epidemic of variant CJD (vCJD) cases appeared in the mid-1990s. Due to its unconventional transmission and invariable fatality, CJD poses a serious risk to public health. The hundreds of sporadic, genetic, and iatrogenic CJD cases as well as potential zoonotic transmission suggest that CJD is an ongoing concern for the field of medicine. Nevertheless, treatment aimed at clinical prevention and treatment that reverses the course of disease does not exist currently. Active surveillance and effective laboratory diagnosis of CJD are, therefore, critical. In this report, the surveillance systems and laboratory tests used currently to diagnose CJD in different countries are reviewed. The current efforts to improve surveillance and diagnosis for CJD using molecular and biochemical findings are also described.

  17. Current methods of laboratory diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    PubMed Central

    Black, C M

    1997-01-01

    Infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis are probably the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. Commonly unrecognized and often inadequately treated, chlamydial infections can ascend the reproductive tract and cause pelvic inflammatory disease, which often results in the devastating consequences of infertility, ectopic pregnancy, or chronic pelvic pain. C. trachomatis infections are also known to increase the risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The obligate intracellular life cycle of C. trachomatis has traditionally required laboratory diagnostic tests that are technically demanding, labor-intensive, expensive, and difficult to access. In spite of these historical challenges, however, laboratory diagnosis of C. trachomatis has been a rapidly advancing area in which there is presently a wide array of commercial diagnostic technologies, costs, manufacturers. This review describes and compares the diagnostic methods for C. trachomatis infection that are currently approved for use in the United States, including the newest DNA amplification technologies which are yet to be licensed for commercial use. Issues to consider in selecting a test for purposes of screening versus diagnosis based on prevalence, performance, legal, social, and cost issues are also discussed. PMID:8993862

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of melioidosis: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna KP; Sridhar, Siddharth; Ho, Chi-Chun; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging, potentially fatal disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, which requires prolonged antibiotic treatment to prevent disease relapse. However, difficulties in laboratory diagnosis of melioidosis may delay treatment and affect disease outcomes. Isolation of B. pseudomallei from clinical specimens has been improved with the use of selective media. However, even with positive cultures, identification of B. pseudomallei can be difficult in clinical microbiology laboratories, especially in non-endemic areas where clinical suspicion is low. Commercial identification systems may fail to distinguish between B. pseudomallei and closely related species such as Burkholderia thailandensis. Genotypic identification of suspected isolates can be achieved by sequencing of gene targets such as groEL which offer higher discriminative power than 16S rRNA. Specific PCR-based identification of B. pseudomallei has also been developed using B. pseudomallei-specific gene targets such as Type III secretion system and Tat-domain protein. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, a revolutionary technique for pathogen identification, has been shown to be potentially useful for rapid identification of B. pseudomallei, although existing databases require optimization by adding reference spectra for B. pseudomallei. Despite these advances in bacterial identification, diagnostic problems encountered in culture-negative cases remain largely unresolved. Although various serological tests have been developed, they are generally unstandardized “in house” assays and have low sensitivities and specificities. Although specific PCR assays have been applied to direct clinical and environmental specimens, the sensitivities for diagnosis remain to be evaluated. Metabolomics is an uprising tool for studying infectious diseases and may offer a novel approach for exploring potential diagnostic biomarkers. The metabolomics profiles of B

  19. A novel 33-Gene targeted resequencing panel provides accurate, clinical-grade diagnosis and improves patient management for rare inherited anaemias.

    PubMed

    Roy, Noémi B A; Wilson, Edward A; Henderson, Shirley; Wray, Katherine; Babbs, Christian; Okoli, Steven; Atoyebi, Wale; Mixon, Avery; Cahill, Mary R; Carey, Peter; Cullis, Jonathan; Curtin, Julie; Dreau, Helene; Ferguson, David J P; Gibson, Brenda; Hall, Georgina; Mason, Joanne; Morgan, Mary; Proven, Melanie; Qureshi, Amrana; Sanchez Garcia, Joaquin; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Teo, Juliana; Tedgård, Ulf; Higgs, Doug; Roberts, David; Roberts, Irene; Schuh, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Accurate diagnosis of rare inherited anaemias is challenging, requiring a series of complex and expensive laboratory tests. Targeted next-generation-sequencing (NGS) has been used to investigate these disorders, but the selection of genes on individual panels has been narrow and the validation strategies used have fallen short of the standards required for clinical use. Clinical-grade validation of negative results requires the test to distinguish between lack of adequate sequencing reads at the locations of known mutations and a real absence of mutations. To achieve a clinically-reliable diagnostic test and minimize false-negative results we developed an open-source tool (CoverMi) to accurately determine base-coverage and the 'discoverability' of known mutations for every sample. We validated our 33-gene panel using Sanger sequencing and microarray. Our panel demonstrated 100% specificity and 99·7% sensitivity. We then analysed 57 clinical samples: molecular diagnoses were made in 22/57 (38·6%), corresponding to 32 mutations of which 16 were new. In all cases, accurate molecular diagnosis had a positive impact on clinical management. Using a validated NGS-based platform for routine molecular diagnosis of previously undiagnosed congenital anaemias is feasible in a clinical diagnostic setting, improves precise diagnosis and enhances management and counselling of the patient and their family.

  20. ACE-I Angioedema: Accurate Clinical Diagnosis May Prevent Epinephrine-Induced Harm

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, R. Mason; Felder, Sarah; Borici-Mazi, Rozita; Ball, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Upper airway angioedema is a life-threatening emergency department (ED) presentation with increasing incidence. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor induced angioedema (AAE) is a non-mast cell mediated etiology of angioedema. Accurate diagnosis by clinical examination can optimize patient management and reduce morbidity from inappropriate treatment with epinephrine. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence of angioedema subtypes and the management of AAE. We evaluate the appropriateness of treatments and highlight preventable iatrogenic morbidity. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of consecutive angioedema patients presenting to two tertiary care EDs between July 2007 and March 2012. Results Of 1,702 medical records screened, 527 were included. The cause of angioedema was identified in 48.8% (n=257) of cases. The most common identifiable etiology was AAE (33.1%, n=85), with a 60.0% male predominance. The most common AAE management strategies included diphenhydramine (63.5%, n=54), corticosteroids (50.6%, n=43) and ranitidine (31.8%, n=27). Epinephrine was administered in 21.2% (n=18) of AAE patients, five of whom received repeated doses. Four AAE patients required admission (4.7%) and one required endotracheal intubation. Epinephrine induced morbidity in two patients, causing myocardial ischemia or dysrhythmia shortly after administration. Conclusion AAE is the most common identifiable etiology of angioedema and can be accurately diagnosed by physical examination. It is easily confused with anaphylaxis and mismanaged with antihistamines, corticosteroids and epinephrine. There is little physiologic rationale for epinephrine use in AAE and much risk. Improved clinical differentiation of mast cell and non-mast cell mediated angioedema can optimize patient management. PMID:27330660

  1. Relapsing Fever: Diagnosis Thanks to a Vigilant Hematology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Inbal; Tarabin, Salman; Kafka, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Three cases of relapsing fever from southern Israel were diagnosed promptly thanks to vigilance of the hematology laboratory technicians. In this region of Israel, patients presenting with prolonged fever and leukopenia without localizing symptoms are generally suspected of having brucellosis or a rickettsial disease. Pediatric patients with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and negative aforementioned serologies are often hospitalized for further work-up. Because of the policy of performing a manual blood smear when results of the automated blood count demonstrate severe anemia and abnormal platelet and/or white blood cell counts, a diagnosis of tick-borne relapsing fever was confirmed and promptly relayed to the physician. This routine prevented unnecessary examinations and hospitalization days and provided important information to regional epidemiology and public health authorities.

  2. An update on laboratory diagnosis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Oger, Joel; Frykman, Hans

    2015-09-20

    This review describes the state of the art for the use of laboratory testing in myasthenia gravis. The review brings a detailed description of the different clinical forms of auto-immune myasthenia and of the Lambert Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS). They stress the differences between the different forms of acquired (auto-immune) myasthenia. Then they present a summary of the different antibodies found in the disease. They insist on the advantage of the RIPA assay to measure antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor. They stress the different types of contribution of each of these antibodies to the clinical diagnosis. They also describe the methods to measure each of the specific antibodies that have recently permitted to split the diagnosis: Abs to omega-conotoxin receptor in Lambert Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS), abs to the acetylcholine receptor (AchR) in MG, Abs to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) in Ab negative MG, and Abs to low molecular weight receptor related low-density lipo protein-4 (LRP-4). They also broach over the striated antibodies, less frequent and clinically less useful such as anti-titin, -ryanodine, -agrin and -rapsyn. This represent a 360° view of the field as presented in Toronto in October 2014.

  3. Comparison of PCR, culturing and Pap smear microscopy for accurate diagnosis of genital Actinomyces.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Dilek; Demirezen, Şayeste; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Gülmez Kivanç, Dolunay; Beksaç, Mehmet Sinan

    2013-05-01

    Members of the genus Actinomyces, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming anaerobic bacteria, are normal inhabitants of the mucosal surfaces of the oral, gastrointestinal and genital tracts. Identification of these bacteria using conventional methods is generally difficult because of their complex transport and growth requirements and their fastidious and slow-growing nature. However, in recent years, the advancement of molecular techniques has provided much improved identification and differentiation of closely related Actinomyces species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the PCR technique in the diagnosis of genital Actinomyces in comparison with culturing and Papanicolaou (Pap) smear microscopy. Multiple sampling was conducted from 200 women using smear microscopy, culturing and PCR. Cyto-brushes were smeared on glass slides and stained using the routine Pap technique. Culturing was performed from a sterile swab, and Actinomyces were determined using the BBL Crystal ANR ID kit. PCR was performed from a second swab, and the Actinomyces type was determined using type-specific primers designed in our laboratory. Only one vaginal fluid sample (0.5%) revealed Actinomyces-like organisms on Pap smear examination. Actinomyces were detected in nine samples (4.5%) using the BBL Crystal ANR ID kit. Using PCR, eight samples (4%) were found positive for Actinomyces. No specimens that gave positive results by Pap smear microscopy and culturing could be confirmed by PCR. Pap smear microscopy and culturing were both found to have zero sensitivity for Actinomyces. PCR appears to be a sensitive and reliable diagnostic method for the detection of Actinomyces, which are difficult to cultivate from genital samples. PCR can be used for diagnostic confirmation in cases diagnosed by conventional methods, to prevent false-positive results.

  4. Hemoglobin D-Punjab: origin, distribution and laboratory diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lidiane de Souza; Okumura, Jéssika Viviani; Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto da; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses hemoglobin D-Punjab, also known as hemoglobin D-Los Angeles, one of the most common hemoglobin variants worldwide. It is derived from a point mutation in the beta-globin gene (HBB: c.364G>C; rs33946267) prevalent in the Punjab region, Northwestern Indian. Hemoglobin D-Punjab can be inherited in heterozygosis with hemoglobin A causing no clinical or hematological alterations, or in homozygosis, the rarest form of inheritance, a condition that is commonly not related to clinical symptomatology. Moreover, this variant can exist in association with other hemoglobinopathies, such as thalassemias; the most noticeable clinical alterations occur when hemoglobin D-Punjab is associated to hemoglobin S. The clinical manifestations of this association can be similar to homozygosis for hemoglobin S. Although hemoglobin D-Punjab is a common variant globally with clinical importance especially in cases of double heterozygosis, hemoglobin S/D-Punjab is still understudied. In Brazil, for example, hemoglobin D-Punjab is the third most common hemoglobin variant. Thus, this paper summarizes information about the origin, geographic distribution, characterization and occurrence of hemoglobin D-Punjab haplotypes to try to improve our knowledge of this variant. Moreover, a list of the main techniques used in its identification is provided emphasizing the importance of complementary molecular analysis for accurate diagnosis. PMID:25818823

  5. Laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract diseases of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Matz, M E; Guilford, W G

    2003-12-01

    An increasing number of laboratory tests are available for diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract diseases in dogs and cats. Use of these tests can lead to more accurate and rapid diagnoses. This review discusses laboratory tests, both new and old, and the role they currently play in the evaluation of animals presented with gastrointestinal problems. A minimum database helps assess the severity of the disorder, detect extra-gastrointestinal causes of problems and assists in formulating diagnostic and therapeutic plans. Faecal examination remains one of the most important diagnostic procedures in the investigation of gastrointestinal problems. Zinc sulphate faecal flotation is an excellent routine screening technique for helminth and protozoal infections, including giardiasis. Rectal cytology can assist in the diagnosis of large bowel disorders. Interpretation of faecal immunodiagnostic tests is hampered by insufficient knowledge of test sensitivities and specificities. Routine faecal cultures are not warranted and faecal occult blood tests are rarely indicated. Serum tests for gastric inflammation are now under development. The serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity test remains the gold standard technique for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Breath hydrogen tests can be helpful in assessing the functional relevance of mild abnormalities in small-bowel biopsy specimens. Subnormal concentrations of serum cobalamin appear to be more specific indicators of gastrointestinal disease in cats than in dogs. Tests for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth remain controversial and assessment of gastrointestinal permeability has yet to prove its value in the diagnostic assessment of companion animals with gastrointestinal problems. Faecal alpha1-protease inhibitor shows promise for the diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy.

  6. The hyponatremic patient: a systematic approach to laboratory diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Milionis, Haralampos J.; Liamis, George L.; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2002-01-01

    HYPONATREMIA (SERUM SODIUM LEVEL LESS THAN 134 MMOL/L) is a common electrolyte disturbance. Its high prevalence and potential neurologic sequelae make a logical and rigorous differential diagnosis mandatory before any therapeutic intervention. A history of concurrent illness and medication use as well as the assessment of extracellular volume status on physical examination may provide useful clues as to the pathogenesis of hyponatremia. Measurement of the effective serum tonicity (serum osmolality less serum urea level) is the first step in the laboratory evaluation. In patients with normal or elevated effective serum osmolality (280 mOsm/kg or greater), pseudohyponatremia should be excluded. In the hypo-osmolar state (serum osmolality less than 280 mOsm/kg), urine osmolality is used to determine whether water excretion is normal or impaired. A urine osmolality value of less than 100 mOsm/kg indicates complete and appropriate suppression of antidiuretic hormone secretion. A urine sodium level less than 20 mmol/L is indicative of hypovolemia, whereas a level greater than 40 mmol/L is suggestive of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Levels of hormones (thyroid-stimulating hormone and cortisol) and arterial blood gases should be determined in difficult cases of hyponatremia. PMID:12002984

  7. Laboratory diagnosis and interpretation of tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, S A; Steiner, B M; Rudolph, A H

    1995-01-01

    The lack of a method for demonstrating the presence of Treponema pallidum by growth necessitates the use of alternative methods. Traditionally, these methods are divided into direct detection methods (animal inoculation, dark-field microscopy, etc.) and serologic tests for the presence of patient antibody against T. pallidum. Serologic methods are further divided into two classes. One class, the nontreponemal tests, detects antibodies to lipoidal antigens present in either the host or T. pallidum; examples are the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory and rapid plasma reagin and tests. Reactivity in these tests generally indicates host tissue damage that may not be specific for syphilis. Because these tests are easy and inexpensive to perform, they are commonly used for screening, and with proper clinical signs they are suggestive of syphilis. The other class of test, the treponemal tests, uses specific treponemal antigens. Confirmation of infection requires a reactive treponemal test. Examples of the treponemal tests are the microhemagglutination assay for antibodies to T. pallidum and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test. These tests are more expensive and complicated to perform than the nontreponemal tests. On the horizon are a number of direct antigen, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and PCR techniques. Several of these techniques have shown promise in clinical trials for the diagnosis of congenital syphilis and neurosyphilis that are presently difficult to diagnose. PMID:7704889

  8. Guidelines for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon-Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Jong-Rak; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in Korea was unexpected that laboratory response had to be built up urgently during the outbreak. The outbreak was almost all healthcare-associated, which was aggravated by lack of availability in laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV on site. On behalf of the MERS joint public and private sector response committee (MERS Joint committee), the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS response task force (MERS KSLM TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories set up MERS molecular diagnosis. MERS TF established guidelines for laboratory diagnosis of MERS-CoV and provided it to all participating laboratories as the official guidance of MERS Joint committee. This guideline was used for procedure manual of molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV and laboratory safety manual. PMID:27104019

  9. Race and Socioeconomic Status as Confounding Variables in the Accurate Diagnosis of Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luepnitz, Roy R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Studied the incidence of bias related to race and socioeconomic status which could confound the diagnosis of alcoholism. Graduate psychology students made a diagnosis based on videotapes. Results indicated lower socioeconomic class individuals were more often diagnosed correctly for alcoholism, and Blacks were diagnosed alcoholic more often than…

  10. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  11. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Péré, Hélène; Bélec, Laurent

    2014-05-12

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection-an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy.

  12. Laboratory diagnosis of infection status in infants perinatally exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Paul, M O; Tetali, S; Lesser, M L; Abrams, E J; Wang, X P; Kowalski, R; Bamji, M; Napolitano, B; Gulick, L; Bakshi, S

    1996-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of infection status in infants born to women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is of paramount importance. The comparative accuracy of five diagnostic decision rules was evaluated in 208 HIV-exposed infants (32 infected, 176 uninfected) based on laboratory testing during the first 6 months of life. Diagnostic rules A and B, which required single blood samples analyzed by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (rule A) or culture, PCR, and p24 antigen detection (rule B) were more prone to incorrect diagnoses than were rules requiring 2 blood samples analyzed by a single assay (rule C) or combinations of culture and PCR (rules D and E). Rule D, which used PCR as the initial test, established the most useful algorithm: a positive PCR result followed by a positive culture in the second sample confirmed infected status, while two consecutive negative PCR results reconfirmed as negative at 6 months of age established uninfected status.

  13. Laboratory Diagnosis of Tick-Borne African Relapsing Fevers: Latest Developments

    PubMed Central

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In Africa, relapsing fevers caused by ectoparasite-borne Borrelia species are transmitted by ticks, with the exception of Borrelia recurrentis, which is a louse-borne spirochete. These tropical diseases are responsible for mild to deadly spirochetemia. Cultured Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia hispanica circulate alongside at least six species that have not yet been cultured in vectors. Direct diagnosis is hindered by the use of non-specific laboratory tools. Indeed, microscopic observation of Borrelia spirochaeta in smears of peripheral blood taken from febrile patients lacks sensitivity and specificity. Although best visualized using dark-field microscopy, the organisms can also be detected using Wright–Giemsa or acridine orange stains. PCR-based detection of specific sequences in total DNA extracted from a specimen can be used to discriminate different relapsing fever Borreliae. In our laboratory, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for the specific detection of B. duttonii/recurrentis and B. crocidurae: multispacer sequence typing accurately identified cultured relapsing fever borreliae and revealed diversity among them. Other molecular typing techniques, such as multilocus sequence analysis of tick-borne relapsing fever borreliae, showed the potential risk of human infection in Africa. Recent efforts to culture and sequence relapsing fever borreliae have provided new information for reassessment of the diversity of these bacteria. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been reported as a means of identifying cultured borreliae and of identifying both vectors and vectorized pathogens such as detecting relapsing fever borreliae directly in ticks. The lack of a rapid diagnosis test restricts the management of such diseases. We produced monoclonal antibodies against B. crocidurae in order to develop cheap assays for the rapid detection of relapsing fever borreliae. In this paper, we

  14. How accurately and consistently do laboratories measure workplace concentrations of respirable crystalline silica?

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2016-11-01

    Permissible exposure limits (PELs) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) have recently been reduced from 0.10 to 0.05 mg/m(3). This raises an important question: do current laboratory practices and standards for assessing RCS concentrations permit reliable discrimination between workplaces that are in compliance and workplaces that are not? To find out, this paper examines recent laboratory performance in quantifying RCS amounts on filters sent to them to assess their proficiency. A key finding is that accredited laboratories do not reliably (e.g., with 95% confidence) estimate RCS quantities to within a factor of 2. Thus, laboratory findings indicating that RCS levels are above or below a PEL provide little confidence that this is true. The current accreditation standard only requires laboratories to achieve estimates within three standard deviations of the correct (reference) value at least two thirds of the time, rather than a more usual standard such as within 25% of the correct value at least 95% of the time. Laboratory practices may improve as the new PEL is implemented, but they are presently essentially powerless to discriminate among RCS levels over most of the range of values that have been tested, leaving employers and regulators without a reliable means to ascertain when workplace RCS levels are above or below the PEL.

  15. Accurate Diagnosis of Severe Hypospadias Using 2D and 3D Ultrasounds

    PubMed Central

    López Ramón y Cajal, Carlos; Marín Ortiz, Elena; Sarmiento Carrera, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The hypospadias is the most common urogenital anomaly of male neonates but the prenatal diagnosis of this is often missed before birth. We present the prenatal diagnosis of a severe penoscrotal hypospadias using 2D and 3D ultrasounds. 3D sonography allowed us the best evaluation of the genitals and their anatomical relations. This ample detailed study allowed us to show the findings to the parents and the pediatric surgeon and to configure the best information about the prognosis and surgical treatment. PMID:27774326

  16. [Characteristics of Clostridium tetani and laboratory diagnosis of tetanus].

    PubMed

    Smietańska, Karolina; Rokosz-Chudziak, Natalia; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The causative agent of tetanus is the obligate anaerobic bacterium--Clostridium tetani. These bacteria form endospores that are able to survive long periods of exposure to air and other adverse environmental conditions. Infection generally occurs through wound contamination. We can distinguish several forms of tetanus: generalized, local and neonatal. Diagnosis of tetanus is based primarily on the patient's clinical symptoms (muscle cramps, painful back muscle spasms, generalized contractions of the arcuate curvature of the body) as well as on microbiological diagnosis. This article is a brief review of C. tetani and diagnosis of infections caused by these organisms in humans.

  17. How accurate are leukocyte indices and C-reactive protein for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Orlando; Ohlsson, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is often difficult to make. Treatment on the basis of clinical suspicion and risk factors may result in overtreatment. A previous review of the usefulness of C-reactive protein and leukocyte indices concluded that these test results should be interpreted with caution. The present paper reviews and, when appropriate, revises, in light of new information, the conclusions reached in the previous systematic review of the topic. PMID:20401235

  18. Accurate diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions from nuclear morphology using supervised learning

    PubMed Central

    Ozolek, John A.; Tosun, Akif Burak; Wang, Wei; Chen, Cheng; Kolouri, Soheil; Basu, Saurav; Huang, Hu; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2014-01-01

    Follicular lesions of the thyroid remain significant diagnostic challenges in surgical pathology and cytology. The diagnosis often requires considerable resources and ancillary tests including immunohistochemistry, molecular studies, and expert consultation. Visual analyses of nuclear morphological features, generally speaking, have not been helpful in distinguishing this group of lesions. Here we describe a method for distinguishing between follicular lesions of the thyroid based on nuclear morphology. The method utilizes an optimal transport-based linear embedding for segmented nuclei, together with an adaptation of existing classification methods. We show the method outputs assignments (classification results) which are near perfectly correlated with the clinical diagnosis of several lesion types' lesions utilizing a database of 94 patients in total. Experimental comparisons also show the new method can significantly outperform standard numerical feature-type methods in terms of agreement with the clinical diagnosis gold standard. In addition, the new method could potentially be used to derive insights into biologically meaningful nuclear morphology differences in these lesions. Our methods could be incorporated into a tool for pathologists to aid in distinguishing between follicular lesions of the thyroid. In addition, these results could potentially provide nuclear morphological correlates of biological behavior and reduce health care costs by decreasing histotechnician and pathologist time and obviating the need for ancillary testing. PMID:24835183

  19. Laboratory diagnosis of infectious diarrhoea syndrome; a three years study in two hospitals of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Damian, Maria; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Dorina; Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa; Oprişan, Gabriela; Palade, Andi-Marian; Dinu, Sorin; Szmal, Camelia; Ciontea, Simona Adriana; Ceciu, Stefania; Condei, Maria; Persu, Ana; Baicuş, Anda; Pop, Mariana; Neagoe, Ionela; Steriu, Dan; Codreanu, Radu; Graur, Marian; Cretu, Michaela Carmen; Cilievici, Suzana; Nica, Maria; Ecovoiu, Alexandru; Gavrili, Lucian

    2009-01-01

    Infectious diarrhoea is a syndrome caused by a variety of bacterial, viral and parasitic organisms which represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. The wide diversity of etiological agents impairs the surveillance and the diagnosis and affects the correct treatment applied to reduce the long-term complications. Besides well known enteric pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia, a high number of emergent and re-emergent aetiologies are now recognised to be at the origin of diarrhoea. The lack of a correct diagnostic algorithm and adequate methods of analyses leads to under-evaluation and incertitude in an important number of clinical cases. Our study was designed as a complex analysis of the stool specimens collected from the patients, in the purpose to improve the laboratory diagnostic and to enhance the number of confirmed cases of infectious diarrhoea. A number of 756 samples from inpatients with diarrhoea were tested targeting pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria, viruses and parasites by classical and molecular methods. We documented that, in case of non-Salmonella, non-Shigella, non-Yersinia diarrhoea, the quality of diagnostic was improved by increasing the percentage of positive specimens to 22.49% compared to 11.12% when only bacteria, 5.56% when only viruses and 4.10% when only parasites were investigated. The laboratory data are of great value in evaluating the diarrhoea syndrome offering the documentation for an accurate epidemiological response and an adequate treatment.

  20. Application of a cell microarray chip system for accurate, highly sensitive, and rapid diagnosis for malaria in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Yatsushiro, Shouki; Yamamoto, Takeki; Yamamura, Shohei; Abe, Kaori; Obana, Eriko; Nogami, Takahiro; Hayashi, Takuya; Sesei, Takashi; Oka, Hiroaki; Okello-Onen, Joseph; Odongo-Aginya, Emmanuel I.; Alai, Mary Auma; Olia, Alex; Anywar, Dennis; Sakurai, Miki; Palacpac, Nirianne MQ; Mita, Toshihiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Baba, Yoshinobu; Kataoka, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Accurate, sensitive, rapid, and easy operative diagnosis is necessary to prevent the spread of malaria. A cell microarray chip system including a push column for the recovery of erythrocytes and a fluorescence detector was employed for malaria diagnosis in Uganda. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm width and 50 μm depth) was made of polystyrene. For the analysis, 6 μl of whole blood was employed, and leukocytes were practically removed by filtration through SiO2-nano-fibers in a column. Regular formation of an erythrocyte monolayer in each microchamber was observed following dispersion of an erythrocyte suspension in a nuclear staining dye, SYTO 21, onto the chip surface and washing. About 500,000 erythrocytes were analyzed in a total of 4675 microchambers, and malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes could be detected in 5 min by using the fluorescence detector. The percentage of infected erythrocytes in each of 41 patients was determined. Accurate and quantitative detection of the parasites could be performed. A good correlation between examinations via optical microscopy and by our chip system was demonstrated over the parasitemia range of 0.0039–2.3438% by linear regression analysis (R2 = 0.9945). Thus, we showed the potential of this chip system for the diagnosis of malaria. PMID:27445125

  1. How accurate are electronic monitoring devices? A laboratory study testing two devices to measure medication adherence.

    PubMed

    De Bleser, Leentje; De Geest, Sabina; Vandenbroeck, Sofie; Vanhaecke, Johan; Dobbels, Fabienne

    2010-01-01

    In a prospective descriptive laboratory study, 25 Helping Hand(™) (HH) (10 without and 15 with reminder system) and 50 Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) (25 with 18-month and 25 with 2-year battery life) were manipulated twice daily following a predefined protocol during 3 consecutive weeks. Accuracy was determined using the fixed manipulation scheme as the reference. Perfect functioning (i.e., total absence of missing registrations and/or overregistrations) was observed in 70% of the HH without, 87% of the HH with reminder, 20% MEMS with 18 months, and 100% with 2-year battery life respectively.

  2. Unusual Laboratory Findings in a Case of Norwegian Scabies Provided a Clue to Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Samson S. Y.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of Norwegian scabies was missed for a year for an elderly long-term-care facility resident. Serpiginous tracks were noted on the surface of Sabouraud dextrose agar used for fungal culture of the skin scrapings. This unusual laboratory manifestation must alert clinical microbiologists to the possible diagnosis of scabies. PMID:15872307

  3. Fiber diffraction of skin and nails provides an accurate diagnosis of malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica J.

    2009-10-21

    An early diagnosis of malignancies correlates directly with a better prognosis. Yet for many malignancies there are no readily available, noninvasive, cost-effective diagnostic tests with patients often presenting too late for effective treatment. This article describes for the first time the use of fiber diffraction patterns of skin or fingernails, using X-ray sources, as a biometric diagnostic method for detecting neoplastic disorders including but not limited to melanoma, breast, colon and prostate cancers. With suitable further development, an early low-cost, totally noninvasive yet reliable diagnostic test could be conducted on a regular basis in local radiology facilities, as a confirmatory test for other diagnostic procedures or as a mass screening test using suitable small angle X-ray beam-lines at synchrotrons.

  4. D-dimer testing and acute venous thromboembolism. A shortcut to accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Becker, D M; Philbrick, J T; Bachhuber, T L; Humphries, J E

    1996-05-13

    D-dimer fragments can be measured easily in plasma and whole blood, and the presence or absence of D-dimer could be useful in the diagnostic evaluation of venous thromboembolism. We systematically reviewed the English literature for articles that compared D-dimer results with those of other tests for deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Twenty-nine studies were selected for detailed review, and we noted wide variability in assay performance, heterogeneity among subjects, and failure to define absence or presence of venous thromboembolism by a comprehensive criterion standard for diagnosis. These methodologic problems limit the generalizability of the published estimates of D-dimer accuracy for deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, and the clinical utility of this potentially important test remains unproved.

  5. Accurate diagnosis of renal transplant rejection by indium-111 platelet imaging despite postoperative cyclosporin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Adams, M.B.; Kauffman, H.M.; Trembath, L.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Tisdale, P.L.; Rao, S.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T.

    1988-08-01

    Previous reports indicate that In-111 platelet scintigraphy (IPS) is a reliable test for the early diagnosis of acute post-operative renal transplant rejection (TR). However, the recent introduction of cyclosporin for post-transplantation immunosuppression requires that the diagnostic efficacy of IPS once again be established. Therefore, a prospective IPS study of 73 post-operative renal transplant recipients was conducted. Fourty-nine patients received cyclosporin and 24 patients did not receive this drug. Between these two patient groups, there were no significant differences in the diagnostic sensitivities (0.86 vs 0.80) and specificities (0.93 vs 0.84) with which TR was identified. We conclude that during the first two weeks following renal transplantation the cyclosporin treatment regimen used at our institution does not limit the reliability of IPS as a test for TR.

  6. Accurate VUV Laboratory Measurements of Fe III Transitions for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Pickering, J. C.; Smillie, D.; Nave, G.; Szabo, C. I.; Smith, Peter L.; Nielsen, K. E.; Peters, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report preliminary measurements of Fe III spectra in the 1150 to 2500 A wavelength interval. Spectra have been recorded with an iron-neon Penning discharge lamp (PDL) between 1600 and 2500 A at Imperial College (IC) using high resolution Fourier (FT) transform spectroscopy. These FT spectrometer measurements were extended beyond 1600 A to 1150 A using high-resolution grating spectroscopy at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These recorded spectra represent the first radiometrically calibrated measurements of a doubly-ionized iron-group element spectrum combining the techniques of vacuum ultraviolet FT and grating spectroscopy. The spectral range of the new laboratory measurements corresponds to recent HST/STIS observations of sharp-lined B stars and of Eta Carinae. The new improved atomic data can be applied to abundance studies and diagnostics of astrophysical plasmas.

  7. An Update on Laboratory Diagnosis of Liver Inherited Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice

    2013-01-01

    Liver inherited diseases are a group of genetically determined clinical entities that appear with an early chronic liver involvement. They include Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), hereditary hemochromatosis, and alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, cystic fibrosis, although it is not specifically a liver disease, may cause a severe liver involvement in a significant percentage of cases. For all these pathologies, the disease gene is known, and molecular analysis may contribute to the unequivocal diagnosis. This approach could avoid the patient invasive procedures and limit complications associated with a delay in diagnosis. We review liver inherited diseases on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the contribution of molecular analysis in the multistep diagnostic workup. PMID:24222913

  8. Iofetamine I 123 single photon emission computed tomography is accurate in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Holman, B.L.; Rosen, T.J.; Nagel, J.S.; English, R.J.; Growdon, J.H. )

    1990-04-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of iofetamine hydrochloride I 123 (IMP) with single photon emission computed tomography in Alzheimer's disease, we studied 58 patients with AD and 15 age-matched healthy control subjects. We used a qualitative method to assess regional IMP uptake in the entire brain and to rate image data sets as normal or abnormal without knowledge of subjects'clinical classification. The sensitivity and specificity of IMP with single photon emission computed tomography in AD were 88% and 87%, respectively. In 15 patients with mild cognitive deficits (Blessed Dementia Scale score, less than or equal to 10), sensitivity was 80%. With the use of a semiquantitative measure of regional cortical IMP uptake, the parietal lobes were the most functionally impaired in AD and the most strongly associated with the patients' Blessed Dementia Scale scores. These results indicated that IMP with single photon emission computed tomography may be a useful adjunct in the clinical diagnosis of AD in early, mild disease.

  9. The International Classification of Headache Disorders: accurate diagnosis of orofacial pain?

    PubMed

    Benoliel, R; Birman, N; Eliav, E; Sharav, Y

    2008-07-01

    The aim was to apply diagnostic criteria, as published by the International Headache Society (IHS), to the diagnosis of orofacial pain. A total of 328 consecutive patients with orofacial pain were collected over a period of 2 years. The orofacial pain clinic routinely employs criteria published by the IHS, the American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDCTMD). Employing IHS criteria, 184 patients were successfully diagnosed (56%), including 34 with persistent idiopathic facial pain. In the remaining 144 we applied AAOP/RDCTMD criteria and diagnosed 120 as masticatory myofascial pain (MMP) resulting in a diagnostic efficiency of 92.7% (304/328) when applying the three classifications (IHS, AAOP, RDCTMD). Employing further published criteria, 23 patients were diagnosed as neurovascular orofacial pain (NVOP, facial migraine) and one as a neuropathy secondary to connective tissue disease. All the patients were therefore allocated to predefined diagnoses. MMP is clearly defined by AAOP and the RDCTMD. However, NVOP is not defined by any of the above classification systems. The features of MMP and NVOP are presented and analysed with calculations for positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). In MMP the combination of facial pain aggravated by jaw movement, and the presence of three or more tender muscles resulted in a PPV = 0.82 and a NPV = 0.86. For NVOP the combination of facial pain, throbbing quality, autonomic and/or systemic features and attack duration of > 60 min gave a PPV = 0.71 and a NPV = 0.95. Expansion of the IHS system is needed so as to integrate more orofacial pain syndromes.

  10. Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Diagnosis of Human Monocytotropic Ehrlichiosis in a Commercial Laboratory Setting

    PubMed Central

    Olano, Juan P.; Hogrefe, Wayne; Seaton, Brent; Walker, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory diagnostic issues of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME) were investigated in a retrospective case study conducted at a national reference laboratory (Focus Technologies, formerly MRL Reference Laboratory), and at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas, during 1997 and 1998. Standard questionnaires were sent to physicians for each laboratory-diagnosed patient 2 days to 2 weeks after immunofluorescent antibody assay results were available. Among the 41 cases for which data were obtained, 32 (78%) were definite cases of HME, and 9 (22%) were probable cases of HME. Tick bite or exposure to ticks was recorded in more than 97% of cases. The most prominent clinical findings were fever, abdominal tenderness, and regional lymphadenopathy. There was an association between age and severity of illness. The main laboratory findings included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. Clinical and laboratory findings were nonspecific and were not good predictors of the severity of illness. The 90% of patients who received doxycycline treatment underwent rapid clinical improvement with a favorable outcome. The usual duration of effective treatment with doxycycline was 7 to 10 days. This retrospective study is unique because it was based in a commercial reference laboratory setting that receives specimens from different geographic locations. The clinical and laboratory information from 41 patients provides insight into the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory characteristics of HME. PMID:12965923

  11. [Enhancement of laboratory diagnosis specificity in human toxocariasis].

    PubMed

    Zarnowska-Prymek, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to enhance specificity of immunological diagnosis in toxocarosis. The investigations concern: detection of circulating parasite antigens using dot-ELISA technique and detection of specific IgG antigodies using ELISA test with low molecular weight (< or = 30 kD) excretory-secretory (ES) larval T. canis antigens. The circulating antigens were investigated in 60 sera and 20 anterior chamber fluids from children with ocular form of toxocarosis. These antigens were present only in 3 sera and 2 anterior chamber fluids in children with active intraocular inflamation and fluid antibodies titers 1:5120 and 1:20 000. Comparative study with different ELISA tests indicated that use of low molecular weight antigens increase specificity of reaction.

  12. [Current epidemiology and laboratory diagnosis of endemic mycoses in Spain].

    PubMed

    Buitrago, María J; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Histoplasmosis and paracoccidioidomycosis are emerging infections in Spain associated with immigration and travelling. In last three decades a total of 128 cases of histoplasmosis have been reported in Spain, 59 in travellers, 63 in immigrants, three associated to drug abuse, two in laboratory workers, and one in a solid organ transplant receptor. In 1969 the first Spanish case of paracoccidioidomycosis was published and a total of 21 cases have been reported so far. Those patients suffered from the chronic form of the disease with period of latency as long as 50 years. Other endemic mycoses such as blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, lobomycosis, pythiosis and sporotrichosis have not increased in frequency. Microbiological cultures of endemic fungi must be handled in facilities which comply with international biosafety regulations and must also be taken into account for cultures from patients with suspected endemic mycosis.

  13. Collagen, type XI, alpha 1: an accurate marker for differential diagnosis of breast carcinoma invasiveness in core needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Freire, Javier; Domínguez-Hormaetxe, Saioa; Pereda, Saray; De Juan, Ana; Vega, Alfonso; Simón, Laureano; Gómez-Román, Javier

    2014-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of invasive breast lesions, when analyzed by Core Needle Biopsy, may suppose a major challenge for the pathologist. Various markers of invasiveness such as laminin, S-100 protein, P63 or calponin have been described; however, none of them is completely reliable. The use of a specific marker of the infiltrating tumor microenvironment seems vital to support the diagnosis of invasive against in situ lesions. At this point, Collagen, type XI, alpha 1 (COL11A1), might be helpful since it has been described to be associated to cancer associated fibroblasts in other tumors such as lung, pancreas or colorectal. This paper aims to analyze the role of COL11A1 as a marker of invasiveness in breast tumor lesions. Two hundred and one breast Core Needle Biopsy samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry against pro-COL11A1. The results show a significant difference (p < 0.0001) when comparing the expression in infiltrative tumors (93%) versus immunostaining of non-invasive lesions (4%). Forty cases of underestimated DCIS were also stained for COL11A1, presenting a sensitivity of 90% when compared with p63 and calponin which not tagged invasion. In conclusion, pro-COL11A1 expression is a promising marker of invasive breast lesions, and may be included in immunohistochemical panels aiming at identifying infiltration in problematic breast lesions.

  14. Functional protease profiling for laboratory based diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Bassel; Costina, Victor; Buchheidt, Dieter; Reinwald, Mark; Neumaier, Michael; Findeisen, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains difficult to diagnose in immunocompromised patients, because diagnostic criteria according to EORTC/MSG guidelines are often not met and have low sensitivity. Hence there is an urgent need to improve diagnostic procedures by developing novel approaches. In the present study, we present a proof of concept experiment for the monitoring of Aspergillus associated protease activity in serum specimens for diagnostic purpose. Synthetic peptides that are selectively cleaved by proteases secreted from Aspergillus species were selected from our own experiments and published data. These so called reporter peptides (RP, n=5) were added to serum specimens from healthy controls (HC, n=101) and patients with proven (IA, n=9) and possible (PIA, n=144) invasive aspergillosis. Spiked samples were incubated ex vivo under strictly standardized conditions. Proteolytic fragments were analyzed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Spiked specimens of IA patients had highest concentrations of RP-fragments followed by PIA and HC. The median signal intensity was 116.546 (SD, 53.063) for IA and 5.009 (SD, 8.432) for HC. A cut-off >36.910 was chosen that performed with 100% specificity and sensitivity. Patients with PIA had either values above [53% (76/144)] or below [47% (67/144)] this chosen cut-off. The detection of respective reporter peptide fragments can easily be performed by MALDI TOF mass spectrometry. In this proof of concept study we were able to demonstrate that serum specimens of patients with IA have increased proteolytic activity towards selected reporter peptides. However, the diagnostic value of functional protease profiling has to be validated in further prospective studies. It is likely that a combination of existing and new methods will be required to achieve optimal performance for diagnosis of IA in the future.

  15. [Laboratory performance of primary care units in tuberculosis diagnosis in Pelotas, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Vieira Beduhn, Dagoberta Alves; Harter, Jenifer; Pieren Dos Reis, Simone; Barbosa Antunes, Luize; Cardozo-Gonzales, Roxana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess laboratory performance of Primary Care Units (UAP, Spanish acronym) in TB diagnosis though the sputum smear test in Pelotas, Brazil, a descriptive study was completed which included all sputum smear tests requested at eleven primary care units from 2007 to 2010. To assess laboratory performance, the number of sputum smear tests requested was quantified as well as the time between the request and the reading of the glass slides at the lab. 477 requests were registered at UAP. Of this total, only 51,8% were found in the laboratory’s record book, the lowest performance was 24,2% and the highest 71,4%. Regarding the reading of glass slides, it was determined that 27,7% readings took 8 days or more. It is concluded that the primary care units in Pelotas have a low laboratory performance in TB diagnosis by sputum smear tests.

  16. Lung Ultrasound in Early Diagnosis of Neonatal Ventilator Associated Pneumonia before Any Radiographic or Laboratory Changes

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Bioumy, Nouran; El-Sharkawy, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal pneumonia is reported to be the primary cause of neonatal respiratory failure and one of the common causes of neonatal hospitalization and death in developing countries. Chest X-ray was considered the gold standard for diagnosis of neonatal pneumonia. Lung ultrasonography has been described as a valuable noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of many neonatal pulmonary diseases. We report a case of ventilation associated neonatal pneumonia with very early diagnosis using lung ultrasound before any significant radiographic changes in chest X-ray or laboratory findings suggestive of infection. PMID:27891280

  17. [A flow chart for the laboratory diagnosis of anaemia as requested by general practice].

    PubMed

    Huisman, A; van Solinge, W W

    2007-10-20

    Anaemia is a common problem in primary care. It can be a symptom of an underlying disease such as a malignancy, and should therefore not be ignored. The diagnosis of anaemia is laboratory-based and is defined as a haemoglobin concentration below the lower reference value. The reference values are currently under debate; some authors argue that the WHO lower reference values are incorrect and should be replaced by higher values. Algorithms for requesting laboratory tests can be applied as a guide to the classification and diagnosis ofanaemia. The Dutch College of General Practitioners has issued such a flow chart which is based on Wintrobe's classification and in which the red cell volume is a central value i.e. the 'mean corpuscular volume' (MCV). An alternative flow chart has been proposed which starts with the determination of the ferritin concentration. However, neither of these algorithms is always practical. They often do not lead to a diagnosis, and combined diagnoses may not be accounted for. In general practice, the initial diagnosis of anaemia could be based on a reliable haemoglobin measurement which would establish if anaemia is or is not present. Consequently, a simple laboratory diagnosis algorithm could be applied to frequently occurring causes of anaemia, such as iron deficiency. Should the cause be a rarer one, then a specialist should be consulted.

  18. Laboratory reporting of hemostasis assays: the final post-analytical opportunity to reduce errors of clinical diagnosis in hemostasis?

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2010-03-01

    The advent of modern instrumentation, with associated improvements in test performance and reliability, together with appropriate internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assurance (EQA) measures, has led to substantial reductions in analytical errors within hemostasis laboratories. Unfortunately, the reporting of incorrect or inappropriate test results still occurs, perhaps even as frequently as in the past. Many of these cases arise due to a variety of events largely outside the control of the laboratories performing the tests. These events are primarily preanalytical, related to sample collection and processing, but can also include post-analytical events related to the reporting and interpretation of test results. The current report provides an overview of these events, as well as guidance for prevention or minimization. In particular, we propose several strategies for the post-analytical reporting of hemostasis assays, and how this may provide the final opportunity to prevent serious clinical errors in diagnosis. This report should be of interest to both the laboratory scientists working in hemostasis and clinicians that request and attempt to interpret the test results. Laboratory scientists are ultimately responsible for these test results, and there is a duty to provide both accurate and precise results to enable clinicians to manage patients appropriately and to avoid the need to recollect and retest. Also, clinicians will not be in a position to best diagnose and manage their patient unless they gain an appreciation of these issues.

  19. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: issues with testing of the growth and thyroid axes.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism are variable and depend on the severity of hormone deficiency, creating a diagnostic challenge for diagnosis of the non-classical patient who may have a less severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency and only a suggestion of possible hypothyroidism. Laboratory tests contribute to the diagnostic process, but the tests for growth and thyroid dysfunction, two of the most common manifestations of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, are some of the most problematic from a methodological perspective. Patients in the "grey zone" of diagnosis, for whom there is no distinct dividing line or gold standard diagnostic test, are the focus of this article. Issues relating to the use of laboratory tests involving GH, insulin-like growth factor-I, and free thyroxine in the diagnosis of GH and thyroid deficiency are reviewed. Assay harmonization initiatives are required before clinical research studies are performed to establish diagnostic thresholds for GH and thyroid hormone deficiencies.

  20. Support of the Laboratory in the Diagnosis of Fungal Ocular Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vanzzini Zago, Virginia; Alcantara Castro, Marino; Naranjo Tackman, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    This is a retrospective, and descriptive study about the support that the laboratory of microbiology aids can provide in the diagnosis of ocular infections in patients whom were attended a tertiary-care hospital in México City in a 10-year-time period. We describe the microbiological diagnosis in palpebral mycose; in keratitis caused by Fusarium, Aspergillus, Candida, and melanized fungi; endophthalmitis; one Histoplasma scleritis and one mucormycosis. Nowadays, ocular fungal infections are more often diagnosed, because there is more clinical suspicion and there are easy laboratory confirmations. Correct diagnosis is important because an early medical treatment gives a better prognosis for visual acuity. In some cases, fungal infections are misdiagnosed and the antifungal treatment is delayed. PMID:22518339

  1. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%–40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%–100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  2. Improving Clinical Laboratory Efficiency: Introduction of Systems for the Diagnosis and Monitoring of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Marta; Chueca, Natalia; Guillot, Vicente; Bernal, María Del Carmen; García, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Since the first tests for identifying individuals with suspected human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were introduced in the mid-1980s, diagnostic virology testing has greatly evolved. The technological advances, automating in the laboratories and the advances in molecular biology techniques have helped introduce invaluable laboratory methods for managing HIV patients. Tests for diagnosis, specially for screening HIV antibodies, are now fully automated; in the same way, tests for monitoring HIV viral load (HIV RNA copies/ml of plasma), which is used for monitoring infection and response to antiretroviral treatment, are also fully automated; however, resistance testing, tropism determination and minor variant detection, which are used to make decisions for changing antiretroviral treatment regimens in patients failing therapy, still remain highly laborious and time consuming. This chapter will review the main aspects relating to the automating of the methods available for laboratory diagnosis as well as for monitoring of the HIV infection and determination of resistance to antiretrovirals and viral tropism.

  3. Munchausen syndrome and factitious disorder: the role of the laboratory in its detection and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kinns, H; Housley, D; Freedman, D B

    2013-05-01

    The term Munchausen syndrome is used to describe the patient who chronically fabricates or induces illness with the sole intention of assuming the patient role. Such persons often have a close association with the medical profession and thus use their knowledge to falsify symptoms and laboratory specimens to mimic disease. Cases of factitious disease have appeared in the literature originating from all medical specialties, and include such rare disorders as phaeochromocytoma and Bartter's syndrome. The laboratory can play a key role in the detection and diagnosis of factitious disorders. Indeed discrepant biochemistry results may provide the first clue to the diagnosis. Laboratory staff should be particularly aware of highly variable test results and extreme abnormalities that are not consistent with the wider biochemical profile, suggesting sample tampering. Factitious disorder should also be included in the clinician's differential diagnosis when disease presentation is unusual or an underlying cause cannot be found. Investigation to exclude or confirm factitious disorder at an early stage can prevent unnecessary testing in the search for increasingly rare diseases. Appropriate analyses may include screening tests for the detection of surreptitious drug administration or replication of a fabricated sample to confirm the method used. In all cases close communication between the clinician and laboratory is essential. This will ensure that appropriate tests are conducted particularly with regard to time critical and repeat tests.

  4. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas.

  5. Infectious titres of sheep scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents cannot be accurately predicted from quantitative laboratory test results.

