Science.gov

Sample records for accurate markerless motion

  1. Markerless motion tracking of awake animals in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kyme, Andre; Se, Stephen; Meikle, Steven; Angelis, Georgios; Ryder, Will; Popovic, Kata; Yatigammana, Dylan; Fulton, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging of awake, unrestrained small animals using motion-compensation removes the need for anesthetics and enables an animal's behavioral response to stimuli or administered drugs to be studied concurrently with imaging. While the feasibility of motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of awake rodents using marker-based optical motion tracking has been shown, markerless motion tracking would avoid the risk of marker detachment, streamline the experimental workflow, and potentially provide more accurate pose estimates over a greater range of motion. We have developed a stereoscopic tracking system which relies on native features on the head to estimate motion. Features are detected and matched across multiple camera views to accumulate a database of head landmarks and pose is estimated based on 3D-2D registration of the landmarks to features in each image. Pose estimates of a taxidermal rat head phantom undergoing realistic rat head motion via robot control had a root mean square error of 0.15 and 1.8 mm using markerless and marker-based motion tracking, respectively. Markerless motion tracking also led to an appreciable reduction in motion artifacts in motion-compensated positron emission tomography imaging of a live, unanesthetized rat. The results suggest that further improvements in live subjects are likely if nonrigid features are discriminated robustly and excluded from the pose estimation process.

  2. Applications of markerless motion capture in gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Sandau, Martin

    2016-03-01

    This thesis is based on four manuscripts where two of them were accepted and two were submitted to peer-reviewed journals. The experimental work behind the thesis was conducted at the Institute of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen. The purpose of the studies was to explore the variability of human gait and to conduct new methods for precise estimation of the kinematic parameters applied in forensic gait analysis. The gait studies were conducted in a custom built gait laboratory designed to obtain optimal conditions for markerless motion analysis. The set-up consisted of eight synchronised cameras located in the corners of the laboratory, which were connected to a single computer. The captured images were processed with stereovision-based algorithms to provide accurate 3D reconstructions of the participants. The 3D reconstructions of the participants were obtained during normal walking and the kinematics were extracted with manual and automatic methods. The kinematic results from the automatic approach were compared to marker-based motion capture to validate the precision. The results showed that the proposed markerless motion capture method had a precision comparable to marker-based methods in the frontal plane and the sagittal plane. Similar markerless motion capture methods could therefore provide the basis for reliable gait recognition based on kinematic parameters. The manual annotations were compared to the actual anthropometric measurements obtained from MRI scans and the intra- and inter-observer variability was also quantified to observe the associated effect on recognition. The results showed not only that the kinematics in the lower extremities were important but also that the kinematics in the shoulders had a high discriminatory power. Likewise, the shank length was also highly discriminatory, which has not been previously reported. However, it is important that the same expert performs all annotations, as the inter

  3. Real time markerless motion tracking using linked kinematic chains

    DOEpatents

    Luck, Jason P.; Small, Daniel E.

    2007-08-14

    A markerless method is described for tracking the motion of subjects in a three dimensional environment using a model based on linked kinematic chains. The invention is suitable for tracking robotic, animal or human subjects in real-time using a single computer with inexpensive video equipment, and does not require the use of markers or specialized clothing. A simple model of rigid linked segments is constructed of the subject and tracked using three dimensional volumetric data collected by a multiple camera video imaging system. A physics based method is then used to compute forces to align the model with subsequent volumetric data sets in real-time. The method is able to handle occlusion of segments and accommodates joint limits, velocity constraints, and collision constraints and provides for error recovery. The method further provides for elimination of singularities in Jacobian based calculations, which has been problematic in alternative methods.

  4. Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings.

    PubMed

    Fung, Sim Kwoh; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Kiang, Lam Chee; Nadarajah, Sivadev; Sahayadhas, Arun; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul; Palaniappan, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries.