    PubMed

    González, Lorenzo; Thorne, Leigh; Jeffrey, Martin; Martin, Stuart; Spiropoulos, John; Beck, Katy E; Lockey, Richard W; Vickery, Christopher M; Holder, Thomas; Terry, Linda

    2012-11-01

    It is widely accepted that abnormal forms of the prion protein (PrP) are the best surrogate marker for the infectious agent of prion diseases and, in practice, the detection of such disease-associated (PrP(d)) and/or protease-resistant (PrP(res)) forms of PrP is the cornerstone of diagnosis and surveillance of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Nevertheless, some studies question the consistent association between infectivity and abnormal PrP detection. To address this discrepancy, 11 brain samples of sheep affected with natural scrapie or experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy were selected on the basis of the magnitude and predominant types of PrP(d) accumulation, as shown by immunohistochemical (IHC) examination; contra-lateral hemi-brain samples were inoculated at three different dilutions into transgenic mice overexpressing ovine PrP and were also subjected to quantitative analysis by three biochemical tests (BCTs). Six samples gave 'low' infectious titres (10⁶·⁵ to 10⁶·⁷ LD₅₀ g⁻¹) and five gave 'high titres' (10⁸·¹ to ≥ 10⁸·⁷ LD₅₀ g⁻¹) and, with the exception of the Western blot analysis, those two groups tended to correspond with samples with lower PrP(d)/PrP(res) results by IHC/BCTs. However, no statistical association could be confirmed due to high individual sample variability. It is concluded that although detection of abnormal forms of PrP by laboratory methods remains useful to confirm TSE infection, infectivity titres cannot be predicted from quantitative test results, at least for the TSE sources and host PRNP genotypes used in this study. Furthermore, the near inverse correlation between infectious titres and Western blot results (high protease pre-treatment) argues for a dissociation between infectivity and PrP(res).

  6. Tuberculosis diagnosis after bleach processing for early stage tuberculosis laboratory capacity building.

    PubMed

    David, S; Sutre, A F; Sanca, A; Mané, A; Henriques, V; Portugal, C; Sancho, L; Cardoso, A; Paixão, E; Duarte, E L; Leite, C Q F; Salem, J I; Antunes, A

    2012-11-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis is seriously hampered in the absence of standard biosafety laboratory facilities for specimen concentration and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. Within a laboratory twinning arrangement, heat-fixed direct smear and sediment from 74 bleach-processed and 20 non-processed specimens from Cumura Hospital, Guinea-Bissau, were sent to Lisbon for molecular evaluation of rifampicin resistance. Sequence analysis of a 369 base-pair rpoB locus detected 3.2% (3/94) resistant specimens. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the molecular analysis of M. tuberculosis from bleach-processed sputum, an alternative to current diagnostic practice in low-resource settings.

  7. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  8. [Assessment of the quality of laboratory diagnosis of intestinal parasitic diseases by the laboratories participating in the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing].

    PubMed

    Malakhov, V N; Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu; Serdiuk, A P

    2014-01-01

    In 2010-2013, the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents ofparasitic diseases in the feces has been assessed by the specialists of the laboratories of the therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions (TPIs) and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, which are participants of the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing. Thirty-two specimens containing 16 species of human helminths and 4 species of enteric protozoa in different combinations were examined. The findings suggest that the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents of parasitic diseases is low in the laboratories of health care facilities and that the specialists of the laboratories of TPIs and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, do not not possess the knowledge and skills necessary to make a laboratory diagnosis of helminths and enteric protozoa. The average detection rates of helminths and protozoa were at a level of 64 and 36%, respectively. The correct results showed that the proportion of helminths and protozoa were 94.5 and 5.5%, respectively. According to the biological and epidemiological classification of helminths, there were higher detection rates for contact group parasites (Enterobius vermicularis and Hymenolepis nana) and geohelminths (Ascaris, Trichuris trichiura, and others). Biohelminths (Opisthorchis, tapeworms, and others) Were detectable slightly worse.

  9. Factoring quality laboratory diagnosis into the malaria control agenda for sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Aidoo, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Recent progress in malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa has been achieved primarily through provision of insecticide-treated nets, indoor residual spraying, and antimalarial drugs. Although these interventions are important, proper case identification and accurate measurement of their impact depend on quality diagnostic testing. Current availability of diagnostic testing for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa is inadequate to support disease management, prevention programs, and surveillance needs. Challenges faced include a dearth of skilled workforce, inadequate health systems infrastructure, and lack of political will. A coordinated approach to providing pre-service clinical and laboratory training together with systems that support a scale-up of laboratory services could provide means not only for effective malaria case management but also, management of non-malaria febrile illnesses, disease surveillance, and accurate control program evaluation. A synthesis of the challenges faced in ensuring quality malaria testing and how to include this information in the malaria control and elimination agenda are presented.

  10. Verification of Inter-laboratorial Genotyping Consistency in the Molecular Diagnosis of Polyglutamine Spinocerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Amanda; Raposo, Mafalda; Milà, Montserrat; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Magaña, Jonathan J; Bettencourt, Bruno Filipe; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Santos, Cristina; Lima, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, caused by CAG expansions in the coding region of the respective genes. Given their considerable clinical overlapping, differential diagnosis relies on molecular testing. Laboratory best practice guidelines for molecular genetic testing of the SCAs were released in 2010 by the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network, following the recognition of gross genotyping errors by some diagnostic laboratories. The main goal of this study was to verify the existence of inter-laboratorial consistency comparing genotypes for SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7 obtained by independent diagnostic laboratories. The individual impact of different methodological issues on the genotype for the several SCAs was also analysed. Four international collaborative diagnostic laboratories provided 79 samples and the respective SCA genotypes. Samples were genotyped in-house for all SCAs using an independent methodology; comparison of the allele size obtained with the one provided by the collaborative laboratories was performed. Globally, no significant differences were identified, a result which could be reflecting the fulfilment of recommendations for the molecular testing of SCAs and demonstrating an improvement in genotyping accuracy.

  11. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid lens-free microscopy: a new tool for the laboratory diagnosis of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Delacroix, Robin; Morel, Sophie Nhu An; Hervé, Lionel; Bordy, Thomas; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Drancourt, Michel; Allier, Cédric

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid cytology is performed by operator-dependant light microscopy as part of the routine laboratory work-flow diagnosis of meningitis. We evaluated operator-independent lens-free microscopy numeration of erythrocytes and leukocytes for the cytological diagnosis of meningitis. In a first step, prospective optical microscopy counts of leukocytes done by five different operators yielded an overall 16.7% misclassification of 72 cerebrospinal fluid specimens in meningitis/non-meningitis categories using a 10 leukocyte/μL cut-off. In a second step, the lens-free microscopy algorithm adapted for counting cerebrospinal fluid cells and discriminating leukocytes from erythrocytes was modified step-by-step in the prospective analysis of 215 cerebrospinal fluid specimens. The definite algorithm yielded a 100% sensitivity and a 86% specificity compared to confirmed diagnostics. In a third step, a blind lens-free microscopic analysis of 116 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including six cases of microbiology-confirmed infectious meningitis, yielded a 100% sensitivity and a 79% specificity. Adapted lens-free microscopy is thus emerging as an operator-independent technique for the rapid numeration of leukocytes and erythrocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. In particular, this technique is well suited to the rapid diagnosis of meningitis at point-of-care laboratories. PMID:28045084

  13. Cardiac troponins I and T: molecular markers for early diagnosis, prognosis, and accurate triaging of patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ram P; Jain, Anubhav; Khan, Zakir; Kohli, Veena; Bharmal, R N; Kartikeyan, S; Bisen, Prakash S

    2012-12-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of death worldwide, with early diagnosis still being difficult. Promising new cardiac biomarkers such as troponins and creatine kinase (CK) isoforms are being studied and integrated into clinical practice for early diagnosis of AMI. The cardiac-specific troponins I and T (cTnI and cTnT) have good sensitivity and specificity as indicators of myocardial necrosis and are superior to CK and its MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) in this regard. Besides being potential biologic markers, cardiac troponins also provide significant prognostic information. The introduction of novel high-sensitivity troponin assays has enabled more sensitive and timely diagnosis or exclusion of acute coronary syndromes. This review summarizes the available information on the potential of troponins and other cardiac markers in early diagnosis and prognosis of AMI, and provides perspectives on future diagnostic approaches to AMI.

  14. Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Resource-Poor Countries: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Linda M.; Somoskövi, Ákos; Gutierrez, Cristina; Lee, Evan; Paramasivan, C. N.; Abimiku, Alash'le; Spector, Steven; Roscigno, Giorgio; Nkengasong, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary: With an estimated 9.4 million new cases globally, tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health concern. Eighty percent of all cases worldwide occur in 22 high-burden, mainly resource-poor settings. This devastating impact of tuberculosis on vulnerable populations is also driven by its deadly synergy with HIV. Therefore, building capacity and enhancing universal access to rapid and accurate laboratory diagnostics are necessary to control TB and HIV-TB coinfections in resource-limited countries. The present review describes several new and established methods as well as the issues and challenges associated with implementing quality tuberculosis laboratory services in such countries. Recently, the WHO has endorsed some of these novel methods, and they have been made available at discounted prices for procurement by the public health sector of high-burden countries. In addition, international and national laboratory partners and donors are currently evaluating other new diagnostics that will allow further and more rapid testing in point-of-care settings. While some techniques are simple, others have complex requirements, and therefore, it is important to carefully determine how to link these new tests and incorporate them within a country's national diagnostic algorithm. Finally, the successful implementation of these methods is dependent on key partnerships in the international laboratory community and ensuring that adequate quality assurance programs are inherent in each country's laboratory network. PMID:21482728

  15. Accuracy of the Clinical Diagnosis of Vaginitis Compared to a DNA Probe Laboratory Standard

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Nancy K.; Neal, Jeremy L.; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of the three most common causes of acute vulvovaginal symptoms (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis vaginitis, and trichomoniasis vaginalis) using a traditional, standardized clinical diagnostic protocol compared to a DNA probe laboratory standard. Methods This prospective clinical comparative study had a sample of 535 active duty United States military women presenting with vulovaginal symptoms. Clinical diagnoses were made by research staff using a standardized protocol of history, physical examination including pelvic examination, determination of vaginal pH, vaginal fluid amines test, and wet-prep microscopy. Vaginal fluid samples were obtained for DNA analysis. The research clinicians were blinded to the DNA results. Results The participants described a presenting symptom of abnormal discharge (50%), itching/irritation (33%), malodor (10%), burning (4%), or others such as vulvar pain and vaginal discomfort. According to laboratory standard, there were 225 cases (42%) of bacterial vaginosis 76 cases (14%) of candidiasis vaginitis, 8 cases (1.5%) of trichomoniasis vaginalis, 87 cases of mixed infections (16%), and 139 negative cases (26%). For each single infection, the clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.8% and 70.0% for bacterial vaginosis; 83.8% and 84.8% for candidiasis vaginitis; and 84.6% and 99.6% for trichomoniasis vaginalis when compared to the DNA probe standard. Conclusion Compared to a DNA probe standard, clinical diagnosis is 81-85% sensitive and 70- 99% specific for bacterial vaginosis, candida vaginitis, and trichomoniasis. Even under research conditions that provided clinicians with sufficient time and materials to conduct a thorough and standardized clinical evaluation, the diagnosis and therefore, subsequent treatment of these common vaginal problems remains difficult. PMID:19104364

  16. [Laboratory diagnosis of rabies in the west region of São Paulo State].

    PubMed

    Albas, Avelino; Zoccolaro, Paulo Tadeu; Rosa, Talita Zacarias; Cunha, Elenice Maria Sequetin

    2005-01-01

    The Pólo da Alta Sorocabana laboratory, Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil, and the Biological Institute in São Paulo State, performed an evaluation of rabies diagnosis from 1996 to 2003 in the west region of São Paulo State. For the tests, the laboratories used direct immunofluorescence and mice inoculation in 4,950 samples, that were sent for analysis involving dogs, cats, cattle, chiroptera (bats) and other animals. According to the results, the laboratories found 74 positive samples; of which 58 (78.4%) were non-hematophagous bats and 16 (21.6%) related to cattle. The present epidemiological study verified that in spite of the high positive index in chiroptera compared to the other species, there was not an outbreak of rabies in the species in the region of Presidente Prudente, from 1996 to 2003 but a rise in the positive index due to a marked increase in the number of chiroptera samples sent to the laboratories for virus rabies research.

  17. Prenatal diagnosis in haemophilia A: experience of the genetic diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kessler, L; Adams, R; Mighion, L; Walther, S; Ganguly, A

    2014-11-01

    The paper describes the experience of the Genetic Diagnostic Laboratory in prenatal testing for haemophilia A, an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the F8 gene. Knowledge of a familial mutation prior to pregnancy can benefit prenatal diagnosis and decrease wait time for molecular testing during pregnancy. This is a retrospective review of a series of pregnant women who pursued F8 gene testing from December 1997 through May 2012, highlighting three cases, which demonstrate the technical complexities of analysis and the implications of not knowing carrier status prior to pregnancy. Mutations of the F8 gene were detected in affected males, obligate female carriers and suspected female carriers by DNA sequencing, inverse-PCR, qRT-PCR, Southern blot and exonic dosage analysis. The same methods were used to analyse prenatal samples from obligate or suspected female carriers upon request. Maternal cell contamination studies were performed for all prenatal samples analysed. Ninety-nine women pursued F8 testing during pregnancy, either for carrier status alone or carrier status and prenatal diagnosis. Ninety-one women (91%) requested carrier testing because they did not know their F8 mutation carrier status prior to pregnancy. Eight women requested prenatal diagnosis only, and only 4 of these were aware of their mutation status. Thirty-seven individuals were found to be mutation carriers. Forty-two prenatal samples were received for prenatal diagnosis. In total 21 foetuses were identified as mutation carriers. Mutation detection was complex and increased the turnaround time in some cases. Only four of 99 women who submitted samples for F8 testing were aware of their F8 mutation status prior to pregnancy. Knowledge of F8 mutation status prior to pregnancy allows for efficient prenatal diagnosis, when desired. Thus, preconception genetic counselling is required to inform patients of the available options and the complex and time-consuming nature of F8 testing.

  18. Summary Report on the Graded Prognostic Assessment: An Accurate and Facile Diagnosis-Specific Tool to Estimate Survival for Patients With Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu, Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; Chiang, Veronica; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Sperduto, Christina Maria; Lin, Nancy; Mehta, Minesh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Our group has previously published the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA), a prognostic index for patients with brain metastases. Updates have been published with refinements to create diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment indices. The purpose of this report is to present the updated diagnosis-specific GPA indices in a single, unified, user-friendly report to allow ease of access and use by treating physicians. Methods A multi-institutional retrospective (1985 to 2007) database of 3,940 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases underwent univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic factors associated with outcomes by primary site and treatment. Significant prognostic factors were used to define the diagnosis-specific GPA prognostic indices. A GPA of 4.0 correlates with the best prognosis, whereas a GPA of 0.0 corresponds with the worst prognosis. Results Significant prognostic factors varied by diagnosis. For lung cancer, prognostic factors were Karnofsky performance score, age, presence of extracranial metastases, and number of brain metastases, confirming the original Lung-GPA. For melanoma and renal cell cancer, prognostic factors were Karnofsky performance score and the number of brain metastases. For breast cancer, prognostic factors were tumor subtype, Karnofsky performance score, and age. For GI cancer, the only prognostic factor was the Karnofsky performance score. The median survival times by GPA score and diagnosis were determined. Conclusion Prognostic factors for patients with brain metastases vary by diagnosis, and for each diagnosis, a robust separation into different GPA scores was discerned, implying considerable heterogeneity in outcome, even within a single tumor type. In summary, these indices and related worksheet provide an accurate and facile diagnosis-specific tool to estimate survival, potentially select appropriate treatment, and stratify clinical trials for patients with brain metastases. PMID:22203767

  19. Botulism in Brazil, 2000-2008: epidemiology, clinical findings and laboratorial diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Ruth Estela Gravato; Ristori, Christiane Asturiano; Lopes, Giselle Ibette S Lopez; Paula, Ana Maria Ramalho de; Sakuma, Harumi; Grigaliunas, Raquel; Lopreato Filho, Roberto; Gelli, Dilma Scala; Eduardo, Maria Bernadete de Paula; Jakabi, Miyoko

    2010-01-01

    Botulism is a rare and potentially lethal illness caused by Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin. We describe the findings of a laboratorial investigation of 117 suspected cases of botulism reported to the surveillance system in Brazil from January 2000 to October 2008. Data on the number and type of samples analyzed, type of toxins identified, reporting of the number of botulism cases and transmission sources are discussed. A total of 193 clinical samples and 81 food samples were analyzed for detection and identification of the botulism neurotoxin. Among the clinical samples, 22 (11.4%) presented the toxin (nine type A, five type AB and eight with an unidentified type); in food samples, eight (9.9%) were positive for the toxin (five type A, one type AB and two with an unidentified type). Of the 38 cases of suspected botulism in Brazil, 27 were confirmed by a mouse bioassay. Laboratorial botulism diagnosis is an important procedure to elucidate cases, especially food-borne botulism, to confirm clinical diagnosis and to identify toxins in food, helping sanitary control measures.

  20. Serological Diagnosis of Paracoccidioidomycosis: High Rate of Inter-laboratorial Variability among Medical Mycology Reference Centers

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Monica Scarpelli Martinelli; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Vicentini, Adriana Pardini; Svidzinski, Teresinha Inez Estivalet; Mendes-Giannini, Maria Jose; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Martinez, Roberto; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires; Taborda, Carlos Pelleschi; Benard, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Background Serological tests have long been established as rapid, simple and inexpensive tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of PCM. However, different protocols and antigen preparations are used and the few attempts to standardize the routine serological methods have not succeeded. Methodology/Principal findings We compared the performance of six Brazilian reference centers for serological diagnosis of PCM. Each center provided 30 sera of PCM patients, with positive high, intermediate and low titers, which were defined as the “reference” titers. Each center then applied its own antigen preparation and serological routine test, either semiquantitative double immunodifusion or counterimmmunoelectrophoresis, in the 150 sera from the other five centers blindly as regard to the “reference” titers. Titers were transformed into scores: 0 (negative), 1 (healing titers), 2 (active disease, low titers) and 3 (active disease, high titers) according to each center's criteria. Major discordances were considered between scores indicating active disease and scores indicating negative or healing titers; such discordance when associated with proper clinical and other laboratorial data, may correspond to different approaches to the patient's treatment. Surprisingly, all centers exhibited a high rate of “major” discordances with a mean of 31 (20%) discordant scores. Alternatively, when the scores given by one center to their own sera were compared with the scores given to their sera by the remaining five other centers, a high rate of major discordances was also found, with a mean number of 14.8 sera in 30 presenting a discordance with at least one other center. The data also suggest that centers that used CIE and pool of isolates for antigen preparation performed better. Conclusion There are inconsistencies among the laboratories that are strong enough to result in conflicting information regarding the patients' treatment. Renewed efforts should be promoted to improve

  1. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of infections caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae and C. ulcerans. World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Efstratiou, A; George, R C

    1999-12-01

    These guidelines represent an application of the World Health Organization European Region's manual for the laboratory diagnosis of diphtheria for laboratories in the United Kingdom (UK), but they could be applied to laboratories overseas. The manual was rewritten in response to the re-emergence of diphtheria in eastern Europe and the emergence of other infections caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae and C. ulcerans in the UK and overseas. The guidelines summarise our current recommendations and procedures for the microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by toxigenic and non-toxigenic isolates of corynebacteria, with particular reference to C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans.

  2. Role of the virology laboratory in diagnosis and management of patients with central nervous system disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chonmaitree, T; Baldwin, C D; Lucia, H L

    1989-01-01

    A number of viruses cause acute central nervous system disease. The two major clinical presentations are aseptic meningitis and the less common meningoencephalitis. Clinical virology laboratories are now more widely available than a decade ago; they can be operated on a modest scale and can be tailored to the needs of the patients they serve. Most laboratories can provide diagnostic information on diseases caused by enteroviruses, herpesviruses, and human immunodeficiency virus. Antiviral therapy for herpes simplex virus is now available. By providing a rapid diagnostic test or isolation of the virus or both, the virology laboratory plays a direct role in guiding antiviral therapy for patients with herpes simplex encephalitis. Although there is no specific drug available for enteroviruses, attention needs to be paid to these viruses since they are the most common cause of nonbacterial meningitis and the most common pathogens causing hospitalization for suspected sepsis in young infants in the United States during the warm months of the year. When the virology laboratory maximizes the speed of viral detection or isolation, it can make a significant impact on management of these patients. Early viral diagnosis benefits patients with enteroviral meningitis, most of whom are hospitalized and treated for bacterial sepsis or meningitis or both; these patients have the advantage of early withdrawal of antibiotics and intravenous therapy, early hospital discharge, and avoidance of the risks and costs of unnecessary tests and treatment. Enteroviral infection in young infants also is a risk factor for possible long-term sequelae. For compromised patients, the diagnostic information helps in selecting specific immunoglobulin therapy. Good communication between the physician and the laboratory will result in the most benefit to patients with central nervous system viral infection. PMID:2644021

  3. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles.

  4. Laboratory tests for diagnosis of food allergy: advantages, disadvantages and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Kanny, G; Frémont, S

    2003-04-01

    Numerous biological tests point to the diagnosis of food sensitization: detection of specific IgEs by Rast techniques, multi-detection assays, immunoblotting, screening of basophil activation (BAT or FAST), assays for leukotriene LTC4 release (CAST), measurement of plasma histamine, serum tryptase, serum ECP, urinary EDN, completed by mannitol-lactulose test evaluating intestinal permeability, assay of fecal IgEs, Rast for specific IgG4. Primary screening for anti-food IgEs by multi-detection assays seeks justification from insufficient clinical data and false positive tests are common in patients sensitized to pollens or latex, on account of in vitro cross reactivities (CR). Multiple CR explain positive Rast to vegetal food allergens in such patients. Biological tests should not be performed as the first line of diagnosis. In vivo sensitisation is assessed by positive prick-tests, demonstrating the bivalence of allergens, as well as the affinity of specific IgEs, two conditions necessary to bridge membrane bound specific IgEs, leading to the release of mediators. Prick-tests are closer to clinical symptoms than biological tests. However, the diagnosis of food allergy is based on standardised oral challenges. Exceptions are high levels of specific IgEs to egg (> 6 kUl/l), peanut (> 15 kUl/l), fish (> 20 kUl/l) and milk (> 32 kUl/l), reaching a 95% predictive positive value. Rast inhibition tests are useful to identify masked allergens in foods. Research developments will have impact on the development of new diagnostic tools: allergen mixes reinforcing a food extract by associated recombinant major allergens, multiple combination of recombinant allergens (chips) or tests with synthetic epitopes aimed a the prediction of recovery. Laboratory tests take place in the decision free for the diagnosis for the food allergy and the follow-up of the levels specific IgEs is a tool to assess outcome and contributes to predict recovery or persistent allergy. Up to now the

  5. The laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis III (Sanfilippo syndrome): A changing landscape.

    PubMed

    Bodamer, Olaf A; Giugliani, Roberto; Wood, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III) is characterized by progressive neurological deterioration, behavioral abnormalities, a relatively mild somatic phenotype, and early mortality. Because of the paucity of somatic manifestations and the rarity of the disease, early diagnosis is often difficult. Therapy targeting the underlying disease pathophysiology may offer the greatest clinical benefit when started prior to the onset of significant neurologic sequelae. Here we review current practices in the laboratory diagnosis of MPS III in order to facilitate earlier patient identification and diagnosis. When clinical suspicion of MPS III arises, the first step is to order a quantitative assay that screens urine for the presence of glycosaminoglycan biomarkers using a spectrophotometric compound (e.g., dimethylmethylene blue). We recommend testing all patients with developmental delay and/or behavioral abnormalities as part of the diagnostic work-up because quantitative urine screening is inexpensive and non-invasive. Semi-quantitative urine screening assays using cationic dyes on filter paper (e.g., spot tests) have relatively high rates of false-positives and false-negatives and are obsolete. Of note, a negative urinary glycosaminoglycan assay does not necessarily rule out MPS because, in some patients, an overlap in excretion levels with healthy controls may occur. All urine samples that test positive for glycosaminoglycans with a quantitative assay should be confirmed by electrophoresis, thin layer chromatography, or tandem mass spectrometry, which further improves the sensitivity and specificity. The gold standard for diagnosis remains the enzyme activity assay in cultured skin fibroblasts, leukocytes, plasma, or serum, which can be used as a first-line diagnostic test in some regions. Molecular genetic analysis should be offered to all families of patients to allow genetic counseling for informed family planning. For a small number of variants, genotype

  6. Relevance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for diagnosis of respiratory tract infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Ieven, M; Goossens, H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly receiving requests to perform nucleic acid amplification tests for the detection of a wide variety of infectious agents. In this paper, the efficiency of nucleic acid amplification techniques for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections is reviewed. In general, these techniques should be applied only for the detection of microorganisms for which available diagnostic techniques are markedly insensitive or nonexistent or when turnaround times for existing tests (e.g., viral culture) are much longer than those expected with amplification. This is the case for rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and hantaviruses causing a pulmonary syndrome, Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Coxiella burnetii. For Legionella spp. and fungi, contamination originating from the environment is a limiting factor in interpretation of results, as is the difficulty in differentiating colonization and infection. Detection of these agents in urine or blood by amplification techniques remains to be evaluated. In the clinical setting, there is no need for molecular diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii. At present, amplification methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis cannot replace the classical diagnostic techniques, due to their lack of sensitivity and the absence of specific internal controls for the detection of inhibitors of the reaction. Also, the results of interlaboratory comparisons are unsatisfactory. Furthermore, isolates are needed for susceptibility studies. Additional work remains to be done on sample preparation methods, comparison between different amplification methods, and analysis of results. The techniques can be useful for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in particular circumstances, as well as the rapid detection of most rifampin-resistant isolates. The introduction of diagnostic amplification techniques into a clinical laboratory implies a level of proficiency for

  7. Rare hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies associated with hemolytic anemia - pathophysiology, clinical aspects, and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koralkova, P; van Solinge, W W; van Wijk, R

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies are genetic disorders affecting genes encoding red blood cell enzymes. They cause a specific type of anemia designated hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). Enzymopathies affect cellular metabolism, which, in the red cell, mainly consists of anaerobic glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, glutathione metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. Enzymopathies are commonly associated with normocytic normochromic hemolytic anemia. In contrast to other hereditary red cell disorders such as membrane disorders or hemoglobinopathies, the morphology of the red blood cell shows no specific abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on detection of reduced specific enzyme activity and molecular characterization of the defect on the DNA level. The most common enzyme disorders are deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and pyruvate kinase (PK). However, there are a number of other enzyme disorders, often much less known, causing HNSHA. These disorders are rare and often underdiagnosed, and the purpose of this review. In this brief review, we provide an overview of clinically relevant enzymes, their function in red cell metabolism, and key aspects of laboratory diagnosis.

  8. Probable Zika virus-associated Guillain-Barré syndrome: Challenges with clinico-laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eliza; Becker, Zoe; Shalev, Daniel; Lee, Christopher T; Cioroiu, Comana; Thakur, Kiran

    2017-04-15

    A 55year old woman in New York City presented in May 2016 with progressive weakness, ataxia, paresthesia, and areflexia, shortly after returning from the Dominican Republic. Lumbar puncture revealed cytoalbuminological dissociation. Due to her recent travel, Zika-associated Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS) was suspected and she underwent evaluation for recent flavivirus exposure. Zika virus RNA was not detected in serum, but Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) was detected in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Dengue virus IgM in serum was equivocal and dengue virus IgG was detected in the serum. Plaque-reduction neutralization testing showed elevated titers to both Zika virus and dengue virus, providing evidence of recent infection with a flavivirus. The patient was diagnosed with probable Zika virus-associated GBS based on clinical findings, ancillary testing, and laboratory assays according to current guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Zika virus transmission in the Americas is resulting in increasing numbers of patients presenting with Zika virus-associated neurological syndromes. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis in these cases can be challenging and may be aided by consultation with CDC, and state and local public health agencies.

  9. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, Kate; Hay, Alastair D.; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; MacGowan, Alasdair; Whiting, Penny; Lawton, Michael; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Hollingworth, William; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Harman, Kim; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the validity of diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) through urine culture between samples processed in routine health service laboratories and those processed in a research laboratory. Population and methods We conducted a prospective diagnostic cohort study in 4808 acutely ill children aged <5 years attending UK primary health care. UTI, defined as pure/predominant growth ≥105 CFU/mL of a uropathogen (the reference standard), was diagnosed at routine health service laboratories and a central research laboratory by culture of urine samples. We calculated areas under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) for UTI predicted by pre-specified symptoms, signs and dipstick test results (the “index test”), separately according to whether samples were obtained by clean catch or nappy (diaper) pads. Results 251 (5.2%) and 88 (1.8%) children were classified as UTI positive by health service and research laboratories respectively. Agreement between laboratories was moderate (kappa = 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.43), and better for clean catch (0.54; 0.45, 0.63) than nappy pad samples (0.20; 0.12, 0.28). In clean catch samples, the AUC was lower for health service laboratories (AUC = 0.75; 95% CI 0.69, 0.80) than the research laboratory (0.86; 0.79, 0.92). Values of AUC were lower in nappy pad samples (0.65 [0.61, 0.70] and 0.79 [0.70, 0.88] for health service and research laboratory positivity, respectively) than clean catch samples. Conclusions The agreement of microbiological diagnosis of UTI comparing routine health service laboratories with a research laboratory was moderate for clean catch samples and poor for nappy pad samples and reliability is lower for nappy pad than for clean catch samples. Positive results from the research laboratory appear more likely to reflect real UTIs than those from routine health service laboratories, many of which (particularly from nappy pad samples) could be due to contamination. Health service

  10. Update on laboratory tests for the diagnosis and differentiation of hereditary angioedema and acquired angioedema.

    PubMed

    Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Giclas, Patricia C

    2011-01-01

    The importance of laboratory testing in the diagnosis of hereditary angioedema (HAE) has increased with the advent of new treatment options in recent years. It has been 50 years since HAE was linked to a decrease of C1INH (the inhibitor of complement enzyme, C1 esterase), a link that provided for the first laboratory test available for this disorder. HAE is subdivided into types that can be differentiated only by laboratory testing. The Type I form is characterized by low levels and function of C1INH in the circulation. The Type II form is characterized by normal levels of C1INH, but low function. Sample collection and handling is critical for the functional assays. The serum samples for the functional analysis must be collected, separated, and frozen at less than -60°C within 2 hours of the blood draw. Additionally some suspected Type II patients may benefit from looking closely at what method is used for the functional testing. The acquired forms of angioedema (AAE) can benefit from the same clinical testing, because most are ultimately due to decreased C1INH. Measurement of C1q levels and testing for anti-C1INH autoantibodies can help differentiate AAE from HAE. Diagnostic testing for the third hereditary form, alternately called estrogen-dependent HAE, HAE with Normal C1INH or HAE Type III, still presents challenges, and definitive testing may have to wait until there is a more complete understanding of this mixed group of patients. The next steps will include genetic analysis of C1INH and other proteins involved in HAE.

  11. Lateral Flow Rapid Test for Accurate and Early Diagnosis of Scrub Typhus: A Febrile Illness of Historically Military Importance in the Pacific Rim.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chien-Chung; Zhangm, Zhiwen; Weissenberger, Giulia; Chen, Hua-Wei; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2017-03-01

    Scrub typhus (ST) is an infection caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Historically, ST was ranked as the second most important arthropod-borne medical problem only behind malaria during World War II and the Vietnam War. The disease occurs mainly in Southeast Asia and has been shown to emerge and reemerge in new areas, implying the increased risk for U.S. military and civilian personnel deployed to these regions. ST can effectively be treated by doxycycline provided the diagnosis is made early, before the development of severe complications. Scrub Typhus Detect is a lateral flow rapid test based on a mixture of recombinant 56-kDa antigens with broad reactivity. The performance of this prototype product was evaluated against indirect immunofluorescence assay, the serological gold standard. Using 249 prospectively collected samples from Thailand, the sensitivity and specificity for IgM was found to be 100% and 92%, respectively, suggesting a high potential of this product for clinical use. This product will provide a user friendly, rapid, and accurate diagnosis of ST for clinicians to provide timely and accurate treatments of deployed personnel.

  12. Accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome based upon objective test methods for characteristic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank NM

    2015-01-01

    Although myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are considered to be synonymous, the definitional criteria for ME and CFS define two distinct, partially overlapping, clinical entities. ME, whether defined by the original criteria or by the recently proposed criteria, is not equivalent to CFS, let alone a severe variant of incapacitating chronic fatigue. Distinctive features of ME are: muscle weakness and easy muscle fatigability, cognitive impairment, circulatory deficits, a marked variability of the symptoms in presence and severity, but above all, post-exertional “malaise”: a (delayed) prolonged aggravation of symptoms after a minor exertion. In contrast, CFS is primarily defined by (unexplained) chronic fatigue, which should be accompanied by four out of a list of 8 symptoms, e.g., headaches. Due to the subjective nature of several symptoms of ME and CFS, researchers and clinicians have questioned the physiological origin of these symptoms and qualified ME and CFS as functional somatic syndromes. However, various characteristic symptoms, e.g., post-exertional “malaise” and muscle weakness, can be assessed objectively using well-accepted methods, e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise tests and cognitive tests. The objective measures acquired by these methods should be used to accurately diagnose patients, to evaluate the severity and impact of the illness objectively and to assess the positive and negative effects of proposed therapies impartially. PMID:26140274

  13. A new method of accurate broken rotor bar diagnosis based on modulation signal bispectrum analysis of motor current signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, F.; Wang, T.; Alwodai, A.; Tian, X.; Shao, Y.; Ball, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) has been an effective way of monitoring electrical machines for many years. However, inadequate accuracy in diagnosing incipient broken rotor bars (BRB) has motivated many studies into improving this method. In this paper a modulation signal bispectrum (MSB) analysis is applied to motor currents from different broken bar cases and a new MSB based sideband estimator (MSB-SE) and sideband amplitude estimator are introduced for obtaining the amplitude at (1 ± 2 s)fs (s is the rotor slip and fs is the fundamental supply frequency) with high accuracy. As the MSB-SE has a good performance of noise suppression, the new estimator produces more accurate results in predicting the number of BRB, compared with conventional power spectrum analysis. Moreover, the paper has also developed an improved model for motor current signals under rotor fault conditions and an effective method to decouple the BRB current which interferes with that of speed oscillations associated with BRB. These provide theoretical supports for the new estimators and clarify the issues in using conventional bispectrum analysis.

  14. Accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome based upon objective test methods for characteristic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Twisk, Frank Nm

    2015-06-26

    Although myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are considered to be synonymous, the definitional criteria for ME and CFS define two distinct, partially overlapping, clinical entities. ME, whether defined by the original criteria or by the recently proposed criteria, is not equivalent to CFS, let alone a severe variant of incapacitating chronic fatigue. Distinctive features of ME are: muscle weakness and easy muscle fatigability, cognitive impairment, circulatory deficits, a marked variability of the symptoms in presence and severity, but above all, post-exertional "malaise": a (delayed) prolonged aggravation of symptoms after a minor exertion. In contrast, CFS is primarily defined by (unexplained) chronic fatigue, which should be accompanied by four out of a list of 8 symptoms, e.g., headaches. Due to the subjective nature of several symptoms of ME and CFS, researchers and clinicians have questioned the physiological origin of these symptoms and qualified ME and CFS as functional somatic syndromes. However, various characteristic symptoms, e.g., post-exertional "malaise" and muscle weakness, can be assessed objectively using well-accepted methods, e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise tests and cognitive tests. The objective measures acquired by these methods should be used to accurately diagnose patients, to evaluate the severity and impact of the illness objectively and to assess the positive and negative effects of proposed therapies impartially.

  15. The Role of Laboratory Supervision in Improving the Quality of Malaria Diagnosis: A Pilot Study in Huambo, Angola.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Rebecca; Mugizi, Rukaaka; Lopes, Sergio; Etossi, R Cacilda; Allan, Richard

    2016-03-01

    In 2006, the Angolan National Malaria Control Program introduced clinical guidelines for malaria case management, which included diagnostic confirmation of malaria before administration of treatment; however, diagnostic practices were inconsistent and of unknown quality. In 2009, a laboratory supervision program was implemented in Huambo Province, with the goal of assessing and improving diagnosis of malaria within the confines of available in-country resources. Supervisions were carried out from 2009 to 2014 using a standardized supervision tool by national laboratory trainers. Data from the first supervision were compared with that from the final supervision. Over the study period, the number and level of training of laboratory technicians increased, and there was a nonstatistically significant trend toward improved laboratory conditions. There was a significant reduction in false-positive microscopy slide reading (P = 0.0133). Laboratory infrastructural capacity to diagnose other communicable diseases, including syphilis, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus infections (P = 0.0012, 0.0233 and 0.0026, respectively), also improved significantly. Laboratory supervision for malaria diagnosis found significant areas for improvement, and in combination with concurrent capacity-building activities, it improved the diagnostic capacity for malaria and other diseases. Importantly, this study demonstrates that locally available resources can be used to improve the accuracy of malaria diagnosis.

  16. [Laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection, viral tropism and resistance to antiretrovirals].

    PubMed

    García, Federico; Álvarez, Marta; Bernal, Carmen; Chueca, Natalia; Guillot, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    The accurate diagnosis of HIV infection demands that to consider a positive result, at least three assays with different antigenic base should be used, one of them, Western-Blot being mandatory for confirmation. Fourth generation ELISAs shorten the window phase to 13-15 days, as they now include p24 antigen detection. Proviral DNA or Viral RNA detection by molecular methods have proved useful for addressing complex situations in which serology was inconclusive. Viral load (HIV-RNA) is routinely used to follow-up HIV infected patients and is used for treatment initiation decisions. It is also used to monitor viral failure. When this happens, resistance tests are needed to guide treatment changes. Resistance is also used to assess the transmission of drug resistance to newly diagnosed patients. Finally, before using an anti-CCR5 drug, viral tropism needs to be determined. This can be done using genotypic tests, widely available in many HIV labs, or phenotypic tests, only available at certain sites.

  17. Comparison of laboratory and immediate diagnosis of coagulation for patients under oral anticoagulation therapy before dental surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kruse-Loesler, Birgit; Kelker, Matthias; Kleinheinz, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Background Dental surgery can be carried out on patients under oral anticoagulation therapy by using haemostyptic measures. The aim of the study was a comparative analysis of coagulation by laboratory methods and immediate patient diagnosis on the day of the planned procedure. Methods On the planned day of treatment, diagnoses were carried out on 298 patients for Prothrombin Time (PT), the International Normalised Ratio (INR), and Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT). The decision to proceed with treatment was made with an INR < 4.0 according to laboratory results. Results Planned treatment did not go ahead in 2.7% of cases. Postoperatively, 14.8% resulted in secondary bleeding, but were able to be treated as out-patients. 1.7% had to be treated as in-patients. The average error between the immediate diagnosis and the laboratory method: 95% confidence interval was -5.8 ± 15.2% for PT, -2.7 ± 17.9 s for PTT and 0.23 ± 0.80 for INR. The limits for concordance were 9.4 and -21.1% for PT, 15.2 and -20.5 s for PTT, and 1.03 and -0.57 for INR. Conclusion This study showed a clinically acceptable concordance between laboratory and immediate diagnosis for INR. Concordance for PT and PTT did not meet clinical requirements. For patients under oral anticoagulation therapy, patient INR diagnosis enabled optimisation of the treatment procedure when planning dental surgery. PMID:16316464

  18. Laboratory Diagnosis for Outbreak-Prone Infectious Diseases after Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Saito-Obata, Mariko; Saito, Mayuko; Tan, Titus C.; Medado, Inez Andrea P.; Dapat, Clyde; Okamoto, Michiko; Tamaki, Raita; Capistrano, Rowena C.; Segubre-Mercado, Edelwisa; Lupisan, Socorro P.; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) hit the central part of the Philippines on November 8, 2013. To identify possible outbreaks of communicable diseases after the typhoon, nasopharyngeal swabs, stool and blood samples were collected from patients who visited the Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center due to acute respiratory infection (ARI), acute gastroenteritis (AGE) or other febrile illness (OFI) including suspected dengue fever, between November 28, 2013 and February 5, 2014.   Methods: Samples were tested on-site for selected pathogens using rapid diagnostic tests. Confirmation and further analysis were conducted at the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM) in Manila using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Residues of the rapid diagnostic tests and samples collected in the filter papers (FTATM card) were transported to Manila under suboptimal conditions. PCR results were compared between the kit residues and the filter papers.   Results: A total of 185 samples were collected. Of these, 128 cases were ARI, 17 cases were AGE and 40 cases were OFI. For nasopharyngeal swab samples, detection rates for enterovirus and rhinovirus residues were higher than the filter papers. For stool samples, rotavirus positive rate for the filter paper was higher than the kit residues. We also managed to obtain the sequence data from some of the kit residues and filter papers.   Discussion: Our results confirmed the importance of PCR for the laboratory diagnosis of infectious diseases in post-disaster situations when  diagnostic options are limited. PMID:27917305

  19. Laboratory diagnosis of contagious ecthyma: comparison of different PCR protocols with virus isolation in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kottaridi, Christine; Nomikou, Kiki; Lelli, Rossella; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Mangana, Olga

    2006-06-01

    A new polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid diagnosis of contagious ecthyma was designed and applied to 21 clinical samples from Greece. This assay, which detects a highly conserved gene from the parapox genome, was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity in order to be considered as a useful diagnostic tool. A comparative study with two published PCR protocols one using primers PPP1-PPP3, PPP1-PPP4 which targets putative virion envelope gene B2L and the other using VIR1-VIR2 primers which amplifies ORF virus interferon resistant (VIR) gene, as well as cell culture virus neutralization assay was carried out. All samples tested were amplified successfully with the PCR protocol established in the laboratory. The combination of primers PPP1-PPP3 and PPP1-PPP4 in a semi-nested PCR gave a positive result in 20 of 21 samples while primers VIR1-VIR2 failed to amplify successfully 7 of 21 samples. The diagnostic value of parapox viral DNA amplification was also compared with the results of virus isolation by cell culture and was positive in three samples that the virus isolation was obtained.

  20. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  1. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015.

  2. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea and molecular characterization of clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Russello, Giuseppe; Russo, Antonio; Sisto, Francesca; Scaltrito, Maria Maddalena; Farina, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated a three-step algorithm for laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD). First, stool specimens were screened using an EIA test for glutamate dehydrogenase detection. Screen-positive specimens were tested by a rapid cytotoxintoxin A/B assay and subjected to stool culture. All cultures positive for C. difficile underwent toxigenic culture. The results showed that toxigenic culture allowed us to recover 37/156 (24.4%) stool samples harbouring toxigenic C. difficile that would have been missed by using faecal cytotoxin assay alone. This determined an increase in infection prevalence of 4.2% (from 11.4% to 15.6 %). Furthermore, to characterize the clinical Clostridium difficile isolates and the distribution of PCR ribotypes circulating in the San Carlo Borromeo hospital, molecular typing using semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep- PCR) and PCR ribotyping, and an evaluation of the antibiotic resistance were also performed. Among them, 71 indistinguishable strains were detected by rep-PCR and 83 by PCR-ribotyping revealing C. difficile outbreaks in our hospital. A total of 6 different ribotypes were obtained by PCR ribotyping. The most frequent ribotype was 018 (88.2%) that also showed resistance to moxifloxacin. In one case, uncommon PCR ribotype 186 was also identified.

  3. Workplace investigation of increased diagnosis of malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.H. II; Patterson, H.W.; Hatch, F.; Discher, D.; Schneider, J.S.; Bennett, D.

    1994-08-01

    Based on rates for the surrounding communities, the diagnosis rate of malignant melanoma for employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 1972 to 1977 was three to four times higher than expected. In 1984 Austin and Reynolds concluded, as a result of a case-control study, that five occupational factors were {open_quotes}causally associated{close_quotes} with melanoma risk at LLNL. These factors were: (1) exposure to radioactive materials, (2) work at Site 300, (3) exposure to volatile photographic chemicals, (4) presence at the Pacific Test Site, and (5) chemist duties. Subsequent reviews of the Austin and Reynolds report concluded that the methods used were appropriate and correctly carried out. These reports did determine, however, that Austin and Reynolds` conclusion concerning a causal relationship between occupational factors and melanoma among employees was overstated. There is essentially no supporting evidence linking the occupational factors with melanoma from animal studies or human epidemiology. Our report summarizes the results of further investigation of potential occupational factors.

  4. [RDBH-method and big DyeTM terminator technology in accurate diagnosis of β-thalassemia and the allelic polymorphism of β-globin cluster].

    PubMed

    Akperova, G A

    2014-11-01

    IThe purpose of this study was to evaluate of the efficiency of RDBH-method and Big DyeTM Terminator technology in an accurate diagnosis of β-thalassemia and the allelic polymorphism of β-globin cluster. It was done a complete hematology analysis (HB, MCH, MCV, MCHC, RBC, Hct, HbA2, HbF, Serum iron, Serum ferritin at four children (males, 6-10 years old) and their parents. Molecular analysis included Reverse Dot-Blot Hybridization StripAssay (RDBH) and DNA sequencing on ABI PRISM Big DyeTM Terminator. Hematologic and molecular parameters were contradictory. The homozygosity for β0-thalassemia (β0IVS2.1[G>A] and β0codon 8[-AA]) at three boys with the mild clinical manifestation and heterozygosity of their parents for mutations, and the absence of β-globin mutations at parents and a boy who holds monthly transfusion was established by RDBH-analysis. DNA sequencing by technology Big DyeTM Terminator showed polymorphism at positions -551 and -521 of Cap5'-region (-650-250) - (AT)7(T)7 and (AT)8(T)5. Application of the integrated clinical-molecular approach is an ideal method for an accurate diagnosis, identification of asymptomatic carriers and a reduce of the risk of complications from β-thalassemia, moreover screening of γG-gene and the level of fetal hemoglobin in early childhood will help manage of β-thalassemia clinic and prevent heavy consequences of the disease.

  5. Diagnosis of Wilson disease in young children: molecular genetic testing and a paradigm shift from the laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong Kee

    2012-12-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism that results in accumulation of copper primarily in the liver, brain and cornea. Mutations in the WD gene, ATP7B, cause failure of copper excretion from hepatocyte into bile and a defective synthesis of ceruloplasmin. More than 500 mutations are now recognized, scattered throughout the ATP7B gene. Since WD has protean clinical presentations, awareness of WD in clinical practice is important for the early diagnosis and prevention of accumulated copper toxicity. Molecular genetic testing is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of WD in uncertain cases and family screening. Siblings should be screened for WD once an index case has been diagnosed. Discrimination of heterozygotes from asymptomatic patients is essential to avoid inappropriate lifelong therapy for heterozygotes. Genetic testing, either by haplotype analysis or by mutation analysis, is the only definite solution for differentiating heterozygote carriers from affected asymptomatic patients. Routine genetic testing, because of the multitude of documented mutations, has been thought to be impractical until recently. However, genetic testing is now being more actively applied to the diagnosis of WD, particularly in young children in whom conventional biochemical diagnosis has much limitation and only genetic testing is able to confirm WD. Because advancement of modern biochemical technology now allows more rapid, easier, and less expensive mutation detection, direct DNA sequencing could be actively considered as the primary mode of diagnostic investigation rather than a supplementary test to the conventional biochemical tests. This review will focus on the recent advancement of molecular genetics and genetic diagnosis of WD in very young children on the basis of research data of the Seoul National University Children's Hospital and recent literature.

  6. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Methods A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of experts was first asked to evaluate 115 profiles of patients with MAS, which included the values of laboratory tests at the pre-MAS visit and at MAS onset, and the change in values between the two time points. The experts were asked to choose the 5 laboratory tests in which change was most important for the diagnosis of MAS and to rank the 5 selected tests in order of importance. The relevance of change in laboratory parameters was further discussed and ranked by the same experts at a consensus conference. Results Platelet count was the most frequently selected test, followed by ferritin level, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white cell count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Ferritin was most frequently assigned the highest score. At the end of the process, platelet count, ferritin level and AST were the laboratory tests in which the experts found change over time to be most important. Conclusions We identified the laboratory tests in which change over time is most valuable for the early diagnosis of MAS in sJIA. The dynamics of laboratory values during the course of MAS should be further scrutinised in a prospective study in order to establish the optimal cut-off values for their variation. PMID:26848401

  7. Identification of Bile Duct Paucity in Alagille Syndrome: Using CK7 and EMA Immunohistochemistry as a Reliable Panel for Accurate Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Haley K; Abramowsky, Carlos R; Caltharp, Shelley; Metry, Diana; Cundiff, Caitlin A; Romero, Rene; Gillespie, Scott E; Shehata, Bahig M

    2016-01-01

    Bile duct paucity is the absence or marked reduction in the number of interlobular bile ducts (ILBD) within portal tracts. Its syndromic variant, Alagille syndrome (ALGS), is a multisystem disorder with effects on the liver, cardiovascular system, skeleton, face, and eyes. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait due to defects in NOTCH signaling pathway. ALGS is characterized by vanishing ILBD with subsequent chronic obstructive cholestasis in approximately 89% of cases. Cholestasis stimulates formation of new bile ductules through a process of neoductular reaction, making it difficult to evaluate the presence or absence of ILBD. Therefore, finding a method to differentiate clearly between ILBD and the ductular proliferation is essential for accurate diagnosis. A database search identified 28 patients with confirmed diagnosis of ALGS between 1992 and 2014. Additionally, 7 controls were used. A panel of two immunostains, cytokeratin 7 (CK7) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), was performed. CK7 highlighted the bile duct epithelium of ILBD and ductular proliferation, while EMA stained only the brush border of ILBD. In our ALGS group, the ratio of EMA-positive ILBD to identified portal tracts was 12.6% (range, 0%-41%). However, this same ratio was 95.0% (range, 90%-100%) among control cases (P < 0.001). We propose a panel of two immunostains, CK7 and EMA, to differentiate ILBD from ductular proliferation in patients with cholestasis. With this panel, identification of bile duct paucity can be achieved. Additional studies, including molecular confirmation and clinical correlation, would provide a definitive diagnosis of ALGS.