  5. Implementation of a markerless motion analysis method to quantify hyperkinesis in males with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Khan, Hassan; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Wimmer, Markus A

    2014-02-01

    Hyperactive behavior - and implicitly, motion - in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) has been historically described using behavioral rating scales. While rating scales are the current standard outcome measures used in clinical research, they have limitations including their qualitative nature and subjectivity. The advent of new motion capture technologies has provided the opportunity to develop quantitative methods for measuring hyperactive motion. The hypotheses for this study were that a novel markerless motion analysis method (1) can quantitatively measure kinematic parameters, (2) can differentiate the level of hyperkinesis between control and FXS populations, and (3) will correlate with blind-reviewer synchronous video-capture methods and behavioral rating scale scores. Twenty young males (7-control, 13-FXS; ages 9-32) were studied using a standardized protocol in a markerless motion analysis suite. Behavioral scale questionnaires were filled out by parents and those scores were correlated with motion parameters (frequency and total traveled distance) of body segments during 30s of story listening while standing in the observation space. The markerless system was able to track subjects and the two populations displayed significantly different quantities of motion, with larger amounts of motion in the FXS group (p < 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients between frequency counts obtained from the markerless system and rater-based video capture were between 0.969 and 0.996 (p < 0.001). Significant correlations between rating scale scores and motion parameters ranged from 0.462 ≤ r ≤ 0.568 (p ≤ 0.040). These results suggest feasibility and validity of a markerless system as a non-invasive method able to quantify motion in individuals with hyperkinesis.

  6. Markerless motion capture can provide reliable 3D gait kinematics in the sagittal and frontal plane.

    PubMed

    Sandau, Martin; Koblauch, Henrik; Moeslund, Thomas B; Aanæs, Henrik; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2014-09-01

    Estimating 3D joint rotations in the lower extremities accurately and reliably remains unresolved in markerless motion capture, despite extensive studies in the past decades. The main problems have been ascribed to the limited accuracy of the 3D reconstructions. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to develop a new approach based on highly detailed 3D reconstructions in combination with a translational and rotational unconstrained articulated model. The highly detailed 3D reconstructions were synthesized from an eight camera setup using a stereo vision approach. The subject specific articulated model was generated with three rotational and three translational degrees of freedom for each limb segment and without any constraints to the range of motion. This approach was tested on 3D gait analysis and compared to a marker based method. The experiment included ten healthy subjects in whom hip, knee and ankle joint were analysed. Flexion/extension angles as well as hip abduction/adduction closely resembled those obtained from the marker based system. However, the internal/external rotations, knee abduction/adduction and ankle inversion/eversion were less reliable.

  7. Marker-less respiratory motion modeling using the Microsoft Kinect for Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahavori, F.; Alnowami, M.; Wells, K.

    2014-03-01

    Patient respiratory motion is a major problem during external beam radiotherapy of the thoracic and abdominal regions due to the associated organ and target motion. In addition, such motion introduces uncertainty in both radiotherapy planning and delivery and may potentially vary between the planning and delivery sessions. The aim of this work is to examine subject-specific external respiratory motion and its associated drift from an assumed average cycle which is the basis for many respiratory motion compensated applications including radiotherapy treatment planning and delivery. External respiratory motion data were acquired from a group of 20 volunteers using a marker-less 3D depth camera, Kinect for Windows. The anterior surface encompassing thoracic and abdominal regions were subject to principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate dominant variations. The first principal component typically describes more than 70% of the motion data variance in the thoracic and abdominal surfaces. Across all of the subjects used in this study, 58% of subjects demonstrate largely abdominal breathing and 33% exhibited largely thoracic dominated breathing. In most cases there is observable drift in respiratory motion during the 300s capture period, which is visually demonstrated using Kernel Density Estimation. This study demonstrates that for this cohort of apparently healthy volunteers, there is significant respiratory motion drift in most cases, in terms of amplitude and relative displacement between the thoracic and abdominal respiratory components. This has implications for the development of effective motion compensation methodology.

  8. Marker-less multi-frame motion tracking and compensation in PET-brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C.; Mukherjee, J. M.; Johnson, K.; Olivier, P.; Song, X.; Shao, L.; King, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    In PET brain imaging, patient motion can contribute significantly to the degradation of image quality potentially leading to diagnostic and therapeutic problems. To mitigate the image artifacts resulting from patient motion, motion must be detected and tracked then provided to a motion correction algorithm. Existing techniques to track patient motion fall into one of two categories: 1) image-derived approaches and 2) external motion tracking (EMT). Typical EMT requires patients to have markers in a known pattern on a rigid too attached to their head, which are then tracked by expensive and bulky motion tracking camera systems or stereo cameras. This has made marker-based EMT unattractive for routine clinical application. Our main contributions are the development of a marker-less motion tracking system that uses lowcost, small depth-sensing cameras which can be installed in the bore of the imaging system. Our motion tracking system does not require anything to be attached to the patient and can track the rigid transformation (6-degrees of freedom) of the patient's head at a rate 60 Hz. We show that our method can not only be used in with Multi-frame Acquisition (MAF) PET motion correction, but precise timing can be employed to determine only the necessary frames needed for correction. This can speeds up reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessary subdivision of frames.