  8. Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocyte Cytometric Pattern Is More Accurate than Subepithelial Deposits of Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase IgA for the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Lymphocytic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    García-Puig, Roger; Rosinach, Mercè; González, Clarisa; Alsina, Montserrat; Loras, Carme; Salas, Antonio; Viver, Josep M.; Esteve, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims An increase in CD3+TCRγδ+ and a decrease in CD3− intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) is a characteristic flow cytometric pattern of celiac disease (CD) with atrophy. The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of both CD IEL cytometric pattern and anti-TG2 IgA subepithelial deposit analysis (CD IF pattern) for diagnosing lymphocytic enteritis due to CD. Methods Two-hundred and five patients (144 females) who underwent duodenal biopsy for clinical suspicion of CD and positive celiac genetics were prospectively included. Fifty had villous atrophy, 70 lymphocytic enteritis, and 85 normal histology. Eight patients with non-celiac atrophy and 15 with lymphocytic enteritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori acted as control group. Duodenal biopsies were obtained to assess both CD IEL flow cytometric (complete or incomplete) and IF patterns. Results Sensitivity of IF, and complete and incomplete cytometric patterns for CD diagnosis in patients with positive serology (Marsh 1+3) was 92%, 85 and 97% respectively, but only the complete cytometric pattern had 100% specificity. Twelve seropositive and 8 seronegative Marsh 1 patients had a CD diagnosis at inclusion or after gluten free-diet, respectively. CD cytometric pattern showed a better diagnostic performance than both IF pattern and serology for CD diagnosis in lymphocytic enteritis at baseline (95% vs 60% vs 60%, p = 0.039). Conclusions Analysis of the IEL flow cytometric pattern is a fast, accurate method for identifying CD in the initial diagnostic biopsy of patients presenting with lymphocytic enteritis, even in seronegative patients, and seems to be better than anti-TG2 intestinal deposits. PMID:25010214

  9. Febrile urinary tract infections: clinical and laboratory diagnosis, imaging, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Edefonti, Alberto; Tel, Francesca; Testa, Sara; De Palma, Diego

    2014-03-01

    According to the literature, febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common severe bacterial infections occurring in childhood, with potential serious long-term consequences. In recent years, there have been significant developments in our understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical and laboratory issues of febrile UTIs. Studies are focusing on the role of predisposing host factors related to genes regulating immune response, inflammation and fibrosis in the development of acute renal damage and subsequent processes leading to renal scars. All the available guidelines underline the importance of a correct diagnosis of febrile UTI to allow a more rational use of antibiotics and imaging. As a consequence, a shift from aggressive imaging studies to a more restrictive and targeted approach has been recently observed. Regarding the prognosis of febrile UTI, the introduction of prenatal ultrasound studies revealed that a great portion of the alterations at imaging (and thus of the clinical complications), previously attributed to postinfection scarring, were because of congenital kidney and urinary tract abnormalities. Although the long-term consequences of febrile UTIs are difficult to ascertain, it seems that children with febrile UTI, normal renal function and normal kidneys at start present a very low risk of developing decreased renal function or hypertension during follow-up. However, high body temperature and high procalcitonin levels during the acute phase of disease, which are indicative of severe inflammation, and the finding of renal scarring on imaging with DMSA scintigraphy 6 months after febrile UTI, together with the detection of congenital kidney and urinary tract abnormalities, indicate "kidney at risk" in UTI.

  10. Validation of real-time PCR for laboratory diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul P; Kowalski, Regis P; Shanks, Robert M Q; Gordon, Y Jerold

    2008-10-01

    Confirmation of Acanthamoeba keratitis by laboratory diagnosis is the first step in the treatment of this vision-threatening disease. Two real-time PCR TaqMan protocols (the Rivière and Qvarnstrom assays) were developed for the detection of genus-specific Acanthamoeba DNA but lacked clinical validation. We have adapted these assays for the Cepheid SmartCycler II system (i) by determining their real-time PCR limits of detection and amplification efficiencies, (ii) by determining their ability to detect trophozoites and cysts, and (iii) by testing a battery of positive and negative samples. We also examined the inhibitory effects of a number of commonly used topical ophthalmic drugs on real-time PCR. The results of the real-time PCR limit of detection and amplification efficiency of the Rivière and Qvarnstrom assays were 11.3 DNA copies/10 microl and 94% and 43.8 DNA copies/10 microl and 92%, respectively. Our extraction protocol enabled us to detect 0.7 Acanthamoeba cysts/10 microl and 2.3 Acanthamoeba trophozoites/10 microl by both real-time PCR assays. The overall agreement between the assays was 97.0%. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of both real-time PCR assays based on culture were 100% (7 of 7) and 100% (37 of 37), respectively. Polyhexamethylene biguanide was the only topical drug that demonstrated PCR inhibition, with a minimal inhibitory dilution of 1/640 and an amplification efficiency of 72.7%. Four clinical samples were Acanthamoeba culture negative and real-time PCR positive. Our results indicate that both real-time PCR assays could be used to diagnose Acanthamoeba keratitis. Polyhexamethylene biguanide can inhibit PCR, and we suggest that specimen collection occur prior to topical treatment to avoid possible false-negative results.

  11. Current updates on laboratory techniques for the diagnosis of male reproductive failure

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Suresh C; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of male reproductive failure leading to infertility, whether due to delayed parenthood, environmental issues, genetic factors, drugs, etc., is increasing throughout the world. The diagnosis and prognosis of male subfertility have become a challenge. While the basic semen assessment has been performed for many years, a number of studies question the value of the traditional semen characteristics. This is partly due to inadequate methods and standardization, limited knowledge of technical requirements for quality assurance, and an incomplete understanding of what clinical information a semen assessment can provide. Laboratories currently performing semen and endocrine assessment show great variability. The World Health Organization (WHO) manual for the evaluation of semen has been the core of andrology and fertility evaluation that has helped in further development of this field over many years. These include the physical appearance of the ejaculate, assessments of sperm count, motility, vitality, morphology, and functional aspects of the sperm and semen sample. These tests also include male endocrine profile, biochemical evaluation of the semen, detection of antisperm antibodies in serum, the use of computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), sperm DNA integrity, and its damage due to oxidative stress. Assisted reproductive techniques (e.g., IVF, ICSI) have shown great success but are too expensive. Further development in this field with newer techniques and extensive training/instructions can improve accuracy and reduce variability, thus maintaining the quality and standards of such an evaluation. There is an urgent need to have standardized training centers and increased awareness in this area of men's health for reproductive success. PMID:27056346

  12. Clinical and Laboratory Methods in Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Groselj-Grenc, Mojca; Repše, Stane; Vidmar, Dubravka; Derganc, Metka

    2007-01-01

    Aim To compare the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination, white blood cell and differential count, and C-reactive protein as routine tests for acute appendicitis with that of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and ultrasonography. Methods Eighty-two children were admitted to the Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Ljubljana, Slovenia because of suspected acute appendicitis. Among them, 49 children underwent surgery for acute appendicitis and 33 had abdominal pain but were not treated surgically and were diagnosed with non-specific abdominal pain or mesenteric lymphadenitis on sonography. Clinical signs of acute appendicitis were determined by surgeons on admission. White blood cell count and differential and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and IL-6 were measured and abdominal ultrasonography was performed. Results Ultrasonography showed the highest diagnostic accuracy (92.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84.5%-98.0%, Bayes’ theorem), followed by serum IL-6 concentration (77.6% [67.1-86.1%] receiver-operating characteristic [ROC] curve analysis), clinical signs (69.5% [59.5-79.0%] Bayes’ theorem), white blood cell count (68.4% [57.2-78.3%] ROC curve analysis), and serum C-reactive protein concentration (63.7% [52.1-74.3%] ROC curve analysis). Ultrasonography achieved also the highest specificity (95.2%) and positive (93.8%) and negative (93.3%) predictive values, whereas clinical signs showed the highest sensitivity (93.9%). Conclusion Ultrasonography was a more accurate diagnostic method than IL-6 serum concentration, laboratory marker with the highest diagnostic accuracy in our study, and hence it should be a part of the diagnostic procedure for acute appendicitis in children. PMID:17589979

  13. Clinical and laboratory factors in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis in adult HIV-negative patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingjun; Lv, Kefeng; Bao, Jian; Lu, Ciyong; Lu, Zhengqi

    2013-01-01

    Objective It is difficult to make the differential diagnosis between tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and cryptococcal meningitis (CM) when the smear is negative. The objective of this study was to create a diagnostic rule for differentiating TBM from CM in adult HIV-negative patients based on clinical and laboratory features. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of 219 adult HIV-negative patients satisfying the diagnostic criteria for tuberculous (n=100) and cryptococcal (n=119) meningitis hospitalized at the Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University during the period 2000-2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Features found to be independently predictive of tuberculous meningitis were modeled using a multivariate logistic regression to create a diagnostic rule. The performance of the diagnostic rule was assessed using a prospective test data method. Results Six factors were found to be predictive of a diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis: gender, mental disorders, vision and/or hearing damage, proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, the total cerebrospinal fluid white cell count and the coexistence of tuberculosis in peripheral organs. The diagnostic rule developed using these features exhibited 78.0% sensitivity, 95.2% specificity, 92.9% positive predictive value and 84.4% negative predictive value. The corresponding values for the diagnostic rule were 70.0% and 88.0% using prospective test data. Conclusion Clinical and laboratory features can be helpful in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and cryptococcal meningitis in adult HIV-negative patients.

  14. Accurate laboratory determination of the near-infrared water vapor self-continuum: A test of the MT_CKD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campargue, A.; Kassi, S.; Mondelain, D.; Vasilchenko, S.; Romanini, D.

    2016-11-01

    The semi-empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum of water vapor is widely used in atmospheric radiative transfer codes of the atmosphere of Earth and, recently, of exoplanets but lacks of experimental validation in the atmospheric windows. Recent laboratory measurements by Fourier transform Spectroscopy led to self-continuum cross sections much larger than the MT_CKD values in the near-infrared transparency windows. We report on accurate measurements by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical Feedback-Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of the transparency windows centered around 4.0, 2.1, and 1.25 µm. The temperature dependence of the absorption continuum at 4.38 µm is measured in the 23-39°C range. The self-continuum water vapor absorption is derived either from the baseline variation of water vapor spectra recorded for a series of pressure values over a small spectral interval or from baseline monitoring at fixed laser frequency during pressure ramps. After subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution, self-continuum cross sections, Cs, are determined with an accuracy better than 10% from the pressure squared dependence of the continuum absorption measured up to about 15 Torr. Together with our previous measurements in the 2.1 and 1.6 µm windows, the present results provide a unique set of water vapor cross sections for testing the MT_CKD model in four transparency windows. Although showing some important deviations of the absolute values (up to about a factor 4), our accurate measurements validate the overall frequency dependence of the most recent version (V2.8) of the MT_CKD model.

  15. [Laboratory diagnosis of Treponema pallidum infection in patients with early syphilis and neurosyphilis through a PCR-based test].

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Grassi, Bruno; Fich, Félix; Salvo, Aurelio; Araya, Luis; Abarzúa, Fernando; Soto, Julia; Poggi, Helena; Lagos, Marcela; Vásquez, Patricia; León, Eugenia P; Pérez, Carlos; Wozniak, Aniela

    2011-08-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. The diagnosis is based mainly in clinical presentation and non-specific assays. PCR-based diagnosis has been suggested as an attractive alternative method. The aim of this study was the validation of a PCR-based test for the diagnosis of early syphilis (ES) and neurosyphilis (NS). Clinical samples of mucocutaneous lesions and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients previously diagnosed for ES and NS respectively using an enlarged gold standard, were tested by PCR. The reaction was done using primers targeting the tpN47 gene. Twenty out of 21 mucocutaneous samples from patients diagnosed with ES were positive by PCR, with a clinical sensitivity of 95%. Four out of 8 CSF samples from patients previously diagnosed with NS were positive by PCR, with a clinical sensitivity of 50%. The clinical specificity for both ES and NS was 100%. The PCR sensitivity and specificity for mucocutaneous samples allowed us to implement this assay in our laboratory for routine diagnosis. Although the sensitivity of the PCR in CSF was low, it may be useful to support clinical diagnosis.

  16. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raka; Verma, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clinical care. PMID:26957863

  17. A model of genetic guidance for hemoglobinopathy patients and laboratory diagnosis of family members as educational and preventive measures

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Dela-Sávia; Freire, Adriana Sousa; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; García-Zapata, Marco Túlio Antônio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Brazil constitutes a public health problem and thus educational and preventive measures are necessary to reduce the incidence. Genetic guidance, a modality of genetic counseling, and family screening are measures that can assist in reproductive decisions and mitigate clinical, psychological and social problems of families with these disorders. Objetive: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of educational and preventive measures for hemoglobinopathies using genetic guidance and laboratory screening of families. Methods: The diagnoses of patients with hemoglobinopathies were confirmed and then the level of knowledge about their disease was evaluated and genetic guidance was provided. Three months later, the level of assimilated information of these patients was evaluated. In addition, laboratory diagnosis of family members was carried out. Results: Diagnosis of sickle cell anemia was confirmed for most patients. Moreover, the majority of the patients who had a low level of knowledge before genetic guidance (68.8%) demonstrated a higher level of assimilated information after the process (81.8%). Almost 70% of the family members had hemoglobin changes and some had hemoglobinopathies(2.6%). They were duly informed about the results of the examinations, which made it possible to investigate further. Conclusion: Genetic guidance and family screening were effective preventive and educational measures that improved the quality of life of patients, preventing complications and sequels and allowed the referral of those who may transmit altered genes for clinical diagnosis and to genetic counseling services. PMID:23125541

  18. Consolidating HIV testing in a public health laboratory for efficient and sustainable early infant diagnosis (EID) in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kiyaga, Charles; Sendagire, Hakim; Joseph, Eleanor; Grosz, Jeff; McConnell, Ian; Narayan, Vijay; Esiru, Godfrey; Elyanu, Peter; Akol, Zainab; Kirungi, Wilford; Musinguzi, Joshua; Opio, Alex

    2015-05-01

    Uganda introduced an HIV Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) program in 2006, and then worked to improve the laboratory, transportation, and clinical elements. Reported here are the activities involved in setting up a prospective analysis in which the Ministry of Health, with its NGO partners, determined it would be more effective and efficient to consolidate the initial eight-laboratory system for EID testing of HIV dried blood samples offered by two nongovernmental partners operating research facilities into a single well-equipped and staffed laboratory within the Ministry. A retrospective analysis confirmed that redesign reduced overhead cost per PCR test of HIV dried blood samples from US$22.20 to an average of $5. Along with the revamped system of sample collection, transportation, and result communication, Uganda has been able to vastly increase the HIV diagnosis of babies and engagement of them and their mothers in clinical care, including antiretroviral therapy. Uganda reduced turnaround times for results reporting to clinicians from more than a month in 2006 to just 2 weeks by 2014, even as samples tested increased dramatically. The next challenge is overcoming loss of babies and mothers to follow up.

  19. Human herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system: laboratory diagnosis based on DNA detection by nested PCR in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples.

    PubMed

    Rimério, Carla Aparecida Tavares; De Oliveira, Renato Souza; de Almeida Bonatelli, Murilo Queiroz; Nucci, Anamarli; Costa, Sandra Cecília Botelho; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves

    2015-04-01

    Infections of the central nervous systems (CNS) present a diagnostic problem for which an accurate laboratory diagnosis is essential. Invasive practices, such as cerebral biopsy, have been replaced by obtaining a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis using cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) as a reference method. Tests on DNA extracted from plasma are noninvasive, thus avoiding all of the collateral effects and patient risks associated with CSF collection. This study aimed to determine whether plasma can replace CSF in nested PCR analysis for the detection of CNS human herpesvirus (HHV) diseases by analysing the proportion of patients whose CSF nested PCR results were positive for CNS HHV who also had the same organism identified by plasma nested PCR. In this study, CSF DNA was used as the "gold standard," and nested PCR was performed on both types of samples. Fifty-two patients with symptoms of nervous system infection were submitted to CSF and blood collection. For the eight HHV, one positive DNA result-in plasma and/or CSF nested PCR-was considered an active HHV infection, whereas the occurrence of two or more HHVs in the same sample was considered a coinfection. HHV infections were positively detected in 27/52 (51.9%) of the CSF and in 32/52 (61.5%) of the plasma, difference not significant, thus nested PCR can be performed on plasma instead of CSF. In conclusion, this findings suggest that plasma as a useful material for the diagnosis of cases where there is any difficulty to perform a CSF puncture.

  20. Guideline: the laboratory diagnosis of malaria. General Haematology Task Force of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J Wendi; Williams, John; Bain, Barbara J; Parker-Williams, John; Chiodini, Peter L

    2013-12-01

    UK National External Quality Assessment Service surveys indicate continuing problems in malaria diagnosis: inaccurate calculation of parasitaemia or failure to estimate it altogether, difficulty distinguishing Plasmodium vivax from P. ovale, reporting malaria parasites when none were present and misidentification of P. falciparum as another species still occur. Therefore, the British Committee for Standards in Haematology Guidelines for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Malaria have been revised. They are intended for use in the UK but may also prove useful in other non-endemic areas. Routine use of thick and thin films is advised for malaria diagnosis. Thick films should be stained using Giemsa or Field stain. Thin films should be stained with Giemsa stain or Leishman stain. Thick films should be examined by two observers, each viewing a minimum of 200 high power fields. If thick films are positive, the species should be determined by examination of a thin film. In the case of P. falciparum or P. knowlesi infection, the percentage of parasitized cells or the number of parasites per microlitre (/μl) should be estimated and reported. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malarial antigen cannot replace microscopy but are indicated as a supplementary test when malaria diagnosis is performed by relatively inexperienced staff. Malaria RDTs are negative in babesiosis.

  1. The status of and future research into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: the need of accurate diagnosis, objective assessment, and acknowledging biological and clinical subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are used interchangeably, the diagnostic criteria define two distinct clinical entities. Cognitive impairment, (muscle) weakness, circulatory disturbances, marked variability of symptoms, and, above all, post-exertional malaise: a long-lasting increase of symptoms after a minor exertion, are distinctive symptoms of ME. This latter phenomenon separates ME, a neuro-immune illness, from chronic fatigue (syndrome), other disorders and deconditioning. The introduction of the label, but more importantly the diagnostic criteria for CFS have generated much confusion, mostly because chronic fatigue is a subjective and ambiguous notion. CFS was redefined in 1994 into unexplained (persistent or relapsing) chronic fatigue, accompanied by at least four out of eight symptoms, e.g., headaches and unrefreshing sleep. Most of the research into ME and/or CFS in the last decades was based upon the multivalent CFS criteria, which define a heterogeneous patient group. Due to the fact that fatigue and other symptoms are non-discriminative, subjective experiences, research has been hampered. Various authors have questioned the physiological nature of the symptoms and qualified ME/CFS as somatization. However, various typical symptoms can be assessed objectively using standardized methods. Despite subjective and unclear criteria and measures, research has observed specific abnormalities in ME/CFS repetitively, e.g., immunological abnormalities, oxidative and nitrosative stress, neurological anomalies, circulatory deficits and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, to improve future research standards and patient care, it is crucial that patients with post-exertional malaise (ME) and patients without this odd phenomenon are acknowledged as separate clinical entities that the diagnosis of ME and CFS in research and clinical practice is based upon accurate criteria and an objective assessment of characteristic symptoms

  2. Eclipsing Binaries as Astrophysical Laboratories: CM Draconis - Accurate Absolute Physical Properties of Low Mass Stars and an Independent Estimate of the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCook, G. P.; Guinan, E. F.; Saumon, D.; Kang, Y. W.

    1997-05-01

    CM Draconis (Gl 630.1; Vmax = +12.93) is an important eclipsing binary consisting of two dM4.5e stars with an orbital period of 1.2684 days. This binary is a high velocity star (s= 164 km/s) and the brighter member of a common proper motion pair with a cool faint white dwarf companion (LP 101-16). CM Dra and its white dwarf companion were once considered by Zwicky to belong to a class of "pygmy stars", but they turned out to be ordinary old, cool white dwarfs or faint red dwarfs. Lacy (ApJ 218,444L) determined the first orbital and physical properties of CM Dra from the analysis of his light and radial velocity curves. In addition to providing directly measured masses, radii, and luminosities for low mass stars, CM Dra was also recognized by Lacy and later by Paczynski and Sienkiewicz (ApJ 286,332) as an important laboratory for cosmology, as a possible old Pop II object where it may be possible to determine the primordial helium abundance. Recently, Metcalfe et al.(ApJ 456,356) obtained accurate RV measures for CM Dra and recomputed refined elements along with its helium abundance. Starting in 1995, we have been carrying out intensive RI photoelectric photometry of CM Dra to obtain well defined, accurate light curves so that its fundamental properties can be improved, and at the same time, to search for evidence of planets around the binary from planetary transit eclipses. During 1996 and 1997 well defined light curves were secured and these were combined with the RV measures of Metcalfe et al. (1996) to determine the orbital and physical parameters of the system, including a refined orbital period. A recent version of the Wilson-Devinney program was used to analyze the data. New radii, masses, mean densities, Teff, and luminosities were found as well as a re-determination of the helium abundance (Y). The results of the recent analyses of the light and RV curves will be presented and modelling results discussed. This research is supported by NSF grants AST-9315365

  3. Utility of Laboratory Diagnosis for Confirmation of the Syndromic Case Management in Married Indian Women with Vaginal Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Prabhav; Bhattar, Sonali; Sahani, Satyendra Kumar; Bhalla, Preena

    2016-01-01

    Objective WHO and NACO recommend treatment of STIs/RTIs on the basis syndromic case management (SCM), even without laboratory confirmation, which may lead to over-treatment. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the utility of laboratory diagnosis for confirmation of patients with vaginal discharge diagnosed on the basis of SCM. Methodology 234 married women in reproductive age group, diagnosed as having vaginal discharge syndrome were included. Normal saline wet-mount slide preparations were made for detection of motile trichomonads. Gram stained smear were prepared and scored as per classification developed by Nugent. The presence of pseudohyphae and/or budding yeast cells was considered diagnostic of candidal infection. VDRL, TPHA and HIV testing were also done as per protocol. Results The median age of the study population was 34 years. Most common cause was bacterial vaginosis (positive= 21.4%, 95% CI= 16.6–27.1%; intermediate score= 17.5%, 95% CI= 13.2–22.9%), followed by candidiasis (13.7%, 95% CI= 98–18.7%) and trichomoniasis (0.4%, 95% CI= 0–2.6%). No etiological diagnosis for vaginal discharge could be established in approximately half of the women. Only two women were HIV positive; one was reactive by VDRL and TPHA tests. Conclusion Our study highlights the possible lacunae in SCM. Large number of patients may be over-treated if only syndromic management is followed, with financial, medical and social implications. Thus we recommend, the treatment maybe initiated on the basis of SCM, but it is essential that laboratory diagnosis is sought for and the treatment modified accordingly. PMID:27833516

  4. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components.

  5. [Laboratory diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections in chronic inflammatory diseases of the reproductive system].

    PubMed

    Gasanova, T A

    2001-01-01

    The complex clinico-laboratory examination of 120 infertile married couples and 120 couples with habitual miscarriage was made. For control, 96 healthy married couples were used. The microbiological risk factors of chronic pelvic inflammatory diseases were determined, namely: mixed parasitocenosis, including active anaerobic, viral and fungal components, as well as Chlamydia trachomatis. As shown in this study, metabolically active forms of chlamydial infection were characteristic of infertile married women and persistent forms of C. trachomatis, for pregnant women. At the same time chlamydial infection did not cause infertility in males. The use two of levels of laboratory tests for qualitative, quantitative and functional evaluation of parasitocenoses were proposed.

  6. Use of filter paper as a transport medium for laboratory diagnosis of cholera under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Page, Anne-Laure; Alberti, Kathryn P; Guénolé, Alain; Mondongue, Vital; Lonlas Mayele, Sylvaine; Guerin, Philippe J; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2011-08-01

    Confirmation of a cholera epidemic is based on bacteriological identification of the agent and requires the sending of samples to a culture laboratory, often in countries with limited resources. Comparison of the use of filter paper with the use of Cary-Blair reference medium for stool transport showed that this simple transport medium is appropriate for the recovery of Vibrio cholerae.

  7. Can the Dupuit-Thiem equation accurately describe the flow pattern induced by injection in a laboratory scale aquifer-well system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Jose; Kalwa, Fritz; Händel, Falk; Binder, Martin; Stefan, Catalin

    2016-04-01

    The Dupuit-Thiem equation is normally used to assess flow towards a pumping well in unconfined aquifers under steady-state conditions. For the formulation of the equation it is assumed that flow is laminar, radial and horizontal towards the well. It is well known that these assumptions are not met in the vicinity of the well; some authors restrict the application of the equation only to a radius larger than 1.5-fold the aquifer thickness. In this study, the equation accuracy to predict the pressure head is evaluated as a simple and quick analytical method to describe the flow pattern for different injection rates in the LSAW. A laboratory scale aquifer-well system (LSAW) was implemented to study the aquifer recharge through wells. The LSAW consists of a 1.0 m-diameter tank with a height of 1.1 meters, filled with sand and a screened well in the center with a diameter of 0.025 m. A regulated outflow system establishes a controlled water level at the tank wall to simulate various aquifer thicknesses. The pressure head at the bottom of the tank along one axis can be measured to assess the flow profile every 0.1 m between the well and the tank wall. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the Dupuit-Thiem equation, a combination of different injection rates and aquifer thicknesses were simulated in the LSAW. Contrary to what was expected (significant differences between the measured and calculated pressure heads in the well), the absolute difference between the calculated and measured pressure head is less than 10%. Beside this, the highest differences are not observed in the well itself, but in the near proximity of it, at a radius of 0.1 m. The results further show that the difference between the calculated and measured pressure heads tends to decrease with higher flow rates. Despite its limitations (assumption of laminar and horizontal flow throughout the whole aquifer), the Dupuit-Thiem equation is considered to accurately represent the flow system in the LSAW.

  8. The Marshall Space Flight Center Fault Detection Diagnosis and Recovery Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchett, Bradley T.; Gamble, Jonathan; Rabban, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Fault Detection Diagnosis and Recovery Lab (FDDR) has been developed to support development of,fault detection algorithms for the flight computer aboard the Ares I and follow-on vehicles. It consists of several workstations using Ethernet and TCP/IP to simulate communications between vehicle sensors, flight computers, and ground based support computers. Isolation of tasks between workstations was set up intentionally to limit information flow and provide a realistic simulation of communication channels within the vehicle and between the vehicle and ground station.

  9. A History of Computer-Assisted Medical Diagnosis at Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    user documenta- tion 7 . The conversion was essentially ’line- Dental Pain Program for-line" to keep the knowledge representation (the "brains" of the...the 19. Caras, B. G., Fisherkeller, K. D., and management of acute dental pain - User’s Southerland D. G. (1989). MEDIC - Manual (NSMRL Report 1143...for "classic" presentations of dental pain marine Medical Research Laboratory. (NSMRL Report 1136). Groton, CT: Naval Submarine Medical Research 37

  10. Laboratory diagnosis of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Cammarata, R

    1986-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial infections are commonly seen in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, and laboratory culture is the best method for diagnosing these infections. In addition to conventional agar media, we used BACTEC 12A (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) broth medium for culture. More isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were recovered from 12A broth than from Lowenstein-Jensen or Middlebrook 7H11 agar. Also, the average detection time of these mycobacteria was the earliest with 12A broth. Stool examination has been helpful in diagnosing mycobacterial disease in AIDS patients, and in this study both acid-fast stain and culture of fecal material was necessary for efficient detection of mycobacteria. Another sensitive and practical method for detecting mycobacterial infections in patients with AIDS is the Isolator lysis-centrifugation system (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) which offers the advantage of quantitating the degree of mycobacteremia. Laboratories should be alerted to the possibility of mixed mycobacterial infection in patients with AIDS, and positive cultures should be repeatedly examined to detect coinfection with a slower-growing mycobacterium such as M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium complex. PMID:3095369

  11. Current laboratory practices in the diagnosis and management of haemophilia: a global assessment.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, S; Signer-Romero, K; Key, N S

    2015-07-01

    Haemophilia management is complicated by the extreme variability in laboratory practices. Lack of consistency or comparability in testing makes it difficult to establish diagnostic criteria or disease severity, and complicates response assessment. A global survey was conducted to document current practices. A 35-min survey was completed by 30 laboratory scientists in each of seven countries (France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, UK, USA; 210 in total); results were weighted by average country testing volume in haemophilia. Eighty-three per cent of participants reported participation in a Quality Assurance scheme. Ninety per cent reported using clotting tests in haemophilia A and 88% in haemophilia B (55% and 53% frequent use respectively). Sixty-eight per cent reported chromogenic assays were used in haemophilia A, with only 23% reporting frequent use, compared to only 11% reporting any use in haemophilia B. Twenty-nine separate activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) reagents were reported for haemophilia A and 27 aPTT reagents were reported for haemophilia B, with one-quarter or less obtaining reagents or kits from any single manufacturer. Fifty-four per cent run a calibration curve with every factor VIII (FVIII) assay. The mean number of plasma dilutions varied from 2 to 4 for FVIII assays and from 1 to 3 for FIX assays. Results indicate very low consistency in materials and practices used to test for factor activity in haemophilia. A number of responses suggest that some laboratory scientists' understanding of best practices or guidelines in haemophilia could be improved. More education and broader understanding is recommended regarding assay types, assay components, test material and instrument features and capabilities.

  12. Chikungunya from the Caribbean: the importance of appropriate laboratory tests to confirm the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Magurano, Fabio; Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Baggieri, Melissa; Fortuna, Claudia; Farese, Alberto; Benedetti, Eleonora; Fiorentini, Cristiano; Rezza, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Loredana; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) appeared for the first time in the Western Hemisphere--the French West Indies--in December of 2013. From there, the virus has spread to other Caribbean islands. Following the diagnosis of first autochthonous CHIKV cases in the Caribbean island of Saint Martin, a large outbreak is ongoing in the Americas. As of September 12, 2014, a total of 706,093 suspected and 9803 confirmed CHIKV cases have been reported in the Americas. This case study highlights the possibility of false-negative immunochromatographic CHIKV immunoglobulin M (IgM) tests and the need of confirmatory tests for suspected cases. Moreover, a greater spread of virus together with the presence of a mosquito vector (Aedes albopictus) enhances the risk of autochthonous transmission in Europe.

  13. Laboratory-based diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia: state of the art and unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Vernet, G; Saha, S; Satzke, C; Burgess, D H; Alderson, M; Maisonneuve, J-F; Beall, B W; Steinhoff, M C; Klugman, K P

    2011-05-01

    In view of the increasing use of pneumococcal vaccines, especially in the developing world, there is a need for appropriate diagnostics to understand the aetiology of pneumonia, to define the burden of pneumococcal disease, and to monitor vaccine efficacy and effectiveness. This article summarizes a meeting on the diagnosis, detection and serotyping of pneumococcal disease organized by PATH and Fondation Mérieux (18-20 October 2009, Fondation Mérieux Conference Centre, Les Pensières, France). Workers and experts met to discuss the gaps in the microbiology-based diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae disease, with special emphasis on pneumonia. The meeting was designed to evaluate the state of the art of pneumococcal diagnostics and serotyping methodologies, identify research and development needs, and propose new guidelines to public health authorities to support the introduction of vaccines. Regarding detection, the main recommendations were to encourage chest X-rays and antigen detection in urine. Large-scale studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of test algorithms that associate chest X-rays, antigen detection in urine, S. pneumoniae quantitative PCR in nasopharyngeal aspirates and sputum, and C-reactive protein or procalcitonin measurement in blood. Efforts should be focused on proteomics to identify pneumococcus-specific antigens in urine or host markers in blood expressed during pneumonia. It was recommended to develop S. pneumoniae typing capacities, to understand the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease, and to evaluate vaccine effectiveness. Simple and effective approaches are encouraged, and new technologies based on beads, microarrays or deep sequencing should be developed to determine, in a single test capsular serotype, resistance profile and genotype.

  14. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease. PMID:25988157

  15. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease.

  16. [HIV infection. Diagnosis in the national network of laboratories in Chile].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, G; Vera, L; Soto, G; Mora, J; Ramírez, E

    1991-11-01

    A national network including 114 blood banks and laboratories performs screening for HIV infection on approximately 250,000 blood donors a year. This represents 100% coverage of blood transfusions performed in Chile. Up to December 1990. 4956 samples had been sent to the National Reference Center for AIDS for supplementary studies. HIV infection was confirmed in 1465 (29.6%). A prior study covering the first semester of 1989 showed a 26.9% confirmation rate for HIV infection on 845 serum samples. Technical errors including sample contamination, poor cleaning, decreasing titers of controls and erratic criteria regarding the need for supplementary studies may explain the low confirmation rate reported in this study.

  17. Tonsils--place of botulinum toxin production: results of routine laboratory diagnosis in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Böhnel, H; Wagner, C; Gessler, F

    2008-08-25

    Since a case of a veterinarian was reported, who was likely to be infected/intoxicated by Clostridium botulinum during the handling of a diseased animal, tonsils in animals were tested for botulinum neurotoxin and bacterial forms of neurotoxic Clostridium botulinum during routine botulism laboratory examinations including standard samples (intestinal tract and liver) from 48 cattle, 11 horses, and 14 goats. Ten out of 60 samples from tonsils contained free botulinum toxin, and 12 out of 59 were positive for live toxin producing bacteria. In 32 out of 162 intestinal samples toxin was detected. Toxin producing bacteria were found in 37 samples. Eight of 56 liver samples contained free toxin, and 15 out of 43 toxigenic bacteria. Samples from 10 slaughter pigs were all negative, whereas from slaughter cattle tonsils had a high incidence of toxin (7 of 10) or toxigenic bacteria (2 of 8). The results are discussed in the context of effects on animal health and botulism as zoonosis.

  18. Point-of-Care Laboratory of Pathogen Diagnosis in Rural Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Fenollar, Florence; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Tall, Adama; Trape, Jean-François; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Background In tropical Africa, where the spectrum of the bacterial pathogens that cause fevers is poorly understood and molecular-based diagnostic laboratories are rare, the time lag between test results and patient care is a critical point for treatment of disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We implemented POC laboratory in rural Senegal to resolve the time lag between test results and patient care. During the first year of the study (February 2011 to January 2012), 440 blood specimens from febrile patients were collected in Dielmo and Ndiop villages. All samples were screened for malaria, dengue fever, Borrelia spp., Coxiella burnetii, Tropheryma whipplei, Rickettsia conorii, R. africae, R. felis, and Bartonella spp. Conclusions/Significance We identified DNA from at least one pathogenic bacterium in 80/440 (18.2%) of the samples from febrile patients. B. crocidurae was identified in 35 cases (9.5%), and R. felis DNA was found in 30 cases (6.8%). The DNA of Bartonella spp. was identified in 23/440 cases (4.3%), and DNA of C. burnetii was identified in 2 cases (0.5%). T. whipplei (0.2%) was diagnosed in one patient. No DNA of R. africae or R. conorii was identified. Among the 7 patients co-infected by two different bacteria, we found R. felis and B. crocidurae in 4 cases, B. crocidurae and Bartonella spp. in 2 cases, and B. crocidurae and C. burnetii in 1 case. Malaria was diagnosed in 54 cases. In total, at least one pathogen (bacterium or protozoa) was identified in 127/440 (28.9%) of studied samples. Here, the authors report the proof of concept of POC in rural tropical Africa. Discovering that 18.2% of acute infections can be successfully treated with doxycycline should change the treatment strategy for acute fevers in West Africa. PMID:23350001

  19. Automatic laboratory-based strategy to improve the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Lugo, Javier; Pomares, Francisco J; Asencio, Alberto; Ahumada, Miguel; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To study the pre-design and success of a strategy based on the addition of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the blood samples of certain primary care patients to detect new cases of type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods In a first step, we retrospectively calculated the number of HbA1c that would have been measured in one year if HbA1c would have been processed, according to the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Based on those results we decided to prospectively measure HbA1c in every primary care patient above 45 years, with no HbA1c in the previous 3 years, and glucose concentration between 5.6-6.9 mmol/L, during an 18 months period. We calculated the number of HbA1c that were automatically added by the LIS based on our strategy, we evaluated the medical record of such subjects to confirm whether type 2 diabetes was finally confirmed, and we calculated the cost of our intervention. Results In a first stage, according to the guidelines, Hb1Ac should have been added to the blood samples of 13,085 patients, resulting in a cost of 14,973€. In the prospective study, the laboratory added Hb1Ac to 2092 patients, leading to an expense of 2393€. 314 patients had an HbA1c value ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol). 82 were finally diagnosed as type 2 diabetes; 28 thanks to our strategy, with an individual cost of 85.4€; and 54 due to the request of HbA1c by the general practitioners (GPs), with a cost of 47.5€. Conclusion The automatic laboratory-based strategy detected patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care, at a cost of 85.4€ per new case. PMID:26981026

  20. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections: clinical signs, pathology and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Clinical signs and pathological features are still the corner-stones to suspect and diagnose overt disease associated with PCV2 infection. The clinico-pathological scope of this viral infection has been expanded over time. From the initial description of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, some enteric, respiratory and reproductive disorders have been subsequently linked with PCV2. Porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome, an immunocomplex disease, has also been associated with infection by this virus. All together, these conditions have been grouped under the name of porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD) or porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The precise mechanisms by which a PCV2 infected pig develops a PCV2 subclinical infection or a clinical PCVD/PCVAD are still to be fully elucidated, but inferences based upon clinical, gross and histologic findings from field cases of disease have been useful to suggest the pathogenesis of this viral infection. The objective of the present review is to update the current knowledge on the clinical and pathological scope of PCV2 infections, as well as on their diagnosis. Moreover, a proposal on a unified PCVD/PCVAD terminology and clearly defined diagnostic criteria for these conditions are also given.

  1. A new mathematical model based on clinical and laboratory variables for the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin-Martin, L S; Latini, A; Pagano, A; Ragno, A; Stasi, R; Coppè, A; Davoli, G; Crescenzi, A; Alimonti, A; Migliore, A

    2003-05-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that mainly affects exocrine glands. A diagnosis of SS in its early stages has a potential clinical relevance, but it is difficult and cannot be made solely on clinical grounds. Several sets of diagnostic criteria have been proposed, but none has met with a general consensus. Minor salivary gland has been judged to be the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of SS. However, it is a painful procedure and has a small but significant proportion of both false positive and false negative results. The aim of our study was to develop a simple mathematical score that uses clinical and laboratory variables for diagnosing SS, thereby reducing the need of minor salivary gland. The following variables were included in the model: ANA, SS-A/SS-B, Schirmer's Test/BUT, C3/C4, serum gammaglobulin levels. One hundred consecutive individuals reporting clinical syndromes consistent with a sicca syndrome were included in the study. The application of our multifactorial mathematical model has shown a high predictive value for SS vs controls or vs patients with other autoimmune disorders (Sensitivity 93%, Specificity 100%), with an estimated minor salivary gland reduction of 77%. We conclude that our mathematical model can be considered a useful non-invasive approach for diagnosing Sjogren's Syndrome and recommend its validation on a larger scale.

  2. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the Molecular Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During an Outbreak in Korea in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Hyukmin; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon-Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Jong-Rak; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    For two months between May and July 2015, a nationwide outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in Korea. On June 3, 2015, the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS-CoV Laboratory Response Task Force (LR-TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories to set up the diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection. Based on the WHO interim recommendations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of United States guidelines for MERS-CoV laboratory testing, and other available resources, the KSLM MERS-CoV LR-TF provided the first version of the laboratory practice guidelines for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV to the clinical laboratories on June 12, 2015. The guidelines described here are an updated version that includes case definition, indications for testing, specimen type and protocols for specimen collection, specimen packing and transport, specimen handling and nucleic acid extraction, molecular detection of MERS-CoV, interpretation of results and reporting, and laboratory safety. The KSLM guidelines mainly focus on the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV, reflecting the unique situation in Korea and the state of knowledge at the time of publication. PMID:26915607

  3. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the Molecular Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During an Outbreak in Korea in 2015.

    PubMed

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyukmin; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Mi Na; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-05-01

    For two months between May and July 2015, a nationwide outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in Korea. On June 3, 2015, the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS-CoV Laboratory Response Task Force (LR-TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories to set up the diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection. Based on the WHO interim recommendations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of United States guidelines for MERS-CoV laboratory testing, and other available resources, the KSLM MERS-CoV LR-TF provided the first version of the laboratory practice guidelines for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV to the clinical laboratories on June 12, 2015. The guidelines described here are an updated version that includes case definition, indications for testing, specimen type and protocols for specimen collection, specimen packing and transport, specimen handling and nucleic acid extraction, molecular detection of MERS-CoV, interpretation of results and reporting, and laboratory safety. The KSLM guidelines mainly focus on the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV, reflecting the unique situation in Korea and the state of knowledge at the time of publication.

  4. CXCL13 may improve diagnosis in early neuroborreliosis with atypical laboratory findings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Current guidelines regarding Lyme neuroborreliosis [LNB] require the presence of intrathecal Borrelia burgdorferi-specific antibody production for the definite diagnosis of LNB. However, about 20% of early stage infections present without an elevated antibody index. Moreover, intrathecal B. burgdorferi specific antibody synthesis may persist long after successful therapy of LNB. Recently published data indicate that CXCL13 seems to be a promising diagnostic tool for early stage LNB. In addition, CXCL13 might be suitable for treatment monitoring. Case presentation We report on a 39-year-old male patient from southern Germany, who has been suffering from subfebrile body temperatures and meningeal headache for six weeks. On the second day after hospital admission he developed peripheral palsy of the VII. cranial nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed granulocytic pleocytosis, elevated total protein and blood-CSF barrier dysfunction. Differential diagnostics for granulocytic pleocytosis were unremarkable. Only a second lumbar puncture, on day 6 after admission, revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis. Serologic testing pointed to clear intrathecal Borrelia specific IgG antibody production. Interestingly, no anti-OspC antibodies were detectable. DNA of the rare Borrelia garinii OspA-type 7 could be amplified from the first CSF sample. The monitoring of CXCL13 in all CSF samples documented a fast decrease from 5000 pg/ml to 450 pg/ml after appropriate antibiotic treatment. Conclusion CXCL13 is a novel biomarker with high sensitivity and specificity for acute LNB. Our data show, that CXCL13 might be helpful in unclear cases and support the presumption that it might be a valuable tool for treatment monitoring. Anti-OspC antibody negativity is a rare observation, given the need of OspC for infection of the human hosts. Most likely this is due to a lack of sensitivity of OspC immunoblots that are unable to detect rare OspC variants. PMID:23228054

  5. [Laboratory diagnosis of opportunistic intestinal parasites with emphasis on human microsporidiosis, in Goiânia-Go].

    PubMed

    de Souza Júnior, Edson Sidião; Garcia-Zapata, Marco Tulio A

    2006-01-01

    Microsporidia are emergent and opportunistic protozoa that are responsible for diseases with high morbidity and mortality, especially among individuals with immune disorders. This study had the aim of determining the clinical-laboratory profile of these agents. In total, 723 patients were evaluated, divided into two groups: I) Immunosuppressed/immunodepressed individuals; II) Apparently immunocompetent individuals. After obtaining free informed consent, these patients were interviewed and gave fecal samples. These samples were all subjected to the HPJ, Rugai and Faust techniques and to specific staining for Coccidia and Microsporidia. The frequency of Microsporidia was 1.3% (5/393) in group I, whereas it was a quarter of this in group II. The occurrence of other opportunistic intestinal parasites was also greater in group I. It was concluded, firstly, that these agents are present in our environment and, secondly, that there is a need to improve the clinical and laboratory diagnosis, in order to define the geographic distribution of these agents in the State of Goiás and throughout Brazil.

  6. [Usefulness of a single radial immunodiffusion method for the immediate diagnosis of abnormal fibrinogenemia in the laboratory].

    PubMed

    Yoshika, Masamichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Terauchi, Satoe; Teraoka, Atsuko; Munakata, Machiko; Yasuda, Katsuhiko; Amakawa, Ryuuichi; Masaki, Hiroya; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2008-05-01

    Patients with dysfibrinogenemia demonstrate a low concentration of plasma fibrinogen. However, many cases remain a symptomatic and are incidentally identified on a pre-operative or screening test for pregnancy. Therefore, urgent diagnosis is desirable. To diagnose this abnormality, it is important to demonstrate a discrepancy between test results by the Clauss and immunologic methods. We use a single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) method to measure the fibrinogen level immunologically. We present one dysfibrinogenemia case diagnosed by SRID. The present case was 23 year-old pregnant female. She demonstrated a low plasma level of fibrinogen (91 mg/dl by the Clauss method) on a pre-delivery-screening test in the 39th week of pregnancy. We suspected dysfibrinogenemia, and measured the fibrinogen level immunologically with SRID. Briefly, we dissolved agar in 10% PBS solution and added 1 mg/ml anti-fibrinogen antibody. Then, patient plasma and 50-200 mg/dl of control plasma were placed on the agar overnight. The immunoreactive fibrinogen level in this patient was 400 mg/dl. Therefore, we diagnosed her as dysfibrinogenemia. She did not have a bleeding episode during the normal vaginal delivery even through fibrinogen was not transfused. The SRID method is readily available, and requires only an anti-fibrinogen antibody and agar, both of which are usually stocked by a general laboratory. The practical method and application described in this report provide instructive information for hospital laboratories.

  7. Comparison of five parasitological techniques for laboratory diagnosis of Balantidium coli cysts.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alynne da Silva; Bastos, Otilio Machado Pereira; Uchôa, Claudia Maria Antunes; Pissinatti, Alcides; Bastos, Augusto César Machado Pereira; Souza, Igo Vieira de; Dib, Laís Verdan; Azevedo, Eduarda Peixoto; Siqueira, Mayara Perlingeiro de; Cardozo, Matheus Lessa; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2016-01-01

    Balantidium coli is a protozoon that can cause dysentery in humans, pigs and nonhuman primates, with zoonotic potential. In the literature, there is still little information on the effectiveness of different laboratory techniques for diagnosing this disease. This study compared and evaluated the performance of the Lutz, modified Ritchie, Faust, modified Sheather and direct examination techniques for detecting cysts of this protozoon. Between 2012 and 2014, 1905 fecal samples were collected from captive animals in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Of these, 790 were obtained from the rectum of pigs and 1115 from enclosures occupied by nonhuman primates. B. coli cysts were most evident through direct examination (22.4% of the samples) and the Lutz technique (21%). Fair agreement (Kappa = 0.41; p < 0.05) was observed only between direct examination and Lutz. The flotation techniques (Faust and modified Sheather) did not show good recovery of cysts. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the frequency of cysts between pigs and nonhuman primates could only be observed through direct examination and the Lutz technique. The most efficient method for diagnosing this parasitosis was seen to an association between direct examination and the spontaneous sedimentation technique.

  8. [The laboratory diagnosis and epidemiology of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Paraná State, southern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silveira, T G; Arraes, S M; Bertolini, D A; Teodoro, U; Lonardoni, M V; Roberto, A C; Ramos, M; Nerilo Sobrinho, A; Ishikawa, E; Shaw, J

    1999-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1997 a total of 1418 patients were examined at the Clinical Analysis Teaching and Research Laboratory of Maringá State University (LEPAC/UEM) for cutaneous leishmaniasis by direct examination of stained smears made from the lesions, the Montenegro skin test and the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. Nine hundred and fifty five patients (67.3%) were positive for at least one of the three tests and of these 804 (84.2%) were considered to have contracted the disease in Paraná State; 665 (69.6%) were between 15 and 49 years old; 658 (68.9%) were males; 523 (54.8%) sought medical advice during the first three months of their infections and 74 (7.7%) had mucosal lesions. Of the 83 counties of Paraná State, where the patients had most probably acquired their infections, 44.7% were from the counties of São Jorge do Ivaí (10.2%), Doutor Camargo (9.8%), Terra Boa (7.3%), Maringá (7.3%), Jussara (6.0%) and Cianorte (4.5%). Seventy seven strains of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis were isolated and 63.6% of these strains belong to serodema 1.