  9. SU-E-J-26: A Novel Technique for Markerless Self-Sorted 4D-CBCT Using Patient Motion Modeling: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Harris, W; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automatic markerless 4D-CBCT projection sorting technique by using a patient respiratory motion model extracted from the planning 4D-CT images. Methods: Each phase of onboard 4D-CBCT is considered as a deformation of one phase of the prior planning 4D-CT. The deformation field map (DFM) is represented as a linear combination of three major deformation patterns extracted from the planning 4D-CT using principle component analysis (PCA). The coefficients of the PCA deformation patterns are solved by matching the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the deformed volume to the onboard projection acquired. The PCA coefficients are solved for each single projection, and are used for phase sorting. Projections at the peaks of the Z direction coefficient are sorted as phase 1 and other projections are assigned into 10 phase bins by dividing phases equally between peaks. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used to evaluate the proposed technique. Three scenarios were simulated, with different tumor motion amplitude (3cm to 2cm), tumor spatial shift (8mm SI), and tumor body motion phase shift (2 phases) from prior to on-board images. Projections were simulated over 180 degree scan-angle for the 4D-XCAT. The percentage of accurately binned projections across entire dataset was calculated to represent the phase sorting accuracy. Results: With a changed tumor motion amplitude from 3cm to 2cm, markerless phase sorting accuracy was 100%. With a tumor phase shift of 2 phases w.r.t. body motion, the phase sorting accuracy was 100%. With a tumor spatial shift of 8mm in SI direction, phase sorting accuracy was 86.1%. Conclusion: The XCAT phantom simulation results demonstrated that it is feasible to use prior knowledge and motion modeling technique to achieve markerless 4D-CBCT phase sorting. National Institutes of Health Grant No. R01-CA184173 Varian Medical System.

  10. Improving accuracy of markerless tracking of lung tumours in fluoroscopic video by incorporating diaphragm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, M.; Teske, H.; Stoll, M.; Bendl, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation of moving tumours is a challenging task in radiotherapy. Tumour motion induced by respiration can be visualized in fluoroscopic images recorded during patients breathing. Markerless methods making use of registration techniques can be used to estimate tumour motion. However, registration methods might fail when the tumour is hidden by ribs. Using motion of anatomical surrogates, like the diaphragm, is promising to model tumour motion. Methods: A sequence of 116 fluoroscopic images was analyzed and the tumour positions were manually defined by three experts. A block matching (BM) technique is used to calculate the displacement vector relatively to a selected reference image of the first breathing cycle. An enhanced method was developed: Positions, when the tumour is not located behind a rib, are taken as valid estimations of the tumour position. Furthermore, these valid estimations are used to establish a linear model of tumour position and diaphragm motion. For invalid estimations the calculated tumour positions are not taken into consideration, and instead the model is used to determine tumour motion. Results: Enhancing BM with a model of tumour motion from diaphragm motion improves the tracking accuracy when the tumour moves behind a rib. The error (mean ± SD) in longitudinal dimension was 2.0 ± 1.5mm using only BM and 1.0 ± 1.1mm when the enhanced approach was used. Conclusion: The enhanced tracking technique is capable to improve tracking accuracy compared to BM in the case that the tumour is occluded by ribs.

  11. SU-E-J-188: Theoretical Estimation of Margin Necessary for Markerless Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R; Block, A; Harkenrider, M; Roeske, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the margin necessary to adequately cover the target using markerless motion tracking (MMT) of lung lesions given the uncertainty in tracking and the size of the target. Methods: Simulations were developed in Matlab to determine the effect of tumor size and tracking uncertainty on the margin necessary to achieve adequate coverage of the target. For simplicity, the lung tumor was approximated by a circle on a 2D radiograph. The tumor was varied in size from a diameter of 0.1 − 30 mm in increments of 0.1 mm. From our previous studies using dual energy markerless motion tracking, we estimated tracking uncertainties in x and y to have a standard deviation of 2 mm. A Gaussian was used to simulate the deviation between the tracked location and true target location. For each size tumor, 100,000 deviations were randomly generated, the margin necessary to achieve at least 95% coverage 95% of the time was recorded. Additional simulations were run for varying uncertainties to demonstrate the effect of the tracking accuracy on the margin size. Results: The simulations showed an inverse relationship between tumor size and margin necessary to achieve 95% coverage 95% of the time using the MMT technique. The margin decreased exponentially with target size. An increase in tracking accuracy expectedly showed a decrease in margin size as well. Conclusion: In our clinic a 5 mm expansion of the internal target volume (ITV) is used to define the planning target volume (PTV). These simulations show that for tracking accuracies in x and y better than 2 mm, the margin required is less than 5 mm. This simple simulation can provide physicians with a guideline estimation for the margin necessary for use of MMT clinically based on the accuracy of their tracking and the size of the tumor.

  12. Motion based markerless gait analysis using standard events of gait and ensemble Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, Nalini; Mitra, Anish; Duric, Zoran; Gerber, Naomi Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to gait analysis using ensemble Kalman filtering which permits markerless determination of segmental movement. We use image flow analysis to reliably compute temporal and kinematic measures including the translational velocity of the torso and rotational velocities of the lower leg segments. Detecting the instances where velocity changes direction also determines the standard events of a gait cycle (double-support, toe-off, mid-swing and heel-strike). In order to determine the kinematics of lower limbs, we model the synergies between the lower limb motions (thigh-shank, shank-foot) by building a nonlinear dynamical system using CMUs 3D motion capture database. This information is fed into the ensemble Kalman Filter framework to estimate the unobserved limb (upper leg and foot) motion from the measured lower leg rotational velocity. Our approach does not require calibrated cameras or special markers to capture movement. We have tested our method on different gait sequences collected from the sagttal plane and presented the estimated kinematics overlaid on the original image frames. We have also validated our approach by manually labeling the videos and comparing our results against them.

  13. A Markerless 3D Computerized Motion Capture System Incorporating a Skeleton Model for Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Bretas, Rafael Vieira; Takamura, Yusaku; Hori, Etsuro; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a novel markerless motion capture system (MCS) for monkeys, in which 3D surface images of monkeys were reconstructed by integrating data from four depth cameras, and a skeleton model of the monkey was fitted onto 3D images of monkeys in each frame of the video. To validate the MCS, first, estimated 3D positions of body parts were compared between the 3D MCS-assisted estimation and manual estimation based on visual inspection when a monkey performed a shuttling behavior in which it had to avoid obstacles in various positions. The mean estimation error of the positions of body parts (3–14 cm) and of head rotation (35–43°) between the 3D MCS-assisted and manual estimation were comparable to the errors between two different experimenters performing manual estimation. Furthermore, the MCS could identify specific monkey actions, and there was no false positive nor false negative detection of actions compared with those in manual estimation. Second, to check the reproducibility of MCS-assisted estimation, the same analyses of the above experiments were repeated by a different user. The estimation errors of positions of most body parts between the two experimenters were significantly smaller in the MCS-assisted estimation than in the manual estimation. Third, effects of methamphetamine (MAP) administration on the spontaneous behaviors of four monkeys were analyzed using the MCS. MAP significantly increased head movements, tended to decrease locomotion speed, and had no significant effect on total path length. The results were comparable to previous human clinical data. Furthermore, estimated data following MAP injection (total path length, walking speed, and speed of head rotation) correlated significantly between the two experimenters in the MCS-assisted estimation (r = 0.863 to 0.999). The results suggest that the presented MCS in monkeys is useful in investigating neural mechanisms underlying various psychiatric disorders and developing

  14. Markerless motion capture and measurement of hand kinematics: validation and application to home-based upper limb rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Cheryl D; Robinson, Rebecca; Malpass, Adam J; Bogle, Tristan P; Dell, Thomas A; Harris, Chris; Demain, Sara H

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic movements of the hand, fingers, and thumb are difficult to measure due to the versatility and complexity of movement inherent in function. An innovative approach to measuring hand kinematics is proposed and validated. The proposed system utilizes the Microsoft Kinect and goes beyond gesture recognition to develop a validated measurement technique of finger kinematics. The proposed system adopted landmark definition (validated through ground truth estimation against assessors) and grip classification algorithms, including kinematic definitions (validated against a laboratory-based motion capture system). The results of the validation show 78% accuracy when identifying specific markerless landmarks. In addition, comparative data with a previously validated kinematic measurement technique show accuracy of MCP ± 10° (average absolute error (AAE) = 2.4°), PIP ± 12° (AAE = 4.8°), and DIP ± 11° (AAE = 4.8°). These results are notably better than clinically based alternative manual measurement techniques. The ability to measure hand movements, and therefore functional dexterity, without interfering with underlying composite movements, is the paramount objective to any bespoke measurement system. The proposed system is the first validated markerless measurement system using the Microsoft Kinect that is capable of measuring finger joint kinematics. It is suitable for home-based motion capture for the hand and, therefore, achieves this objective.