  9. Current Pathological and Laboratory Considerations in the Diagnosis of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Alhamdi, Yasir; Abrams, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    Systemically sustained thrombin generation in vivo is the hallmark of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Typically, this is in response to a progressing disease state that is associated with significant cellular injury. The etiology could be infectious or noninfectious, with the main pathophysiological mechanisms involving cross-activation among coagulation, innate immunity, and inflammatory responses. This leads to consumption of both pro- and anticoagulant factors as well as endothelial dysfunction and disrupted homeostasis at the blood vessel wall interface. In addition to the release of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) following cellular activation and damage, respectively, there is the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as extracellular histones and cell-free DNA. Extracellular histones are increasingly recognized as significantly pathogenic in critical illnesses through direct cell toxicity, the promotion of thrombin generation, and the induction of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Clinically, high circulating levels of histones and histone–DNA complexes are associated with multiorgan failure, DIC, and adverse patient outcomes. Their measurements as well as that of other DAMPs and molecular markers of thrombin generation are not yet applicable in the routine diagnostic laboratory. To provide a practical diagnostic tool for acute DIC, a composite scoring system using rapidly available coagulation tests is recommended by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Its usefulness and limitations are discussed alongside the advances and unanswered questions in DIC pathogenesis. PMID:27578502

  10. Workflow and maintenance characteristics of five automated laboratory instruments for the diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, Sam; Jang, Dan; Gilchrist, Jodi; Smieja, Marek; Poirier, Andre; Hatchette, Todd; Flandin, Jean-Frederic; Chernesky, Max

    2014-07-01

    The choice of a suitable automated system for a diagnostic laboratory depends on various factors. Comparative workflow studies provide quantifiable and objective metrics to determine hands-on time during specimen handling and processing, reagent preparation, return visits and maintenance, and test turnaround time and throughput. Using objective time study techniques, workflow characteristics for processing 96 and 192 tests were determined on m2000 RealTime (Abbott Molecular), Viper XTR (Becton Dickinson), cobas 4800 (Roche Molecular Diagnostics), Tigris (Hologic Gen-Probe), and Panther (Hologic Gen-Probe) platforms using second-generation assays for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A combination of operational and maintenance steps requiring manual labor showed that Panther had the shortest overall hands-on times and Viper XTR the longest. Both Panther and Tigris showed greater efficiency whether 96 or 192 tests were processed. Viper XTR and Panther had the shortest times to results and m2000 RealTime the longest. Sample preparation and loading time was the shortest for Panther and longest for cobas 4800. Mandatory return visits were required only for m2000 RealTime and cobas 4800 when 96 tests were processed, and both required substantially more hands-on time than the other systems due to increased numbers of return visits when 192 tests were processed. These results show that there are substantial differences in the amount of labor required to operate each system. Assay performance, instrumentation, testing capacity, workflow, maintenance, and reagent costs should be considered in choosing a system.

  11. Algorithms Could Automate Cancer Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baky, A. A.; Winkler, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Five new algorithms are a complete statistical procedure for quantifying cell abnormalities from digitized images. Procedure could be basis for automated detection and diagnosis of cancer. Objective of procedure is to assign each cell an atypia status index (ASI), which quantifies level of abnormality. It is possible that ASI values will be accurate and economical enough to allow diagnoses to be made quickly and accurately by computer processing of laboratory specimens extracted from patients.

  12. Laboratory control values for CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Implications for HIV-1 diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bofill, M; Janossy, G; Lee, C A; MacDonald-Burns, D; Phillips, A N; Sabin, C; Timms, A; Johnson, M A; Kernoff, P B

    1992-01-01

    With the advent of standard flow cytometric methods using two-colour fluorescence on samples of whole blood, it is possible to establish the ranges of CD3, CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets in the routine laboratory, and also to assist the definition of HIV-1-related deviations from these normal values. In 676 HIV-1-seronegative individuals the lymphocyte subset percentages and absolute counts were determined. The samples taken mostly in the morning. The groups included heterosexual controls, people with various clotting disorders but without lymphocyte abnormalities as well as seronegative homosexual men as the appropriate controls for the HIV-1-infected groups. The stability of CD4% and CD8% values was demonstrated throughout life, and in children CD4 values less than 25% could be regarded as abnormal. The absolute counts of all T cell subsets decreased from birth until the age of 10 years. In adolescents and adults the absolute numbers (mean +/- s.d.) of lymphocytes, CD3, CD4 and CD8 cells were 1.90 +/- 0.55, 1.45 +/- 0.46, 0.83 +/- 0.29 and 0.56 +/- 0.23 x 10(9)/l, respectively. In patients with haemophilia A and B the mean values did not differ significantly. In homosexual men higher CD8 levels were seen compared with heterosexual men and 27% had an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio but mostly without CD4 lymphopenia (CD4 less than 0.4 x 10(9)/l). However, some healthy uninfected people were 'physiologically' lymphopenic without having inverted CD4/CD8 ratios. When the variations 'within persons' were studied longitudinally over a 5-year period, the absolute CD4 counts tended to be fixed at different levels. As a marked contrast, over 60% of asymptomatic HIV-1+ patients exhibited low CD4 counts less than 0.4 x 10(9)/l together with inverted CD4/CD8 ratios. Such combined changes among the heterosexual and HIV-1-seronegative homosexual groups were as rare as 1.4% and 3%, respectively. For this reason, when the lymphocyte tests show less than 0.4 x 10(9)/l CD4 count and a CD

  13. First imported Plasmodium ovale malaria in Central America: case report of a Guatemalan soldier and a call to improve its accurate diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, María Eugenia; Díaz, Sheilee; Parsons, Emily; Peruski, Leonard F; Enríquez, Fabiola; Ramírez, Juan Luis; Padilla, Norma

    2015-01-01

    The Mesoamerican Ministers of Health have set 2020 as the target for malaria elimination to be achieved in the region. Imported malaria cases are a potential threat to countries attempting elimination or working to prevent resurgence. We report the first imported Plasmodium ovale infection with molecular confirmation in Central America, which occurred in a Guatemalan soldier that had been deployed in Africa. The obstacles for its diagnosis using the standard microscopy technique and the need to improve its detection are discussed.

  14. Follow-Up of External Quality Controls for PCR-Based Diagnosis of Whooping Cough in a Hospital Laboratory Network (Renacoq) and in Other Hospital and Private Laboratories in France.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Sophie; Guiso, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    The French National Reference Centre (NRC) for Whooping Cough carried out an external quality control (QC) analysis in 2010 for the PCR diagnosis of whooping cough. The main objective of the study was to assess the impact of this QC in the participating laboratories through a repeat analysis in 2012.

  15. Follow-Up of External Quality Controls for PCR-Based Diagnosis of Whooping Cough in a Hospital Laboratory Network (Renacoq) and in Other Hospital and Private Laboratories in France

    PubMed Central

    Guiso, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The French National Reference Centre (NRC) for Whooping Cough carried out an external quality control (QC) analysis in 2010 for the PCR diagnosis of whooping cough. The main objective of the study was to assess the impact of this QC in the participating laboratories through a repeat analysis in 2012. PMID:27194689

  16. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Laboratory Diagnosis and TBX1 and FGF8 Mutation Screening

    PubMed Central

    Sgardioli, Ilária C.; Vieira, Társis P.; Simioni, Milena; Monteiro, Fabíola P.; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is one of the recognized forms of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) and has an incidence of 1 of 4,000 to 1 of 6,000 births. Nevertheless, the 22q11 deletion is not found in several patients with a 22q11.2 DS phenotype. In this situation, other chromosomal aberrations and/or mutations in the T-box 1 transcription factor C (TBX1) gene have been detected in some patients. A similar phenotype to that of the 22q11.2 DS has been reported in animal models with mutations in fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) gene. To date, FGF8 mutations have not been investigated in humans. We tested a strategy to perform laboratory testing to reduce costs in the investigation of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS phenotype. A total of 109 individuals with clinical suspicion were investigated using GTG-banding karyotype, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A conclusive diagnosis was achieved in 33 of 109 (30.2%) cases. In addition, mutations in the coding regions of TBX1 and FGF8 genes were investigated in selected cases where 22q11.2 deletion had been excluded, and no pathogenic mutations were detected in both genes. This study presents a strategy for molecular genetic characterization of patients presenting with the 22q11.2 DS using different laboratory techniques. This strategy could be useful in different countries, according to local resources. Also, to our knowledge, this is the first investigation of FGF8 gene in humans with this clinical suspicion. PMID:27617111

  17. Diagnosis of CMT1A duplications and HNPP deletions by interphase FISH: Implications for testing in the cytogenetics laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, L.G.; Kennedy, G.M.; Spikes, A.S.

    1997-03-31

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1A is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness, decreased nerve conduction velocities, and genetic linkage to 17p12. Most (>98%) CMT1A cases are caused by a DNA duplication of a 1.5-Mb region in 17p12 containing the PMP22 gene. The reciprocal product of the CMT1A duplication is a 1.5-Mb deletion which causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). The most informative current diagnostic testing requires pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect DNA rearrangement-specific junction fragments. We investigated the use of interphase FISH for the detection of duplications and deletions for these disorders in the clinical molecular cytogenetics laboratory. Established cell lines or blood specimens from 23 individuals with known molecular diagnoses and 10 controls were obtained and scored using a two-color FISH assay. At least 70%, of CMT1A cells displayed three signals consistent with duplications. Using this minimum expected percentile to make a CMT1A duplication diagnosis, all patients with CMT1A showed a range of 71-92% of cells displaying at least three signals. Of the HNPP cases, 88% of cells displayed only one hybridization signal, consistent with deletions. The PMP22 locus from normal control individuals displayed a duplication pattern in {approximately}9% of cells, interpreted as replication of this locus. The percentage of cells showing replication was significantly lower than in those cells displaying true duplications. We conclude that FISH can be reliably used to diagnose CMT1A and HNPP in the clinical cytogenetics laboratory and to readily distinguish the DNA rearrangements associated with these disorders from individuals without duplication or deletion of the PMP22 locus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Diagnosis of CMT1A duplications and HNPP deletions by interphase FISH: implications for testing in the cytogenetics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, L G; Kennedy, G M; Spikes, A S; Lupski, J R

    1997-03-31

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1A is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by slowly progressive distal muscle wasting and weakness, decreased nerve conduction velocities, and genetic linkage to 17p12. Most (> 98%) CMT1A cases are caused by a DNA duplication of a 1.5-Mb region in 17p12 containing the PMP22 gene. The reciprocal product of the CMT1A duplication is a 1.5-Mb deletion which causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). The most informative current diagnostic testing requires pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to detect DNA rearrangement-specific junction fragments. We investigated the use of interphase FISH for the detection of duplications and deletions for these disorders in the clinical molecular cytogenetics laboratory. Established cell lines or blood specimens from 23 individuals with known molecular diagnoses and 10 controls were obtained and scored using a two-color FISH assay. At least 70% of CMT1A cells displayed three signals consistent with duplications. Using this minimum expected percentile to make a CMT1A duplication diagnosis, all patients with CMT1A showed a range of 71-92% of cells displaying at least three signals. Of the HNPP cases, 88% of cells displayed only one hybridization signal, consistent with deletions. The PMP22 locus from normal control individuals displayed a duplication pattern in approximately 9% of cells, interpreted as replication of this locus. The percentage of cells showing replication was significantly lower than in those cells displaying true duplications. We conclude that FISH can be reliably used to diagnose CMT1A and HNPP in the clinical cytogenetics laboratory and to readily distinguish the DNA rearrangements associated with these disorders from individuals without duplication or deletion of the PMP22 locus.

  19. An Extended, Problem-Based Learning Laboratory Exercise on the Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases Suitable for Large Level 1 Undergraduate Biology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatner, Mary; Tierney, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a two-week laboratory class, based on the diagnosis of human infectious diseases, is described. It can be easily scaled up or down, to suit class sizes from 50 to 600 and completed in a shorter time scale, and to different audiences as desired. Students employ a range of techniques to solve a real-life and…

  20. Comparison of MALDI-TOF MS and VITEK 2 system for laboratory diagnosis of Granulicatella and Abiotrophia species causing invasive infections.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, Paul; Fang, Hong; Thidholm, Ellinor; Boräng, Stina; Westling, Katarina; Özenci, Volkan

    2013-11-01

    Granulicatella and Abiotrophia spp. were known as nutritionally variant streptococci (NVS). Such strains have caused major diagnostic difficulties due to fastidious culturing and unspecific colony morphology. The present study is aimed at comparing the performance of laboratory available diagnostic methods for NVS isolates and determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates. Fourteen clinical invasive isolates, consisting of 10 Granulicatella adiacens, 1 Granulicatella elegans, and 3 Abiotrophia defectiva were in parallel analyzed by 2 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems, i.e., Bruker MS and Vitek MS, as well as Vitek 2 for the species determination. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was applied as a reference method. The Vitek MS gave correct identification for all 14 isolates. The Bruker MS could correctly identify 8/10 G. adiacens, 0/1 G. elegans, and 3/3 A. defectiva isolates at the first analysis occasion, and all 14 isolates became identifiable after repeated tests. The Vitek 2 system could identify 6/10 G. adiacens, 1/1 G. elegans, and 2/3 A. defectiva isolates at the species level. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of 11 antibiotics were determined by Etest. Resistance against ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, rifampicin, and tetracycline were observed in 4, 10, 4, and 1 isolates, respectively. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is a useful tool for the rapid diagnosis of NVS. Phenotypic testing by Vitek 2 is only partially effective for the accurate identification of such strains. The emergence of resistant NVS isolates indicates the necessity of monitoring antimicrobial susceptibilities of such uncommon pathogens.

  1. Performance of an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in laboratory routine diagnosis from a high burden setting

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Juliana Failde; Pinhata, Juliana Maira Watanabe; Chimara, Erica; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Fukasawa, Lucila Okuyama; de Oliveira, Rosangela Siqueira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Brazil is one of the high burden countries for tuberculosis, and a rapid diagnosis is essential for effective control of the disease. In the present study, an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the mpt64 gene for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates was evaluated under routine diagnosis conditions in a reference laboratory. From May 2011 to July 2012, 1,520 isolates of mycobacteria were prospectively submitted for phenotypic and/or PRA-hsp65 identification and to real-time PCR. The mpt64 real-time PCR showed 99.7% sensitivity and 96% specificity and detected 79.4% of the cases missed by phenotypic and PRA-hsp65 identification. The in-house real-time PCR assay showed high sensitivity and specificity and was successfully implemented in the routine diagnosis of tuberculosis in a reference laboratory from a high burden setting. PMID:27598243

  2. Performance of an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in laboratory routine diagnosis from a high burden setting.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Juliana Failde; Pinhata, Juliana Maira Watanabe; Chimara, Erica; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Fukasawa, Lucila Okuyama; Oliveira, Rosangela Siqueira de

    2016-09-01

    Brazil is one of the high burden countries for tuberculosis, and a rapid diagnosis is essential for effective control of the disease. In the present study, an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the mpt64 gene for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates was evaluated under routine diagnosis conditions in a reference laboratory. From May 2011 to July 2012, 1,520 isolates of mycobacteria were prospectively submitted for phenotypic and/or PRA-hsp65 identification and to real-time PCR. The mpt64 real-time PCR showed 99.7% sensitivity and 96% specificity and detected 79.4% of the cases missed by phenotypic and PRA-hsp65 identification. The in-house real-time PCR assay showed high sensitivity and specificity and was successfully implemented in the routine diagnosis of tuberculosis in a reference laboratory from a high burden setting.

  3. High heterogeneity in methods used for the laboratory confirmation of pertussis diagnosis among European countries, 2010: integration of epidemiological and laboratory surveillance must include standardisation of methodologies and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Barkoff, A M; Mertsola, J; Glismann, S; Bacci, S

    2012-08-09

    Despite extensive childhood immunisation, pertussis remains one of the world’s leading causes of vaccine preventable deaths. The current methods used for laboratory diagnosis of pertussis include bacterial culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serology. We conducted a questionnaire survey to identify variations in the laboratory methods and protocols used among participating countries included in the European surveillance network for vaccine-preventable diseases(EUVAC.NET). In February 2010, we performed the survey using a web-based questionnaire and sent it to the country experts of 25 European Union countries,and two European Economic Area (EEA) countries,Norway and Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 37 questions which covered both general information on surveillance methods and detailed laboratory methods used. A descriptive analysis was performed.Questionnaires were answered by all 27 contacted countries. Nineteen countries had pertussis reference laboratories at the national level; their functions varied from performing diagnosis to providing technical advice for routine microbiology laboratories. Culture,PCR and serology were used in 17, 18 and 20 countries,respectively. For PCR, nine laboratories used insertion sequence IS481 as the target gene, which is present in multiple copies in the Bordetella pertussis genome and thus has a greater sensitivity over single copy targets, but has been proved not to be specific for B.pertussis. Antibodies directed against pertussis toxin(PT) are specific for B. pertussis infections. For ELISA serology, only 13 countries’ laboratories used purified PT as coating antigen and 10 included World Health Organization (WHO) or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reference sera in their tests. This present survey shows that methods used for laboratory confirmation of pertussis differ widely among European countries and that there is a great heterogeneity of the reference

  4. Laboratory diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Casemore, D P; Armstrong, M; Sands, R L

    1985-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is now widely accepted as a cause of gastroenteritis. Various methods have been applied to detect oocysts in faeces, but the difficulties of discriminating between non-cryptosporidial bodies, acid fast bodies like cryptosporidia, and cryptosporidia remain. A simple examination in two stages, suitable for routine use is described, using auramine phenol and carbol fuchsine for screening and a modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method for confirmation. A further method, using Jenner and Giemsa stains, is of value for confirmation of identity, especially where fluorescence microscopy is unavailable. A modification of the formol-ether method of concentration is also described. Immunofluorescence and thin section electron microscopy provide definitive identification. Vomiting can be an important clinical feature of gastroenteritis, and the first description of oocysts in vomit is reported. Preliminary findings, after more than two years of study show that Cryptosporidium is an important pathogenic agent in gastroenteritis, confirm the increased incidence in children, and suggest a possible seasonal trend. Images PMID:2416782

  5. β-human chorionic gonadotropin assay in vaginal washing fluid for the accurate diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes during late pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Orhan; Çöğendez, Ebru; Selçuk, Selçuk; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Kaya, Erdal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the measurement of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels in vaginal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Material and Methods A total of 92 pregnant women between 24 and 40 weeks gestation participated in this study. The patients with fluid leaking from the vagina were designated Group 1, the patients with no fluid leaking from the vagina were Group 2, and those with a suspicion of fluid leaking from the vagina were classified as Group 3. Irrigating the posterior vaginal fornix with 5 mL sterile saline was used to measure β-hCG levels of the patients. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine the cut-off value for a positive diagnosis. Results The β-hCG levels of vaginal fluid were measured as 20.5±25.0 mIU/mL, 254.6±346.8 mIU/mL, and 74.3±100.8 mIU/mL in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Vaginal β-hCG level was higher statistically significantly in Group 2 than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.001). 100 mIU/mL was accepted as a cut-off value by using the receiver operating characteristic curve. According to 100 mIU/mL, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values were calculated as 71.2, 100, 100, and 65.1%, respectively. Conclusion The study showed that the measurement of β-hCG level in vaginal washing fluid is an efficient and easy diagnostic test for predicting the amount of fluid leaking from the vagina. However, due to the low negative predictive value of the test, it would not be convenient in daily practice. PMID:24592106

  6. Role of secondary level laboratories in strengthening quality at primary level health facilities' laboratories: an innovative approach to ensure accurate HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria test results in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Paterniti, Antonio D; Redfield, Robert R; Marinucci, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Providing regular external quality assessment of primary level laboratories and timely feedback is crucial to ensure the reliability of testing capacity of the whole laboratory network. This study was aimed to assess the diagnostic performances of primary level laboratories in Southwest Showa Zone in Ethiopia. An external quality assessment protocol was devised whereby from among all the samples collected on-site at 4 health centers (HCs), each HC sent to a district hospital (DH) on a weekly basis 2 TB slides (1 Ziehl-Neelsen stained and another unstained), 2 malaria slides (1 Giemsa stained and another unstained), and 2 blood samples for HIV testing (1 whole blood and another plasma) for a comparative analysis. Similarly, the DH preserved the same amount and type of specimens to send to each HC for retesting. From October to November 2011, 192 single-blinded specimens were rechecked: 64 TB slides, 64 malaria slides, and 64 blood specimens for HIV testing. The analyses demonstrated an overall agreement of 95.3% (183/192) between the test and the retest, and 98.4% (63/64), 92.2% (59/64,) and 95.3% (61/64) for TB microscopy, malaria microscopy, and HIV rapid testing, respectively. Of the total TB slides tested positive, 20/23 (87%) were quantified similar in both laboratories. The agreement on HIV rapid testing was 100% (32/32) when plasma samples were tested either at HC (16/16) or at DH (16/16), while when whole blood specimens were tested, the agreement was 87.5% (14/16) and 93.8% (15/16) for samples prepared by HCs and DH, respectively. Results of this new approach proved that secondary laboratories could play a vital role in assuring laboratory qualities at primary level HCs, without depending on remotely located national and regional laboratories to provide this support.

  7. SNP-array based whole genome homozygosity mapping: a quick and powerful tool to achieve an accurate diagnosis in LGMD2 patients.

    PubMed

    Papić, Lea; Fischer, Dirk; Trajanoski, Slave; Höftberger, Romana; Fischer, Carina; Ströbel, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Bittner, Reginald E; Schabhüttl, Maria; Gruber, Karin; Pieber, Thomas R; Janecke, Andreas R; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    A large number of novel disease genes have been identified by homozygosity mapping and the positional candidate approach. In this study we used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array-based, whole genome homozygosity mapping as the first step to a molecular diagnosis in the highly heterogeneous muscle disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). In a consanguineous family, both affected siblings showed homozygous blocks on chromosome 15 corresponding to the LGMD2A locus. Direct sequencing of CAPN3, encoding calpain-3, identified a homozygous deletion c.483delG (p.Ile162SerfsX17). In a sporadic LGMD patient complete absence of caveolin-3 on Western blot was observed. However, a mutation in CAV3 could not be detected. Homozygosity mapping revealed a large homozygous block at the LGMD2I locus, and direct sequencing of FKRP encoding fukutin-related-protein detected the common homozygous c.826 C>A (p.Leu276Ile) mutation. Subsequent re-examination of this patient's muscle biopsy showed aberrant α-dystroglycan glycosylation. In summary, we show that whole-genome homozygosity mapping using low cost SNP arrays provides a fast and non-invasive method to identify disease-causing mutations in sporadic patients or sibs from consanguineous families in LGMD2. Furthermore, this is the first study describing that in addition to PTRF, encoding polymerase I and transcript release factor, FKRP mutations may cause secondary caveolin-3 deficiency.

  8. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-01-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractures. The two modalities were compared in terms of effectiveness based on simple radiographic readings and US examination results. We also investigated the factors that influenced the effectiveness of US examination. Rib fractures were detected on radiography in 69 patients (34.3%) but not in 132 patients. Rib fractures were diagnosed by using US examination in 160 patients (84.6%). Of the 132 patients who showed no rib fractures on radiography, 92 showed rib fractures on US. Among the 69 patients of rib fracture detected on radiography, 33 had additional rib fractures detected on US. Of the patients, 76 (37.8%) had identical radiographic and US results, and 125 (62.2%) had fractures detected on US that were previously undetected on radiography or additional fractures detected on US. Age, duration until US examination, and fracture location were not significant influencing factors. However, in the group without detected fractures on radiography, US showed a more significant effectiveness than in the group with detected fractures on radiography (P=0.003). US examination could detect unnoticed rib fractures on simple radiography. US examination is especially more effective in the group without detected fractures on radiography. More attention should be paid to patients with chest trauma who have no detected fractures on radiography. PMID:28119889

  9. A Highly Sensitive Porous Silicon (P-Si)-Based Human Kallikrein 2 (hK2) Immunoassay Platform toward Accurate Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wook; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kim, Soyoun; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-05-22

    Levels of total human kallikrein 2 (hK2), a protein involved the pathology of prostate cancer (PCa), could be used as a biomarker to aid in the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, we report on a porous silicon antibody immunoassay platform for the detection of serum levels of total hK2. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, which offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. The tailored pore size of the porous silicon also allows efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. Monoclonal hK2 capture antibody (6B7) was dispensed onto P-Si chip using a piezoelectric dispenser. In total 13 × 13 arrays (169 spots) were spotted on the chip with its single spot volume of 300 pL. For an optimization of capture antibody condition, we firstly performed an immunoassay of the P-Si microarray under a titration series of hK2 in pure buffer (PBS) at three different antibody densities (75, 100 and 145 µg/mL). The best performance of the microarray platform was seen at 100 µg/mL of the capture antibody concentration (LOD was 100 fg/mL). The platform then was subsequently evaluated for a titration series of serum-spiked hK2 samples. The developed platform utilizes only 15 µL of serum per test and the total assay time is about 3 h, including immobilization of the capture antibody. The detection limit of the hK2 assay was 100 fg/mL in PBS buffer and 1 pg/mL in serum with a dynamic range of 106 (10(-4) to 10(2) ng/mL).

  10. Validation of Three Early Ejaculation Diagnostic Tools: A Composite Measure Is Accurate and More Adequate for Diagnosis by Updated Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Jern, Patrick; Piha, Juhana; Santtila, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To validate three early ejaculation diagnostic tools, and propose a new tool for diagnosis in line with proposed changes to diagnostic criteria. Significant changes to diagnostic criteria are expected in the near future. Available screening tools do not necessarily reflect proposed changes. Materials and Methods Data from 148 diagnosed early ejaculation patients (Mage = 42.8) and 892 controls (Mage = 33.1 years) from a population-based sample were used. Participants responded to three different questionnaires (Premature Ejaculation Profile; Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool; Multiple Indicators of Premature Ejaculation). Stopwatch measured ejaculation latency times were collected from a subsample of early ejaculation patients. We used two types of responses to the questionnaires depending on the treatment status of the patients 1) responses regarding the situation before starting pharmacological treatment and 2) responses regarding current situation. Logistic regressions and Receiver Operating Characteristics were used to assess ability of both the instruments and individual items to differentiate between patients and controls. Results All instruments had very good precision (Areas under the Curve ranging from .93-.98). A new five-item instrument (named CHecklist for Early Ejaculation Symptoms – CHEES) consisting of high-performance variables selected from the three instruments had validity (Nagelkerke R2 range .51-.79 for backwards/forwards logistic regression) equal to or slightly better than any individual instrument (i.e., had slightly higher validity statistics, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance). Importantly, however, this instrument was more in line with proposed changes to diagnostic criteria. Conclusions All three screening tools had good validity. A new 5-item diagnostic tool (CHEES) based on the three instruments had equal or somewhat more favorable validity statistics compared to the other three tools, but is

  11. A Highly Sensitive Porous Silicon (P-Si)-Based Human Kallikrein 2 (hK2) Immunoassay Platform toward Accurate Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Wook; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kim, Soyoun; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-01-01

    Levels of total human kallikrein 2 (hK2), a protein involved the pathology of prostate cancer (PCa), could be used as a biomarker to aid in the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, we report on a porous silicon antibody immunoassay platform for the detection of serum levels of total hK2. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, which offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. The tailored pore size of the porous silicon also allows efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. Monoclonal hK2 capture antibody (6B7) was dispensed onto P-Si chip using a piezoelectric dispenser. In total 13 × 13 arrays (169 spots) were spotted on the chip with its single spot volume of 300 pL. For an optimization of capture antibody condition, we firstly performed an immunoassay of the P-Si microarray under a titration series of hK2 in pure buffer (PBS) at three different antibody densities (75, 100 and 145 µg/mL). The best performance of the microarray platform was seen at 100 µg/mL of the capture antibody concentration (LOD was 100 fg/mL). The platform then was subsequently evaluated for a titration series of serum-spiked hK2 samples. The developed platform utilizes only 15 µL of serum per test and the total assay time is about 3 h, including immobilization of the capture antibody. The detection limit of the hK2 assay was 100 fg/mL in PBS buffer and 1 pg/mL in serum with a dynamic range of 106 (10−4 to 102 ng/mL). PMID:26007739

  12. Microscopic diagnosis of sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin-fixed stool samples for helminths and intestinal protozoa: a comparison among European reference laboratories.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, J; Botero-Kleiven, S; Castelli, F; Chiodini, P L; Edwards, H; Köhler, N; Gulletta, M; Lebbad, M; Manser, M; Matthys, B; N'Goran, E K; Tannich, E; Vounatsou, P; Marti, H

    2010-03-01

    The present study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of different European reference laboratories in diagnosing helminths and intestinal protozoa, using an ether-concentration method applied to sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF)-preserved faecal samples. In total, 102 stool specimens were analysed during a cross-sectional parasitological survey in urban farming communities in Côte d'Ivoire. Five SAF-preserved faecal samples were prepared from each specimen and forwarded to the participating reference laboratories, processed and examined under a microscope adhering to a standard operating procedure (SOP). Schistosoma mansoni (cumulative prevalence: 51.0%) and hookworm (cumulative prevalence: 39.2%) were the predominant helminths. There was excellent agreement (kappa > 0.8; p < 0.001) among the reference laboratories for the diagnosis of S. mansoni, hookworm, Trichuris trichiura and Ascaris lumbricoides. Moderate agreement (kappa = 0.54) was found for Hymenolepis nana, and lesser agreement was observed for other, less prevalent helminths. The predominant intestinal protozoa were Entamoeba coli (median prevalence: 67.6%), Blastocystis hominis (median prevalence: 55.9%) and Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (median prevalence: 47.1%). Substantial agreement among reference laboratories was found for E. coli (kappa = 0.69), but only fair or moderate agreement was found for other Entamoeba species, Giardia intestinalis and Chilomastix mesnili. There was only poor agreement for B. hominis, Isospora belli and Trichomonas intestinalis. In conclusion, although common helminths were reliably diagnosed by European reference laboratories, there was only moderate agreement between centres for pathogenic intestinal protozoa. Continued external quality assessment and the establishment of a formal network of reference laboratories is necessary to further enhance both accuracy and uniformity in parasite diagnosis.

  13. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing.

  14. Impact of Proficiency Testing Program for Laboratories Conducting Early Diagnosis of HIV-1 Infection in Infants in Low- to Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Albert; Subbarao, Shambavi; Zhang, Guoqing; Parsons, Linda; Nkengasong, John; Ou, Chin-Yih

    2014-01-01

    A voluntary, cost-free external quality assessment (EQA) program established by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was implemented to primarily monitor the performance of laboratories conducting HIV Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) from dried blood spots (DBS) in low- to middle-income countries since 2006. Ten blind DBS proficiency test (PT) specimens and 100 known HIV-positive and -negative DBS specimens (to be used as internal controls) were shipped triannually to participating laboratories with reports for the PT specimens due within 30 days. The participant's results and a summary of the performance of all participating laboratories and each diagnostic method were provided after each test cycle. Enrollment in the CDC PT program expanded progressively from 17 laboratories from 11 countries in 2006 to include 136 laboratories from 41 countries at the end of 2012. Despite external pressures to test and treat more children while expanding EID programs, mean PT test scores significantly improved over time as demonstrated by the upward trend from mid-2006 to the end of 2012 (P = 0.001) and the increase in the percentage of laboratories scoring 100% (P = 0.003). The mean test scores plateaued over the past 10 testing cycles, ranging between 98.2% and 99.7%, and discordant test results still occur but at a rate of no higher than 2.6%. Analysis of these test results suggests a positive impact of proficiency testing on the testing performance of the participating laboratories, and a continuous training program and proficiency testing participation may translate into laboratories improving their testing accuracy. PMID:24353004

  15. Comparison between qualitative and semiquantitative catheter-tip cultures: laboratory diagnosis of catheter-related infection in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Camila; de Lourdes RS Cunha, Maria; Lyra, João C; Bentlin, Maria R; Batalha, Jackson EN; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Rugolo, Lígia MSS

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated semiquantitative and qualitative catheter-culture methods for diagnosis of catheter-related infection (CRI) in newborns. Catheter tips from newborns admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the University Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP were included in the study. Catheter cultures were performed with both semiquantitative and qualitative techniques. For CRI diagnosis, microorganisms isolated from catheter cultures and from peripheral blood cultures were identified and submitted to agent susceptibility test. The gold standard was the certain CRI diagnosis when same microorganism (specie and profile of susceptibility to agents) was isolated from both catheter tips and peripheral blood culture. A total of 85 catheters from 63 newborns were included in the study. The semiquantitative culture method, despite presenting lower sensitivity (90%), showed higher specificity (71%) when compared to 100% of sensitivity and 60% of specificity in the qualitative method. The identification of the microorganisms obtained from the catheter cultures showed a prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) species. The specie Staphylococcus epidermidis (77.5%) was the prevalent in the catheters with positive semiquantitative cultures. Among 11 episodes with CRI diagnosis, 8 (72.7%) were associated with CNS species, of which 6 were S. epidermidis. Two episodes of CRI by S. aureus and one by Candida parapsilosis were also detected. The semiquantitative catheter-culture method showed advantages for CRI diagnosis in newborns when compared to the conservative qualitative method. PMID:24031213

  16. Do English NHS Microbiology laboratories offer adequate services for the diagnosis of UTI in children? Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) Audit of Standard Operational Procedures.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Verlander, Neville Q; Moore, Philippa C L; Larcombe, James; Dudley, Jan; Banerjee, Jaydip; Jadresic, Lyda

    2015-09-01

    quarter of laboratories were providing a service that would allow clinicians to fully comply with the first line recommendations in the 2007 NICE UTI in children guidance. Laboratory urine submission report figures suggest that the guidance has not led to an increase in diagnosis of UTI in children under 3 years old.

  17. Reliability of clinical diagnosis and laboratory testing techniques currently used for identification of canine parvovirus enteritis in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Faz, Mirna; Martínez, José Simón; Quijano-Hernández, Israel; Fajardo, Raúl

    2017-01-24

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is the main etiological agent of viral enteritis in dogs. Actually in literature, CPV-2 has been reported with clinical signs that vary from the classical disease, and immunochromatography test and PCR technique have been introduced to veterinary hospitals to confirm CPV-2 diagnosis and other infections. However, the reliability of these techniques has been poorly analyzed. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of veterinary clinical diagnosis, immunochromatography test and PCR technique. Our data indicate that variations in the clinical signs of CPV-2 complicate the gathering of an appropriate diagnosis; and immunochromatography test and PCR technique do not have adequate sensitivity to diagnose positive cases.

  18. Reliability of clinical diagnosis and laboratory testing techniques currently used for identification of canine parvovirus enteritis in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    FAZ, Mirna; MARTÍNEZ, José Simón; QUIJANO-HERNÁNDEZ, Israel; FAJARDO, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is the main etiological agent of viral enteritis in dogs. Actually in literature, CPV-2 has been reported with clinical signs that vary from the classical disease, and immunochromatography test and PCR technique have been introduced to veterinary hospitals to confirm CPV-2 diagnosis and other infections. However, the reliability of these techniques has been poorly analyzed. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of veterinary clinical diagnosis, immunochromatography test and PCR technique. Our data indicate that variations in the clinical signs of CPV-2 complicate the gathering of an appropriate diagnosis; and immunochromatography test and PCR technique do not have adequate sensitivity to diagnose positive cases. PMID:27818461

  19. Alternative application of Tau protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis: Improvement for weakly positive 14-3-3 protein in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Jeongmin; Park, Jun Sun; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Lee, Sol Moe; An, SeongSoo A.; Lee, Myung Koo; Ju, Young Ran

    2015-01-01

    The 14-3-3 protein has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, weakly positive 14-3-3 leads to false positive results and an incorrect diagnosis. We attempted to use quantitative data for tau protein to provide an accurate diagnosis based on weak 14-3-3 protein. Sixty-two patients with sCJD, including pathologically confirmed, clinically definite, and probable cases, and 89 non-CJD patients were investigated based on a Korean population. Among them, 20 sCJD and 14 non-CJD showed weakly positive 14-3-3. The total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein levels were measured by ELISA, and the p-tau to t-tau ratio (p/t ratio) was calculated. The combined use of the 14-3-3 protein assay, t-tau levels, and p/t ratio improved the specificity of diagnosis compared with the use of the 14-3-3 protein assay alone (47% for 14-3-3 alone; 85.94% for 14-3-3 combined with t-tau; 90.62% for 14-3-3 combined with the p/t ratio). In addition, 18 of 20 sCJD and 12 of 14 non-CJD who were weakly positive for 14-3-3 were positive for the p/t ratio and negative for the p/t ratio, respectively. When used in combination with the 14-3-3 protein, the tau protein is useful as a biomarker for the precise diagnosis of sCJD. PMID:26507666

  20. Alternative application of Tau protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis: Improvement for weakly positive 14-3-3 protein in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Jeongmin; Park, Jun Sun; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Lee, Sol Moe; An, SeongSoo A; Lee, Myung Koo; Ju, Young Ran

    2015-10-28

    The 14-3-3 protein has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, weakly positive 14-3-3 leads to false positive results and an incorrect diagnosis. We attempted to use quantitative data for tau protein to provide an accurate diagnosis based on weak 14-3-3 protein. Sixty-two patients with sCJD, including pathologically confirmed, clinically definite, and probable cases, and 89 non-CJD patients were investigated based on a Korean population. Among them, 20 sCJD and 14 non-CJD showed weakly positive 14-3-3. The total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein levels were measured by ELISA, and the p-tau to t-tau ratio (p/t ratio) was calculated. The combined use of the 14-3-3 protein assay, t-tau levels, and p/t ratio improved the specificity of diagnosis compared with the use of the 14-3-3 protein assay alone (47% for 14-3-3 alone; 85.94% for 14-3-3 combined with t-tau; 90.62% for 14-3-3 combined with the p/t ratio). In addition, 18 of 20 sCJD and 12 of 14 non-CJD who were weakly positive for 14-3-3 were positive for the p/t ratio and negative for the p/t ratio, respectively. When used in combination with the 14-3-3 protein, the tau protein is useful as a biomarker for the precise diagnosis of sCJD.

  1. [Recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing for rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Tohru

    2004-09-01

    Immunologic laboratory tests serve critical roles in the care of patients with various rheumatic diseases. These tests can provide relevant information of rheumatic diseases based on their immunopathophysiological condition. Although immunologic laboratory tests are quite useful for the determination of diagnosis and the estimation of disease activity, organ involvement and prognosis, they are frequently misused and resulted in an inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests and accurate clinical interpretation of the test results can prevent false diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. In order to improve clinical care of patients with rheumatic diseases, clinicians caring patients with rheumatic disease should recognize meanings, characteristics and limitations of each result of immunologic laboratory testing. This article reviewed recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing such as antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, and introduced guidelines for these testing. These guidelines based on evidences of EBM may contribute to the appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests for rheumatic diseases.

  2. Novel, In-House, SYBR Green Based One-Step rRT-PCR: Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Suspected Patients From Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zahraei, Bentolhoda; Hashemzadeh, Mohammad Sadegh; Najarasl, Mohammad; Zahiriyeganeh, Samaneh; Tat, Mahdi; Metanat, Maliheh; Sepehri Rad, Nahid; Khansari-nejad, Behzad; Zafari, Ehsan; Sharti, Mojtaba; Dorostkar, Ruhollah

    2016-01-01

    Background The Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus causes severe disease in humans, with a high mortality rate. Since, there is no approved vaccine or specific treatment for CCHF, an early and accurate diagnosis, as well as reliable surveillance, is essential for case management and patient improvement. Objectives For this research, our aim was to evaluate the application of a novel SYBR Green based one-step real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for the in-house diagnosis of the CCHF virus. Patients and Methods In this experimental study, the highly conserved S-region sequence of the CCHF viral genome was first adapted from GenBank, and the specific primers targeting this region were designed. Then, the viral RNA was extracted from 75 serum samples from different patients in eastern Iran. The sensitivity and specificity of the primers were also evaluated in positive serum samples previously confirmed to have the CCHF virus, by this one-step rRT-PCR assay, as well as a DNA sequencing analysis. Results From a total of 75 suspected serum samples, 42 were confirmed to be positive for CCHF virus, with no false-positives detected by the sequencing results. After 40 amplification cycles, the melting curve analysis revealed a mean melting temperature (Tm) of 86.5 ± 0.6°C (quite different from those of the primer-dimers), and the positive samples showed only a small variation in the parameters. In all of the positive samples, the predicted length of 420 bp was confirmed by electrophoresis. Moreover, the sensitivity test showed that this assay can detect less than 20 copies of viral RNA per reaction. Conclusions This study showed that this novel one-step rRT-PCR assay is a rapid, reliable, repeatable, specific, sensitive, and simple tool for the detection of the CCHF virus. PMID:27099688

  3. Analytic laboratory performance of a point of care urine culture kit for diagnosis and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Bongard, E; Frimodt-Møller, N; Gal, M; Wootton, M; Howe, R; Francis, N; Goossens, H; Butler, C C

    2015-10-01

    Currently available point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests for managing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in general practice are limited by poor performance characteristics, and laboratory culture generally provides results only after a few days. This laboratory evaluation compared the analytic performance of the POC UK Flexicult(™) (Statens Serum Institut) (SSI) urinary kit for quantification, identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing and routine UK National Health Service (NHS) urine processing to an advanced urine culture method. Two hundred urine samples routinely submitted to the Public Health Wales Microbiology Laboratory were divided and: (1) analysed by routine NHS microbiological tests as per local laboratory standard operating procedures, (2) inoculated onto the UK Flexicult(™) SSI urinary kit and (3) spiral plated onto Colorex Orientation UTI medium (E&O Laboratories Ltd). The results were evaluated between the NHS and Flexicult(™ )methods, and discordant results were compared to the spiral plating method. The UK Flexicult(™) SSI urinary kit was compared to routine NHS culture for identification of a pure or predominant uropathogen at ≥ 10(5) cfu/mL, with a positive discordancy rate of 13.5% and a negative discordancy rate of 3%. The sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 73.8-93.7] and 82.6% (95% CI 75.8-87.7), respectively. The UK Flexicult(™) SSI urinary kit was comparable to routine NHS urine processing in identifying microbiologically positive UTIs in this laboratory evaluation. However, the number of false-positive samples could lead to over-prescribing of antibiotics in clinical practice. The Flexicult(™) SSI kit could be useful as a POC test for UTIs in primary care but further pragmatic evaluations are necessary.

  4. Can newly developed, rapid immunochromatographic antigen detection tests be reliably used for the laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infections?

    PubMed

    Dunn, James J; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2015-06-01

    Five years ago, the Point-Counterpoint series was launched. The initial article asked about the role of rapid immunochromatographic antigen testing in the diagnosis of influenza A virus 2009 H1N1 infection (D. F. Welch and C. C. Ginocchio, J Clin Microbiol 48:22-25, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.02268-09). Since that article, not only have major changes been made in immunochromatographic antigen detection (IAD) testing for the influenza viruses, but there has also been rapid development of commercially available nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for influenza virus detection. Further, a novel variant of influenza A, H7N9, has emerged in Asia, and H5N1 is also reemergent. In that initial article, the editor of this series, Peter Gilligan, identified two issues that required further consideration. One was how well IAD tests worked in clinical settings, especially in times of antigen drift and shift. The other was the role of future iterations of influenza NAATs and whether this testing would be available in a community hospital setting. James Dunn, who is Director of Medical Microbiology and Virology at Texas Children's Hospital, has extensive experience using IAD tests for diagnosing influenza. He will discuss the application and value of these tests in influenza diagnosis. Christine Ginocchio, who recently retired as the Senior Medical Director, Division of Infectious Disease Diagnostics, North Shore-LIJ Health System, and now is Vice President for Global Microbiology Affairs at bioMérieux, Durham, NC, wrote the initial counterpoint in this series, where she advocated the use of NAATs for influenza diagnosis. She will update us on the commercially available NAAT systems and explain what their role should be in the diagnosis of influenza infection.

  5. Upgrading the science and technology of assessment and diagnosis: laboratory and clinic-based assessment of children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Rapport, M D; Chung, K M; Shore, G; Denney, C B; Isaacs, P

    2000-12-01

    Reviews the usefulness of clinic-based and laboratory-based instruments and paradigms for diagnosing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and monitoring treatment effects. Extant literature examining the performance of normal children and those with ADHD on an extensive range of neurocognitive tests, tasks, and experimental paradigms indicates that particular types of instruments may be more reliable than others with respect to detecting between-group differences. We review task parameters that may distinguish the more reliable from less reliable instruments. The value of clinic-based and laboratory-based instruments for monitoring treatment response in children with ADHD is questionable when evaluated in the context of ecologically relevant variables such as classroom behavior and academic functioning. We present a general conceptual model to highlight conceptual issues relevant to designing clinic-based and laboratory-based instruments for the purposes of diagnosing and monitoring treatment effects in children with ADHD. Application of the model to currently conceptualized core variables indicates that attention and impulsivity-hyperactivity may represent correlative rather than core features of the disorder. We discuss implications of these findings for designing the next generation of clinic-based and laboratory-based instruments.

  6. Comparison of an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line with Vero cells in the isolation of Herpes simplex virus-1 for the laboratory diagnosis of Herpes simplex keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Athmanathan, Sreedharan; B Reddy, Sesha; Nutheti, Rishita; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2002-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) is a sight threatening ocular infection often requiring a specific and prompt laboratory diagnosis. Isolation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in culture provides the most reliable and specific method and is considered as the "Gold Standard" in the laboratory diagnosis of HSK in spite of its low sensitivity. Using "cell lines of corneal origin" for virus isolation may be beneficial under such circumstances, since these cells have been shown to be excellent substrates for the growth of HSV-1 isolated from the cornea. We report a comparative study of a novel human corneal epithelial cell line (HCE) and the Vero cell line in the isolation of HSV-1 from corneal scrapings employing a shell vial assay. Methods Corneal scrapings were obtained from 17 patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK. All the cases were confirmed by virological investigations (PCR and viral antigen detection positive, n = 15, PCR positive, n = 1, Viral antigen positive, n = 1). Scrapings obtained from 10 patients with infectious keratitis of non-viral origin were included as controls. All the scrapings were simultaneously inoculated into shell vials of HCE and Vero cells. Cultures were terminated at 24 h post-infection. Isolation of HSV-1 was confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence/ immunoperoxidase assay. Results Virus could be isolated using both or either of the cell lines in 10/17 (58.82%) patients with HSK. HSV-1 was isolated from 10/ 17 (58.82%) and 4/17(23.52%) specimens in HCE and Vero cells, respectively (P = 0.036). None of the controls yielded HSV-1. While all the 10 (100%) strains were isolated in HCE, Vero yielded only 4/10 (40%) strains in the shell vial culture (P = 0.014). Conclusions HCE showed a statistically significant difference in the virus isolation rate with respect to Vero cells. HCE may be an excellent alternative cell line for the isolation of HSV-1, especially from corneal scrapings, for the laboratory diagnosis of HSK

  7. Multicentric comparative assessment of the bio-evolution Toxoplasma gondii detection kit with eight laboratory-developed PCR assays for molecular diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Filisetti, Denis; Sterkers, Yvon; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Cassaing, Sophie; Dalle, Frédéric; Delhaes, Laurence; Pelloux, Hervé; Touafek, Fériel; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Yera, Hélène; Candolfi, Ermano; Bastien, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The detection of Toxoplasma gondii in amniotic fluid is an essential tool for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis and is currently essentially based on the use of PCR. Although some consensus is emerging, this molecular diagnosis suffers from a lack of standardization and an extreme diversity of laboratory-developed methods. Commercial kits for the detection of T. gondii by PCR were recently developed and offer certain advantages; however, they must be assessed in comparison with optimized reference PCR assays. The present multicentric study aimed to compare the performances of the Bio-Evolution T. gondii detection kit and laboratory-developed PCR assays set up in eight proficient centers in France. The study compared 157 amniotic fluid samples and found concordances of 99% and 100% using 76 T. gondii-infected samples and 81 uninfected samples, respectively. Moreover, taking into account the classification of the European Research Network on Congenital Toxoplasmosis, the overall diagnostic sensitivity of all assays was identical and calculated to be 86% (54/63); specificity was 100% for all assays. Finally, the relative quantification results were in good agreement between the kit and the laboratory-developed assays. The good performances of this commercial kit are probably in part linked to the use of a number of good practices: detection in multiplicate, amplification of the repetitive DNA target rep529, and the use of an internal control for the detection of PCR inhibitors. The only drawbacks noted at the time of the study were the absence of uracil-N-glycosylase and small defects in the reliability of the production of different reagents.