  15. Markerless rat head motion tracking using structured light for brain PET imaging of unrestrained awake small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in small animals is generally performed under anesthesia to immobilize the animal during scanning. More recently, for rat brain PET studies, methods to perform scans of unrestrained awake rats are being developed in order to avoid the unwanted effects of anesthesia on the brain response. Here, we investigate the use of a projected structure stereo camera to track the motion of the rat head during the PET scan. The motion information is then used to correct the PET data. The stereo camera calculates a 3D point cloud representation of the scene and the tracking is performed by point cloud matching using the iterative closest point algorithm. The main advantage of the proposed motion tracking is that no intervention, e.g. for marker attachment, is needed. A manually moved microDerenzo phantom experiment and 3 awake rat [18F]FDG experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed tracking method. The tracking accuracy was 0.33 mm rms. After motion correction image reconstruction, the microDerenzo phantom was recovered albeit with some loss of resolution. The reconstructed FWHM of the 2.5 and 3 mm rods increased with 0.94 and 0.51 mm respectively in comparison with the motion-free case. In the rat experiments, the average tracking success rate was 64.7%. The correlation of relative brain regional [18F]FDG uptake between the anesthesia and awake scan reconstructions was increased from on average 0.291 (not significant) before correction to 0.909 (p  <  0.0001) after motion correction. Markerless motion tracking using structured light can be successfully used for tracking of the rat head for motion correction in awake rat PET scans.

  16. Combining marker-less patient setup and respiratory motion monitoring using low cost 3D camera technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahavori, F.; Adams, E.; Dabbs, M.; Aldridge, L.; Liversidge, N.; Donovan, E.; Jordan, T.; Evans, PM.; Wells, K.

    2015-03-01

    Patient set-up misalignment/motion can be a significant source of error within external beam radiotherapy, leading to unwanted dose to healthy tissues and sub-optimal dose to the target tissue. Such inadvertent displacement or motion of the target volume may be caused by treatment set-up error, respiratory motion or an involuntary movement potentially decreasing therapeutic benefit. The conventional approach to managing abdominal-thoracic patient set-up is via skin markers (tattoos) and laser-based alignment. Alignment of the internal target volume with its position in the treatment plan can be achieved using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) in conjunction with marker-based respiratory motion monitoring. We propose a marker-less single system solution for patient set-up and respiratory motion management based on low cost 3D depth camera technology (such as the Microsoft Kinect). In this new work we assess this approach in a study group of six volunteer subjects. Separate simulated treatment mimic treatment "fractions" or set-ups are compared for each subject, undertaken using conventional laser-based alignment and with intrinsic depth images produced by Kinect. Microsoft Kinect is also compared with the well-known RPM system for respiratory motion management in terms of monitoring free-breathing and DIBH. Preliminary results suggest that Kinect is able to produce mm-level surface alignment and a comparable DIBH respiratory motion management when compared to the popular RPM system. Such an approach may also yield significant benefits in terms of patient throughput as marker alignment and respiratory motion can be automated in a single system.

  17. Marker-less reconstruction of dense 4-D surface motion fields using active laser triangulation for respiratory motion management.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian; Berkels, Benjamin; Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Hornegger, Joachim; Rumpf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To manage respiratory motion in image-guided interventions a novel sparse-to-dense registration approach is presented. We apply an emerging laser-based active triangulation (AT) sensor that delivers sparse but highly accurate 3-D measurements in real-time. These sparse position measurements are registered with a dense reference surface extracted from planning data. Thereby a dense displacement field is reconstructed which describes the 4-D deformation of the complete patient body surface and recovers a multi-dimensional respiratory signal for application in respiratory motion management. The method is validated on real data from an AT prototype and synthetic data sampled from dense surface scans acquired with a structured light scanner. In a study on 16 subjects, the proposed algorithm achieved a mean reconstruction accuracy of +/- 0.22 mm w.r.t. ground truth data.