  8. Multicentric Comparative Assessment of the Bio-Evolution Toxoplasma gondii Detection Kit with Eight Laboratory-Developed PCR Assays for Molecular Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Filisetti, Denis; Sterkers, Yvon; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Cassaing, Sophie; Dalle, Frédéric; Delhaes, Laurence; Pelloux, Hervé; Touafek, Fériel; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Yera, Hélène; Candolfi, Ermano

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Toxoplasma gondii in amniotic fluid is an essential tool for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis and is currently essentially based on the use of PCR. Although some consensus is emerging, this molecular diagnosis suffers from a lack of standardization and an extreme diversity of laboratory-developed methods. Commercial kits for the detection of T. gondii by PCR were recently developed and offer certain advantages; however, they must be assessed in comparison with optimized reference PCR assays. The present multicentric study aimed to compare the performances of the Bio-Evolution T. gondii detection kit and laboratory-developed PCR assays set up in eight proficient centers in France. The study compared 157 amniotic fluid samples and found concordances of 99% and 100% using 76 T. gondii-infected samples and 81 uninfected samples, respectively. Moreover, taking into account the classification of the European Research Network on Congenital Toxoplasmosis, the overall diagnostic sensitivity of all assays was identical and calculated to be 86% (54/63); specificity was 100% for all assays. Finally, the relative quantification results were in good agreement between the kit and the laboratory-developed assays. The good performances of this commercial kit are probably in part linked to the use of a number of good practices: detection in multiplicate, amplification of the repetitive DNA target rep529, and the use of an internal control for the detection of PCR inhibitors. The only drawbacks noted at the time of the study were the absence of uracil-N-glycosylase and small defects in the reliability of the production of different reagents. PMID:25339393

  9. Diagnosis of prostatic neuroendocrine carcinoma: Two cases report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    He, Hai-Qing; Fan, Shu-Feng; Xu, Qiong; Chen, Zhen-Jing; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of prostatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) imaged by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and literature review are presented. Early enhanced CT, MRI, especially diffusion-weighted image were emphasized, the complementary roles of ultrasound, CT, MRI, clinical and laboratory characteristic’s features in achieving accurate diagnosis were valued in the preoperative diagnosis of PNEC. PMID:26029353

  10. Comparative Assessment of a Commercial Kit and Two Laboratory-Developed PCR Assays for Molecular Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Morelle, Christelle; Varlet-Marie, Emmanuelle; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Cassaing, Sophie; Pelloux, Hervé; Bastien, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection that may cause severe disease and is regarded as a serious health problem in France. Detection of the parasite by molecular methods is crucial for diagnosing the disease. The extreme diversity of methods and performances of Toxoplasma PCR assays makes the use of commercial PCR kits an attractive alternative, as they offer a chance for standardization. We compared the performances of three molecular methods for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in amniotic fluid: a commercial method using nested PCR and two laboratory-developed methods, one using conventional PCR and the other one real-time PCR. This evaluation was based upon a T. gondii DNA serial dilution assay, three amniotic fluid samples spiked with T. gondii at different concentrations, and a clinical cohort of 33 amniotic fluid samples. The T. gondii DNA serial dilution assay showed a much lower sensitivity for the commercial kit than for the laboratory-developed methods. Moreover, out of 12 proven congenital toxoplasmosis cases, 91.7% were detected by the laboratory-developed assays, whereas only 50% were detected by the commercial kit. A lack of sensitivity of the method, partly due to the presence of PCR inhibitors, was the main drawback of the commercial method. This study emphasizes that commercial PCR diagnostic kits do not systematically perform better than carefully optimized laboratory-developed methods. There is a need for thorough evaluation of such kits by proficient groups, as well as for performance standards that commercial kits can be tested against to improve confidence in those selected by health care providers. PMID:23035184

  11. Laboratorial diagnosis of fragile-X syndrome: experience in a sample of individuals with pervasive developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Carlos Eduardo; Guerreiro, Marilisa Mantovani; Marques-de-Faria, Antonia Paula; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2005-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a frequent genetic disease associated to developmental disorders, including learning disability, mental retardation, behavioral problems and pervasive developmental disorders (autism and related conditions). We studied a sample of 82 individuals (69 males and 13 females) presenting with pervasive developmental disorders using three techniques for the diagnosis of fragile X syndrome (FXS). Cytogenetic analysis detected the fragile site in four males, but only one showed a consistent positive rate. Molecular study based on the PCR technique was inconclusive for most females (92.3%), which where latter submitted to Southern blotting analysis, and for one male (1.4%), excluding the FRAXA mutation in the remaining male individuals (98.6%). Molecular tests using the Southern blotting technique confirmed only one positive case (1.2%) in a male subject. These results showed that Southern blotting analysis of the FRAXA mutation has the best sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of FXS but also validated the PCR technique as a confinable screening test.

  12. Laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of the infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli: a Chinese consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; He, L; Hu, B; Hu, J; Huang, X; Lai, G; Li, Y; Liu, Y; Ni, Y; Qiu, H; Shao, Z; Shi, Y; Wang, M; Wang, R; Wu, D; Xie, C; Xu, Y; Yang, F; Yu, K; Yu, Y; Zhang, J; Zhuo, C

    2016-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) are defined as bacterial isolates susceptible to two or fewer antimicrobial categories. XDR-GNB mainly occur in Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The prevalence of XDR-GNB is on the rise in China and in other countries, and it poses a major public health threat as a result of the lack of adequate therapeutic options. A group of Chinese clinical experts, microbiologists and pharmacologists came together to discuss and draft a consensus on the laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of XDR-GNB infections. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created according to documents from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Multiple risk factors of XDR-GNB infections are analyzed, with long-term exposure to extended-spectrum antimicrobials being the most important one. Combination therapeutic regimens are summarized for treatment of XDR-GNB infections caused by different bacteria based on limited clinical studies and/or laboratory data. Most frequently used antimicrobials used for the combination therapies include aminoglycosides, carbapenems, colistin, fosfomycin and tigecycline. Strict infection control measures including hand hygiene, contact isolation, active screening, environmental surface disinfections, decolonization and restrictive antibiotic stewardship are recommended to curb the XDR-GNB spread.

  13. Laboratory diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis: a solid phase radioassay for IgG and IgM antiglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Nineham, L J; Hay, F C; Roitt, I M

    1976-01-01

    A technique suitable for the routine estimation of IgM and IgG antiglobulins has been devised. The assay involves the binding of antiglobulins to plastic tubes coated with rabbit immunoglobulin: the amount of antiglobulin bound is then determined by adding radiolabelled antihuman IgG or IgM. The conditions for the assay have been examined and optimal incubation times and amounts of reagents established. Verification of the antibody nature of antiglobulin activity has been obtained. Both IgG and IgM antiglobulins were raised in virtually all seropositive rheumatoid arthritics, and most seronegative patients gave elevated values for either IgM or IgG rheumatoid factors. The use of an anti-light chain reagent as a screening test for total antiglobulins was investigated. These tests should prove valuable in diagnosis and permit quantitative evaluation of research studies. PMID:1087638

  14. [Visual evoked potentials and the E-UFA test. Laboratory contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Caputo, D; Vanzulli, F; Zibetti, A

    1979-09-29

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and electrophoretic mobility test of erythrocytes (E-UFA test) were compared in 50 multiple sclerosis (M.S.) patients as diagnostic tests. Abnormal VEPs were recorded in 35 patients. E-UFA test was found positive in 31 cases. With respect to Mc Alpine diagnostic criteria, 26 out of 33 definite M.S., 6 out of 9 probable M.S. and 3 out of 8 possible M.S. cases had abnormal VEPs. A positive response in E-UFA test was observed rispectively in 16, 8, 7 patients. Complessively 48 cases (96%) had an abnormal response to the one and/or to the other of the two tests, which apper complementar in early diagnosis of M.S.

  15. [Bacteriological diagnosis of renal tuberculosis: an experience at the regional tuberculosis laboratory in Córdoba Province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Berta, Mariana; Sturm, Gabriela; Juri, Leticia; Cosiansi, Maria C; Barzón, Silvia; Barnes, Ana I; Rojo, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Given the incidence of renal tuberculosis in patients suffering of pulmonary tuberculosis, we seek to study both the frequency of this association in diagnosed cases of renal tuberculosis and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species that were identified (period 1997-2009), observing its incidence by sex, demonstrating the importance of serial culture of urine samples and evaluating the convenience of using solid and liquid media. The analysis of urine samples from 383 patients indicated renal tuberculosis in 24 cases; in most cases, (95.8 %) Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species prevailed, whereas the presence of Mycobacterium bovis accounted for 4.2 % of the cases. The association of pulmonary and renal tuberculosis was found in 6 cases. The isolation of Mycobacterium bovis indicates the importance of including Stonebrink medium along with Lowenstein- Jensen medium. The liquid medium made no significant contribution to the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis, but indeed, cultivating serial samples increases sensitivity.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of dementia: 2. Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Howard H.; Jacova, Claudia; Robillard, Alain; Garcia, Angeles; Chow, Tiffany; Borrie, Michael; Schipper, Hyman M.; Blair, Mervin; Kertesz, Andrew; Chertkow, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background Dementia can now be accurately diagnosed through clinical evaluation, cognitive screening, basic laboratory evaluation and structural imaging. A large number of ancillary techniques are also available to aid in diagnosis, but their role in the armamentarium of family physicians remains controversial. In this article, we provide physicians with practical guidance on the diagnosis of dementia based on recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia, held in March 2006. Methods We developed evidence-based guidelines using systematic literature searches, with specific criteria for study selection and quality assessment, and a clear and transparent decision-making process. We selected studies published from January 1996 to December 2005 that pertained to key diagnostic issues in dementia. We graded the strength of evidence using the criteria of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Results Of the 1591 articles we identified on all aspects of dementia diagnosis, 1095 met our inclusion criteria; 620 were deemed to be of good or fair quality. From a synthesis of the evidence in these studies, we made 32 recommendations related to the diagnosis of dementia. There are clinical criteria for diagnosing most forms of dementia. A standard diagnostic evaluation can be performd by family physicians over multiple visits. It involves a clinical history (from patient and caregiver), a physical examination and brief cognitive testing. A list of core laboratory tests is recommended. Structural imaging with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in selected cases to rule out treatable causes of dementia or to rule in cerebrovascular disease. There is insufficient evidence to recommend routine functional imaging, measurement of biomarkers or neuropsychologic testing. Interpretation The diagnosis of dementia remains clinically integrative based on history, physical examination and

  17. First evaluation of automated specimen inoculation for wound swab samples by use of the Previ Isola system compared to manual inoculation in a routine laboratory: finding a cost-effective and accurate approach.

    PubMed

    Mischnik, Alexander; Mieth, Markus; Busch, Cornelius J; Hofer, Stefan; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Automation of plate streaking is ongoing in clinical microbiological laboratories, but evaluation for routine use is mostly open. In the present study, the recovery of microorganisms from the Previ Isola system plated polyurethane (PU) swab samples is compared to manually plated control viscose swab samples from wounds according to the CLSI procedure M40-A (quality control of microbiological transport systems). One hundred twelve paired samples (224 swabs) were analyzed. In 80/112 samples (71%), concordant culture results were obtained with the two methods. In 32/112 samples (29%), CFU recovery of microorganisms from the two methods was discordant. In 24 (75%) of the 32 paired samples with a discordant result, Previ Isola plated PU swabs were superior. In 8 (25%) of the 32 paired samples with a discordant result, control viscose swabs were superior. The quality of colony growth on culture media for further investigations was superior with Previ Isola inoculated plates compared to manual plating techniques. Gram stain results were concordant between the two methods in 62/112 samples (55%). In 50/112 samples (45%), the results of Gram staining were discordant between the two methods. In 34 (68%) of the 50 paired samples with discordant results, Gram staining of PU swabs was superior to that of control viscose swabs. In 16 (32%) of the 50 paired samples, Gram staining of control viscose swabs was superior to that of PU swabs. We report the first clinical evaluation of Previ Isola automated specimen inoculation for wound swab samples. This study suggests that use of an automated specimen inoculation system has good results with regard to CFU recovery, quality of Gram staining, and accuracy of diagnosis.

  18. The Utility of Blood and Bone Marrow Films and Trephine Biopsy Sections in the Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clare E.; Bain, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory haematologist has a role in the diagnosis of parasitic infections. Peripheral blood examination is critical in the diagnosis of malaria, babesiosis, filariasis and trypanosomiasis. Bone marrow examination is important in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis and occasionally leads to the diagnosis of other parasitic infections. The detection of eosinophilia or iron deficiency anaemia can alert the laboratory haematologist or physician to the possibility of parasitic infection. In addition to morphological skills, an adequate clinical history is important for speedy and accurate diagnosis, particularly in non-endemic areas. PMID:26075046

  19. Fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of equine skin disease and the epidemiology of equine skin cytology submissions in a western Canadian diagnostic laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Zachar, Erin K.; Burgess, Hilary J.; Wobeser, Bruce K.

    2016-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is commonly used to diagnose skin disease in companion animals, but its use in horses appears to be infrequent. Equine veterinarians in western Canada were surveyed to determine their opinions about FNA and 15 years of diagnostic submissions were used to compare the perceived to actual value of FNA in the diagnosis of skin disease in horses. Practitioners viewed FNA as quick, easy, economical, and minimally invasive. However, most veterinarians rarely chose to use FNA due to a perception that sample quality and diagnostic yield were poor and there was a narrow range of diseases the technique could diagnose. Analysis of the FNA cytology samples from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory showed a wide variety of equine skin disease conditions, but the frequency of non-diagnostic results was significantly higher in equine submissions compared to those from dogs and cats. PMID:27247463

  20. Post-mortem examination and laboratory-based analysis for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis among dairy cattle in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Proaño-Pérez, Freddy; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington; Desmecht, Daniel; Coral, Marco; Ortiz, Julio; Ron, Lenin; Portaels, Françoise; Rigouts, Leen; Linden, Annick

    2011-08-01

    Veterinary inspection in slaughterhouses allows for the detection of macroscopic lesions reminiscent of bovine tuberculosis, but the presence of Mycobacterium bovis must be confirmed by laboratory methods. This study aimed at comparing the performances of the standard diagnostic tools used to identify M. bovis in tissue specimens sampled from suspicious animals. During a two years period, 1390 cattle were inspected at the Machachi abattoir in the Mejia canton - Ecuador. A total of 33 animals with granulomatous lesions were detected, representing 2.33% (16/687) and 2.42% (17/703) animals examined in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Ninety-four tissue specimens were sampled and screened for the presence of mycobacteria. Acid-fast bacilli were identified in one third of the suspicious cattle (11/33) and suggestive microscopic lesions in 27.3% (9/33) of the samples examined by direct microscopy and histopathology, respectively. Culturing on Stonebrink medium and 16S-rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) yielded 36.4% (12/33) and 27.3% (9/33) of positives, respectively. Compared to culture, other diagnostic procedures displayed a lower sensitivity, with 56.5% for PCR, and 43.5% for direct microscopy and histopathology; however, the specificity was higher (94.4% for PCR and microscopy, and 97.2% for histopathology). We conclude that reliable post-mortem laboratory testing either requires the combination of a set of available diagnostic tools or necessitates the development of improved new-generation tools with better sensitivity and specificity characteristics.

  1. Internal transcribed spacer region sequence heterogeneity in Rhizopus microsporus: implications for molecular diagnosis in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Leung, Shui-Yee; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Cheng, Vincent C C; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Although internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequence heterogeneity has been reported in a few fungal species, it has very rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi and has never been described in Mucorales, causes of the highly fatal mucormycosis. In a recent outbreak investigation of intestinal mucormycosis due to Rhizopus microsporus infection in patients with hematological malignancies, PCR of the ITS of four of the 28 R. microsporus strains, P11, P12, D3-1, and D4-1, showed thick bands at about 700 bp. Direct sequencing of the purified bands showed frequent double peaks along all of the sequence traces and occasional triple peaks for P12, D3-1, and D4-1. The thick bands of the four R. microsporus strains were purified and cloned. Sequencing of 10 clones for each strain revealed two different ITS sequences for P11 and three different ITS sequences for P12, D3-1, and D4-1. Variations in ITS sequence among the different ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operons in the same strain were observed in only ITS1 and ITS2 and not the 5.8S rDNA region. One copy of P11, P12, and D4-1, respectively, and one copy of P11, P12, D3-1, and D4-1, respectively, showed identical sequences. This represents the first evidence of ITS sequence heterogeneity in Mucorales. ITS sequence heterogeneity is an obstacle to molecular identification and genotyping of fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories. When thick bands and double peaks are observed during PCR sequencing of a gene target, such a strain should be sent to reference laboratories proficient in molecular technologies for further identification and/or genotyping.

  2. Laboratory diagnosis of hymenoptera venom allergy: comparative study between specific IgE, western blot and allergen leukocyte stimulation (CAST).

    PubMed

    Santos, M C Pereira; Carlos, M L Palma; Pedro, E; Carlos, A G Palma

    2002-01-01

    Allergy to hymenoptera venom is a classical IgE mediated disease with a potentially fatal course. Specific venom immunotherapy (SIT) is the most effective mean of treating this serious condition, after the diagnosis has been clearly established by a clinical history, in-vivo and in vitro tests. We have evaluated the usefulness of a cellular test (CAST) which is a recently developed ELISA method based on the evaluation of sulfidoleukotriene secretion by leukocytes stimulated with specific antigen. We also evaluated the correlation of CAST with skin tests, specific IgE (sIgE) and western blot for sIgE for hymenoptera venom sIgE. We have included in this study 14 patients, with a clinical history suggestive of hymenoptera venom allergy. None of them had previously been subjected to immunotherapy. A good correlation was obtained between skin tests, sIgE and western blot. However, there was no correlation between these methods and CAST. We conclude that the positivity of CAST method raises some questions about other mechanisms, which maybe non-IgE dependent. Although the number of patients in this study is quite small, the immunoblot analysis may be a valuable additional method in insect venom allergy.

  3. PCR-based diagnosis of surra-targeting VSG gene: experimental studies in small laboratory rodents and buffalo.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P P; Balumahendiran, M; Suryanaryana, V V S; Raghavendra, A G; Shome, B R; Gajendragad, M R; Prabhudas, K

    2010-07-15

    Trypanosoma evansi, the causative organism of 'surra' expresses its variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) at early, middle and late stages of infection in animals. The variable antigenic nature of VSG caused by switching its expression type favours evasion from the host immune response and leads to chronic and persistent infection. Developing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic tool targeting the VSG gene is expected to be highly specific and sensitive for diagnosis of surra. Hence, in the present study, we have designed EXP3F/4R primer pair and amplified the 1.4 kb of VSG gene of T. evansi and studied the phylogenetic relationship by in silico analysis. The PCR method was standardised using another set of primer, DITRYF/R, and 400 bp was amplified from blood and tissue samples of experimentally infected animals. Applying the PCR method, we were able to detect as low as 0.15 trypanosomeml(-1). Considering the number of parasite-to-DNA concentration, the PCR method has a sensitivity of 0.015 pg ml(-1). The PCR could detect the presence of the parasite as early as 24h post-infection (p.i.) and 72 h p.i., respectively, in experimentally infected rats and buffalo. No amplification was observed with DNA of Babesia bigemina and Theileria annulata, indicating the primers are specific for T. evansi. The PCR method could detect the dog, lion and leopard isolates of T. evansi. Similarly, amplifying the DNA from the experimentally infected tissues was also found to be sensitive. Thus, the findings of this study favour the application of PCR over the parasitological methods for the detection of the early and/or chronic stage of surra in domestic and wild animals.

  4. Avian toxicologic diagnosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdson, C.J.; Franson, J.C.; Fudge, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes the sources and pathophysiology of some potential poisons that affect birds and summarizes useful laboratory tests. The diagnosis of poisoning in birds, as in mammals, requires a complete and accurate history, careful observation of clinical signs, and a thorough necropsy evaluation. Appropriate sample handling and analysis, based on consultation with the diagnostic toxicologist, are critical (Table 19--1). Veterinary toxicology laboratories are becoming increasingly specialized, with only certain laboratories capable of analyzing for drug residues or anticoagulants, for example. Although a local laboratory may not be able to fulfill a specific test request, they may recommend an alternative laboratory or may be willing to forward the sample. As a general rule in suspect poisoning cases, large tissue samples of liver, kidney, brain, and subcutaneous fat and of crop, proventriculus, and ventriculus contents should be collected at necropsy and frozen. Appropriate samples should be submitted frozen, with the remainder held in the freezer for possible later testing. A second set of tissues should be placed in 10% formalin for histopathologic examination.

  5. Laboratory Diagnosis, Epidemiology, and Clinical Outcomes of Pandemic Influenza A and Community Respiratory Viral Infections in Southern Brazil▿

    PubMed Central

    Raboni, Sonia M.; Stella, Vanessa; Cruz, Cristina R.; França, João B.; Moreira, Suzana; Gonçalves, Lili; Nogueira, Meri B.; Vidal, Luine R.; Almeida, Sergio M.; Debur, Maria C.; Carraro, Hipolito; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N.

    2011-01-01

    Community respiratory viruses (CRVs) are commonly associated with seasonal infections. They have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality among children, elderly individuals, and immunosuppressed patients. In April 2009, the circulation of a new influenza A virus (FLUA H1N1v) was responsible for the first influenza pandemic of this century. We report the clinical and epidemiological profiles of inpatients infected with CRVs or with FLUA H1N1v at a tertiary care hospital in southern Brazil. In addition, we used these profiles to evaluate survivor and nonsurvivor patients infected with FLUA H1N1v. Multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and real time RT-PCR were used to detect viruses in inpatients with respiratory infections. Record data from all patients were reviewed. A total of 171 patients were examined over a period of 16 weeks. Of these, 39% were positive for FLUA H1N1v, 36% were positive for CRVs, and 25% were negative. For the FLUA H1N1v- and CRV-infected patients, epidemiological data regarding median age (30 and 1.5 years), myalgia (44% and 13%), need for mechanical ventilation (44% and 9%), and mortality (35% and 9%) were statistically different. In a multivariate analysis comparing survivor and nonsurvivor patients infected with influenza A virus H1N1, median age and creatine phosphokinase levels were significantly associated with a severe outcome. Seasonal respiratory infections are a continuing concern. Our results highlight the importance of studies on the prevalence and severity of these infections and that investments in programs of clinical and laboratory monitoring are essential to detect the appearance of new infective agents. PMID:21248084

  6. Laboratory diagnosis, epidemiology, and clinical outcomes of pandemic influenza A and community respiratory viral infections in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia M; Stella, Vanessa; Cruz, Cristina R; França, João B; Moreira, Suzana; Gonçalves, Lili; Nogueira, Meri B; Vidal, Luine R; Almeida, Sergio M; Debur, Maria C; Carraro, Hipolito; dos Santos, Claudia N Duarte

    2011-04-01

    Community respiratory viruses (CRVs) are commonly associated with seasonal infections. They have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality among children, elderly individuals, and immunosuppressed patients. In April 2009, the circulation of a new influenza A virus (FLUA H1N1v) was responsible for the first influenza pandemic of this century. We report the clinical and epidemiological profiles of inpatients infected with CRVs or with FLUA H1N1v at a tertiary care hospital in southern Brazil. In addition, we used these profiles to evaluate survivor and nonsurvivor patients infected with FLUA H1N1v. Multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and real time RT-PCR were used to detect viruses in inpatients with respiratory infections. Record data from all patients were reviewed. A total of 171 patients were examined over a period of 16 weeks. Of these, 39% were positive for FLUA H1N1v, 36% were positive for CRVs, and 25% were negative. For the FLUA H1N1v- and CRV-infected patients, epidemiological data regarding median age (30 and 1.5 years), myalgia (44% and 13%), need for mechanical ventilation (44% and 9%), and mortality (35% and 9%) were statistically different. In a multivariate analysis comparing survivor and nonsurvivor patients infected with influenza A virus H1N1, median age and creatine phosphokinase levels were significantly associated with a severe outcome. Seasonal respiratory infections are a continuing concern. Our results highlight the importance of studies on the prevalence and severity of these infections and that investments in programs of clinical and laboratory monitoring are essential to detect the appearance of new infective agents.

  7. Comparison of two laboratory-developed PCR methods for the diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Brazilian patients with and without HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Direct smear examination with Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is cheap and easy to use, but its low sensitivity is a major drawback, particularly in HIV seropositive patients. As such, new tools for laboratory diagnosis are urgently needed to improve the case detection rate, especially in regions with a high prevalence of TB and HIV. Objective To evaluate the performance of two in house PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction): PCR dot-blot methodology (PCR dot-blot) and PCR agarose gel electrophoresis (PCR-AG) for the diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) in HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative patients. Methods A prospective study was conducted (from May 2003 to May 2004) in a TB/HIV reference hospital. Sputum specimens from 277 PTB suspects were tested by Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) smear, Culture and in house PCR assays (PCR dot-blot and PCR-AG) and their performances evaluated. Positive cultures combined with the definition of clinical pulmonary TB were employed as the gold standard. Results The overall prevalence of PTB was 46% (128/277); in HIV+, prevalence was 54.0% (40/74). The sensitivity and specificity of PCR dot-blot were 74% (CI 95%; 66.1%-81.2%) and 85% (CI 95%; 78.8%-90.3%); and of PCR-AG were 43% (CI 95%; 34.5%-51.6%) and 76% (CI 95%; 69.2%-82.8%), respectively. For HIV seropositive and HIV seronegative samples, sensitivities of PCR dot-blot (72% vs 75%; p = 0.46) and PCR-AG (42% vs 43%; p = 0.54) were similar. Among HIV seronegative patients and PTB suspects, ROC analysis presented the following values for the AFB smear (0.837), Culture (0.926), PCR dot-blot (0.801) and PCR-AG (0.599). In HIV seropositive patients, these area values were (0.713), (0.900), (0.789) and (0.595), respectively. Conclusion Results of this study demonstrate that the in house PCR dot blot may be an improvement for ruling out PTB diagnosis in PTB suspects assisted at hospitals with a high prevalence of TB/HIV. PMID:21447159

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of legionnaires' disease due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1: comparison of phenotypic and genotypic methods.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Diane S J; Abraham, William H; Findlay, William; Christie, Peter; Johnston, Fiona; Edwards, Giles F S

    2004-03-01

    Laboratory results of 67 cases of legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup (Sg) 1 spanning a 6-year period were analysed by both phenotypic and genotypic methods. The methods compared were urinary antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA), an immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) test, direct fluorescent antibody (DFA), culture and a 5S rRNA PCR with Southern blotting confirmation. Urine was available in 53 cases, of which 35 (66%) were positive, with an antigen peak observed at 5-10 days after onset of disease symptoms. The IFA test was positive in 62 (92.5%) cases, with 56 (90.3%) cases producing a greater than fourfold rise in titre and 6 (9.7%) giving presumptive high titres of > or =1:128. There were two antibody peaks, one at 10-15 days and another at >25 days after onset. In 23 cases where samples were available, DFA and culture were respectively positive in 5 (22%) and 10 (48%) cases. There was a peak in culture-positives 5-10 days after onset of disease. A Legionella-specific 5S rRNA PCR on patient serum was positive in 54 (80.5%) cases, with a peak in PCR positivity at 6-10 days after disease onset. In 22 of the 67 cases, the full panel of diagnostic methods was available for comparison. The relative sensitivity and specificity of the urinary antigen EIA and the serum PCR was 100%. The IFA gave relative sensitivity and specificity values of 93.8 and 95%. DFA and culture, although 100% specific, produced only low sensitivities, of 19 and 42.8%, respectively. This study has shown that urinary antigen and serum PCR are valuable tests in the acute phase of disease, with excellent sensitivity and specificity values. At present, the Legionella species causing infection requires to be verified by IFA serology and/or culture, but this could become unnecessary as new antigen and L. pneumophila Sg 1-specific PCR tests become available.

  9. A mathematical model of Clostridium difficile transmission in medical wards and a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing different strategies for laboratory diagnosis and patient isolation

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Leshno, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common and potentially fatal healthcare-associated infection. Improving diagnostic tests and infection control measures may prevent transmission. We aimed to determine, in resource-limited settings, whether it is more effective and cost-effective to allocate resources to isolation or to diagnostics. Methods We constructed a mathematical model of CDI transmission based on hospital data (9 medical wards, 350 beds) between March 2010 and February 2013. The model consisted of three compartments: susceptible patients, asymptomatic carriers and CDI patients. We used our model results to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis, comparing four strategies that were different combinations of 2 test methods (the two-step test and uniform PCR) and 2 infection control measures (contact isolation in multiple-bed rooms or single-bed rooms/cohorting). For each strategy, we calculated the annual cost (of CDI diagnosis and isolation) for a decrease of 1 in the average daily number of CDI patients; the strategy of the two-step test and contact isolation in multiple-bed rooms was the reference strategy. Results Our model showed that the average number of CDI patients increased exponentially as the transmission rate increased. Improving diagnosis by adopting uniform PCR assay reduced the average number of CDI cases per day per 350 beds from 9.4 to 8.5, while improving isolation by using single-bed rooms reduced the number to about 1; the latter was cost saving. Conclusions CDI can be decreased by better isolation and more sensitive laboratory methods. From the hospital perspective, improving isolation is more cost-effective than improving diagnostics. PMID:28187144

  10. [Multicenter evaluation of h-FABP semi-quantitative assay (Cardio Detect) in central laboratory: the point in acute myocardial infarction diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, G; Fayet, J-M; Graïne, H; Berny, C; Maupas-Schwalm, F; Capolaghi, B; Morin, C

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic performance of heart-Fatty Acid Binding Protein (h-FABP) (semi-quantitative CardioDetect test) and cardiac troponin I (TnIc) blood assays were compared in one hundred patients presenting with suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Final patient diagnosis was "acute myocardial infarction" in 36 cases, "non ST myocardial infarction" in 25 cases and "non ischemic pathologies" in 39 cases. h-FABP results were positive in 26 patients, negative in 57 patients and ambiguous in 17 patients, the latter corresponding to the final diagnosis of "acute myocardial infarction" in 5 cases, "non ST myocardial infarction" in 2 cases and "non ischemic pathologies " in 10 cases. At admission, h-FABP and TnIc exhibiteda sensitivity of 54% an 66%, respectively and a specificity of 86% and 95%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 81% and 64% for h-FABP, respectively and 92% and 75% for cTnI, respectively. h-FABP and cTnI demonstrated a similar diagnostic efficiency if admission delay is less than 4 hours after onset of chest pain (area under ROC curve TnIc = 0.767 +/- 0.091 ; area under ROC curve h-FABP = 0.622 +/- 0.109 ; p = 0.144). On the contrary, cTnI assay demonstrated a better efficiency than h-FABP (p< 0.005) for patients admitted in a delay of 4 to 12 hours after the onset of chest pain. If chosen cTnI cut-off corresponded to the recent consensus definition used for monitoring acute coronary syndrome patients, h-FABP semi-quantitative assay realized within central laboratory did not demonstrated a better diagnostic efficiency than cTnI.

  11. Salmonella Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the diagnosis is confirmed, or in laboratory-terms, “culture confirmed.” Clinical diagnostic laboratories report the test results ... or viruses, which share distinctive surface chemical structures Culture: Growing bacteria, viruses, and other living matter in ...

  12. Evaluation of the Mean Cost and Activity Based Cost in the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Laboratory Routine of a High-Complexity Hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Isabela N.; de Assis Figueredo, Lida J.; Soares, Valéria M.; Vater, Maria C.; Alves, Suely; da Silva Carvalho, Wânia; Kritski, Afrânio L.; de Miranda, Silvana S.

    2017-01-01

    At a global level, with the increase in healthcare costs, there is a need to assess the economic impact of the incorporation of new technologies in different health disorders in different countries. There is scarce information regarding costs incurred with the use of current or new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis or from the vantage point of their incorporation within the healthcare systems of high-burden countries. The present study aimed to assess the mean cost and the activity based cost of the laboratory diagnosis for tuberculosis by means of conventional techniques and from the Detect TB®LabTest molecular test kit in a general high-complexity hospital of the public health system in Brazil. Cost analysis was performed by means of primary data, collected in the Mycobacteria and Molecular Biology Laboratory in 2013. The mean cost and activity based cost were, respectively, U$10.06/U$5.61 for centrifuged bacilloscopy by Ziehl Neelsen (ZN) and Auramine (AU); U$7.42/U$4.15 for direct bacilloscopy by ZN; U$27.38/U$16.50 for culture in a Loweinstein-Jensen solid medium; and U$115.74/U$73.46 for the Detect TB®LabTest Kit. The calculation of the ABC should be used in making decisions by administrators to be the best method of assessing the costs of conventional techniques and molecular method for providing the real value of the tests. So it is need to calculate the ABC, and not of the mean cost, in various scenarios before incorporating new technologies in health institutions. PMID:28261194

  13. An easy, reproducible and cost-effective method for andrologists to improve the laboratory diagnosis of non-obstructive azoospermia: a novel microcentrifugation technique

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Rosa Alice Casemiro; Pariz, Juliana Risso; Pieri, Patrícia de Campos; Hallak, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes a new method of microcentrifugation as an improved, viable, cost-effective option to the classical Cytospin apparatus to confirm azoospermia. Azoospermic semen samples were evaluated for cryptozoospermia by a centrifugation method similar to that of World Health Organization guidelines (2010; entire specimen centrifuged at 3000g for 15 min, and aliquots of the pellet examined). Then, if no sperm were detected, the pellet from that procedure was resuspended in culture medium, centrifuged (2000g for 15 min), and the entire pellet spread on a 4 X 6mm area of a slide and stained using the Christmas tree method (Nuclear-Fast solution and picric acid). The entire stained area was examined for the presence or absence of sperm. A total of 148 azoospermic samples (after standard WHO diagnosis) were included in the study and 21 samples (14.2%) were identified as sperm-positive. In all microcentrifugation slides, intact spermatozoa could be easily visualized against a clear background, with no cellular debris. This novel microcentrifugation technique is clearly a simple and effective method, with lower cost, increasing both sensitivity and specificity in confirming the absence or presence of spermatozoa in the ejaculate. It may represent a step forward of prognostic value to be introduced by andrology laboratories in the routine evaluation of patients with azoospermia in the initial semen analysis. PMID:27136479

  14. Improvement in laboratory diagnosis of wound botulism and tetanus among injecting illicit-drug users by use of real-time PCR assays for neurotoxin gene fragments.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, D; Grant, K A; McLauchlin, J

    2005-09-01

    An upsurge in wound infections due to Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani among users of illegal injected drugs (IDUs) occurred in the United Kingdom during 2003 and 2004. A real-time PCR assay was developed to detect a fragment of the neurotoxin gene of C. tetani (TeNT) and was used in conjunction with previously described assays for C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E (BoNTA, -B, and -E). The assays were sensitive, specific, rapid to perform, and applicable to investigating infections among IDUs using DNA extracted directly from wound tissue, as well as bacteria growing among mixed microflora in enrichment cultures and in pure culture on solid media. A combination of bioassay and PCR test results confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 10 of 25 cases of suspected botulism and two of five suspected cases of tetanus among IDUs. The PCR assays were in almost complete agreement with the conventional bioassays when considering results from different samples collected from the same patient. The replacement of bioassays by real-time PCR for the isolation and identification of both C. botulinum and C. tetani demonstrates a sensitivity and specificity similar to those of conventional approaches. However, the real-time PCR assays substantially improves the diagnostic process in terms of the speed of results and by the replacement of experimental animals. Recommendations are given for an improved strategy for the laboratory investigation of suspected wound botulism and tetanus among IDUs.

  15. Improvement in Laboratory Diagnosis of Wound Botulism and Tetanus among Injecting Illicit-Drug Users by Use of Real-Time PCR Assays for Neurotoxin Gene Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, D.; Grant, K. A.; McLauchlin, J.

    2005-01-01

    An upsurge in wound infections due to Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani among users of illegal injected drugs (IDUs) occurred in the United Kingdom during 2003 and 2004. A real-time PCR assay was developed to detect a fragment of the neurotoxin gene of C. tetani (TeNT) and was used in conjunction with previously described assays for C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E (BoNTA, -B, and -E). The assays were sensitive, specific, rapid to perform, and applicable to investigating infections among IDUs using DNA extracted directly from wound tissue, as well as bacteria growing among mixed microflora in enrichment cultures and in pure culture on solid media. A combination of bioassay and PCR test results confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 10 of 25 cases of suspected botulism and two of five suspected cases of tetanus among IDUs. The PCR assays were in almost complete agreement with the conventional bioassays when considering results from different samples collected from the same patient. The replacement of bioassays by real-time PCR for the isolation and identification of both C. botulinum and C. tetani demonstrates a sensitivity and specificity similar to those of conventional approaches. However, the real-time PCR assays substantially improves the diagnostic process in terms of the speed of results and by the replacement of experimental animals. Recommendations are given for an improved strategy for the laboratory investigation of suspected wound botulism and tetanus among IDUs. PMID:16145075

  16. An easy, reproducible and cost-effective method for andrologists to improve the laboratory diagnosis of nonobstructive azoospermia: a novel microcentrifugation technique.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosa Alice Casemiro; Pariz, Juliana Risso; Pieri, Patricia de Campos; Hallak, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a new method of microcentrifugation as an improved, viable, cost-effective option to the classical Cytospin apparatus to confirm azoospermia. Azoospermic semen samples were evaluated for cryptozoospermia by a centrifugation method similar to that of World Health Organization guidelines (2010; entire specimen centrifuged at 3000g for 15 min, and aliquots of the pellet examined). Then, if no sperm were detected, the pellet from that procedure was resuspended in culture medium, centrifuged (2000g for 15 min), and the entire pellet spread on a 4 X 6mm area of a slide and stained using the Christmas tree method (Nuclear-Fast solution and picric acid). The entire stained area was examined for the presence or absence of sperm. A total of 148 azoospermic samples (after standard WHO diagnosis) were included in the study and 21 samples (14.2%) were identified as sperm-positive. In all microcentrifugation slides, intact spermatozoa could be easily visualized against a clear background, with no cellular debris. This novel microcentrifugation technique is clearly a simple and effective method, with lower cost, increasing both sensitivity and specificity in confirming the absence or presence of spermatozoa in the ejaculate. It may represent a step forward of prognostic value to be introduced by andrology laboratories in the routine evaluation of patients with azoospermia in the initial semen analysis.

  17. Laboratory diagnosis of viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    Lennette, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 30 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radioimmunoassay Systems; Enzyme Immunoassay Systems; Concepts of Clinical Diagnostic Virology; Role of Tissue Culture Systems, Adenoviruses; Influenza Viruses; Rabies Virus; and Rubella.

  18. DIAGNOSIS OF HISTOPLASMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Allan Jefferson; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2010-01-01

    Endemic mycoses can be challenging to diagnose and accurate interpretation of laboratory data is important to ensure the most appropriate treatment for the patients. Although the definitive diagnosis of histoplasmosis (HP), one of the most frequent endemic mycoses in the world, is achieved by direct diagnosis performed by micro and/or macroscopic observation of Histoplasma capsulatum (H. capsulatum), serologic evidence of this fungal infection is important since the isolation of the etiologic agents is time-consuming and insensitive. A variety of immunoassays have been used to detect specific antibodies to H. capsulatum. The most applied technique for antibody detection is immunodiffusion with sensitivity between 70 to 100 % and specificity of 100%, depending on the clinical form. The complement fixation (CF) test, a methodology extensively used on the past, is less specific (60 to 90%). Detecting fungal antigens by immunoassays is valuable in immunocompromised individuals where such assays achieve positive predictive values of 96–98%. Most current tests in diagnostic laboratories still utilize unpurified antigenic complexes from either whole fungal cells or their culture filtrates. Emphasis has shifted, however, to clinical immunoassays using highly purified and well-characterized antigens including recombinant antigens. In this paper, we review the current conventional diagnostic tools, such as complement fixation and immunodiffusion, outline the development of novel diagnostic reagents and methods, and discuss their relative merits and disadvantages to the immunodiagnostic of this mycosis. PMID:20445761

  19. Ubiquiter circovirus sequences raise challenges in laboratory diagnosis: the case of honey bee and bee mite, reptiles, and free living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Marton, Szilvia; Ihász, Katalin; Lengyel, György; Farkas, Szilvia L; Dán, Ádám; Paulus, Petra; Bányai, Krisztián; Fehér, Enikő

    2015-03-01

    Circoviruses of pigs and birds are established pathogens, however, the exact role of other, recently described circoviruses and circovirus-like viruses remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was the detection of circoviruses in neglected host species, including honey bees, exotic reptiles and free-living amoebae by widely used broad-spectrum polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays specific for the replication initiation protein coding gene of these viruses. The majority of sequences obtained from honey bees were highly similar to canine and porcine circoviruses, or, were distantly related to dragonfly cycloviruses. Other rep sequences detected in some honey bees, reptiles and amoebae showed similarities to various rep sequences deposited in the GenBank. Back-to-back PCR primers designed for the amplification of whole viral genomes failed to work that suggested the existence of integrated rep-like elements in many samples. Rolling circle amplification and exonuclease treatment confirmed the absence of small circular DNA genomes in the specimens analysed. In case of honey bees Varroa mite DNA contamination might be a source of the identified endogenous rep-like elements. The reptile and amoebae rep-like sequences were nearly identical with each other and with sequences detected in chimpanzee feces raising the possibility that detection of novel or unusual rep-like elements in some host species might originate from the microbial community of the host. Our results indicate that attention is needed when broad-spectrum rep gene specific polymerase chain reaction is chosen for laboratory diagnosis of circovirus infections.

  20. The role of laboratory investigation in the diagnosis and management of patients with suspected herpes simplex encephalitis: a consensus report. The EU Concerted Action on Virus Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cinque, P; Cleator, G M; Weber, T; Monteyne, P; Sindic, C J; van Loon, A M

    1996-01-01

    As effective therapies for the treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) have become available, the virology laboratory has acquired a role of primary importance in the early diagnosis and clinical management of this condition. Several studies have shown that the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of CSF for the detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2) DNA provides a reliable method for determining an aetiological diagnosis of HSE. The use of PCR in combination with the detection of a specific intrathecal antibody response to HSV currently represents the most reliable strategy for the diagnosis and monitoring of the treatment of adult patients with HSE. The use of these techniques has also led to the identification of atypical presentations of HSV infections of the nervous system and permits the investigation of patients who develop a relapse of encephalitic illness after an initial episode of HSE. A strategy for the optimal use of the investigative laboratory in the diagnosis of HSE and subsequent management decisions is described. Images PMID:8890768

  1. Beyond the Evidence of the New Hypertension Guidelines. Blood pressure measurement - is it good enough for accurate diagnosis of hypertension? Time might be in, for a paradigm shift (I).

    PubMed

    Pater, Cornel

    2005-04-06

    Despite widespread availability of a large body of evidence in the area of hypertension, the translation of that evidence into viable recommendations aimed at improving the quality of health care is very difficult, sometimes to the point of questionable acceptability and overall credibility of the guidelines advocating those recommendations.The scientific community world-wide and especially professionals interested in the topic of hypertension are witnessing currently an unprecedented debate over the issue of appropriateness of using different drugs/drug classes for the treatment of hypertension. An endless supply of recent and less recent "drug-news", some in support of, others against the current guidelines, justifying the use of selected types of drug treatment or criticising other, are coming out in the scientific literature on an almost weekly basis. The latest of such debate (at the time of writing this paper) pertains the safety profile of ARBs vs ACE inhibitors.To great extent, the factual situation has been fuelled by the new hypertension guidelines (different for USA, Europe, New Zeeland and UK) through, apparently small inconsistencies and conflicting messages, that might have generated substantial and perpetuating confusion among both prescribing physicians and their patients, regardless of their country of origin.The overwhelming message conveyed by most guidelines and opinion leaders is the widespread use of diuretics as first-line agents in all patients with blood pressure above a certain cut-off level and the increasingly aggressive approach towards diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. This, apparently well-justified, logical and easily comprehensible message is unfortunately miss-obeyed by most physicians, on both parts of the Atlantic.Amazingly, the message assumes a universal simplicity of both diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, while ignoring several hypertension-specific variables, commonly known to have high level of complexity, such

  2. Beyond the Evidence of the New Hypertension Guidelines. Blood pressure measurement – is it good enough for accurate diagnosis of hypertension? Time might be in, for a paradigm shift (I)

    PubMed Central

    Pater, Cornel

    2005-01-01

    Despite widespread availability of a large body of evidence in the area of hypertension, the translation of that evidence into viable recommendations aimed at improving the quality of health care is very difficult, sometimes to the point of questionable acceptability and overall credibility of the guidelines advocating those recommendations. The scientific community world-wide and especially professionals interested in the topic of hypertension are witnessing currently an unprecedented debate over the issue of appropriateness of using different drugs/drug classes for the treatment of hypertension. An endless supply of recent and less recent "drug-news", some in support of, others against the current guidelines, justifying the use of selected types of drug treatment or criticising other, are coming out in the scientific literature on an almost weekly basis. The latest of such debate (at the time of writing this paper) pertains the safety profile of ARBs vs ACE inhibitors. To great extent, the factual situation has been fuelled by the new hypertension guidelines (different for USA, Europe, New Zeeland and UK) through, apparently small inconsistencies and conflicting messages, that might have generated substantial and perpetuating confusion among both prescribing physicians and their patients, regardless of their country of origin. The overwhelming message conveyed by most guidelines and opinion leaders is the widespread use of diuretics as first-line agents in all patients with blood pressure above a certain cut-off level and the increasingly aggressive approach towards diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. This, apparently well-justified, logical and easily comprehensible message is unfortunately miss-obeyed by most physicians, on both parts of the Atlantic. Amazingly, the message assumes a universal simplicity of both diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, while ignoring several hypertension-specific variables, commonly known to have high level of complexity

  3. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  4. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  5. Diagnosis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Tezer, Hasan; Polat, Meltem

    2015-05-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is the most extensive tick-borne virus, it causes a severe infection, which occurs widely in Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia. In recent years, the dramatic increase in the global distribution of CCHF, with the high mortality rates, highlights the importance of improving diagnostic capacity. Clinical and epidemiological data play a crucial role for early recognition of CCHF. However, CCHF is clinically difficult to diagnose and to distinguish, a rapid and reliable laboratory confirmation is necessary. Confirmation of infection in the acute phase of the disease can be made by detection of viral nucleic acid using reverse transcription-PCR, by demonstration of viral antigen or by virus isolation. In the convalescent phase of the disease, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of an antibody response. The consideration of viral replication kinetics and antiviral humoral immune responses facilitates the selection of appropriate laboratory tests and accurate interpretation of laboratory findings.

  6. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-09-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety.

  7. Diagnosis of Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahner, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Early recognition of osteoporosis is difficult because symptoms are lacking and there are no distinct, readily accessible diagnostic features. This article reviews the standard approach, radiographic and laboratory diagnosis, bone mass measurement techniques, and interpretation of bone mineral data. (MT)

  8. Comparison of Premier CAMPY Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA), ProSpecT Campylobacter EIA, and ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY Tests with Culture for Laboratory Diagnosis of Campylobacter Enteric Infections ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Paul A.; Chen, Li; Holiday, Iris; Rawling, Russell A.; Novak-Weekley, Susan M.; Quinlan, Tammy; Musser, Kimberlee A.

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter enteritis is a food-borne or waterborne illness caused almost exclusively by Campylobacter jejuni and, to a lesser extent, by Campylobacter coli. These organisms produce indistinguishable clinical diseases and together represent the second most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in the United States and the leading cause of enteric infection throughout the world. The conventional approach to the laboratory diagnosis of Campylobacter enteritis is based on the recovery of the organism from a stool specimen, which requires the use of a specialized medium incubated at 42°C for several days in an artificially created microaerophilic environment. Recently, several commercially available enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been developed for the direct detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in stool specimens. This study compared conventional culture with three EIA methods, the Premier CAMPY EIA (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH), the ProSpecT Campylobacter EIA (Remel, Lenexa, KS), and the ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY test (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH), for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli in 485 patient stool samples. Discordant results were arbitrated by using an in-house, real-time PCR assay that was developed and validated by a public health reference laboratory. Following analyses of the discrepant specimens by PCR, the sensitivity and specificity of both the Premier CAMPY and ProSpecT Campylobacter EIAs were 99.3% and 98%, respectively, while the ImmunoCard STAT! CAMPY test had a sensitivity of 98.5% and a specificity of 98.2%. By use of the PCR test as the reference standard, culture detected 127 of 135 Campylobacter-positive stool specimens, yielding a sensitivity of 94.1%. These results showed that the three EIAs evaluated in this study provide a rapid and reliable alternative for the laboratory diagnosis of enteric infections with C. jejuni and C. coli and that conventional culture may no longer be recognized as the “gold standard” for

  9. Quality guidelines and standards for genetic laboratories/clinics in prenatal diagnosis on fetal samples obtained by invasive procedures. An attempt to establish a common European framework for quality assessment. EUCROMIC Quality Assessment Group.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    At a workshop in Leuven, November 8-10, 1996, 24 clinical and laboratory geneticists from 15 countries in Europe met and discussed minimum standards for prenatal diagnosis. These guidelines are intended for use as a reference manual by genetic centres all over Europe, especially in countries without national guidelines, in their efforts to achieve and maintain high standards. The workshop was restricted to discuss quality assessment on established invasive procedures for cytogenetic and molecular studies. The committee brought together from their own countries substantial experience of genetic counselling, cytogenetics, molecular biology and quality assessment. It is hoped that future discussions, embracing all aspects of clinical and laboratory genetic services will lead to the establishment of common guidelines for all European countries.