  18. Joint surface reconstruction and 4D deformation estimation from sparse data and prior knowledge for marker-less Respiratory motion tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Berkels, Benjamin; Rumpf, Martin; Bauer, Sebastian; Ettl, Svenja; Arold, Oliver; Hornegger, Joachim

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The intraprocedural tracking of respiratory motion has the potential to substantially improve image-guided diagnosis and interventions. The authors have developed a sparse-to-dense registration approach that is capable of recovering the patient's external 3D body surface and estimating a 4D (3D + time) surface motion field from sparse sampling data and patient-specific prior shape knowledge.Methods: The system utilizes an emerging marker-less and laser-based active triangulation (AT) sensor that delivers sparse but highly accurate 3D measurements in real-time. These sparse position measurements are registered with a dense reference surface extracted from planning data. Thereby a dense displacement field is recovered, which describes the spatio-temporal 4D deformation of the complete patient body surface, depending on the type and state of respiration. It yields both a reconstruction of the instantaneous patient shape and a high-dimensional respiratory surrogate for respiratory motion tracking. The method is validated on a 4D CT respiration phantom and evaluated on both real data from an AT prototype and synthetic data sampled from dense surface scans acquired with a structured-light scanner.Results: In the experiments, the authors estimated surface motion fields with the proposed algorithm on 256 datasets from 16 subjects and in different respiration states, achieving a mean surface reconstruction accuracy of ±0.23 mm with respect to ground truth data—down from a mean initial surface mismatch of 5.66 mm. The 95th percentile of the local residual mesh-to-mesh distance after registration did not exceed 1.17 mm for any subject. On average, the total runtime of our proof of concept CPU implementation is 2.3 s per frame, outperforming related work substantially.Conclusions: In external beam radiation therapy, the approach holds potential for patient monitoring during treatment using the reconstructed surface, and for motion-compensated dose delivery using

  19. SU-D-207-01: Markerless Respiratory Motion Tracking with Contrast Enhanced Thoracic Cone Beam CT Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Rosenzweig, K; Lo, Y; Brousmiche, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel technique to enhance the image contrast of clinical cone beam CT projections and extract respiratory signals based on anatomical motion using the modified Amsterdam Shroud (AS) method to benefit image guided radiation therapy. Methods: Thoracic cone beam CT projections acquired prior to treatment were preprocessed to increase their contrast for better respiratory signal extraction. Air intensity on raw images was firstly estimated and then applied to correct the projections to generate new attenuation images that were subsequently improved with deeper anatomy feature enhancement through taking logarithm operation, derivative along superior-inferior direction, respectively. All pixels on individual post-processed two dimensional images were horizontally summed to one column and all projections were combined side by side to create an AS image from which patient’s respiratory signal was extracted. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal rendering was also investigated. Ten projection image sets from five lung cancer patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on 21iX Clinac (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Results: Application of the air correction on raw projections showed that more than an order of magnitude of contrast enhancement was achievable. The typical contrast on the raw projections is around 0.02 while that on attenuation images could greater than 0.5. Clear and stable breathing signal can be reliably extracted from the new images while the uncorrected projection sets failed to yield clear signals most of the time. Conclusion: Anatomy feature plays a key role in yielding breathing signal from the projection images using the AS technique. The air correction process facilitated the contrast enhancement significantly and attenuation images thus obtained provides a practical solution to obtaining markerless breathing motion tracking.

  20. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  1. WE-G-BRF-05: Feasibility of Markerless Motion Tracking Using Dual Energy Cone Beam Computed Tomography (DE-CBCT) Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Panfil, J; Patel, R; Surucu, M; Roeske, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare markerless template-based tracking of lung tumors using dual energy (DE) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections versus single energy (SE) CBCT projections. Methods: A RANDO chest phantom with a simulated tumor in the upper right lung was used to investigate the effectiveness of tumor tracking using DE and SE CBCT projections. Planar kV projections from CBCT acquisitions were captured at 60 kVp (4 mAs) and 120 kVp (1 mAs) using the Varian TrueBeam and non-commercial iTools Capture software. Projections were taken at approximately every 0.53° while the gantry rotated. Due to limitations of the phantom, angles for which the shoulders blocked the tumor were excluded from tracking analysis. DE images were constructed using a weighted logarithmic subtraction that removed bony anatomy while preserving soft tissue structures. The tumors were tracked separately on DE and SE (120 kVp) images using a template-based tracking algorithm. The tracking results were compared to ground truth coordinates designated by a physician. Matches with a distance of greater than 3 mm from ground truth were designated as failing to track. Results: 363 frames were analyzed. The algorithm successfully tracked the tumor on 89.8% (326/363) of DE frames compared to 54.3% (197/363) of SE frames (p<0.0001). Average distance between tracking and ground truth coordinates was 1.27 +/− 0.67 mm for DE versus 1.83+/−0.74 mm for SE (p<0.0001). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the effectiveness of markerless template-based tracking using DE CBCT. DE imaging resulted in better detectability with more accurate localization on average versus SE. Supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of 3D Mouse Behaviors and Motor Function in the Open-Field after Spinal Cord Injury Using Markerless Motion Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Alison L.; Lai, Po-Lun; Fisher, Lesley C.; Basso, D. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of scientists strive to identify cellular mechanisms that could lead to breakthroughs in developing ameliorative treatments for debilitating neural and muscular conditions such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most studies use rodent models to test hypotheses, and these are all limited by the methods available to evaluate animal motor function. This study’s goal was to develop a behavioral and locomotor assessment system in a murine model of SCI that enables quantitative kinematic measurements to be made automatically in the open-field by applying markerless motion tracking approaches. Three-dimensional movements of eight naïve, five mild, five moderate, and four severe SCI mice were recorded using 10 cameras (100 Hz). Background subtraction was used in each video frame to identify the animal’s silhouette, and the 3D shape at each time was reconstructed using shape-from-silhouette. The reconstructed volume was divided into front and back halves using k-means clustering. The animal’s front Center of Volume (CoV) height and whole-body CoV speed were calculated and used to automatically classify animal behaviors including directed locomotion, exploratory locomotion, meandering, standing, and rearing. More detailed analyses of CoV height, speed, and lateral deviation during directed locomotion revealed behavioral differences and functional impairments in animals with mild, moderate, and severe SCI when compared with naïve animals. Naïve animals displayed the widest variety of behaviors including rearing and crossing the center of the open-field, the fastest speeds, and tallest rear CoV heights. SCI reduced the range of behaviors, and decreased speed (r = .70 p<.005) and rear CoV height (r = .65 p<.01) were significantly correlated with greater lesion size. This markerless tracking approach is a first step toward fundamentally changing how rodent movement studies are conducted. By providing scientists with sensitive, quantitative measurement

  3. Fast Markerless Tracking for Augmented Reality in Planar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Afif, Fadhil Noer; Almazyad, Abdulaziz S.; AbuJabal, Hamza Ali S.; Rehman, Amjad; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim

    2015-12-01

    Markerless tracking for augmented reality should not only be accurate but also fast enough to provide a seamless synchronization between real and virtual beings. Current reported methods showed that a vision-based tracking is accurate but requires high computational power. This paper proposes a real-time hybrid-based method for tracking unknown environments in markerless augmented reality. The proposed method provides collaboration of vision-based approach with accelerometers and gyroscopes sensors as camera pose predictor. To align the augmentation relative to camera motion, the tracking method is done by substituting feature-based camera estimation with combination of inertial sensors with complementary filter to provide more dynamic response. The proposed method managed to track unknown environment with faster processing time compared to available feature-based approaches. Moreover, the proposed method can sustain its estimation in a situation where feature-based tracking loses its track. The collaboration of sensor tracking managed to perform the task for about 22.97 FPS, up to five times faster than feature-based tracking method used as comparison. Therefore, the proposed method can be used to track unknown environments without depending on amount of features on scene, while requiring lower computational cost.

  4. Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Alfredo; Pennestrì, Ettore; Valentini, Pier Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the comparison between a high-end marker-based acquisition system and a low-cost marker-less methodology for the assessment of the human posture during working tasks. The low-cost methodology is based on the use of a single Microsoft Kinect V1 device. The high-end acquisition system is the BTS SMART that requires the use of reflective markers to be placed on the subject's body. Three practical working activities involving object lifting and displacement have been investigated. The operational risk has been evaluated according to the lifting equation proposed by the American National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The results of the study show that the risk multipliers computed from the two acquisition methodologies are very close for all the analysed activities. In agreement to this outcome, the marker-less methodology based on the Microsoft Kinect V1 device seems very promising to promote the dissemination of computer-aided assessment of ergonomics while maintaining good accuracy and affordable costs. PRACTITIONER’S SUMMARY: The study is motivated by the increasing interest for on-site working ergonomics assessment. We compared a low-cost marker-less methodology with a high-end marker-based system. We tested them on three different working tasks, assessing the working risk of lifting loads. The two methodologies showed comparable precision in all the investigations.