  10. Clinical Laboratories – Production Factories or Specialized Diagnostic Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Judit

    2016-01-01

    Since a large proportion of medical decisions are based on laboratory results, clinical laboratories should meet the increasing demand of clinicians and their patients. Huge central laboratories may process over 10 million tests annually; they act as production factories, measuring emergency and routine tests with sufficient speed and accuracy. At the same time, they also serve as specialized diagnostic centers where well-trained experts analyze and interpret special test results. It is essential to improve and constantly monitor this complex laboratory service, by several methods. Sample transport by pneumatic tube system, use of an advanced laboratory information system and point-of-care testing may result in decreased total turnaround time. The optimization of test ordering may result in a faster and more cost-effective laboratory service. Autovalidation can save time for laboratory specialists, when the analysis of more complex results requires their attention. Small teams of experts responsible for special diagnostic work, and their interpretative reporting according to predetermined principles, may help to minimize subjectivity of these special reports. Although laboratory investigations have become so diversely developed in the past decades, it is essential that the laboratory can provide accurate results relatively quickly, and that laboratory specialists can support the diagnosis and monitoring of patients by adequate interpretation of esoteric laboratory methods. PMID:27683528

  11. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  12. Utilization of multiple real-time PCR assays for the diagnosis of Bordetella spp. in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Kathleen M; Tondella, Maria Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes an upper respiratory infection in infants, adolescents, and adults. Diagnosis of pertussis, a vaccine-preventable disease, can be difficult, but recent implementation of real-time PCR assays in laboratories has hastened the ability of clinicians to make an accurate diagnosis. In this paper we describe the method of nasopharyngeal specimen collection, extraction of DNA, and real-time PCR assays that will allow the detection and identification of Bordetella spp. in clinical specimens.

  13. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  14. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  15. ROM Plus®: accurate point-of-care detection of ruptured fetal membranes

    PubMed Central

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of fetal membranes is imperative to inform and guide gestational age-specific interventions to optimize perinatal outcomes and reduce the risk of serious complications, including preterm delivery and infections. The ROM Plus is a rapid, point-of-care, qualitative immunochromatographic diagnostic test that uses a unique monoclonal/polyclonal antibody approach to detect two different proteins found in amniotic fluid at high concentrations: alpha-fetoprotein and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1. Clinical study results have uniformly demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics with this point-of-care test that exceeds conventional clinical testing with external laboratory evaluation. The description, indications for use, procedural steps, and laboratory and clinical characterization of this assay are presented in this article. PMID:27274316

  16. ROM Plus(®): accurate point-of-care detection of ruptured fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of fetal membranes is imperative to inform and guide gestational age-specific interventions to optimize perinatal outcomes and reduce the risk of serious complications, including preterm delivery and infections. The ROM Plus is a rapid, point-of-care, qualitative immunochromatographic diagnostic test that uses a unique monoclonal/polyclonal antibody approach to detect two different proteins found in amniotic fluid at high concentrations: alpha-fetoprotein and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1. Clinical study results have uniformly demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics with this point-of-care test that exceeds conventional clinical testing with external laboratory evaluation. The description, indications for use, procedural steps, and laboratory and clinical characterization of this assay are presented in this article.

  17. Comparative field evaluation of the fluorescent-antibody test, virus isolation from tissue culture, and enzyme immunodiagnosis for rapid laboratory diagnosis of rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Bourhy, H; Rollin, P E; Vincent, J; Sureau, P

    1989-01-01

    The rabies tissue culture infection test (RTCIT) and rapid rabies enzyme immunodiagnosis (RREID) were compared to the fluorescent-antibody test (FAT) with field specimens. At the French National Reference Center for Rabies, 15,248 specimens were analyzed by FAT and RTCIT, and 2,290 of those specimens were also tested by RREID; 818 other specimens were tested by FAT and RREID in 12 laboratories located in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The sensitivities and specificities of RREID and RTCIT were comparable. This study showed that both tests can be used as backup procedures to confirm FAT. RREID is also strongly recommended for epidemiological studies and for laboratories which are not equipped for performing FAT. PMID:2654181

  18. Inadequacy of clinical and/or laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of lupus vulgaris, re-infection cutaneous tuberculosis: fallout/implication of 6 weeks of anti-tubular therapy (ATT) as a precise diagnostic supplement to complete the scheduled regimen.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Sardana, Kabir; Sharma, Sonal

    2008-01-01

    The morphological diagnosis of the plaque form of lupus vulgaris was made on the basis of distinct clinical features. An endeavor to supplement this diagnosis was made through laboratory investigations comprising total differential leukocyte count,erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR); the results of which were largely ambiguous. Regimented anti-tubular therapy (ATT) was utilized to arrive at the diagnosis. A perceptible regression of the lesions over the course of 6 weeks was remarkably beneficial to completing the treatment subsequently. ATT seems to bea feasible and well-conceived tool in the diagnosis of lupus vulgaris tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and pediatric scleroderma.

  19. Executive summary: a guide to utilization of the microbiology laboratory for diagnosis of infectious diseases: 2013 recommendations by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM)(a).

    PubMed

    Baron, Ellen Jo; Miller, J Michael; Weinstein, Melvin P; Richter, Sandra S; Gilligan, Peter H; Thomson, Richard B; Bourbeau, Paul; Carroll, Karen C; Kehl, Sue C; Dunne, W Michael; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Chapin, Kimberle C; Snyder, James W; Forbes, Betty A; Patel, Robin; Rosenblatt, Jon E; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2013-08-01

    The critical role of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the health care team. This document, developed by both laboratory and clinical experts, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. Sections are divided into anatomic systems, including Bloodstream Infections and Infections of the Cardiovascular System, Central Nervous System Infections, Ocular Infections, Soft Tissue Infections of the Head and Neck, Upper Respiratory Infections, Lower Respiratory Tract infections, Infections of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Intraabdominal Infections, Bone and Joint Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, Genital Infections, and Skin and Soft Tissue Infections; or into etiologic agent groups, including Tickborne Infections, Viral Syndromes, and Blood and Tissue Parasite Infections. Each section contains introductory concepts, a summary of key points, and detailed tables that list suspected agents; the most reliable tests to order; the samples (and volumes) to collect in order of preference; specimen transport devices, procedures, times, and temperatures; and detailed notes on specific issues regarding the test methods, such as when tests are likely to require a specialized laboratory or have prolonged turnaround times. There is redundancy among the tables and sections, as many agents and assay choices overlap. The document is intended to serve as a reference to guide physicians in choosing tests that will aid them to diagnose infectious diseases in their patients.

  20. A guide to utilization of the microbiology laboratory for diagnosis of infectious diseases: 2013 recommendations by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM)(a).

    PubMed

    Baron, Ellen Jo; Miller, J Michael; Weinstein, Melvin P; Richter, Sandra S; Gilligan, Peter H; Thomson, Richard B; Bourbeau, Paul; Carroll, Karen C; Kehl, Sue C; Dunne, W Michael; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Chapin, Kimberle C; Snyder, James W; Forbes, Betty A; Patel, Robin; Rosenblatt, Jon E; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2013-08-01

    The critical role of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the health care team. This document, developed by both laboratory and clinical experts, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. Sections are divided into anatomic systems, including Bloodstream Infections and Infections of the Cardiovascular System, Central Nervous System Infections, Ocular Infections, Soft Tissue Infections of the Head and Neck, Upper Respiratory Infections, Lower Respiratory Tract infections, Infections of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Intraabdominal Infections, Bone and Joint Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, Genital Infections, and Skin and Soft Tissue Infections; or into etiologic agent groups, including Tickborne Infections, Viral Syndromes, and Blood and Tissue Parasite Infections. Each section contains introductory concepts, a summary of key points, and detailed tables that list suspected agents; the most reliable tests to order; the samples (and volumes) to collect in order of preference; specimen transport devices, procedures, times, and temperatures; and detailed notes on specific issues regarding the test methods, such as when tests are likely to require a specialized laboratory or have prolonged turnaround times. There is redundancy among the tables and sections, as many agents and assay choices overlap. The document is intended to serve as a reference to guide physicians in choosing tests that will aid them to diagnose infectious diseases in their patients.

  1. A Guide to Utilization of the Microbiology Laboratory for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases: 2013 Recommendations by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM)a

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ellen Jo; Miller, J. Michael; Weinstein, Melvin P.; Richter, Sandra S.; Gilligan, Peter H.; Thomson, Richard B.; Bourbeau, Paul; Carroll, Karen C.; Kehl, Sue C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Schwartzman, Joseph D.; Chapin, Kimberle C.; Snyder, James W.; Forbes, Betty A.; Patel, Robin; Rosenblatt, Jon E.; Pritt, Bobbi S.

    2013-01-01

    The critical role of the microbiology laboratory in infectious disease diagnosis calls for a close, positive working relationship between the physician and the microbiologists who provide enormous value to the health care team. This document, developed by both laboratory and clinical experts, provides information on which tests are valuable and in which contexts, and on tests that add little or no value for diagnostic decisions. Sections are divided into anatomic systems, including Bloodstream Infections and Infections of the Cardiovascular System, Central Nervous System Infections, Ocular Infections, Soft Tissue Infections of the Head and Neck, Upper Respiratory Infections, Lower Respiratory Tract infections, Infections of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Intraabdominal Infections, Bone and Joint Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, Genital Infections, and Skin and Soft Tissue Infections; or into etiologic agent groups, including Tickborne Infections, Viral Syndromes, and Blood and Tissue Parasite Infections. Each section contains introductory concepts, a summary of key points, and detailed tables that list suspected agents; the most reliable tests to order; the samples (and volumes) to collect in order of preference; specimen transport devices, procedures, times, and temperatures; and detailed notes on specific issues regarding the test methods, such as when tests are likely to require a specialized laboratory or have prolonged turnaround times. There is redundancy among the tables and sections, as many agents and assay choices overlap. The document is intended to serve as a reference to guide physicians in choosing tests that will aid them to diagnose infectious diseases in their patients. PMID:23845951

  2. Virological diagnosis of Ebolavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. W.; Rawlinson, W. D.; Kok, J.; Dwyer, D. E.; Catton, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ebolaviruses, and the other viral causes of haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) have always posed special problems for diagnostic laboratories. These arise from the rarity of human infections, minimal documented experience with test delivery and interpretation, the paucity of established commercial or in-house assays, the lack of clinical material for test development and validation, the high level containment required for handling live virus, the ongoing evolution of the viruses, and the high personal and public health requirements for accurate diagnosis. This article addresses the current situation and the ongoing challenges associated with delivering timely, high quality and safe testing within Australia for people exposed as part of the current major outbreak of Ebolavirus disease (EVD) in Western Africa. The members of the Public Health Laboratory Network have developed deliverable and reliable nucleic acid detection tests, and also have the laboratory capacity to handle the live viruses if necessary. However delivering and maintaining these services necessitates high levels of experience in developing and applying tests for exotic and emerging infections, strong national and international links and collaborations, ongoing monitoring and reassessment of test design and performance, innovative approaches to generation of positive control material, and a regular quality assurance program. PMID:26126050

  3. Virological diagnosis of Ebolavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, D W; Rawlinson, W D; Kok, J; Dwyer, D E; Catton, M

    2015-08-01

    Ebolaviruses, and the other viral causes of haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) have always posed special problems for diagnostic laboratories. These arise from the rarity of human infections, minimal documented experience with test delivery and interpretation, the paucity of established commercial or in-house assays, the lack of clinical material for test development and validation, the high level containment required for handling live virus, the ongoing evolution of the viruses, and the high personal and public health requirements for accurate diagnosis. This article addresses the current situation and the ongoing challenges associated with delivering timely, high quality and safe testing within Australia for people exposed as part of the current major outbreak of Ebolavirus disease (EVD) in Western Africa. The members of the Public Health Laboratory Network have developed deliverable and reliable nucleic acid detection tests, and also have the laboratory capacity to handle the live viruses if necessary. However delivering and maintaining these services necessitates high levels of experience in developing and applying tests for exotic and emerging infections, strong national and international links and collaborations, ongoing monitoring and reassessment of test design and performance, innovative approaches to generation of positive control material, and a regular quality assurance program.

  4. Vibration-Based Damage Diagnosis in a Laboratory Cable-Stayed Bridge Model via an RCP-ARX Model Based Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, P. G.; Apostolellis, P. G.; Fassois, S. D.

    2011-07-01

    Vibration-based damage detection and identification in a laboratory cable-stayed bridge model is addressed under inherent, environmental, and experimental uncertainties. The problem is challenging as conventional stochastic methods face difficulties due to uncertainty underestimation. A novel method is formulated based on identified Random Coefficient Pooled ARX (RCP-ARX) representations of the dynamics and statistical hypothesis testing. The method benefits from the ability of RCP models in properly capturing uncertainty. Its effectiveness is demonstrated via a high number of experiments under a variety of damage scenarios.

  5. Proficiency Program for Real-Time PCR Diagnosis of Bordetella pertussis Infections in French Hospital Laboratories and at the French National Reference Center for Whooping Cough and other Bordetelloses▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Valérie; Guiso, Nicole; Alberti, Corinne; Liguori, Sandrine; Burucoa, Christophe; Couetdic, Gérard; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Ferroni, Agnès; Papin-Gibaud, Sophie; Grattard, Florence; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène; Raymond, Josette; Soler, Catherine; Bouchet, Sylvie; Charreau, Sandrine; Couzon, Brigitte; Leymarie, Isabelle; Tavares, Nicole; Choux, Mathilde; Bingen, Edouard; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    With the support of a ministerial program for innovative and expensive technologies, dedicated to the economic evaluation of laboratory diagnosis of pertussis by real-time PCR, external quality assessment for real-time IS481 PCR was carried out. Coordinated by the National Centre of Reference of Pertussis and other Bordetelloses (NCR), this study aimed to harmonize and to assess the performances of eight participating microbiology hospital laboratories throughout the French territory. Between January 2006 and February 2007, 10 proficiency panels were sent by the NCR (ascending proficiency program), representing a total of 49 samples and including eight panels to analyze and evaluate the global sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR, one to assess the limit of detection, and one to evaluate nucleic acid extraction methods. As part of the descending proficiency program, extracted DNA from clinical samples was sent by the eight participating laboratories in different panels and analyzed by the NCR. In the ascending proficiency analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR methods were 92.2% and 94.3%, respectively. The limit of detection of the different methods ranged between 0.1 and 1 fg/μl (0.2 to 2 CFU/μl). The nucleic acid extraction methods showed similar performances. During the descending proficiency analysis, performed with 126 samples, the result of the NCR for 15 samples (11.9%) was discordant with the result obtained by the source laboratory. Despite several initial differences, harmonization was easy and performances were homogeneous. However, the risk of false-positive results remains quite high, and we strongly recommend establishment of uniform quality control procedures performed regularly. PMID:19692562

  6. Proficiency program for real-time PCR diagnosis of Bordetella pertussis infections in French hospital laboratories and at the French National Reference Center for Whooping Cough and other Bordetelloses.

    PubMed

    Caro, Valérie; Guiso, Nicole; Alberti, Corinne; Liguori, Sandrine; Burucoa, Christophe; Couetdic, Gérard; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Ferroni, Agnès; Papin-Gibaud, Sophie; Grattard, Florence; Réglier-Poupet, Hélène; Raymond, Josette; Soler, Catherine; Bouchet, Sylvie; Charreau, Sandrine; Couzon, Brigitte; Leymarie, Isabelle; Tavares, Nicole; Choux, Mathilde; Bingen, Edouard; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2009-10-01

    With the support of a ministerial program for innovative and expensive technologies, dedicated to the economic evaluation of laboratory diagnosis of pertussis by real-time PCR, external quality assessment for real-time IS481 PCR was carried out. Coordinated by the National Centre of Reference of Pertussis and other Bordetelloses (NCR), this study aimed to harmonize and to assess the performances of eight participating microbiology hospital laboratories throughout the French territory. Between January 2006 and February 2007, 10 proficiency panels were sent by the NCR (ascending proficiency program), representing a total of 49 samples and including eight panels to analyze and evaluate the global sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR, one to assess the limit of detection, and one to evaluate nucleic acid extraction methods. As part of the descending proficiency program, extracted DNA from clinical samples was sent by the eight participating laboratories in different panels and analyzed by the NCR. In the ascending proficiency analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of the real-time PCR methods were 92.2% and 94.3%, respectively. The limit of detection of the different methods ranged between 0.1 and 1 fg/microl (0.2 to 2 CFU/microl). The nucleic acid extraction methods showed similar performances. During the descending proficiency analysis, performed with 126 samples, the result of the NCR for 15 samples (11.9%) was discordant with the result obtained by the source laboratory. Despite several initial differences, harmonization was easy and performances were homogeneous. However, the risk of false-positive results remains quite high, and we strongly recommend establishment of uniform quality control procedures performed regularly.

  7. The intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the causes of cancer, early detection, prevention or treatment need accurate, comprehensive, and timely cancer data. The clinical laboratory provides important cancer information needed for physicians which influence clinical decisions regarding treatment, diagnosis and patient monitoring. Poor communication between health care providers and clinical laboratory personnel can lead to medical errors and wrong decisions in providing cancer care. Because of the key impact of laboratory information on cancer diagnosis and treatment the quality of the tests, lab reports, and appropriate lab management are very important. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) can have an important role in diagnosis, fast and effective access to cancer data, decrease redundancy and costs, and facilitate the integration and collection of data from different types of instruments and systems. In spite of significant advantages LIMS is limited by factors such as problems in adaption to new instruments that may change existing work processes. Applications of intelligent software simultaneously with existing information systems, in addition to remove these restrictions, have important benefits including adding additional non-laboratory-generated information to the reports, facilitating decision making, and improving quality and productivity of cancer care services. Laboratory systems must have flexibility to change and have the capability to develop and benefit from intelligent devices. Intelligent laboratory information management systems need to benefit from informatics tools and latest technologies like open sources. The aim of this commentary is to survey application, opportunities and necessity of intelligent clinical laboratory as a tool to increase cancer care management productivity.

  8. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians.

  9. Video-assisted laparoscopy for the detection and diagnosis of endometriosis: safety, reliability, and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Erica; Nezhat, Camran

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis is a highly enigmatic disease with multiple presentations ranging from infertility to severe pain, often causing significant morbidity. Video-assisted laparoscopy (VALS) has now replaced laparotomy as the gold standard for the diagnosis and management of endometriosis. While imaging has a role in the evaluation of some patients, histologic examination is needed for a definitive diagnosis. Laboratory evaluation currently has a minor role in the diagnosis of endometriosis, although studies are underway investigating serum markers, genetic studies, and endometrial sampling. A high index of suspicion is essential to accurately diagnose this complex condition, and a multidisciplinary approach is often indicated. The following review discusses laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis from the pre-operative evaluation of patients suspected of having endometriosis to surgical technique for safe and adequate laparoscopic diagnosis of the condition and postsurgical care. PMID:22927769

  10. Molecular diagnosis of onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Petinataud, D; Berger, S; Contet-Audonneau, N; Machouart, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis is a frequent cause of nail infections due to dermatophytes. Molds and yeast may also be responsible of these pathologies. Antifungal treatments are frequently given without a mycological diagnosis, partly because of the requisite time for obtaining the biological results. The mycological diagnosis requires a direct microscopic examination and a culture in order to accurately identify the fungal genus and species. Nevertheless, this conventional diagnosis is often time consuming due to the delay of fungal cultures and presents disadvantages that make it not sufficient enough to give a precise and confident response to the clinicians. Therefore additional tests have been developed to help distinguish onychomycosis from other nail disorders. Among them, molecular biology techniques offer modern and rapid tools to improve traditional microbiological diagnosis. In this review, we first present the conventional diagnosis methods for onychomycosis and then we describe the main molecular biology tools and the currently available commercial kits that allow a rapid detection of the pathology.

  11. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  12. The current standing of diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Matta, Bassem N; Uthman, Imad; Taher, Ali T; Khamashta, Munther A

    2013-07-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome was first described in the early 1980s. The term was first coined to describe patients presenting with recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis or pregnancy complications. Antiphospholipid syndrome was first reported in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, but later on it became obvious that systemic lupus erythematosus is not a necessary condition for its occurrence. It has been shown that antibodies to phospholipids are the main causative agents of the disease, hence its name. The diagnosis of the disease has witnessed a remarkable evolution over the course of the past 25 years. With the observation that clinical parameters would not be enough to accurately diagnose the disease, antiphospholipid antibodies were recognized to play a central role in this regard. The main hindrance to an accurate diagnosis was the lack of standardization between different laboratory parameters that tested for the antiphospholipid antibodies. Lately, a combination of tests has been acknowledged to play a crucial role in diagnosis.

  13. Laboratory Accreditation in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acuña, María Amelia; Collino, Cesar; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory accreditation is an essential element in the healthcare system since it contributes substantially to decision-making, in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the health status of the patients, as well as in the organization and management of public healthcare. Therefore, the clinical biochemistry professional works continuously to provide reliable results and contributes to the optimization of operational logistics and integration of a laboratory into the health system. ISO 15189 accreditation, ensures compliance of the laboratory to minimize instances of error through the planning, prevention, implementation, evaluation and improvement of its procedures, which provides skill areas that involve both training undergraduate and graduate professionals in clinical biochemistry.

  14. Diagnosis of Dengue Infection Using Conventional and Biosensor Based Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Om; Hanim Shueb, Rafidah

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an arthropod-borne viral disease caused by four antigenically different serotypes of dengue virus. This disease is considered as a major public health concern around the world. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine or antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of dengue disease. Moreover, clinical features of dengue are indistinguishable from other infectious diseases such as malaria, chikungunya, rickettsia and leptospira. Therefore, prompt and accurate laboratory diagnostic test is urgently required for disease confirmation and patient triage. The traditional diagnostic techniques for the dengue virus are viral detection in cell culture, serological testing, and RNA amplification using reverse transcriptase PCR. This paper discusses the conventional laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of dengue during the acute and convalescent phase and highlights the advantages and limitations of these routine laboratory tests. Subsequently, the biosensor based assays developed using various transducers for the detection of dengue are also reviewed. PMID:26492265

  15. Diagnosis of Dengue Infection Using Conventional and Biosensor Based Techniques.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim

    2015-10-19

    Dengue is an arthropod-borne viral disease caused by four antigenically different serotypes of dengue virus. This disease is considered as a major public health concern around the world. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine or antiviral drug available for the prevention and treatment of dengue disease. Moreover, clinical features of dengue are indistinguishable from other infectious diseases such as malaria, chikungunya, rickettsia and leptospira. Therefore, prompt and accurate laboratory diagnostic test is urgently required for disease confirmation and patient triage. The traditional diagnostic techniques for the dengue virus are viral detection in cell culture, serological testing, and RNA amplification using reverse transcriptase PCR. This paper discusses the conventional laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of dengue during the acute and convalescent phase and highlights the advantages and limitations of these routine laboratory tests. Subsequently, the biosensor based assays developed using various transducers for the detection of dengue are also reviewed.

  16. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  17. [Differential diagnosis of anemias].

    PubMed

    Szerafin, László; Jakó, János

    2005-02-13

    The authors describe the factors influencing of normal hemoglobin level, pathogenetic and morphological classification of anemias and the possibilities to distinguish their different types. They highlight features of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. They summarise in tables the basis of laboratory diagnosis and possibility of identification of different types of anemias.

  18. Laparoscopic diagnosis of ascites in Lesotho.

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, R I; Fitzgerald, J M; Mulpeter, K

    1985-01-01

    In a prospective study of 98 consecutive patients with undiagnosed ascites examined by laparoscopy a correct immediate diagnosis was made in 76 (78%) and a final diagnosis in 92 (94%) of those who underwent laparoscopy. Visual diagnosis was highly accurate in patients with tuberculous peritonitis but only moderately accurate in those with carcinomatosis and liver disease. When the laparoscopic findings were compared with histological and microbiological results visual diagnosis was found to be the most accurate diagnostic method. Laparoscopy may readily be used in rural hospitals for diagnosing ascites. PMID:3160432

  19. Comparative Study of the Accuracy of Different Techniques for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis Mansoni in Areas of Low Endemicity in Barra Mansa City, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Espírito-Santo, Maria Cristina Carvalho; Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Pinto, Pedro Luiz Silva; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Castilho, Vera Lúcia Pagliusi; Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Carrilho, Flair José; Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis constitutes a major public health problem, with an estimated 200 million people infected worldwide. Many areas of Brazil show low endemicity of schistosomiasis, and the current standard parasitological techniques are not sufficiently sensitive to detect the low-level helminth infections common in areas of low endemicity (ALEs). This study compared the Kato-Katz (KK); Hoffman, Pons, and Janer (HH); enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay- (ELISA-) IgG and ELISA-IgM; indirect immunofluorescence technique (IFT-IgM); and qPCR techniques for schistosomiasis detection in serum and fecal samples, using the circumoval precipitin test (COPT) as reference. An epidemiological survey was conducted in a randomized sample of residents from five neighborhoods of Barra Mansa, RJ, with 610 fecal and 612 serum samples. ELISA-IgM (21.4%) showed the highest positivity and HH and KK techniques were the least sensitive (0.8%). All techniques except qPCR-serum showed high accuracy (82–95.5%), differed significantly from COPT in positivity (P < 0.05), and showed poor agreement with COPT. Medium agreement was seen with ELISA-IgG (Kappa = 0.377) and IFA (Kappa = 0.347). Parasitological techniques showed much lower positivity rates than those by other techniques. We suggest the possibility of using a combination of laboratory tools for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in ALEs. PMID:26504777

  20. Comparative Study of the Accuracy of Different Techniques for the Laboratory Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis Mansoni in Areas of Low Endemicity in Barra Mansa City, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Espírito-Santo, Maria Cristina Carvalho; Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Pinto, Pedro Luiz Silva; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Castilho, Vera Lúcia Pagliusi; Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Carrilho, Flair José; Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis constitutes a major public health problem, with an estimated 200 million people infected worldwide. Many areas of Brazil show low endemicity of schistosomiasis, and the current standard parasitological techniques are not sufficiently sensitive to detect the low-level helminth infections common in areas of low endemicity (ALEs). This study compared the Kato-Katz (KK); Hoffman, Pons, and Janer (HH); enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay- (ELISA-) IgG and ELISA-IgM; indirect immunofluorescence technique (IFT-IgM); and qPCR techniques for schistosomiasis detection in serum and fecal samples, using the circumoval precipitin test (COPT) as reference. An epidemiological survey was conducted in a randomized sample of residents from five neighborhoods of Barra Mansa, RJ, with 610 fecal and 612 serum samples. ELISA-IgM (21.4%) showed the highest positivity and HH and KK techniques were the least sensitive (0.8%). All techniques except qPCR-serum showed high accuracy (82-95.5%), differed significantly from COPT in positivity (P < 0.05), and showed poor agreement with COPT. Medium agreement was seen with ELISA-IgG (Kappa = 0.377) and IFA (Kappa = 0.347). Parasitological techniques showed much lower positivity rates than those by other techniques. We suggest the possibility of using a combination of laboratory tools for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in ALEs.

  1. Molecular Diagnosis for Breast Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-94-J-4033 TITLE: Molecular Diagnosis for Breast Malignancy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wen-Tien Chen, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...Biomedical Laboratories. - Signature -^yjgf Wen-Tien Chen, Ph.D. Page 4 Molecular diagnosis for breast malignancy (1) FRONT COVER: (2) SF 298...June 8-9, 1995 (abstract). Chen, W.-T, Goldstein LA, Pineiro-Sänchez M, Howard L, Ghersi G, Salamone M, Flessate D, Yeh Y. 1977. " Molecular Diagnosis for

  2. Clinical laboratory applications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W J; Marshall, D L; Shockley, R K; Martin, W J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) technology is well recognized as a significant development for producing specific serologic reagents to a wide variety of antigens in unlimited amounts. These reagents have provided the means for developing a number of highly specific and reproducible immunological assays for rapid and accurate diagnosis of an extensive list of diseases, including infectious diseases. The impact that MAbs have had in characterizing infectious disease pathogens, as well as their current and future applications for use in clinical microbiology laboratories, is reviewed. In addition, the advantages (and disadvantages) of the use of MAbs in a number of immunoassays, such as particle agglutination, radioimmunoassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescent-antibody assays, and immunohistology, are explored, including the use of these reagents in novel test system assays. Also, nucleic acid probe technology is compared with the use of MAbs from the perspective of their respective applications in the diagnosis of infectious disease agents. There is no question that hybridoma technology has the potential to alter significantly the methods currently used in most clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:3058298

  3. Methylmalonic Acidemia Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods

    PubMed Central

    Keyfi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Saeed; Varasteh, Abdol-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is usually caused by a deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM), a defect in the transport or synthesis of its cofactor, adenosyl-cobalamin (cblA, cblB, cblC, cblF, cblD, and cblX), or deficiency of the enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase. A comprehensive diagnostic approach involves investigations of metabolites with tandem mass spectrometry, organic acid analysis with gas chromatography, enzymatic studies with fibroblast cell culture, and finally, mutation analysis. With biochemical techniques and enzymatic assay the reliable characterization of patients with isolated MMA for mutation analysis can be achieved. Reliable classification of these patients is essential for ongoing and prospective studies on treatments, outcomes, and prenatal diagnoses. This article reviews the diagnostic techniques used to characterize patients with MMA. PMID:28070528

  4. Fabricating an Accurate Implant Master Cast: A Technique Report.

    PubMed

    Balshi, Thomas J; Wolfinger, Glenn J; Alfano, Stephen G; Cacovean, Jeannine N; Balshi, Stephen F

    2015-12-01

    The technique for fabricating an accurate implant master cast following the 12-week healing period after Teeth in a Day® dental implant surgery is detailed. The clinical, functional, and esthetic details captured during the final master impression are vital to creating an accurate master cast. This technique uses the properties of the all-acrylic resin interim prosthesis to capture these details. This impression captures the relationship between the remodeled soft tissue and the interim prosthesis. This provides the laboratory technician with an accurate orientation of the implant replicas in the master cast with which a passive fitting restoration can be fabricated.

  5. Carrier Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ... and Women with Hemophilia Inheritance of Hemophilia Definitions & Terminology Bleeding Symptoms Carrier Diagnosis When to Test for ...

  6. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cree, Ian A; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjö, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Solé, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J Han

    2014-11-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this paper is to provide minimum requirements for the management of molecular pathology laboratories. This general guidance should be augmented by the specific guidance available for different tumour types and tests. Preanalytical considerations are important, and careful consideration of the way in which specimens are obtained and reach the laboratory is necessary. Sample receipt and handling follow standard operating procedures, but some alterations may be necessary if molecular testing is to be performed, for instance to control tissue fixation. DNA and RNA extraction can be standardised and should be checked for quality and quantity of output on a regular basis. The choice of analytical method(s) depends on clinical requirements, desired turnaround time, and expertise available. Internal quality control, regular internal audit of the whole testing process, laboratory accreditation, and continual participation in external quality assessment schemes are prerequisites for delivery of a reliable service. A molecular pathology report should accurately convey the information the clinician needs to treat the patient with sufficient information to allow for correct interpretation of the result. Molecular pathology is developing rapidly, and further detailed evidence-based recommendations are required for many of the topics covered here.

  7. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Ian A; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjö, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Solé, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J Han

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this paper is to provide minimum requirements for the management of molecular pathology laboratories. This general guidance should be augmented by the specific guidance available for different tumour types and tests. Preanalytical considerations are important, and careful consideration of the way in which specimens are obtained and reach the laboratory is necessary. Sample receipt and handling follow standard operating procedures, but some alterations may be necessary if molecular testing is to be performed, for instance to control tissue fixation. DNA and RNA extraction can be standardised and should be checked for quality and quantity of output on a regular basis. The choice of analytical method(s) depends on clinical requirements, desired turnaround time, and expertise available. Internal quality control, regular internal audit of the whole testing process, laboratory accreditation, and continual participation in external quality assessment schemes are prerequisites for delivery of a reliable service. A molecular pathology report should accurately convey the information the clinician needs to treat the patient with sufficient information to allow for correct interpretation of the result. Molecular pathology is developing rapidly, and further detailed evidence-based recommendations are required for many of the topics covered here. PMID:25012948

  8. Cytogenetic analysis in prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schonberg, S A

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is the single most frequent test used in laboratory prenatal diagnostic studies. I summarize the current status of the field, including diagnostic problems in the laboratory and the clinical problems associated with communicating unexpected laboratory findings. I explore the effect of molecular genetics on these issues and its possible future effects on the entire practice of prenatal diagnosis as it relates to the risk for chromosome nondisjunction (trisomy). I also discuss the use of cytogenetic analysis in the prenatal diagnosis of certain inherited genetic diseases. Images PMID:8236978

  9. [Microbiological Surveillance of Measles and Rubella in Spain. Laboratory Network].

    PubMed

    Echevarría, Juan Emilio; Fernández García, Aurora; de Ory, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory is a fundamental component on the surveillance of measles and rubella. Cases need to be properly confirmed to ensure an accurate estimation of the incidence. Strains should be genetically characterized to know the transmission pattern of these viruses and frequently, outbreaks and transmission chains can be totally discriminated only after that. Finally, the susceptibility of the population is estimated on the basis of sero-prevalence surveys. Detection of specific IgM response is the base of the laboratory diagnosis of these diseases. It should be completed with genomic detection by RT-PCR to reach an optimal efficiency, especially when sampling is performed early in the course of the disease. Genotyping is performed by genomic sequencing according to reference protocols of the WHO. Laboratory surveillance of measles and rubella in Spain is organized as a net of regional laboratories with different capabilities. The National Center of Microbiology as National Reference Laboratory (NRL), supports regional laboratories ensuring the availability of all required techniques in the whole country and watching for the quality of the results. The NRL is currently working in the implementation of new molecular techniques based on the analysis of genomic hypervariable regions for the strain characterization at sub-genotypic levels and use them in the surveillance.

  10. Distributed adaptive diagnosis of sensor faults using structural response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragos, Kosmas; Smarsly, Kay

    2016-10-01

    The reliability and consistency of wireless structural health monitoring (SHM) systems can be compromised by sensor faults, leading to miscalibrations, corrupted data, or even data loss. Several research approaches towards fault diagnosis, referred to as ‘analytical redundancy’, have been proposed that analyze the correlations between different sensor outputs. In wireless SHM, most analytical redundancy approaches require centralized data storage on a server for data analysis, while other approaches exploit the on-board computing capabilities of wireless sensor nodes, analyzing the raw sensor data directly on board. However, using raw sensor data poses an operational constraint due to the limited power resources of wireless sensor nodes. In this paper, a new distributed autonomous approach towards sensor fault diagnosis based on processed structural response data is presented. The inherent correlations among Fourier amplitudes of acceleration response data, at peaks corresponding to the eigenfrequencies of the structure, are used for diagnosis of abnormal sensor outputs at a given structural condition. Representing an entirely data-driven analytical redundancy approach that does not require any a priori knowledge of the monitored structure or of the SHM system, artificial neural networks (ANN) are embedded into the sensor nodes enabling cooperative fault diagnosis in a fully decentralized manner. The distributed analytical redundancy approach is implemented into a wireless SHM system and validated in laboratory experiments, demonstrating the ability of wireless sensor nodes to self-diagnose sensor faults accurately and efficiently with minimal data traffic. Besides enabling distributed autonomous fault diagnosis, the embedded ANNs are able to adapt to the actual condition of the structure, thus ensuring accurate and efficient fault diagnosis even in case of structural changes.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improves accurate identification of appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma in an old patient

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Ruan, Li-tao; Dang, Ying; Wang, Yun-yue; Song, Yan; Lian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin is far rarer than other colorectal carcinomas and its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. To our knowledge, utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to diagnose it is much less. Method: A 61-year-old man presented with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant for 20 days. In order to fulfill an accurately preoperative diagnosis, he received laboratory and imaging tests such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), computer tomography (CT), CEUS and endoscope. Diagnosis and Intervention: He was initially suspected of suffering appendicitis, while his white blood cell count was normal and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum was remarkably increased. Both routine ultrasound and computer tomography (CT) examinations supported suppurative appendicitis. The overall data, however, failed to excluded neoplastic pathology thoroughly. Therefore, CEUS was carried out and showed an inhomogeneous enhancement intra the lesion located in the body of the appendix, which made our consideration of neoplasm. The result of the follow-up biopsy guided by endoscope was consistent with appendiceal tumor. The patient received laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. Histopathology confirmed as well differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendix origin. His postoperative course was uneventful, and he had a regular diet again without any complaint. Result: Serum CEA was remarkably increased (12.00 ng/mL). Both routine ultrasound and CT examinations supported suppurative appendicitis. However, CEUS examination showed an inhomogeneous enhancement intra the lesion located in the body of the appendix, which made our consideration of neoplasm. The follow-up biopsy guided by endoscope and surgical specimens confirmed as well differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendix origin. Conclusion: Most mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking appendicitis results in difficult diagnosis preoperatively. Clinician and radiologist should be

  12. Laboratory, clinical, and epidemiological aspects of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M A; Herwaldt, L A

    1988-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, are increasingly important causes of nosocomial infection. Microbiologists and clinicians no longer can afford to disregard clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci as contaminants. Accurate species identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, in a clinically relevant time frame, are important aids in the diagnosis and management of serious coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections. Emphasis in the clinical laboratory should be placed on the routine identification of S. epidermidis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, with identification of other species of coagulase-negative staphylococci as clinically indicated. The application of newer techniques, such as plasmid analysis and tests for slime production and adherence, contribute to our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of coagulase-negative staphylococci and may also be helpful in establishing the diagnosis of infection. PMID:3058297

  13. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  14. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Differentiation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Lee, Kang-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have significantly increased in recent decades in Korea. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and intestinal Behcet’s disease (BD), which should be differentiated from Crohn’s disease (CD), are more frequent in Korea than in the West. Thus, the accurate diagnosis of these inflammatory diseases is problematic in Korea and clinicians should fully understand their clinical and endoscopic characteristics. Ulcerative colitis mostly presents with rectal inflammation and continuous lesions, while CD presents with discontinuous inflammatory lesions and frequently involves the ileocecal area. Involvement of fewer than four segments, a patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, and scars or pseudopolyps are more frequently seen in ITB than in CD. A few ulcers with discrete margins are a typical endoscopic finding of intestinal BD. However, the differential diagnosis is difficult in many clinical situations because typical endoscopic findings are not always observed. Therefore, clinicians should also consider symptoms and laboratory, pathological, and radiological findings, in addition to endoscopic findings. PMID:27484813

  15. Recent progress in molecular diagnosis of sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Deborggraeve, Stijn; Büscher, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    This article will review the most recent progress in the molecular diagnosis of sleeping sickness and its potential role in patient management and disease control. While PCR remains restricted to research and reference laboratories, promising alternative molecular platforms have emerged over the last few years. Several loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays have been developed for detection and identification of the parasite with reported high analytical sensitivity and specificity. Simplified loop-mediated isothermal amplification formats have been designed and are undergoing evaluation studies in the field. Accurate diagnosis based on specific detection of the parasite's ribosomal RNA has been made possible by the isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification and by direct hybridization with fluorescent detection probes. In addition to the technological progress, the authors also discuss the diagnostic performance of molecular tests in the most recent clinical evaluation studies and briefly present some viewpoints for the near future.

  16. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  17. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  18. Diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Dayama, Anand; Mehrotra, Sanjana; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease with up to 350 million people at risk of infection worldwide. Among its different clinical manifestations, visceral is the most severe form. Since clinical features of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) mimic several other common diseases, accurate diagnosis of VL is crucial as the treatment is associated with significant toxicity. Invasive and risky techniques involving demonstration of the parasites in stained preparations from splenic and bone marrow aspirate is still the gold standard for VL diagnosis. Serological tests using rk39 in ELISA or rapid immunochromatographic format, Direct Agglutination Test (DAT), immunoblotting have issues related to a significant proportion of asymptomatic individuals being positive with these tests and their inability to diagnose relapses as these remain positive for several months to years after cure. PCR is the most common molecular technique successfully used for diagnosis and differentiation of species. Through this review we focus extensively on the comparative utilities of the various diagnostic tools currently available for VL, describing in depth their advantages and disadvantages, addressing the recent advances attained in the field. A simple, rapid, non invasive, accurate and cost effective marker of active VL, which can be used in field conditions, is necessary to improve diagnosis of VL. PMID:21074233

  19. Comparison of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) toluidine red unheated serum test and the CSF rapid plasma reagin test with the CSF venereal disease research laboratory test for diagnosis of neurosyphilis among HIV-negative syphilis patients in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Zhou, Pingyu; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commercial RPR antigen diluted 1:2 in 10% saline) test, the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Specificities, sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and kappa values were calculated to determine the performances of the tests. We compared results of the CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST among patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic neurosyphilis who had reactive CSF-Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test results. Overall, the CSF-VDRL test was reactive in 261 patients (23.1%). There were no cases in which the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive and CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, or CSF-TRUST was reactive. Agreement between the results of CSF-TRUST and CSF-RPR was almost perfect (κ=0.861), with substantial agreement between the results of CSF-RPR and CSF-RPR-V (κ=0.740). The sensitivities of CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST were 81.4%, 76.2%, 79.5%, and 76.2%, respectively. Compared to CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST had comparable PPVs and NPVs. However, the specificity of CSF-VDRL (90.3%) was significantly lower than those of the other tests (92.7 to 93.4%). Therefore, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST can be considered alternative tests for neurosyphilis diagnosis in HIV-negative populations, particularly when the CSF-VDRL is not available.

  20. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  1. Exploration Laboratory Analysis - ARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael K.; Fung, Paul P.

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL). The SMEMCL provided diagnosis and treatment for the evidence-based medical conditions and hence, a basis for developing ELA functional requirements.

  2. Laboratory Accreditation in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Collino, Cesar; Chiabrando, Gustavo A.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory accreditation is an essential element in the healthcare system since it contributes substantially to decision-making, in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the health status of the patients, as well as in the organization and management of public healthcare. Therefore, the clinical biochemistry professional works continuously to provide reliable results and contributes to the optimization of operational logistics and integration of a laboratory into the health system. ISO 15189 accreditation, ensures compliance of the laboratory to minimize instances of error through the planning, prevention, implementation, evaluation and improvement of its procedures, which provides skill areas that involve both training undergraduate and graduate professionals in clinical biochemistry. PMID:27683497

  3. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  4. Laboratory Building

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  5. Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Test Results.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Clinical laboratory testing is now a global activity with laboratories no longer working in isolation but as regional and national networks, and often at international levels. We now have all of the electronic gadgetry via internet technology at our fingertips to rapidly and accurately measure and report on laboratory testing but are our test results harmonized?

  6. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: Requests, samples, measurements and reports.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In laboratory medicine, the terms "standardization" and "harmonization" are frequently used interchangeably as the final goal is the same: the equivalence of measurement results among different routine measurement procedures over time and space according to defined analytical and clinical quality specifications. However, the terms define two distinct, albeit closely linked, concepts based on traceability principles. The word "standardization" is used when results for a measurement are equivalent and traceable to the International System of Units (SI) through a high-order primary reference material and/or a reference measurement procedure (RMP). "Harmonization" is generally used when results are equivalent, but neither a high-order primary reference material nor a reference measurement procedure is available. Harmonization is a fundamental aspect of quality in laboratory medicine as its ultimate goal is to improve patient outcomes through the provision of accurate and actionable laboratory information. Patients, clinicians and other healthcare professionals assume that clinical laboratory tests performed by different laboratories at different times on the same sample and specimen can be compared, and that results can be reliably and consistently interpreted. Unfortunately, this is not necessarily the case, because many laboratory test results are still highly variable and poorly standardized and harmonized. Although the initial focus was mainly on harmonizing and standardizing analytical processes and methods, the scope of harmonization now also includes all other aspects of the total testing process (TTP), such as terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits as well as tests and test profiles, requests and criteria for interpretation. Several projects and initiatives aiming to improve standardization and harmonization in the testing process are now underway. Laboratory professionals should therefore step up their efforts to provide

  7. Current tools available for the diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Christopher; Korobitsyn, A.; Weyer, K.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) poses a major threat to control of tuberculosis worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of DR-TB are considerably more difficult than for drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB) and require higher level infrastructure and proficiency from laboratory specialists and clinicians. The World Health Organization (WHO) End TB Strategy calls for early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment of all persons of all ages with any form of drug-susceptible TB or DR-TB. This requires ensuring access to WHO-recommended rapid diagnostics and universal drug susceptibility testing (DST) for all persons with signs and symptoms of TB. There are a number of laboratory tools available for diagnosis of DR-TB, including phenotypic culture-based DST as well as molecular methods. Optimal and complementary use of the available diagnostic tools at the different levels of the tiered network of TB laboratories, as well as correct interpretation of the diagnostic results provided by them is critical for accurate and timely diagnosis of DR-TB thus enabling effective treatment and care of patients. PMID:28386407

  8. Molecular virology in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Josko, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    As one can see by the tests listed at www.amp.org, molecular diagnostic techniques have enabled the laboratory professionals to play an integral role in the identification and quantitation of viral infectious agents. Viral loads can be determined for HIV, HBV, and HCV using a variety of molecular methods such as real-time PCR, TMA, NASBA, and bDNA. Determining the amount of viral particles in a sample can not only monitor the status and progression of the disease, but can also guide recommendations for antiviral therapy. Other assays listed include cytomegalovirus, enterovirus, and human metapneumovirus detection, HPV testing, influenza and respiratory virus panels, and West Nile virus detection in blood donations using a variety of molecular methodologies. The use of molecular methodologies in the detection of viral pathogens has grown at an astounding rate, especially in the past two decades. It is now widely accepted that PCR is the "gold standard" for nucleic acid detection in the clinical laboratory as well as in research facilities. This article only touched on some of the common, widely used assays and platforms used in the identification process. With more and more assays being developed, the cost behind molecular testing has decreased since there are more competitors on the market. At one point, laboratorians may have thought of routine molecular testing as the wave of the future. It is obvious the future is upon us. Molecular diagnostics has become part of the daily, routine workload in most clinical laboratories. The advent of fully automated systems with faster turn around times has given laboratory professionals the tools necessary to report out accurate and sensitive results to clinicians who can ultimately improve patient care and outcomes by rendering a correct and rapid diagnosis.

  9. 2nd International External Quality Control Assessment for the Molecular Diagnosis of Dengue Infections

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Cristina; Niedrig, Matthias; Teichmann, Anette; Kaiser, Marco; Rumer, Leonid; Jarman, Richard G.; Donoso-Mantke, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently dengue viruses (DENV) pose an increasing threat to over 2.5 billion people in over 100 tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. International air travel is facilitating rapid global movement of DENV, increasing the risk of severe dengue epidemics by introducing different serotypes. Accurate diagnosis is critical for early initiation of preventive measures. Different reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) methods are available, which should be evaluated and standardized. Epidemiological and laboratory-based surveillance is required to monitor and guide dengue prevention and control programmes, i.e., by mosquito control or possible vaccination (as soon as an effective and safe vaccine becomes available). Objective The purpose of the external quality assurance (EQA) study described is to assess the efficiency and accuracy of dengue molecular diagnosis methods applied by expert laboratories. Study Design A panel of 12 human plasma samples was distributed and tested for DENV-specific RNA. The panel comprised 9 samples spiked with different DENV serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4), including 10-fold dilution series of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Two specificity controls consisted of a sample with a pool of 4 other flaviviruses and a sample with chikungunya virus. A negative control sample was also included. Results Thirty-seven laboratories (from Europe, Middle East Asia, Asia, the Americas/Caribbean, and Africa) participated in this EQA study, and reports including 46 sets of results were returned. Performance among laboratories varied according to methodologies used. Only 5 (10.9%) data sets met all criteria with optimal performance, and 4 (8.7%) with acceptable performance, while 37 (80.4%) reported results showed the need for improvement regarding accomplishment of dengue molecular diagnosis. Failures were mainly due to lack of sensitivity and the presence of false positives. Conclusions The EQA provides information on each laboratory's efficacy of RT

  10. Roles of laboratories and laboratory systems in effective tuberculosis programmes.

    PubMed

    Ridderhof, John C; van Deun, Armand; Kam, Kai Man; Narayanan, P R; Aziz, Mohamed Abdul

    2007-05-01

    Laboratories and laboratory networks are a fundamental component of tuberculosis (TB) control, providing testing for diagnosis, surveillance and treatment monitoring at every level of the health-care system. New initiatives and resources to strengthen laboratory capacity and implement rapid and new diagnostic tests for TB will require recognition that laboratories are systems that require quality standards, appropriate human resources, and attention to safety in addition to supplies and equipment. To prepare the laboratory networks for new diagnostics and expanded capacity, we need to focus efforts on strengthening quality management systems (QMS) through additional resources for external quality assessment programmes for microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility testing (DST) and molecular diagnostics. QMS should also promote development of accreditation programmes to ensure adherence to standards to improve both the quality and credibility of the laboratory system within TB programmes. Corresponding attention must be given to addressing human resources at every level of the laboratory, with special consideration being given to new programmes for laboratory management and leadership skills. Strengthening laboratory networks will also involve setting up partnerships between TB programmes and those seeking to control other diseases in order to pool resources and to promote advocacy for quality standards, to develop strategies to integrate laboratories functions and to extend control programme activities to the private sector. Improving the laboratory system will assure that increased resources, in the form of supplies, equipment and facilities, will be invested in networks that are capable of providing effective testing to meet the goals of the Global Plan to Stop TB.

  11. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  12. Dual Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis has both a mental disorder and an alcohol or drug problem. These conditions occur together frequently. In particular, alcohol and drug problems tend to occur with Depression Anxiety disorders ...

  13. Assessment of Clinical Diagnosis, Microscopy, Rapid Diagnostic Tests, and Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adegbosin, Olunike Olayeni; Taiwo, Sunday Samuel; Alli, Oyebode Armstrong Terry; Olowe, Olugbenga Adekunle; Ojurongbe, Taiwo Adetola; Bolaji, Oloyede Samuel; Adeyeba, Oluwaseyi Adegboyega

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the performance of clinical diagnosis and three laboratory diagnostic methods (thick film microscopy (TFM), rapid diagnostic test (RDT), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in Nigeria. Using clinical criteria, 217 children were recruited into the study out of which 106 (48.8%) were positive by TFM, 84 (38.7%) by RDT, and 125 (57.6%) by PCR. Using a composite reference method generated from the three diagnostic methods, 71 (32.7%) patients were found to be truly infected and 90 (41.5%) truly uninfected, while 56 (25.8%) were misidentified as infected or noninfected. When each of the 3 diagnostic methods was compared with the composite reference, PCR had sensitivity of 97.3%, specificity of 62.5%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 56.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.8%; microscopy had sensitivity of 77.2%, specificity of 72%, PPV of 66.9%, and NPV of 81.1%, while RDT had sensitivity of 62.3%, specificity of 87.4%, PPV of 67.7%, and NPV of 84.5%. PCR test performed best among the three methods followed by TFM and RDT in that order. The result of this study shows that clinical diagnosis cannot be relied upon for accurate diagnosis of P. falciparum in endemic areas. PMID:24371538

  14. Assessment of Clinical Diagnosis, Microscopy, Rapid Diagnostic Tests, and Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adegbosin, Olunike Olayeni; Taiwo, Sunday Samuel; Alli, Oyebode Armstrong Terry; Olowe, Olugbenga Adekunle; Ojurongbe, Taiwo Adetola; Bolaji, Oloyede Samuel; Adeyeba, Oluwaseyi Adegboyega

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the performance of clinical diagnosis and three laboratory diagnostic methods (thick film microscopy (TFM), rapid diagnostic test (RDT), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum in Nigeria. Using clinical criteria, 217 children were recruited into the study out of which 106 (48.8%) were positive by TFM, 84 (38.7%) by RDT, and 125 (57.6%) by PCR. Using a composite reference method generated from the three diagnostic methods, 71 (32.7%) patients were found to be truly infected and 90 (41.5%) truly uninfected, while 56 (25.8%) were misidentified as infected or noninfected. When each of the 3 diagnostic methods was compared with the composite reference, PCR had sensitivity of 97.3%, specificity of 62.5%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 56.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 97.8%; microscopy had sensitivity of 77.2%, specificity of 72%, PPV of 66.9%, and NPV of 81.1%, while RDT had sensitivity of 62.3%, specificity of 87.4%, PPV of 67.7%, and NPV of 84.5%. PCR test performed best among the three methods followed by TFM and RDT in that order. The result of this study shows that clinical diagnosis cannot be relied upon for accurate diagnosis of P. falciparum in endemic areas.

  15. [The early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent early symptoms of spondyloarthritides are inflammatory back pain and asymetric peripheral arthritis. Currently the mean delay between the onset of first symptoms and diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis which is the frequent type of spondyloarthritis is over 5 years. The availability of effective therapies makes an early diagnosis mandatory. The clinical symptoms of inflammatory back pain, active inflamation on MR, and positivity for HLA-B27 are the most important parameters for an early diagnosis of spondyloarthritis, especially in combination. Moreover, the combination of clinical and laboratory parameters is necessary for the early diagnosis.

  16. Accurate Scientific Visualization in Research and Physics Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Tim

    2011-10-01

    Accurate visualization is key in the expression and comprehension of physical principles. Many 3D animation software packages come with built-in numerical methods for a variety of fundamental classical systems. Scripting languages give access to low-level computational functionality, thereby revealing a virtual physics laboratory for teaching and research. Specific examples will be presented: Galilean relativistic hair, energy conservation in complex systems, scattering from a central force, and energy transfer in bi-molecular reactions.

  17. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  18. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  19. Laboratory accreditation.

    PubMed

    Bradway, D E; Siegelman, F L

    1994-09-01

    An investigation of alleged data fraud at a pesticide analytical laboratory led EPA to take a closer look at the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) inspection program. There was special focus on changes which might be made in the program to enhance the chances of detecting fraud in regulated studies. To this end, the Assistant Administrator of the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) requested EPA's Office of Inspector General (OIG) to examine the GLP program. Several reports were issued by the OIG, including the recommendation that a laboratory accreditation program be adopted. EPA has been examining ways to implement the OIG's recommendations, including (1) laboratory accreditation consisting of three components: document submission and assessment, site visit and assessment, and proficiency assessment; and (2) mandatory registration of all facilities participating in GLP-regulated studies, based on document submission and assessment. These two alternatives are compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed.

  20. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  1. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  2. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  3. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  4. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  5. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  6. Performance of Panfungal- and Specific-PCR-Based Procedures for Etiological Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Diseases on Tissue Biopsy Specimens with Proven Infection: a 7-Year Retrospective Analysis from a Reference Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Martinez, L.; Castelli, M. V.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J. L.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) results for 151 biopsy samples obtained from 132 patients with proven invasive fungal diseases was performed. PCR-based techniques proved to be fast and sensitive and enabled definitive diagnosis in all cases studied, with detection of a total of 28 fungal species. PMID:24574295

  7. Improved multimodal biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis: data from ADNI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor; Tamez-Peña, José

    2013-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) confers many clinical research and patient care benefits. Studies have shown that multimodal biomarkers provide better diagnosis accuracy of AD and MCI than unimodal biomarkers, but their construction has been based on traditional statistical approaches. The objective of this work was the creation of accurate AD and MCI diagnostic multimodal biomarkers using advanced bioinformatics tools. The biomarkers were created by exploring multimodal combinations of features using machine learning techniques. Data was obtained from the ADNI database. The baseline information (e.g. MRI analyses, PET analyses and laboratory essays) from AD, MCI and healthy control (HC) subjects with available diagnosis up to June 2012 was mined for case/controls candidates. The data mining yielded 47 HC, 83 MCI and 43 AD subjects for biomarker creation. Each subject was characterized by at least 980 ADNI features. A genetic algorithm feature selection strategy was used to obtain compact and accurate cross-validated nearest centroid biomarkers. The biomarkers achieved training classification accuracies of 0.983, 0.871 and 0.917 for HC vs. AD, HC vs. MCI and MCI vs. AD respectively. The constructed biomarkers were relatively compact: from 5 to 11 features. Those multimodal biomarkers included several widely accepted univariate biomarkers and novel image and biochemical features. Multimodal biomarkers constructed from previously and non-previously AD associated features showed improved diagnostic performance when compared to those based solely on previously AD associated features.

  8. Spinal tuberculosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Mirkoohi, Maryam; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Yarandi, Kourosh Karimi; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-12-01

    The spinal column is involved in less than 1% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB). Spinal TB is a very dangerous type of skeletal TB as it can be associated with neurologic deficit due to compression of adjacent neural structures and significant spinal deformity. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of spinal TB has special importance in preventing these serious complications. In order to extract current trends in diagnosis and medical or surgical treatment of spinal TB we performed a narrative review with analysis of all the articles available for us which were published between 1990 and 2011. Althoug h the development of more accurate imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and advanced surgical techniques have made the early diagnosis and management of spinal TB much easier, these are still very challenging topics. In this review we aim to discuss the diagnosis and management of spinal TB based on studies with acceptable design, clearly explained results and justifiable conclusions.

  9. Pitfalls in Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin Measurement for Diagnosis and Monitoring of Protoporphyrias

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Eric W.; Balwani, Manisha; Bissell, D. Montgomery; Bloomer, Joseph R.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Desnick, Robert J.; Naik, Hetanshi; Phillips, John D.; Singal, Ashwani K.; Wang, Bruce; Keel, Sioban; Anderson, Karl E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laboratory diagnosis of erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) requires a marked increase in total erythrocyte protoporphyrin (300–5000 µg/dL erythrocytes, reference interval <80 µg/dL) and a predominance (85%–100%) of metal-free protoporphyrin [normal, mostly zinc protoporphyrin (reference intervals for the zinc protoporphyrin proportion have not been established)]; plasma porphyrins are not always increased. X-linked protoporphyria (XLP) causes a similar increase in total erythrocyte protoporphyrin with a lower fraction of metal-free protoporphyrin (50%–85% of the total). CONTENT In studying more than 180 patients with EPP and XLP, the Porphyrias Consortium found that erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations for some patients were much higher (4.3- to 46.7-fold) than indicated by previous reports provided by these patients. The discrepant earlier reports, which sometimes caused the diagnosis to be missed initially, were from laboratories that measure protoporphyrin only by hematofluorometry, which is intended primarily to screen for lead poisoning. However, the instrument can calculate results on the basis of assumed hematocrits and reports results as “free” and “zinc” protoporphyrin (with different reference intervals), implying separate measurements of metal-free and zinc protoporphyrin. Such misleading reports impair diagnosis and monitoring of patients with protoporphyria. SUMMARY We suggest that laboratories should prioritize testing for EPP and XLP, because accurate measurement of erythrocyte total and metal-free protoporphyrin is essential for diagnosis and monitoring of these conditions, but less important for other disorders. Terms and abbreviations used in reporting erythrocyte protoporphyrin results should be accurately defined. PMID:26482161

  10. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  11. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... scientist determines that it is not possible to accurately analyze or make a laboratory determination of a... replacement, or for any other substantial reason, the scientist may postpone laboratory service for...

  12. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... scientist determines that it is not possible to accurately analyze or make a laboratory determination of a... replacement, or for any other substantial reason, the scientist may postpone laboratory service for...

  13. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... scientist determines that it is not possible to accurately analyze or make a laboratory determination of a... replacement, or for any other substantial reason, the scientist may postpone laboratory service for...

  14. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... scientist determines that it is not possible to accurately analyze or make a laboratory determination of a... replacement, or for any other substantial reason, the scientist may postpone laboratory service for...

  15. 7 CFR 91.17 - Postponing a laboratory service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... scientist determines that it is not possible to accurately analyze or make a laboratory determination of a... replacement, or for any other substantial reason, the scientist may postpone laboratory service for...

  16. Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

  17. The hydrologic laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1963-01-01

    The knowledge of soil and rock testing, including the application of the test or analysis data to field problems, is still in its infancy. By learning more about the basic laws and principles of nature we can more accurately predict hydrologic phenomena of the future, as well as solve more efficiently the hydrologic problems of the present Our reservoir of fundamental facts and basic knowledge has been, and can be even more fully, increased by the analysis and research work of the Hydrologic Laboratory.

  18. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  19. Dirofilaria immitis in cats: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Imaging and laboratory studies can help with the diagnosis of heartworm disease in cats, but no test is definitive. Furthermore, even when the diagnosis can be reliably established, therapy directed at the heartworms does little to help the cat. Rather, management is directed at alleviating clinical signs, with an emphasis on prevention for all.

  20. Towards the Standardization of Tumor Diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential diagnosis of chicken tumors is important but has been difficult in practice for a variety of reasons. Methods and criteria have varied among laboratories. This poster is based on a new publication (1) designed to encourage greater standardization of tumor diagnosis. The use of a...

  1. Polymyositis: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... themselves being invaded by cells of the immune system. Looking for more information, support or ways to get involved? Contact Us Get Our Emails About Polymyositis (PM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research Find your MDA Care Center Meet Warner ...

  2. Differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chris; Berl, Tomas; Tejedor, Alberto; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-03-01

    The appropriate management of hyponatraemia is reliant on the accurate identification of the underlying cause of the hyponatraemia. In the light of evidence which has shown that the use of a clinical algorithm appears to improve accuracy in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia, the European Hyponatraemia Network considered the use of two algorithms. One was developed from a nephrologist's view of hyponatraemia, while the other reflected the approach of an endocrinologist. Both of these algorithms concurred on the importance of assessing effective blood volume status and the measurement of urine sodium concentration in the diagnostic process. To demonstrate the importance of accurate diagnosis to the correct treatment of hyponatraemia, special consideration was given to hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients. The differentiation between the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), acute adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency, fluid overload and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was discussed. In patients with SIADH, fluid restriction has been the mainstay of treatment despite the absence of an evidence base for its use. An approach to using fluid restriction to raise serum tonicity in patients with SIADH and to identify patients who are likely to be recalcitrant to fluid restriction was also suggested.

  3. A new intelligent hierarchical fault diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.C.; Huang, C.L.; Yang, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    As a part of a substation-level decision support system, a new intelligent Hierarchical Fault Diagnosis System for on-line fault diagnosis is presented in this paper. The proposed diagnosis system divides the fault diagnosis process into two phases. Using time-stamped information of relays and breakers, phase 1 identifies the possible fault sections through the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) networks, and phase 2 recognizes the types and detailed situations of the faults identified in phase 1 by using a fast bit-operation logical inference mechanism. The diagnosis system has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan power secondary transmission system. Test results show that rapid and accurate diagnosis can be obtained with flexibility and portability for fault diagnosis purpose of diverse substations.

  4. Laboratory Diagnostics of Botulism

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2006-01-01

    Botulism is a potentially lethal paralytic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin. Human pathogenic neurotoxins of types A, B, E, and F are produced by a diverse group of anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, including Clostridium botulinum groups I and II, Clostridium butyricum, and Clostridium baratii. The routine laboratory diagnostics of botulism is based on the detection of botulinum neurotoxin in the patient. Detection of toxin-producing clostridia in the patient and/or the vehicle confirms the diagnosis. The neurotoxin detection is based on the mouse lethality assay. Sensitive and rapid in vitro assays have been developed, but they have not yet been appropriately validated on clinical and food matrices. Culture methods for C. botulinum are poorly developed, and efficient isolation and identification tools are lacking. Molecular techniques targeted to the neurotoxin genes are ideal for the detection and identification of C. botulinum, but they do not detect biologically active neurotoxin and should not be used alone. Apart from rapid diagnosis, the laboratory diagnostics of botulism should aim at increasing our understanding of the epidemiology and prevention of the disease. Therefore, the toxin-producing organisms should be routinely isolated from the patient and the vehicle. The physiological group and genetic traits of the isolates should be determined. PMID:16614251

  5. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  6. Optic Neuritis: Another Dickensian Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis and natural history of optic neuritis was established in the late 1880s by the ophthalmologists von Graefe and Nettleship. The earlier, accurate and insightful description of transient, bilateral visual loss of Esther, the main character in the Charles Dickens novel Bleak House (1852--1853), suggests optic neuritis as a Dickensian diagnosis. Remarkably, Dickens' observations, also preceding the earliest clinical description of multiple sclerosis by Charcot in 1868, described many clinical features such as a prodromal phase; a nadir; gradual recovery over weeks; glare disability; reduced contrast sensitivity; possibly Uhthoff's phenomenon; and visual fading. All this with an accuracy that, to quote Russell Brain, "would credit a trained physician."

  7. Emerging trends in the diagnosis of human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Radwanska, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) or sleeping sickness is caused by protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Despite the enormous technological progress in molecular parasitology in recent years, the diagnosis of HAT is still problematic due to the lack of specific tools. To date, there are two realities when it comes to HAT; the first one being the world of modern experimental laboratories, equipped with the latest state-of-the-art technology, and the second being the world of HAT diagnosis, where the latest semi-commercial test was introduced 30 years ago (Magnus et al. 1978). Hence, it appears that the lack of progress in HAT diagnosis is not primarily due to a lack of scientific interest or a lack of research funds, but mainly results from the many obstacles encountered in the translation of basic research into field-applicable diagnostics. This review will provide an overview of current diagnostic methods and highlight specific difficulties in solving the shortcomings of these methods. Future perspectives for accurate, robust, affordable diagnostics will be discussed as well.

  8. [Methods of rapid diagnosis in clinical microbiology: Clinical needs].

    PubMed

    Vila, Jordi; Gómez, María Dolores; Salavert, Miguel; Bosch, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    The diagnostic methods of infectious diseases should be fast, accurate, simple and affordable. The speed of diagnosis can play a crucial role in healing the patient, allowing the administration of appropriate antibiotic treatment. One aspect that increasingly determines the need for rapid diagnostic techniques is the increased rates of serious infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria, which cause a high probability of error in the empirical treatment. Some of the conventional methods such as Gram staining or antigen detection can generate results in less than 1 hour but lack sensitivity. Today we are witnessing a major change in clinical microbiology laboratories with the technological advances such as molecular diagnostics, digital microbiology and mass spectrometry. There are several studies showing that these changes in the microbiological diagnosis reduce the generation time of the test results, which has an obvious clinical impact. However, if we look into the future, other new technologies which will cover the needs required for a rapid microbiological diagnosis are on the horizon. This review provides an in depth analysis of the clinical impact that the implementation of rapid diagnostic techniques will have on unmet clinical needs.

  9. Melanoma Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsch, Alexander

    The chapter deals with the diagnosis of the malignant melanoma of the skin. This aggressive type of cancer with steadily growing incidence in white populations can hundred percent be cured if it is detected in an early stage. Imaging techniques, in particular dermoscopy, have contributed significantly to improvement of diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings, achieving sensitivities for melanoma experts of beyond 95% at specificities of 90% and more. Automatic computer analysis of dermoscopy images has, in preliminary studies, achieved classification rates comparable to those of experts. However, the diagnosis of melanoma requires a lot of training and experience, and at the time being, average numbers of lesions excised per histology-proven melanoma are around 30, a number which clearly is too high. Further improvements in computer dermoscopy systems and their competent use in clinical settings certainly have the potential to support efforts of improving this situation. In the chapter, medical basics, current state of melanoma diagnosis, image analysis methods, commercial dermoscopy systems, evaluation of systems, and methods and future directions are presented.

  10. Lunar laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  11. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Tunkel, Allan R.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed as a result of the widespread use of conjugate vaccines and preventive antimicrobial treatment of pregnant women. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis, accurate information is necessary regarding the important etiological agents and populations at risk to ascertain public health measures and ensure appropriate management. In this review, we describe the changing epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in the United States and throughout the world by reviewing the global changes in etiological agents followed by specific microorganism data on the impact of the development and widespread use of conjugate vaccines. We provide recommendations for empirical antimicrobial and adjunctive treatments for clinical subgroups and review available laboratory methods in making the etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Finally, we summarize risk factors, clinical features, and microbiological diagnostics for the specific bacteria causing this disease. PMID:20610819

  12. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 1. An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Libera, Agata E.; Pires, Amanda; Therrien, Matthew T.

    2013-01-01

    The Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations were put into place in 1978. They establish a standard of practice to ensure that results from the nonclinical laboratory study reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are valid and that the study report accurately reflects the conduct of the study. While the GLP regulations promulgate…

  13. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  14. Accurate, fast and cost-effective diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36 using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5-0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs.

  15. Accurate, Fast and Cost-Effective Diagnostic Test for Monosomy 1p36 Using Real-Time Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Pricila da Silva; Pena, Heloisa B.; D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Koiffmann, Celia P.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho

    2014-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is considered the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome in humans and it accounts for 0.5–0.7% of all the cases of idiopathic intellectual disability. The molecular diagnosis is often made by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which has the drawback of being a high-cost technique. However, patients with classic monosomy 1p36 share some typical clinical characteristics that, together with its common prevalence, justify the development of a less expensive, targeted diagnostic method. In this study, we developed a simple, rapid, and inexpensive real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for targeted diagnosis of monosomy 1p36, easily accessible for low-budget laboratories in developing countries. For this, we have chosen two target genes which are deleted in the majority of patients with monosomy 1p36: PRKCZ and SKI. In total, 39 patients previously diagnosed with monosomy 1p36 by aCGH, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) all tested positive on our qPCR assay. By simultaneously using these two genes we have been able to detect 1p36 deletions with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. We conclude that qPCR of PRKCZ and SKI is a fast and accurate diagnostic test for monosomy 1p36, costing less than 10 US dollars in reagent costs. PMID:24839341

  16. Trends in Laboratory Diagnostic Methods in Periodontology.

    PubMed

    Bolerázska, Beáta; Mareková, Mária; Markovská, Neda

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a summary of current knowledge on the laboratory diagnosis of periodontitis. It focuses on the theoretical foundations and is supplemented with new knowledge. It subsequently describes specifically the laboratory diagnosis methods of periodontitis: the protein expression of inflammation, oral microbiology and molecular diagnostics. Periodontitis is a serious disease worldwide and its confirmed association with systemic diseases means its severity is increasing. Its laboratory diagnosis has the potential to rise to the level of clinical and diagnostic imaging. The transfer of diagnostic methods from laboratory to clinical use is increasingly used in the prevention and monitoring of the exacerbation and treatment of periodontal disease, as well as of its impact on systemic disease.

  17. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  18. Progressing towards laboratory accreditation in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Young, D S

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory testing is of great value in the diagnosis and management of diseases. Good quality of results is essential if test results are to be meaningful. Uniformly high standards of laboratory practice are required to ensure that physicians may consistently rely on test results. Accreditation provides a way whereby a laboratory may meet international standards and provide assurance to a hospital's administration, medical and laboratory staff and patients that the laboratory is providing high quality results. In the absence of a national accreditation program, laboratories should undertake the low-cost or no cost actions that are elements of all accreditation programs. National societies concerned with the field of laboratory medicine or clinical pathology should work together with the appropriate government agencies to establish aNational Accrediting Body. Institution of an accrediting program will raise the visibility of clinical laboratory testing and ensure enhanced quality of testing for the entire population,

  19. Laboratory detection of sepsis: biomarkers and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Stefan; Carroll, Karen C

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid diagnosis and therapeutic interventions are desirable to improve the overall mortality in patients with sepsis. However, gold standard laboratory diagnostic methods for sepsis, pose a significant challenge to rapid diagnosis of sepsis by physicians and laboratories. This article discusses the usefulness and potential of biomarkers and molecular test methods for a more rapid clinical and laboratory diagnosis of sepsis. Because new technologies are quickly emerging, physicians and laboratories must appreciate the key factors and characteristics that affect the clinical usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of these test methodologies.

  20. [Laboratory tests for parasitic diseases in Israel].

    PubMed

    Marva, Esther; Grossman, Tamar

    2010-09-01

    Microscopic examination is still considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. In many clinical laboratories in hospitals and in health maintenance organizations ("Kupot Holim"), an excellent microscopic identification of parasites is performed. Microscopic examinations using wet mount preparations are performed for the detection of protozoan trophozoites and helmintic ova or larvae. Specific concentration techniques, including flotation and sedimentation procedures are further performed for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. However, microscopic examinations are time-consuming, non-sensitive and not always reliable. Furthermore, the diagnosis of certain infections is not always possible by searching for the parasites in host tissues or excreta since risky invasive techniques might be necessary to locate the parasites. Detection of antibodies can be very useful as an indication for infection with a specific parasite, especially in individuals with no exposure to the parasite prior to recent travel in a disease-endemic area. In addition to serology, there are other tests of high sensitivity which can be integrated with microscopy, such as antigen detection in stool and blood samples as well as the use of other molecular diagnosis methods. There are two main laboratories in Israel where parasitic diagnosis is available by integration of microscopy, serology, antigen detection and molecular methods: The Reference Laboratory for Parasitology in Jerusalem at the Central Laboratories of the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Laboratory of Parasitology at Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva (SOR). There are also two special diagnostic units, one responsible for the identification of toxopLasma: Reference Laboratory for Toxoplasmosis, Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, Tel Aviv (Tox), and the other for the identification of Leishmaniasis: Kuvin Center, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Kuv). This article

  1. Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Bonn, R.H.; Sittler, G.

    1997-04-01

    Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

  2. Automatic Video Analysis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Jorge; Muñoz-Ferrer, Aida; Cervantes, Miguel Ángel; Esquinas, Cristina; Marin, Alicia; Martínez, Carlos; Morera, Josep; Ruiz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated the diagnostic accuracy for the identification of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its severity of a noninvasive technology based on image processing (SleepWise). Methods: This is an observational, prospective study to evaluate the degree of agreement between polysomnography (PSG) and SleepWise. We recruited 56 consecutive subjects with suspected OSA who were referred as outpatients to the Sleep Unit of the Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol (HUGTiP) from January 2013 to January 2014. All patients underwent laboratory PSG and image processing with SleepWise simultaneously the same night. Both PSG and SleepWise analyses were carried independently and blindly. Results: We analyzed 50 of the 56 patients recruited. OSA was diagnosed through PSG in a total of 44 patients (88%) with a median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 25.35 (24.9). According to SleepWise, 45 patients (90%) met the criteria for a diagnosis of OSA, with a median AHI of 22.8 (22.03). An analysis of the ability of PSG and SleepWise to classify patients by severity on the basis of their AHI shows that the two diagnostic systems distribute the different groups similarly. According to PSG, 23 patients (46%) had a diagnosis of severe OSA, 11 patients (22%) moderate OSA, and 10 patients (20%) mild OSA. According to SleepWise, 20, 13, and 12 patients (40%, 26%, and 24%, respectively) had a diagnosis of severe, moderate, and mild OSA respectively. For OSA diagnosis, SleepWise was found to have sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 83% in relation to PSG. The positive predictive value was 97% and the negative predictive value was 100%. The Bland-Altman plot comparing the mean AHI values obtained through PSG and SleepWise shows very good agreement between the two diagnostic techniques, with a bias of −3.85, a standard error of 12.18, and a confidence interval of −0.39 to −7.31. Conclusions: SleepWise was reasonably accurate for noninvasive and automatic diagnosis

  3. Early Lung Cancer Diagnosis by Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Dongliang; Weng, Lixing; Wang, Lianhui

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes an extreme threat to human health, and the mortality rate due to lung cancer has not decreased during the last decade. Prognosis or early diagnosis could help reduce the mortality rate. If microRNA and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), as well as the corresponding autoantibodies, can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis, such high sensitivity of biosensors makes the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer realizable. This review provides an overview of tumor-associated biomarker identifying methods and the biosensor technology available today. Laboratorial researches utilizing biosensors for early lung cancer diagnosis will be highlighted. PMID:23892596

  4. Online motor fault detection and diagnosis using a hybrid FMM-CART model.

    PubMed

    Seera, Manjeevan; Lim, Chee Peng

    2014-04-01

    In this brief, a hybrid model combining the fuzzy min-max (FMM) neural network and the classification and regression tree (CART) for online motor detection and diagnosis tasks is described. The hybrid model, known as FMM-CART, exploits the advantages of both FMM and CART for undertaking data classification and rule extraction problems. To evaluate the applicability of the proposed FMM-CART model, an evaluation with a benchmark data set pertaining to electrical motor bearing faults is first conducted. The results obtained are equivalent to those reported in the literature. Then, a laboratory experiment for detecting and diagnosing eccentricity faults in an induction motor is performed. In addition to producing accurate results, useful rules in the form of a decision tree are extracted to provide explanation and justification for the predictions from FMM-CART. The experimental outcome positively shows the potential of FMM-CART in undertaking online motor fault detection and diagnosis tasks.

  5. Sclerosing Cholangitis: Clinicopathologic Features, Imaging Spectrum, and Systemic Approach to Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Nieun; Lee, Seung Soo; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing cholangitis is a spectrum of chronic progressive cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and stricture of the bile ducts, which can be classified as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic progressive liver disease of unknown cause. On the other hand, secondary sclerosing cholangitis has identifiable causes that include immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease, recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, ischemic cholangitis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related cholangitis, and eosinophilic cholangitis. In this review, we suggest a systemic approach to the differential diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings, as well as the typical imaging features on computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with MR cholangiography. Familiarity with various etiologies of sclerosing cholangitis and awareness of their typical clinical and imaging findings are essential for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:26798213

  6. Fault diagnosis using noise modeling and a new artificial immune system based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Farshid; Mojtahedi, Alireza; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    A new fault classification/diagnosis method based on artificial immune system (AIS) algorithms for the structural systems is proposed. In order to improve the accuracy of the proposed method, i.e., higher success rate, Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise generating models are applied to simulate environmental noise. The identification of noise model, known as training process, is based on the estimation of the noise model parameters by genetic algorithms (GA) utilizing real experimental features. The proposed fault classification/diagnosis algorithm is applied to the noise contaminated features. Then, the results are compared to that obtained without noise modeling. The performance of the proposed method is examined using three laboratory case studies in two healthy and damaged conditions. Finally three different types of noise models are studied and it is shown experimentally that the proposed algorithm with non-Gaussian noise modeling leads to more accurate clustering of memory cells as the major part of the fault classification procedure.

  7. [Clinical microbiology laboratory and imported parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Rocío; Cuadros, Juan; Cañavate, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Imported parasitosis represents an increasingly frequent diagnostic challenge for microbiology laboratories. A surge in immigration and international travel has led to a rise in the number of imported cases of parasitosis, and this trend is expected to continue in the future. The present article addresses this challenge by reviewing recommended diagnostic approaches and tests. Currently, microscopy is always recommended when analysing blood samples for parasites. If malaria is suspected, rapid antigen testing (including at least HRP2 antigen) should also be performed. The work-up for suspected leishmaniasis should include serology, culture, and in selected cases detection of antigen in urine. In suspected Chagas disease, two different serological tests should be performed. PCR for blood protozoa is highly sensitive, although it cannot be used to rule out Chagas disease, since this condition may be present without parasitemia. Accurate diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis usually requires PCR or antigen detection tests. In helminthiasis, traditional microscopy may need to be complemented with other tests, such as agar plate culture for strongyloidiasis, Og4C3 antigen detection for bancroftian filariasis, and antibody detection test for filariasis and schistosomiasis.

  8. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  9. [Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Hertl, M; Sitaru, C

    2016-01-01

    Bullous autoimmune diseases are organ-specific disorders characterized by an autoantibody-mediated blistering of skin and mucous membranes. The detection of tissue-bound and serum autoantibodies is prerequisite for the diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases. The individual entities of this group may be difficult to differentiate on clinical grounds alone. An accurate diagnosis is however important for prognosis and therapy. A preliminary diagnostic step includes direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, which provide information about the binding pattern and isotype of autoantibodies and allow the diagnosis of the autoimmune blistering disease. Subsequent characterization of the molecular specificity of autoantibodies is necessary for the exact classification of autoimmune bullous dermatoses. The quantitative measurement of autoantibodies against structural proteins of the skin may be often used to assess disease severity at follow-up.

  10. Virtual Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, P.

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations playa central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simulated dialogues between code developers, thus sharing not only the code, but also the motivations behind the code.

  11. [Laboratory evaluation of lupus anticoagulant in Israel].

    PubMed

    Sarig, Galit; Garach-Jehoshua, Osnat; Deutch, Varda; Winder, Asher; Hyam, Esti; Katz, Ben Zion; Lahav, Judith; Cassel, Aliza; Zivelin, Ariella; Souroujon, Moshe; Shimron, Orit

    2010-05-01

    Lupus anticoagulants (LAC) are antibodies which are detected by a prolongation of phospholipid-dependent coagulation assays, and are associated with thrombotic events and pregnancy complications in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome. The antiphospholipid syndrome is defined by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity and by laboratory diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibodies. The laboratory diagnosis is based on LAC and/or anticardiolipin and/or anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies present in plasma, on two or more occasions at least 12 weeks apart. ALthough the presence of LAC correlates best with thrombosis, the Laboratory testing of LAC is not well standardized. In this article, the Laboratory evaluation of LAC will be explained, including the different tests that are recommended by the Israeli Sub-committee of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Laboratories, the possibility to evaluate LAC in patients treated with antithrombotic therapy, and how to report and interpret the results.

  12. "Nuts and Bolts" of Laboratory Evaluation of Angioedema.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Henriette; Veszeli, Nóra; Kajdácsi, Erika; Cervenak, László; Varga, Lilian

    2016-10-01

    Angioedema, as a distinct disease entity, often becomes a clinical challenge for physicians, because it may cause a life-threatening condition, whereas prompt and accurate laboratory diagnostics may not be available. Although the bedside diagnosis needs to be established based on clinical symptoms and signs, family history, and the therapeutic response, later, laboratory tests are available. Currently, only for five out of the nine different types of angioedema can be diagnosed by laboratory testing, and these occur only in a minority of the patient population. Hereditary angioedema with C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency type I can be diagnosed by the low C1-INH function and concentration, whereas in type II, C1-INH function is low, but its concentration is normal or even elevated. C1q concentration is normal in both forms. Acquired angioedema with C1-INH deficiency type I is characterized by the low C1-INH function and concentration; however, C1q concentration is also low, and autoantibodies against C1-INH cannot be detected. Complement profile of acquired angioedema with C1-INH deficiency type II is similar to that of type I, but in this form, autoantibodies against C1-INH are present. Hereditary angioedema due to a mutation of the coagulation factor XII can be diagnosed exclusively by mutation analysis of FXII gene. Diagnostic metrics are not available for idiopathic histaminergic acquired angioedema, idiopathic non-histaminergic acquired angioedema, acquired angioedema related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and hereditary angioedema of unknown origin; these angioedemas can be diagnosed by medical and family history, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic response and by excluding the forms previously described. Several potential biomarkers of angioedema are used to date only in research. In the future, they could be utilized into the clinical practice to improve the differential diagnosis, therapy, as well as the prognosis of angioedema.

  13. DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY COCCIDIOIDAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Charles E.

    1951-01-01

    A wide variety of pulmonary lesions may be caused by coccidioidomycosis. Suspicion of coccidioidomycosis may be substantiated by careful clinical-epidemiological histories. The first laboratory procedure should be a coccidioidin skin test. If the reaction to the test is positive, serological tests are next. Also, if there is no reaction to coccidioidin, serological tests are still indicated if dissemination is suspected. The more severe the infection, the greater the probability of establishing a diagnosis serologically. In only three-fifths of patients with coccidioidal cavities can the diagnosis be fixed serologically. In such patients if differential skin tests are not conclusive, attempt should be made to recover the fungus. However, this is accompanied by great risk of laboratory infection. Eosinophilia and accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation are only circumstantial items of evidence, as is the appearance of the pulmonary roentgenogram. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14886741

  14. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  15. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies related to cometary grains and the nuclei of comets can be broken down into three areas which relate to understanding the spectral properties, the formation mechanisms, and the evolution of grains and nuclei: (1) Spectral studies to be used in the interpretation of cometary spectra; (2) Sample preparation experiments which may shed light on the physical nature and history of cometary grains and nuclei by exploring the effects on grain emissivities resulting from the ways in which the samples are created; and (3) Grain processing experiments which should provide insight on the interaction of cometary grains with the environment in the immediate vicinity of the cometary nucleus as the comet travels from the Oort cloud through perihelion, and perhaps even suggestions regarding the relationship between interstellar grains and cometary matter. A summary is presented with a different view of lab experiments than is found in the literature, concentrating on measurement techniques and sample preparations especially relevant to cometary dust.

  16. Laboratory evaluation in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Birtane, Murat; Yavuz, Selçuk; Taştekin, Nurettin

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies can help clinicians to allow early detection of autoimmune diseases and their clinical manifestations, to determine effective monitoring of prognosis and the treatment response. From this point, they have a high impact in rheumatic disease management. When used carefully they allow rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment. However, as they may be present in healthy population they may cause confusion for interpreting the situation. False positive test results may lead to wrong treatment and unnecessary anxiety for patients. Autoantibody positivity alone does not make a diagnosis. Similarly, the absence of autoantibodies alone does not exclude diagnosis. The success of the test is closely related to sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios. So, interpretation of these is very important for a proper laboratory evaluation. In conclusion, in spite of the remarkable advances in science and technology, a deeply investigated anamnesis and comprehensive physical examination still continue to be the best diagnostic method. The most correct approach is that clinicians apply laboratory tests to confirm or exclude preliminary diagnosis based on anamnesis and physical examination. This review will discuss these issues.

  17. [Laboratory chemical analysis in ascites].

    PubMed

    Satz, N

    1991-04-13

    Chemical analysis of ascitic fluid may be helpful in determining the underlying disease. We discuss the diagnostic accuracy of the common and newer chemical parameters (protein, LDH, lactate, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, fibronectin, albumin gradient [value of serum minus value of ascites], ferritin, tumor markers, immunomodulators, leukocytes, bacterial and cytologic examinations). We also review the pathogenesis and clinical findings of the most frequent ascites forms (benign hepatic, infective, malignant ascites, ascites associated with liver metastases or hepatocellular carcinoma, cardiac and pancreatic ascites) and the most important diagnosis criteria. In the malignant ascites a high cholesterol, a narrow albumin gradient or a high ferritin value have high diagnostic accuracy, but diagnosis is by the finding of malignant cells. For the diagnosis of infective ascites, bacteriology is mandatory even though the results are negative in most cases, particularly in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis where diagnosis has to be established clinically, by a low pH or by a high leukocyte count. Benign hepatic ascites is diagnosed by demonstrating an underlying chronic liver disease and laboratory examinations of the peritoneal fluid to exclude other causes. The laboratory tests in ascites associated with liver metastases or with hepatocellular carcinoma were similar to those in benign hepatic ascites and the two ascites forms must be separated by other clinical and technical findings. Pancreatic ascites can easily be distinguished from the other forms by the high amylase and lipase content.

  18. Using an Educational Electronic Documentation System to Help Nursing Students Accurately Identify Nursing Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pobocik, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology and electronic medical records in healthcare has exponentially increased. This quantitative research project used a pretest/posttest design, and reviewed how an educational electronic documentation system helped nursing students to identify the accurate related to statement of the nursing diagnosis for the patient in the case…

  19. Discrete sensors distribution for accurate plantar pressure analyses.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Laetitia; Ille, Anne; Moretto, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of discrete sensors under the footprint for accurate plantar pressure analyses. For this purpose, two different sensor layouts have been tested and compared, to determine which was the most accurate to monitor plantar pressure with wireless devices in research and/or clinical practice. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the study (age range: 23-58 years). The barycenter of pressures (BoP) determined from the plantar pressure system (W-inshoe®) was compared to the center of pressures (CoP) determined from a force platform (AMTI) in the medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. Then, the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) obtained from both W-inshoe® and force platform was compared for both layouts for each subject. The BoP and vGRF determined from the plantar pressure system data showed good correlation (SCC) with those determined from the force platform data, notably for the second sensor organization (ML SCC= 0.95; AP SCC=0.99; vGRF SCC=0.91). The study demonstrates that an adjusted placement of removable sensors is key to accurate plantar pressure analyses. These results are promising for a plantar pressure recording outside clinical or laboratory settings, for long time monitoring, real time feedback or for whatever activity requiring a low-cost system.

  20. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Torruellas, Cara; French, Samuel W; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a hepatotoxin that is commonly consumed worldwide and is associated with a spectrum of liver injury including simple steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a general term used to refer to this spectrum of alcohol-related liver injuries. Excessive or harmful alcohol use is ranked as one of the top five risk factors for death and disability globally and results in 2.5 million deaths and 69.4 million annual disability adjusted life years. All patients who present with clinical features of hepatitis or chronic liver disease or who have elevated serum elevated transaminase levels should be screened for an alcohol use disorder. The diagnosis of ALD can generally be made based on history, clinical and laboratory findings. However, the diagnosis of ALD can be clinically challenging as there is no single diagnostic test that confirms the diagnosis and patients may not be forthcoming about their degree of alcohol consumption. In addition, clinical findings may be absent or minimal in early ALD characterized by hepatic steatosis. Typical laboratory findings in ALD include transaminase levels with aspartate aminotransferase greater than alanine aminotransferase as well as increased mean corpuscular volume, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, and IgA to IgG ratio. In unclear cases, the diagnosis can be supported by imaging and liver biopsy. The histological features of ALD can ultimately define the diagnosis according to the typical presence and distribution of hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and Mallory-Denk bodies. Because of the potential reversible nature of ALD with sobriety, regular screening of the general population and early diagnosis are essential. PMID:25206273

  1. Reassessment of ABO blood group, sex, and age on laboratory parameters used to diagnose von Willebrand disorder: potential influence on the diagnosis vs the potential association with risk of thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Soltani, Soma; McDonald, Jane; Grezchnik, Ella; Easton, Leanne; Favaloro, James W C

    2005-12-01

    We reassessed the influence of ABO blood group, sex, and age on plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen, vWF:ristocetin cofactor, vWF:collagen binding assay, and factor VIII coagulant (FVIII:C). Data show that levels of vWF and FVIII:C increase with increasing age (P < .001 for all parameters) and that the ABO blood group influences plasma levels such that O group levels are significantly less than non-O group levels. There was no significant association with sex and Rh status. The selection of normal ranges based on ABO blood groups may influence the clinical diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (vWD) but might not be clinically relevant or help identify people at increased risk of bleeding. Differences in ABO-related ranges were more extensive at the high end of the ranges. This is of particular interest because high levels of vWF and FVIII are associated with thrombosis risk, and an ABO relationship also has been described. O group individuals may or may not be at greater risk for bleeding (they have lower levels of vWF and FVIII:C) and are more likely to be diagnosed with vWD. It also is possible that O group status may be protective for thrombosis.

  2. Tracking false-negative results in molecular diagnosis: proposal of a triplex-PCR based method for leishmaniasis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular biological methods have become increasingly relevant to the diagnosis and control of infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis. Since various factors may affect the sensitivity of PCR assays, including DNA yield and purity, an optimal extraction method is pivotal. Losses of a parasite’s DNA during extraction may significantly impair its detection by PCR and lead to false-negative results. This study proposes a triplex PCR assay targeting the parasite’s DNA, an external control (pUC18) and an internal control (G3PD) for accurate diagnosis of leishmaniasis. Results Two primer pairs were designed to detect the plasmid pUC18 and a triplex PCR assay targeting the Leishmania braziliensis kinetoplast DNA, the external control and the internal control was standardized. The triplex PCR assay was assessed for its ability to detect the three target DNA fragments simultaneously. PCR products from pUC18 DNA resulted in bands of 368 (P1) and 316 (P2) base pairs (bp). The triplex PCR optimized with the chosen external control system (P1) allowed the simultaneous detection of the internal control (G3PD – 567 bp) as well as of small quantities (10 pg) of the target parasite’s DNA, detected by amplification of a 138 bp product. Conclusions The new tool standardized herein enables a more reliable interpretation of PCR results, mainly by contributing to quality assurance of leishmaniasis diagnosis. Furthermore, after simple standardization steps, this protocol could be applied to the diagnosis of other infectious diseases in reference laboratories. This triplex PCR enables the assessment of small losses during the DNA extraction process, problems concerning DNA degradation (sample quality) and the detection of L. braziliensis kDNA. PMID:24808911

  3. Current and Projected Modes of Delivery of Veterinary Medical Services to Animal Agriculture: Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Vaughn A.

    1980-01-01

    The veterinary diagnostic laboratory's prime role has been diagnosis and/or laboratory findings to assist a diagnosis. Interpretation and evaluation and more involvement with decision-making in monitoring groups of animals and their health status are seen as future roles for diagnostic laboratories. (MLW)

  4. A dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method for power transformers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wensheng; Bai, Cuifen; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In order to diagnose transformer fault efficiently and accurately, a dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method based on Bayesian network is proposed in this paper. First, an integrated fault diagnosis model is established based on the causal relationship among abnormal working conditions, failure modes, and failure symptoms of transformers, aimed at obtaining the most possible failure mode. And then considering the evidence input into the diagnosis model is gradually acquired and the fault diagnosis process in reality is multistep, a dynamic fault diagnosis mechanism is proposed based on the integrated fault diagnosis model. Different from the existing one-step diagnosis mechanism, it includes a multistep evidence-selection process, which gives the most effective diagnostic test to be performed in next step. Therefore, it can reduce unnecessary diagnostic tests and improve the accuracy and efficiency of diagnosis. Finally, the dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method is applied to actual cases, and the validity of this method is verified.

  5. A Dynamic Integrated Fault Diagnosis Method for Power Transformers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wensheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In order to diagnose transformer fault efficiently and accurately, a dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method based on Bayesian network is proposed in this paper. First, an integrated fault diagnosis model is established based on the causal relationship among abnormal working conditions, failure modes, and failure symptoms of transformers, aimed at obtaining the most possible failure mode. And then considering the evidence input into the diagnosis model is gradually acquired and the fault diagnosis process in reality is multistep, a dynamic fault diagnosis mechanism is proposed based on the integrated fault diagnosis model. Different from the existing one-step diagnosis mechanism, it includes a multistep evidence-selection process, which gives the most effective diagnostic test to be performed in next step. Therefore, it can reduce unnecessary diagnostic tests and improve the accuracy and efficiency of diagnosis. Finally, the dynamic integrated fault diagnosis method is applied to actual cases, and the validity of this method is verified. PMID:25685841

  6. Laboratory aspects of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, A G

    1988-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease), a common tick-borne disorder of people and domestic animals in North America and Europe, is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Following the discovery and initial propagation of this agent in 1981 came revelations that other tick-associated infectious disorders are but different forms of Lyme borreliosis. A challenge for the clinician and microbiology laboratory is confirmation that a skin rash, a chronic meningitis, an episode of myocarditis, or an arthritic joint is the consequence of B. burgdorferi infection. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis may be established by (i) directly observing the spirochete in host fluid or tissue, (ii) recovering the etiologic spirochete from the patient in culture medium or indirectly through inoculation of laboratory animals, or (iii) carrying out serologic tests with the patient's serum or cerebrospinal fluid. The last method, while lacking in discriminatory power, is the most efficacious diagnostic assay for most laboratories at present. Images PMID:3069200

  7. Infection in the bone marrow transplant recipient and role of the microbiology laboratory in clinical transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    LaRocco, M T; Burgert, S J

    1997-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, tremendous technological advances have been made in bone marrow and solid organ transplantation. Despite these advances, an enduring problem for the transplant recipient is infection. As immunosuppressive regimens have become more systematic, it is apparent that different pathogens affect the transplant recipient at different time points in the posttransplantation course, since they are influenced by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. An understanding of this evolving risk for infection is essential to the management of the patient following transplantation and is a key to the early diagnosis and treatment of infection. Likewise, diagnosis of infection is dependent upon the quality of laboratory support, and services provided by the clinical microbiology laboratory play an important role in all phases of clinical transplantation. These include the prescreening of donors and recipients for evidence of active or latent infection, the timely and accurate microbiologic evaluation of the transplant patient with suspected infection, and the surveillance of asymptomatic allograft recipients for infection. Expert services in bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, virology, and serology are needed and communication between the laboratory and the transplantation team is paramount for providing clinically relevant, cost-effective diagnostic testing. PMID:9105755

  8. Translation of a laboratory-validated equine herpesvirus-1 specific real-time PCR assay into an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay for point-of-need diagnosis using POCKIT™ nucleic acid analyzer.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Tsai, Yun-Long; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Yu-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Skillman, Ashley; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas; Pronost, Stéphane; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a major problem for the equine industry in the United States, is caused by equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). In addition, EHV-1 is associated with upper respiratory disease, abortion, and chorioretinal lesions in horses. Here we describe the development and evaluation of an inexpensive, user-friendly insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) method targeting open reading 30 (ORF30) to detect both neuropathogenic and non-neuropathogenic strains on the field-deployable POCKIT™ device for point-of-need detection of EHV-1. The analytical sensitivity of the EHV-1 iiPCR assay was 13 genome equivalents per reaction. The assay did not cross react with ten non-target equine viral pathogens. Performance of the EHV-1 iiPCR assay was compared to two previously described real-time PCR (qPCR) assays in two laboratories by using 104 archived clinical samples. All 53 qPCR-positive and 46 of the 51 qPCR-negative samples tested positive and negative, respectively, by the iiPCR. The agreement between the two assays was 95.19% (confidence interval 90.48-99.90%) with a kappa value of 0.90. In conclusion, the newly developed EHV-1 iiPCR assay is robust to provide specificity and sensitivity comparable to qPCR assays for the detection of EHV-1 nucleic acid in clinical specimens.

  9. A bacterial engineered glycoprotein as a novel antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Melli, Luciano J; Guidolin, Leticia S; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Elena, Sebastián; Franco, Cristina; Nicola, Ana M; Feldman, Mario F; Comerci, Diego J; Ugalde, Juan E

    2014-08-27

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects livestock and human beings. Laboratory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serological diagnosis using serum and/or milk samples. Although there are several serological tests with different diagnostic performance and capacity to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, there is still no standardized reference antigen for the disease. Here we validate the first recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. This antigen can be produced in homogeneous batches without the need of culturing pathogenic brucellae; all characteristics that make it appropriate for standardization. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies in bovine samples was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to magnetic beads or ELISA plates. As a proof of concept and to validate the antigen, we analyzed serum, whole blood and milk samples obtained from non-infected, experimentally infected and vaccinated animals included in a vaccination/infection trial performed in our laboratory as well as more than 1000 serum and milk samples obtained from naturally infected and S19-vaccinated animals from Argentina. Our results demonstrate that OAg-AcrA-based assays are highly accurate for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, even in vaccinated herds, using different types of samples and in different platforms. We propose this novel recombinant glycoprotein as an antigen suitable for the development of new standard immunological tests for screening and confirmatory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in regions or countries with brucellosis-control programs.

  10. Home-based Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in an Urban Population

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Natasha; Rolle, Andrew J.; Lee, Todd A.; Prasad, Bharati

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with portable monitoring (PM) is increasingly utilized, but remains understudied in underserved and minority populations. We tested the feasibility of home PM in an urban population at risk for OSA compared to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) and examined patient preference with respect to home PM versus PSG. Methods: Randomized crossover study of home PM (WatchPAT200) and in-laboratory simultaneous PSG and PM in 75 urban African Americans with high pre-test probability of OSA, identified with the Berlin questionnaire. Results: Fifty-seven of 75 participants were women, average age 45 ± 11 years (mean ± SD), 35% with ≤ high school education, and 76% with annual household income < $50,000. Technical failure rates were 5.3% for home vs. 3.1% for in-laboratory PM. There was good agreement between apnea hypopnea index on PSG; AHIPSG and AHI on home PM (mean ± 2 SD of the differences = 0.64 ± 46.5 and intraclass correlation coefficient; ICC = 0.73). The areas under the curve for the receiver-operator characteristic curves for home PM were 0.90 for AHIPSG ≥ 5, 0.95 for AHIPSG ≥ 10, and 0.92 for AHIPSG ≥ 15. 62/75 (82%) participants preferred home over in-laboratory testing. Conclusions: Home PM for diagnosis of OSA in a high risk urban population is feasible, accurate, and preferred by patients. As home PM may improve access to care, the cost-effectiveness of this diagnostic strategy for OSA should be examined in underserved urban and rural populations. Clinical Trials Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01997723 Citation: Garg N, Rolle AJ, Lee TA, Prasad B. Home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in an urban population. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(8):879-885. PMID:25126034

  11. Differential diagnosis of delayed awakening from general anesthesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Frost, Elizabeth A M

    2014-10-01

    With the general use of fast acting anesthetic agents, patients usually awaken quickly in the post operative period. However, sometimes recovery is protracted and the list of possible causes in long. Accurate diagnosis is key to institution of appropriate therapy.

  12. Dengue NS1 and prM antibodies increase the sensitivity of acute dengue diagnosis test and differentiate from Japanese encephalitis infection.

    PubMed

    Gowri Sankar, S; Balaji, T; Venkatasubramani, K; Thenmozhi, V; Dhananjeyan, K J; Paramasivan, R; Tyagi, B K; John Vennison, S

    2014-05-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis of dengue infection is essential for dengue case management. In outbreak conditions, it is essential to include two different tests to diagnose dengue and the choice depends on the number of days after the onset of illness in which the sample is collected. During the laboratory diagnosis of dengue in late acute and convalescent phase by MAC-ELISA, it is necessary to rule out possible cross reactions of closely related flavivirus, such as Japanese encephalitis virus which is commonly co-circulating. In the present investigation, the usefulness of dengue virus NS1 and prM antibodies in diagnosing and differentiating dengue from Japanese encephalitis infection was assessed using samples collected during out-breaks. It was shown here that, detection of antibodies against dengue NS1 and prM proteins increases the sensitivity of dengue diagnosis until 15days. Moreover, detection of antibodies against both proteins was able to differentiate dengue from Japanese encephalitis infection.

  13. Noninferiority of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosis by a point-of-care rapid test vs the laboratory fluorescent spot test demonstrated by copper inhibition in normal human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Baird, J Kevin; Dewi, Mewahyu; Subekti, Decy; Elyazar, Iqbal; Satyagraha, Ari W

    2015-06-01

    Tens of millions of patients diagnosed with vivax malaria cannot safely receive primaquine therapy against repeated attacks caused by activation of dormant liver stages called hypnozoites. Most of these patients lack access to screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, a highly prevalent disorder causing serious acute hemolytic anemia with primaquine therapy. We optimized CuCl inhibition of G6PD in normal red blood cells (RBCs) to assess G6PD diagnostic technologies suited to point of care in the impoverished rural tropics. The most widely applied technology for G6PD screening-the fluorescent spot test (FST)-is impractical in that setting. We evaluated a new point-of-care G6PD screening kit (CareStart G6PD, CSG) against FST using graded CuCl treatments to simulate variable hemizygous states, and varying proportions of CuCl-treated RBC suspensions to simulate variable heterozygous states of G6PD deficiency. In experiments double-blinded to CuCl treatment, technicians reading FST and CSG test (n = 269) classified results as positive or negative for deficiency. At G6PD activity ≤40% of normal (n = 112), CSG test was not inferior to FST in detecting G6PD deficiency (P = 0.003), with 96% vs 90% (P = 0.19) sensitivity and 75% and 87% (P = 0.01) specificity, respectively. The CSG test costs less, requires no specialized equipment, laboratory skills, or cold chain for successful application, and performs as well as the FST standard of care for G6PD screening. Such a device may vastly expand access to primaquine therapy and aid in mitigating the very substantial burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by the hypnozoite reservoir of vivax malaria.

  14. Good laboratory practice and laboratory accreditation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J; McQuaker, N

    1993-12-01

    Principles of good laboratory practice (GLP) and laboratory accreditation programs, particularly as they pertain to the environmental sector, are reviewed. The multitude of programs is proving costly for many laboratories and there is mounting pressure to develop reciprocity agreements between programs and to consolidate nationally and internationally. Inclusion of GLP and laboratory accreditation requirements in government regulations is resulting in a significantly increased number of laboratories participating in these programs.

  15. Diagnostic testing managed by hematopathology specialty and other laboratories: costs and patient diagnostic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful management of patients with hematologic malignancies depends upon accurate and timely diagnosis, which frequently requires integration and interpretation of multiple tests. Our retrospective analysis compared diagnostic uncertainty, resource utilization, and costs for patients with diagnostic bone marrow (BM) tests managed by commercial laboratories. Methods Patients with BM biopsies and suspected hematologic cancer/condition were identified from claims (2005–2011) within a large US health plan (coverage ≥6 pre- and ≥3-months post-biopsy). Cohorts defined by laboratories performing BM morphologic assessment/directing testing sequence: Genoptix (GX, specialty hematology-testing laboratory), large commercial laboratories (LL), other laboratories (OL). One-year post-biopsy changes in diagnosis or treatments, tests performed, and diagnostic/treatment medical costs (measured as per-patient-per-month [PPPM]) were examined. Results The study population included 1,387 GX, 4,162 LL, and 19,115 OL patients with suspected hematologic malignancy/disease and BM morphology assessment. GX had lower diagnostic uncertainty measured between 2 time periods by diagnostic stability (no conditions the same; 6.16% GX, 8.04% LL, 9.73% OL; p < 0.001) and changes (≥1 condition different; 7.88% GX, 11.19% LL, and 14.08% OL; p < 0.001), fewer repeat BM biopsies, and fewer chemotherapy changes (30-days and 60-days post-initiation). One-year PPPM costs adjusted for patient characteristics differences were $8,202 GX, $7,711 LL, and $10,302 OL (p < 0.05); adjusted PPPM costs (excluding testing period) were $6,019 GX, $6,649 LL, and $7,801 OL (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our data suggests that a hematopathology specialty laboratory may result in earlier final diagnosis, fewer subsequent diagnosis changes, reduced need for follow-on testing requiring repeat biopsy procedures, and may result in lower downstream healthcare costs. Further evaluations using

  16. A more accurate nonequilibrium air radiation code - NEQAIR second generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Stephane; Laux, Christophe O.; Chapman, Dean R.; Maccormack, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments, one an equilibrium flow in a plasma torch at Stanford, the other a nonequilibrium flow in a SDIO/IST Bow-Shock-Ultra-Violet missile flight, have provided the basis for modifying, enhancing, and testing the well-known radiation code, NEQAIR. The original code, herein termed NEQAIR1, lacked computational efficiency, accurate data for some species and the flexibility to handle a variety of species. The modified code, herein termed NEQAIR2, incorporates recent findings in the spectroscopic and radiation models. It can handle any number of species and radiative bands in a gas whose thermodynamic state can be described by up to four temperatures. It provides a new capability of computing very fine spectra in a reasonable CPU time, while including transport phenomena along the line of sight and the characteristics of instruments that were used in the measurements. Such a new tool should allow more accurate testing and diagnosis of the different physical models used in numerical simulations of radiating, low density, high energy flows.

  17. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-06-21

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind's history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient's clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis.

  18. [Problems in the diagnosis of ornithosis].

    PubMed

    Nafeyev, A A; Savinova, G A; Rechnik, V N; Voloshina, O A; Vinogradova, I B

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes 3 cases of ornithosis that could be detected by clinical and laboratory studies using immunological assays. In one case, its diagnosis was made late when the infection occurred in a woman working in a travel agency in Cyprus. The two other cases having an occupational contact (pet shop workers) were observed to have its acute form. All the described cases showed lung involvement characterized by external respiratory failure, one of the most common manifestations of ornithosis (psittacosis). Among the practically used laboratory tests, the indirect hemagglutination reaction is an accessible and effective serological assay for the diagnosis of ornithosis.

  19. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  20. Brucella abortus Infection Acquired in Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Pier Luigi; Mastrandrea, Scilla; Rappelli, Paola; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2000-01-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated. PMID:10790142

  1. From Femtosecond Dynamics to Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramczyk, H.; Placek, I.; BroŻek-Płuska, B.; Kurczewski, K.; Morawiec, Z.; Tazbir, M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents new results based on Raman spectroscopy and demonstrates its utilisation as a diagnostic and development tool with the key advantage in breast cancer research. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer research are in the early stages of development. However, research presented here as well as performed in a few other laboratories demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to accurately characterize cancer tissue and distinguish between normal, malignant and benign types. The main goals of bio-Raman spectroscopy at this stage are threefold. Firstly, the aim is to develop the diagnostic ability of Raman spectroscopy so it can be implemented in a clinical environment, producing accurate and rapid diagnoses. Secondly, the aim is to optimize the technique as a diagnostic tool for the non-invasive real time medical applications. Thirdly, the aim is to formulate some hypothesis based on Raman spectroscopy on the molecular mechanism which drives the transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most statistically reliable report on Raman spectroscopy-based diagnosis of breast cancers among the world women population.

  2. From Femtosecond Dynamics to Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, H.; Placek, I.; Brozek-Pluska, B.; Kurczewski, K.; Morawiec, Z.; Tazbir, M.

    2007-12-26

    This paper presents new results based on Raman spectroscopy and demonstrates its utilisation as a diagnostic and development tool with the key advantage in breast cancer research. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer research are in the early stages of development. However, research presented here as well as performed in a few other laboratories demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to accurately characterize cancer tissue and distinguish between normal, malignant and benign types. The main goals of bio-Raman spectroscopy at this stage are threefold. Firstly, the aim is to develop the diagnostic ability of Raman spectroscopy so it can be implemented in a clinical environment, producing accurate and rapid diagnoses. Secondly, the aim is to optimize the technique as a diagnostic tool for the non-invasive real time medical applications. Thirdly, the aim is to formulate some hypothesis based on Raman spectroscopy on the molecular mechanism which drives the transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most statistically reliable report on Raman spectroscopy-based diagnosis of breast cancers among the world women population.

  3. Preoperative diagnosis of a pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Velebit, V.; Christenson, J. T.; Simonet, F.; Maurice, J.; Schmuziger, M.; Hauser, H.; Didier, D.

    1995-01-01

    A pulmonary artery sarcoma was diagnosed preoperatively by magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with gadolinium and confirmed by percutaneous computed tomographic guided needle biopsy. Accurate preoperative diagnosis allowed planned curative surgery with removal of the right ventricular outflow tract and reconstructive surgery using a cryopreserved homograft. Images PMID:8539663

  4. Testing Physical Diagnosis Skills with Videotape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillman, Paula L.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An inexpensive videotape testing system has been developed at the Department of Pediatrics and Department of Medical TV-Cinematography at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. The development and validation of a test using this system to assess observational skills important for accurate physical diagnosis are described. (LBH)

  5. Microbiological diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary disease is by far the most frequent disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). To diagnose NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD), patients should have symptoms and radiologic signs suggestive of NTM-PD, and cultures of multiple respiratory tract samples must grow the same NTM species. Thus, the microbiological laboratory has a central role in the diagnosis of NTM-PD. This review summarizes currently available data on techniques involved in the microbiological diagnosis of NTM-PD, and aims to provide a framework for optimal microbiological diagnosis.

  6. Efficient Model-Based Diagnosis Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Vatan, Farrokh; Barrett, Anthony; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Williams, Colin

    2009-01-01

    An efficient diagnosis engine - a combination of mathematical models and algorithms - has been developed for identifying faulty components in a possibly complex engineering system. This model-based diagnosis engine embodies a twofold approach to reducing, relative to prior model-based diagnosis engines, the amount of computation needed to perform a thorough, accurate diagnosis. The first part of the approach involves a reconstruction of the general diagnostic engine to reduce the complexity of the mathematical-model calculations and of the software needed to perform them. The second part of the approach involves algorithms for computing a minimal diagnosis (the term "minimal diagnosis" is defined below). A somewhat lengthy background discussion is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the innovative aspects of the present efficient model-based diagnosis engine. In model-based diagnosis, the function of each component and the relationships among all the components of the engineering system to be diagnosed are represented as a logical system denoted the system description (SD). Hence, the expected normal behavior of the engineering system is the set of logical consequences of the SD. Faulty components lead to inconsistencies between the observed behaviors of the system and the SD (see figure). Diagnosis - the task of finding faulty components - is reduced to finding those components, the abnormalities of which could explain all the inconsistencies. The solution of the diagnosis problem should be a minimal diagnosis, which is a minimal set of faulty components. A minimal diagnosis stands in contradistinction to the trivial solution, in which all components are deemed to be faulty, and which, therefore, always explains all inconsistencies.

  7. Accurate oscillator strengths for interstellar ultraviolet lines of Cl I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schectman, R. M.; Federman, S. R.; Beideck, D. J.; Ellis, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses on the abundance of interstellar chlorine rely on accurate oscillator strengths for ultraviolet transitions. Beam-foil spectroscopy was used to obtain f-values for the astrophysically important lines of Cl I at 1088, 1097, and 1347 A. In addition, the line at 1363 A was studied. Our f-values for 1088, 1097 A represent the first laboratory measurements for these lines; the values are f(1088)=0.081 +/- 0.007 (1 sigma) and f(1097) = 0.0088 +/- 0.0013 (1 sigma). These results resolve the issue regarding the relative strengths for 1088, 1097 A in favor of those suggested by astronomical measurements. For the other lines, our results of f(1347) = 0.153 +/- 0.011 (1 sigma) and f(1363) = 0.055 +/- 0.004 (1 sigma) are the most precisely measured values available. The f-values are somewhat greater than previous experimental and theoretical determinations.

  8. Laser Raman detection of platelet as a non-invasive approach for early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Tian, Q.; Baek, S. J.; Shang, X. L.; Park, A.; Liu, Z. C.; Yao, X. Q.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, X. H.; Cheng, Y.; Peng, J.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a problem that puzzled many doctors. Reliable markers in easy-assembling samples are of considerable clinical diagnostic value. In this work, laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) was developed a new method that potentially allows early and differential diagnosis of AD from the platelet sample. Raman spectra of platelets isolated from different ages of AD transgenic mice and non-transgenic controls were collected and analyzed. Multilayer perceptron networks (MLP) classification method was used to classify spectra and establish the diagnostic models. For differential diagnosis, spectra of platelets isolated from AD, Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD) mice were also discriminated. Two notable spectral differences at 740 and 1654 cm-1 were revealed in the mean spectrum of platelets isolated from AD transgenic mice and the controls. MLP displayed a powerful ability in the classifying of early, advanced AD and the control group, and in differential diagnosis of PD and advanced AD, as well as VD and advanced AD. The results suggest that platelet detecting by LRS coupled with MLP analysis appears to be an easy and accurate method for early and differential diagnosis of AD. This technique could be rapidly promoted from laboratory to the hospital.

  9. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  10. Optic Neuritis: Another Dickensian Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The clinical diagnosis and natural history of optic neuritis was established in the late 1880s by the ophthalmologists von Graefe and Nettleship. The earlier, accurate and insightful description of transient, bilateral visual loss of Esther, the main character in the Charles Dickens novel Bleak House (1852--1853), suggests optic neuritis as a Dickensian diagnosis. Remarkably, Dickens’ observations, also preceding the earliest clinical description of multiple sclerosis by Charcot in 1868, described many clinical features such as a prodromal phase; a nadir; gradual recovery over weeks; glare disability; reduced contrast sensitivity; possibly Uhthoff’s phenomenon; and visual fading. All this with an accuracy that, to quote Russell Brain, “would credit a trained physician.” PMID:28167994

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment in Neurosarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    GÖZÜBATIK-ÇELİK, Gökçen; UYGUNOĞLU, Uğur; ULUDÜZ, Derya; ATAHAN, Ersan; MÜSELLİM, Benan; SAİP, Sabahattin; SİVA, Aksel

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory multisystem disorder, affecting many systems such as lung, lymph nodes, skin and eye involvement. Nervous system involvement is often seen in 5–15% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis in the first two years. Preceding to systemic involvement the initial symptom as neurological complaints has been rarely reported. Lacking of any specific, clinical and / or radiological findings for neurosarcoidosis in these cases, it could be difficult to make an accurate diagnosis and histopathological evaluation may be required. Due to rarity and complexity diagnosis of the neurosarcoidosis, in this study, clinical, radiological and / or histopathological features, treatment modalities of the 7 neurosarcoidosis patients to be presented with detailed investigations of different neurological symptoms were evaluated. PMID:28360686

  12. The role of radiology in diagnosis and management of drug mules: an update with new challenges and new diagnostic tools.

    PubMed

    Bulakci, Mesut; Cengel, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Emergency physicians and radiologists have been increasingly encountering internal concealment of illegal drugs. The packages commonly contain powdered solid drugs such as cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine and hashish, but they may also contain cocaine in the liquid form. The second type of package has recently been more commonly encountered, and poses a greater diagnostic challenge. As clinical evaluation and laboratory tests frequently fail to make the correct diagnosis, imaging examination is typically required. Imaging methods assume a vital role in the diagnosis, follow-up and management. Abdominal X-ray, ultrasonography, CT and MRI are used for the imaging purposes. Among the aforementioned methods, low-dose CT is state-of-the-art in these cases. It is of paramount importance that radiologists have a full knowledge of the imaging characteristics of these packages and accurately guide physicians and security officials.

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent/chemiluminescence assays, recombinant immunoblot assays and nucleic acid tests in the diagnosis of HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2013-08-01

    The diagnosis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is defined according to the results obtained from screening assays, and confirmation made by supplemental tests, in order to exclude the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results and, therefore, a misdiagnosis. Identifying the patient's true clinical status is of crucial importance to direct an accurate course of therapy, but, often, the definition of this status is only possible after conjunctions and analysis of the results obtained from each methodology applied, considering the limitations of each assay. In this manuscript, it is discussed briefly the possible results obtained from the three methods most commonly applied in routine laboratory and their contribution in the diagnosis of HCV infection.

  14. The role of radiology in diagnosis and management of drug mules: an update with new challenges and new diagnostic tools

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Emergency physicians and radiologists have been increasingly encountering internal concealment of illegal drugs. The packages commonly contain powdered solid drugs such as cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine and hashish, but they may also contain cocaine in the liquid form. The second type of package has recently been more commonly encountered, and poses a greater diagnostic challenge. As clinical evaluation and laboratory tests frequently fail to make the correct diagnosis, imaging examination is typically required. Imaging methods assume a vital role in the diagnosis, follow-up and management. Abdominal X-ray, ultrasonography, CT and MRI are used for the imaging purposes. Among the aforementioned methods, low-dose CT is state-of-the-art in these cases. It is of paramount importance that radiologists have a full knowledge of the imaging characteristics of these packages and accurately guide physicians and security officials. PMID:26867003

  15. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  16. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  17. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  18. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  19. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  20. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  1. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  2. Diagnosis and management of non-criteria obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arachchillage, Deepa R Jayakody; Machin, Samuel J; Mackie, Ian J; Cohen, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management. The international consensus (revised Sapporo) criteria for obstetric APS do not include low positive anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti β2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) antibodies (< 99th centile) and/or certain clinical criteria such as two unexplained miscarriages, three non-consecutive miscarriages, late pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, late premature birth, or two or more unexplained in vitro fertilisation failures. In this review we examine the available evidence to address the question of whether patients who exhibit non-criteria clinical and/or laboratory manifestations should be included within the spectrum of obstetric APS. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies of women with pregnancy morbidity, particularly recurrent pregnancy loss, suggest that elimination of aCL and/or IgM aβ2GPI, or low positive positive aCL or aβ2GPI from APS laboratory diagnostic criteria may result in missing the diagnosis in a sizeable number of women who could be regarded to have obstetric APS. Such prospective and retrospective studies also suggest that women with non-criteria obstetric APS may benefit from standard treatment for obstetric APS with low-molecular-weight heparin plus low-dose aspirin, with good pregnancy outcomes. Thus, non-criteria manifestations of obstetric APS may be clinically relevant, and merit investigation of therapeutic approaches. Women with obstetric APS appear to be at a higher risk than other women of pre-eclampsia, placenta-mediated complications and neonatal mortality, and also at increased long-term risk of thrombotic events. The applicability of these observations to outcomes in women with non-criteria obstetric APS remains to be determined.

  3. State of the art of diagnosis of rickettsial diseases: the use of blood specimens for diagnosis of scrub typhus, spotted fever group rickettsiosis, and murine typhus

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel H.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review With improved malaria control, acute undifferentiated febrile illness studies in tropical regions reveal a startling proportion of rickettsial illnesses, especially scrub typhus, murine typhus, and spotted fever group rickettsioses. Laboratory diagnosis of these infections evolved little over the past 40 years, but combinations of technologies like PCR and loop-mediated isothermal amplification, with refined rapid diagnostic tests and/or ELISA, are promising for guidance for early antirickettsial treatment. Recent findings The long-term reliance on serological tests – useful only late in rickettsial infections – has led to underdiagnosis, inappropriate therapies, and undocumented morbidity and mortality. Recent approaches integrate nucleic acid amplification and recombinant protein-based serological tests for diagnosing scrub typhus. Optimized using Bayesian latent class analyses, this strategy increases diagnostic confidence and enables early accurate diagnosis and treatment – a model to follow for lagging progress in murine typhus and spotted fever. Summary A laboratory diagnostic paradigm shift in rickettsial infections is evolving, with replacement of indirect immunofluorescence assay by the more objective ELISA coupled with nucleic acid amplification assays to expand the diagnostic window toward early infection intervals. This approach supports targeted antirickettsial therapy, reduces morbidity and mortality, and provides a robust evidence base for further development of diagnostics and vaccines. PMID:27429138

  4. A fast and accurate decoder for underwater acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, J M; Deng, Z D; Li, X; Fu, T; McMichael, G A; Trumbo, B A

    2014-07-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has been used to monitor the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through hydroelectric facilities in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Cabled hydrophone arrays deployed at dams receive coded transmissions sent from acoustic transmitters implanted in fish. The signals' time of arrival on different hydrophones is used to track fish in 3D. In this article, a new algorithm that decodes the received transmissions is described and the results are compared to results for the previous decoding algorithm. In a laboratory environment, the new decoder was able to decode signals with lower signal strength than the previous decoder, effectively increasing decoding efficiency and range. In field testing, the new algorithm decoded significantly more signals than the previous decoder and three-dimensional tracking experiments showed that the new decoder's time-of-arrival estimates were accurate. At multiple distances from hydrophones, the new algorithm tracked more points more accurately than the previous decoder. The new algorithm was also more than 10 times faster, which is critical for real-time applications on an embedded system.

  5. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  6. Highly Accurate Calculations of the Phase Diagram of Cold Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulenburger, Luke; Baczewski, Andrew

    The phase diagram of lithium is particularly complicated, exhibiting many different solid phases under the modest application of pressure. Experimental efforts to identify these phases using diamond anvil cells have been complemented by ab initio theory, primarily using density functional theory (DFT). Due to the multiplicity of crystal structures whose enthalpy is nearly degenerate and the uncertainty introduced by density functional approximations, we apply the highly accurate many-body diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method to the study of the solid phases at low temperature. These calculations span many different phases, including several with low symmetry, demonstrating the viability of DMC as a method for calculating phase diagrams for complex solids. Our results can be used as a benchmark to test the accuracy of various density functionals. This can strengthen confidence in DFT based predictions of more complex phenomena such as the anomalous melting behavior predicted for lithium at high pressures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Laboratory medicine in the new healthcare environment.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Simona; Braga, Federica; Panteghini, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The 21st century challenge is to redesign healthcare systems to be safe, efficient, effective, timely, equitable and patient-centred. Although laboratory medicine is integral to many of these objectives involving prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and managing disease of patients, it suffers from poor visibility as a medical discipline and as a profession and fewer rewards for educational efforts when compared to other medical disciplines. Laboratory scientists are often perceived as managing machinery and equipment, but conversely they need to take a position of shared clinical leadership, showing the role of laboratory tests to guarantee optimal care for patients. This is however challenging because of some reluctance by laboratory professionals to involve themselves in test structuring and requesting and in the inspection of work as it arrives because it is assumed that all requests are clinically necessary; there is a poor communication and integration between clinical wards and laboratory; and, importantly, there is the need for an excellent cultural and scientific background of laboratory professionals for implementing outcome research and to act as knowledge managers and skilled clinical consultants. By combining the unique talent of performing quality laboratory assays with knowledge of the pathophysiologic rationale behind the tests, laboratory professionals have the expertise to advise their clinical colleagues in regard to the appropriate test selection and interpretation of laboratory results, thereby creating opportunities to define the added value and the pivotal role of laboratory medicine on healthcare delivery.

  8. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... by testing with at least two different serologic tests. Related Links For more information about laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease, see the DPDx Web site: Chagas disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Diagnostic Procedures: Blood ...

  9. Down Syndrome and Dementia: Is Depression a Confounder for Accurate Diagnosis and Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, Stuart; Hussain, Rafat; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    The past century has seen a dramatic improvement in the life expectancy of people with Down syndrome. However, research has shown that individuals with Down syndrome now have an increased likelihood of early onset dementia. They are more likely than their mainstream peers to experience other significant co-morbidities including mental health…

  10. [Microbiological diagnosis of imported malaria].

    PubMed

    Torrús, Diego; Carranza, Cristina; Manuel Ramos, José; Carlos Rodríguez, Juan; Rubio, José Miguel; Subirats, Mercedes; Ta-Tang, Thuy-Huong

    2015-07-01

    Current diagnosis of malaria is based on the combined and sequential use of rapid antigen detection tests (RDT) of Plasmodium and subsequent visualization of the parasite stained with Giemsa solution in a thin and thick blood smears. If an expert microscopist is not available, should always be a sensitive RDT to rule out infection by Plasmodium falciparum, output the result immediately and prepare thick smears (air dried) and thin extensions (fixed with methanol) for subsequent staining and review by an expert microscopist. The RDT should be used as an initial screening test, but should not replace microscopy techniques, which should be done in parallel. The diagnosis of malaria should be performed immediately after clinical suspicion. The delay in laboratory diagnosis (greater than 3 hours) should not prevent the initiation of empirical antimalarial treatment if the probability of malaria is high. If the first microscopic examination and RDT are negative, they must be repeated daily in patients with high suspicion. If suspicion remains after three negative results must be sought the opinion of an tropical diseases expert. Genomic amplification methods (PCR) are useful as confirmation of microscopic diagnosis, to characterize mixed infections undetectable by other methods, and to diagnose asymptomatic infections with submicroscopic parasitaemia.

  11. The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Kearny, C.H.

    2001-11-20

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of {+-}25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The heart of this report is the step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM. NOTE: ''The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter'', was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory report in1979. Some of the materials originally suggested for suspending the leaves of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) are no longer available. Because of changes in the manufacturing process, other materials (e.g., sewing thread, unwaxed dental floss) may not have the insulating capability to work properly. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has not tested any of the suggestions provided in the preface of the report, but they have been used by other groups. When using these instructions, the builder can verify the

  12. Accurate Point-of-Care Detection of Ruptured Fetal Membranes: Improved Diagnostic Performance Characteristics with a Monoclonal/Polyclonal Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda C.; Scott, Laurie; Block, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of membranes (ROM) is imperative to allow for gestational age-specific interventions. This study compared the diagnostic performance characteristics between two methods used for the detection of ROM as measured in the same patient. METHODS Vaginal secretions were evaluated using the conventional fern test as well as a point-of-care monoclonal/polyclonal immunoassay test (ROM Plus®) in 75 pregnant patients who presented to labor and delivery with complaints of leaking amniotic fluid. Both tests were compared to analytical confirmation of ROM using three external laboratory tests. Diagnostic performance characteristics were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. RESULTS Diagnostic performance characteristics uniformly favored ROM detection using the immunoassay test compared to the fern test: sensitivity (100% vs. 77.8%), specificity (94.8% vs. 79.3%), PPV (75% vs. 36.8%), NPV (100% vs. 95.8%), and accuracy (95.5% vs. 79.1%). CONCLUSIONS The point-of-care immunoassay test provides improved diagnostic accuracy for the detection of ROM compared to fern testing. It has the potential of improving patient management decisions, thereby minimizing serious complications and perinatal morbidity. PMID:27199579

  13. Laboratory Diagnostics and Quality of Blood Collection

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Summary Diagnostic blood samples collected by phlebotomy are the most common type of biological specimens drawn and sent to laboratory medicine facilities for being analyzed, thus supporting caring physicians in patient diagnosis, follow-up and/or therapeutic monitoring. Phlebotomy, a relatively invasive medical procedure, is indeed critical for the downstream procedures accomplished either in the analytical phase made in the laboratory or in the interpretive process done by the physicians. Diagnosis, management, treatment of patients and ultimately patient safety itself can be compromised by poor phlebotomy quality. We have read with interest a recent article where the authors addressed important aspects of venous blood collection for laboratory medicine analysis. The authors conducted a phlebotomy survey based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) H03-A6 document (presently replaced by the GP41-A6 document) in three government hospitals in Ethiopia to evaluate 120 professionals (101 non-laboratory professionals vs. 19 laboratory professionals) as regards the venous blood collection practice. The aim of this mini (non-systematic) review is to both take a cue from the above article and from current practices we had already observed in other laboratory settings, and discuss four questionable activities performed by health care professionals during venous blood collection. We refer to: i) diet restriction assessment; ii) puncture site cleansing; iii) timing of tourniquet removal and; iv) mixing specimen with additives. PMID:28356839

  14. Inadequate Sensitivity of Laboratory Risk Indicator to Rule Out Necrotizing Fasciitis in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Burner, Elizabeth; Henderson, Sean O.; Burke, Guenevere; Nakashioya, Jeffrey; Hoffman, Jerome R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening illness, particularly when surgical debridement is delayed. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC) score was developed to identify patients at higher risk for NF. Despite limited information in this regard, the LRINEC score is often used to “rule out” NF if negative. We describe the sensitivity of the LRINEC score in emergency department (ED) patients for the diagnosis of NF. Methods We conducted a chart review of ED patients in whom coding of hospital discharge diagnoses included NF. We employed standard methods to minimize bias. We used laboratory data to calculate the LRINEC score, and confirmed the diagnosis of NF via explicit chart review. We then calculated the sensitivity of a positive LRINEC score (standardly defined as six or greater) in our cohort. We examined the role of patient characteristics in the performance of the LRINEC score. Finally, we performed sensitivity analyses to estimate whether missing data for c-reactive protein (CRP) results were likely to impact our results. Results Of 266 ED patients coded as having a discharge diagnosis of NF, we were able to confirm the diagnosis, by chart review, in 167. We were able to calculate a LRINEC score in only 80 patients (due to absence of an initial CRP value); an LRINEC score of 6 or greater had a sensitivity of 77%. Sensitivity analyses of missing data supported our finding of inadequate sensitivity to rule out NF. In sub-analysis, NF patients with concurrent diabetes were more likely to be accurately categorized by the LRINEC score. Conclusion Used in isolation, the LRINEC score is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out NF in a general ED population. PMID:27330667

  15. [Hyperprolactinemia: causes, diagnosis, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Karasek, Michał; Pawlikowski, Marek; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The basic data on hyperprolactinemia (i.e. an excess of PRL above a reference laboratory's upper limits), the most common endocrine disorder of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are given in this review. The following issues are discussed: regulation of prolactin (Prl) secretion, definition of hyperprolactinemia, its etiology and pathogenesis as well as its symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment (including medical and surgical therapy). It should be stressed that finding of elevated PRL serum concentrations constitute the beginning of diagnostic procedure and, after exclusion of physiologic, pharmacologic, and other organic causes of increased PRL levels, should be followed by detailed diagnosis including MRI. In patients in whom hyperprolactinemia has been confirmed the treatment with dopamine agonists (with prevalence of cabergoline, followed by quinagoline) is currently considered first-choice therapy. Surgery should be performed only in the patients resistant or intolerant to these agents, or in patients who refuse long-term therapy.

  16. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-28

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP).

  17. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Doern, Christopher D; Richardson, Susan E

    2016-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review.

  18. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review. PMID:27053673

  19. Testicular Vasculitis: A Sonographic and Pathologic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hague, Cameron; Bicknell, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Very little has been published about single-organ vasculitis of the testicle in the radiological literature. Consequently, it is a diagnosis that is unfamiliar to most radiologists. This case report describes the sonographic, pathologic, and laboratory findings of testicular vasculitis and reviews the available literature with regard to this subject. PMID:28246567

  20. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  1. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  2. Successive mycological nail tests for onychomycosis: a strategy to improve diagnosis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Tereza Elizabeth Fernandes; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2008-08-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of nails caused by dermatophytes, yeasts and moulds, accounting for about 50% of onychopathies. A high frequency of onychomycosis caused by Candida species has been reported during the last few years in northeast Brazil, as well as in other regions of the world. A clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis needs to be confirmed through laboratory exams. We evaluated the importance of serial repetition of direct microscopic exams and fungal culture for the diagnosis of onychomycosis in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, in northeast Brazil. We first made a retrospective study of 127 patients with onychomycosis, identifying the fungi that had been isolated from fingernails and toenails. We then made a prospective study of 120 patients, who were submitted to three successive mycological examinations. Ungual residues were scraped off and directly examined with a microscope and fungal cultures were made. In the retrospective study, in which only one sample was analyzed, the incidence of onychomycosis was 25.0%. In our prospective study, in which we had data from successive mycological examinations, 37.8% had onychomycosis. The most commonly isolated fungi in both studies were yeasts from the genera Candida, especially C albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis. We found a high proportion of onychomycosis caused by Candida species. We also concluded that serial repetition of direct microscopic examination and fungal culture, with intervals of 2-5 days improved the diagnosis of onychomycosis. We suggest that this laboratorial strategy is necessary for accurate diagnosis of this type of mycosis, especially when the standard procedures fail to diagnose fungal infection, despite strong clinical suspicion.

  3. [Education for medical students and post-graduates--Training of laboratory medicine at Nihon University Medical School and Surugadai Nihon University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tatsuyuki

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory medicine is defined as 'a field which analyzes the patients' clinical condition and contributes to the procedures such as diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and prognostic determination'. In other words, it involves not only in every process of medical treatment for patients, but also in the field of preventive medicine and occupational health. Therefore, it is unavoidable for every department to interpret the laboratory data. This necessarily requires all medical students to master laboratory test procedures, comprehend various impediments to the accurate laboratory data, and acquire the basics of the interpretation of laboratory data. During postgraduate training period, they must acquire enough skill of test procedures and determination methods such as Gram stain, and their interpretation of the test results should also be wide and directly connected to the treatment. Physicians who are trained in each particular department and aim to become a laboratory physician are in need of enough understanding of the specialized tests relate to each specialized area. Based on the fact that laboratory physicians involve in all of these educations, this symposium addresses the early training during pre- and post-graduation in Nihon University.

  4. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  5. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  6. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  7. Diagnosis and management of facial pigmented macules.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Simonetti, Vito; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pigmented macules on the mottled chronic sun-damaged skin of the face is challenging and includes lentigo maligna (LM), pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, solar lentigo, and lichen-planus-like keratosis. Although dermatoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of the unaided eye, the accurate diagnosis and management of pigmented facial macules remains one of the most challenging scenarios in daily practice. This is related to the fact that pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, lichen-planus-like keratosis, and LM may reveal overlapping criteria, making their differential diagnosis clinically difficult. For this reason, practical rules have been introduced, which should help to minimize the risk for inappropriate diagnosis and management of LM.

  8. Determinants of delayed diagnosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Breen, David P; Evans, Jonathan R; Farrell, Krista; Brayne, Carol; Barker, Roger A

    2013-08-01

    The early and accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the first step towards optimal patient management. The aim of this study was to investigate the major determinants of delayed diagnosis in PD. We recruited a population-representative cohort of 239 newly-diagnosed PD patients who underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Non-parametric methods were used to define the factors associated with diagnostic delay. The median time from motor symptom onset to primary care physician (PCP) presentation was considerably longer than the time from PCP presentation to PD diagnosis (11 vs. 1 months). Male sex and presenting motor phenotype were independently associated with delayed PCP presentation on Cox regression analysis. Patients presenting with gait disturbance experienced the longest delay, whilst those presenting with tremor had the shortest. In summary, male sex and presenting motor phenotype are key determinants of delayed diagnosis in PD.

  9. Digital diagnosis of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Kuismin, Raimo; Jormalainen, Raimo; Dastidar, Prasun; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    2001-08-01

    The popularity of digital imaging devices and PACS installations has increased during the last years. Still, images are analyzed and diagnosed using conventional techniques. Our research group begun to study the requirements for digital image diagnostic methods to be applied together with PACS systems. The research was focused on various image analysis procedures (e.g., segmentation, volumetry, 3D visualization, image fusion, anatomic atlas, etc.) that could be useful in medical diagnosis. We have developed Image Analysis software (www.medimag.net) to enable several image-processing applications in medical diagnosis, such as volumetry, multimodal visualization, and 3D visualizations. We have also developed a commercial scalable image archive system (ActaServer, supports DICOM) based on component technology (www.acta.fi), and several telemedicine applications. All the software and systems operate in NT environment and are in clinical use in several hospitals. The analysis software have been applied in clinical work and utilized in numerous patient cases (500 patients). This method has been used in the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up in various diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), respiratory system (RS) and human reproductive system (HRS). In many of these diseases e.g. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (CNS), nasal airways diseases (RS) and ovarian tumors (HRS), these methods have been used for the first time in clinical work. According to our results, digital diagnosis improves diagnostic capabilities, and together with PACS installations it will become standard tool during the next decade by enabling more accurate diagnosis and patient follow-up.

  10. Investigating Electromagnetic Induction through a Microcomputer-Based Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo; Gelbman, Moshe

    2000-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based laboratory experiment designed for high school students that very accurately analyzes Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, addressing each variable separately while the others are kept constant. (Author/CCM)

  11. Undergraduate Laboratory Data Acquisition With a Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Kenneth C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a flexible, multichannel, highly accurate, digital data acquisition system for use with a microcomputer. Includes a description of instrumentation for computer data acquisition, data acquisition systems, software, uses in the curriculum, library interaction and action, and use in a mechanical engineering laboratory. (DS)

  12. Laboratory spectroscopy in support of atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Thomas J.; Burris, John; Heaps, William S.; Butler, James

    1990-01-01

    Optical measurements of trace species in the atmosphere require precise, accurate spectroscopic data for the molecules under study. This laboratory exits to provide high quality spectroscopic data for the interpretation of data from existing satellite, balloon, ground, and aircraft instruments, as well as to provide sufficient data to assess the feasibility of new instruments.

  13. Amyloid goiter: preoperative scintigraphic diagnosis using Tc-99m pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Rubinow, A.; Pehrson, J.; Skinner, M.; Cohen, A.S.

    1984-04-01

    Amyloid goiter is a rare clinical entity. The diagnosis is rarely made preoperatively because clinical and laboratory findings are nonspecific. The authors report two cases of amyloid goiter in whom the diagnosis was made preoperatively using Tc-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy.

  14. [Theme: Using Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Jack; Braker, Clifton

    1982-01-01

    Pritchard discusses the opportunities for applied learning afforded by laboratories. Braker describes the evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. (SK)

  15. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  16. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  17. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  18. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  19. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  20. Immunoassays for diagnosis of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Kappel, A; Ehm, M

    2010-11-01

    Immunoassays play a pivotal role in the clinical laboratory. In the coagulation section of the laboratory, they are used as an aid for diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, thrombophilia screening, or detection of coagulation factor deficiencies, respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and latex agglutination immunoassay technologies are currently most widely used, while Luminescent Oxygen Channeling Immunoassay (LOCI®) and other chemiluminescence-based immunoassays are emerging technologies for the coagulation laboratory. However, not all immunoassay technologies employed are compatible with the workflow requirements of the coagulation laboratory, and, not all technologies are suitable for detection or quantification of every marker. This review focuses on technical and performance aspects of those immunoassay technologies that are most widely used in the coagulation laboratory, and provides a description of markers that are typically tested by immunoassays.

  1. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MSA: boundary issues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beom S; Jellinger, Kurt A

    2015-08-01

    Because the progression of multiple system atrophy (MSA) is usually rapid and there still is no effective cause-related therapy, early and accurate diagnosis is important for the proper management of patients as well as the development of neuroprotective agents. However, despite the progression in the field of MSA research in the past few years, the diagnosis of MSA in clinical practice still relies largely on clinical features and there are limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity, especially in the early course of the disease. Furthermore, recent pathological, clinical, and neuroimaging studies have shown that (1) MSA can present with a wider range of clinical and pathological features than previously thought, including features considered atypical for MSA; thus, MSA can be misdiagnosed as other diseases, and conversely, disorders with other etiologies and pathologies can be clinically misdiagnosed as MSA; and (2) several investigations may help to improve the diagnosis of MSA in clinical practice. These aspects should be taken into consideration when revising the current diagnostic criteria. This is especially true given that disease-modifying treatments for MSA are under investigation.

  2. [Mycological diagnosis of onychomycosis].

    PubMed

    Chabasse, D; Pihet, M

    2014-12-01

    Onychomycosis represents about 50% of ungueal pathology. Dermatophytes (especially Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale) are the main species involved in tinea pedis. Yeasts of the Candida (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis,...) genus are predominant on hands and very often associated with ungueal disease and perionyxis. Fungi other than the classic dermatophytes and yeasts can be rarely isolated from nail diseases. Among them, species belonging to Scopulariopsis, Aspergillus and Fusarium genus are mainly found, but their involvement in the disease must be proved. Other fungi, presenting a special affinity to keratin (pseudodermatophytes), such as Neoscytalidium dimidiatum (ex Scytalidium dimidiatum) from tropical and subtropical areas and Onychocola canadensis from Northern America and Europe, are considered as real pathogens in nail diseases. A multidisciplinary approach, including clinicians and biologists, is required to confirm the mycosis. This comparative review emphasizes the importance of histological examination, as well as molecular approaches, which are very contributive to the diagnosis of onychomycosis. The role of the laboratory is to identify at the species level the fungus isolated from nail scrapings and to show its involvement in the ungueal lesions.

  3. EMR Gage Would Measure Coal Thickness Accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. D.; Rollwitz, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory tests indicate electron magnetic resonance (EMR) would be effective in measuring thickness of coal overlying rock substrate. In prototype dual-frequency EMR system, Sample is irradiated by two radio frequencies. Signals are mixed, producing sum and difference output frequencies that are detected by receiver. Magnetic field is varied to scan resonant spot through sample. In system designed for field use, electromagnet is U-shaped, so that sample can be adjacent to, rather than inside the probe. Same coil is used for transmitting and receiving.

  4. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: are statistical reports accurate?

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

    2014-04-01

    Before discussing the epidemiology of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) and particularly urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), unification of the terminology is necessary. The term 'urogenital tuberculosis' is preferable to 'genitourinary tuberculosis', as renal and urinary tract tuberculosis is more common than genital tuberculosis. Some understand the term 'extrapulmonary tuberculosis' as a specific tuberculosis (TB) lesion of all organs excluding the bronchus, lungs, pleura and intrathoracic bronchopulmonary lymph nodes, but others consider pleural TB as one form of EPTB - and it is a reason for very different proportions in the spectrum of EPTB. Enigmatic tendencies have also been revealed in patients' distribution - in neighbouring regions the incidence rate may differ significantly. Although there is no clear explanation for these tendencies, careful study of the epidemiology of EPTB in different conditions will improve early diagnosis.

  5. Accurately Diagnosing and Treating Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Julie P.; Correll, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of comorbid bipolar and borderline personality disorders and some diagnostic criteria similar to both conditions present both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. This article delineates certain symptoms which, by careful history taking, may be attributed more closely to one of these two disorders. Making the correct primary diagnosis along with comorbid psychiatric conditions and choosing the appropriate type of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are critical steps to a patient's recovery. In this article, we will use a case example to illustrate some of the challenges the psychiatrist may face in diagnosing and treating borderline personality disorder. In addition, we will explore treatment strategies, including various types of therapy modalities and medication classes, which may prove effective in stabilizing or reducing a broad range of symptomotology associated with borderline personality disorder. PMID:20508805

  6. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patients). The correlation study was done between pre-operative diagnosis, MRI and arthroscopic diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis was as accurate as the MRI with 79% agreement between the preoperative diagnosis and arthroscopy compared to 77% agreement between MRI scan and arthroscopy. There was no evidence, in this study, that MRI scan can reduce the number of negative arthroscopies. Four normal MRI scans had positive arthroscopic diagnosis (two torn medial meniscus, one torn lateral meniscus and one chondromalacia patella). Out of 240 arthroscopies, there were only 10 normal knees (negative arthroscopy) representing 4% of the total number of knee arthroscopies; one patient of those 10 cases had MRI scan with ACL rupture diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12215031

  7. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    PubMed

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed.

  8. Point of care testing: diagnosis outside the virology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Christopher C; Booy, Robert; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2011-01-01

    Numerous point-of-care tests (POCTs) are available to diagnose viral infections in both hospital and community settings. The ideal POCT is rapid, sensitive, specific, and simple to perform. This chapter will describe the benefits of POCTs, factors that can influence the accuracy of POCTs and highlight some limitations of POCT strategies. The sensitivity, specificity, and turn-around time of available POCTs are included for common conditions including respiratory viral infections (e.g. influenza, RSV) and blood-borne viral infections (e.g. HIV).

  9. Laboratory Diagnosis of Sepsis? No SIRS, Not Just Yet

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximize the benefit of prompt antimicrobial therapy and avoid the risk associated with inappropriate use of antimicrobial agents, patients with suspected sepsis must be rapidly differentiated from patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). In combination with standard microbiological testing, a number of biomarkers have been recently evaluated for this purpose, and the performance characteristics of the most promising of these are reviewed. PMID:25631808

  10. Laboratory Diagnosis of Sepsis? No SIRS, Not Just Yet.

    PubMed

    Dunne, W Michael

    2015-08-01

    In order to maximize the benefit of prompt antimicrobial therapy and avoid the risk associated with inappropriate use of antimicrobial agents, patients with suspected sepsis must be rapidly differentiated from patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). In combination with standard microbiological testing, a number of biomarkers have been recently evaluated for this purpose, and the performance characteristics of the most promising of these are reviewed.

  11. Laboratory Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Deficiency Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Dis 158:1158, 1988 2. Albert J, Bredberg U, Chiodi F, et a: A new human retrovirus isolate of West African origin (SBL-6669) and its relationship to...J Epidemiol 4:426, 1988 27. Chiodi F, Albert J, Olausson E, et al: Isolation frequency of human immunodeficiency virus from cerebrospinal fluid and...blood of patients with varying severity of HIV infection. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 4:351, 1988 28. Chiodi F, Bredberg-Baden U, Biberfeld G, et al

  12. [Laboratory diagnosis of renal changes caused by occupational chemical factors].

    PubMed

    Hanke, J; Lutz, W

    1990-06-15

    The problem of early detection of the consequences of toxic action of chemical substances on the kidneys at the working place is becoming one of more important problems in the prophylaxis of renal diseases. The introduction of new sensitive diagnostic methods such as enzyme activity determination or low-molecular-weight proteins measurement in urine has made possible detection of renal damage in the reversible stage. As yet the observations demonstrate that workers exposed in their occupation to heavy metals (cadmium, lead, metalic mercury) and organic solvents should be subjected to special control for detection of renal changes.

  13. A study of optical scattering methods in laboratory plasma diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phipps, C. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Electron velocity distributions are deduced along axes parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field in a pulsed, linear Penning discharge in hydrogen by means of a laser Thomson scattering experiment. Results obtained are numerical averages of many individual measurements made at specific space-time points in the plasma evolution. Because of the high resolution in k-space and the relatively low maximum electron density 2 x 10 to the 13th power/cu cm, special techniques were required to obtain measurable scattering signals. These techniques are discussed and experimental results are presented.

  14. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  15. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  16. LSM: perceptually accurate line segment merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar

    2016-11-01

    Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually accurate line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.

  17. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  18. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  19. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  20. Obtaining accurate translations from expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James; Blaxter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of an increasing number of species are being investigated through the generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). However, ESTs are prone to sequencing errors and typically define incomplete transcripts, making downstream annotation difficult. Annotation would be greatly improved with robust polypeptide translations. Many current solutions for EST translation require a large number of full-length gene sequences for training purposes, a resource that is not available for the majority of EST projects. As part of our ongoing EST programs investigating these "neglected" genomes, we have developed a polypeptide prediction pipeline, prot4EST. It incorporates freely available software to produce final translations that are more accurate than those derived from any single method. We describe how this integrated approach goes a long way to overcoming the deficit in training data.