  5. Letter regarding 'Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics' by Patrizi et al. and research reproducibility.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    The reporting of research in a manner that allows reproduction in subsequent investigations is important for scientific progress. Several details of the recent study by Patrizi et al., 'Comparison between low-cost marker-less and high-end marker-based motion capture systems for the computer-aided assessment of working ergonomics', are absent from the published manuscript and make reproduction of findings impossible. As new and complex technologies with great promise for ergonomics develop, new but surmountable challenges for reporting investigations using these technologies in a reproducible manner arise. Practitioner Summary: As with traditional methods, scientific reporting of new and complex ergonomics technologies should be performed in a manner that allows reproduction in subsequent investigations and supports scientific advancement.

  6. Accurate free and forced rotational motions of rigid Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottereau, L.; Souchay, J.; Aljbaae, S.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The precise and accurate modelling of a terrestrial planet like Venus is an exciting and challenging topic, all the more interesting because it can be compared with that of Earth for which such a modelling has already been achieved at the milli-arcsecond level. Aims: We aim to complete a previous study, by determining the polhody at the milli-arcsecond level, i.e. the torque-free motion of the angular momentum axis of a rigid Venus in a body-fixed frame, as well as the nutation of its third axis of figure in space, which is fundamental from an observational point of view. Methods: We use the same theoretical framework as Kinoshita (1977, Celest. Mech., 15, 277) did to determine the precession-nutation motion of a rigid Earth. It is based on a representation of the rotation of a rigid Venus, with the help of Andoyer variables and a set of canonical equations in Hamiltonian formalism. Results: In a first part we computed the polhody, we showed that this motion is highly elliptical, with a very long period of 525 cy compared with 430 d for the Earth. This is due to the very small dynamical flattening of Venus in comparison with our planet. In a second part we precisely computed the Oppolzer terms, which allow us to represent the motion in space of the third Venus figure axis with respect to the Venus angular momentum axis under the influence of the solar gravitational torque. We determined the corresponding tables of the nutation coefficients of the third figure axis both in longitude and in obliquity due to the Sun, which are of the same order of amplitude as for the Earth. We showed that the nutation coefficients for the third figure axis are significantly different from those of the angular momentum axis on the contrary of the Earth. Our analytical results have been validated by a numerical integration, which revealed the indirect planetary effects.

  7. A Bayesian approach for three-dimensional markerless tumor tracking using kV imaging during lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Caillet, Vincent; Dunbar, Michelle; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Feain, Ilana

    2017-04-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers can potentially enable broad access to more accurate and precise lung radiotherapy. A major challenge is that kilovoltage (kV) imaging based methods are rarely able to continuously track the tumor due to the inferior tumor visibility on 2D kV images. Another challenge is the estimation of 3D tumor position based on only 2D imaging information. The aim of this work is to address both challenges by proposing a Bayesian approach for markerless tumor tracking for the first time. The proposed approach adopts the framework of the extended Kalman filter, which combines a prediction and measurement steps to make the optimal tumor position update. For each imaging frame, the tumor position is first predicted by a respiratory-correlated model. The 2D tumor position on the kV image is then measured by template matching. Finally, the prediction and 2D measurement are combined based on the 3D distribution of tumor positions in the past 10 s and the estimated uncertainty of template matching. To investigate the clinical feasibility of the proposed method, a total of 13 lung cancer patient datasets were used for retrospective validation, including 11 cone-beam CT scan pairs and two stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy cases. The ground truths for tumor motion were generated from the the 3D trajectories of implanted markers or beacons. The mean, standard deviation, and 95th percentile of the 3D tracking error were found to range from 1.6–2.9 mm, 0.6–1.5 mm, and 2.6–5.8 mm, respectively. Markerless tumor tracking always resulted in smaller errors compared to the standard of care. The improvement was the most pronounced in the superior–inferior (SI) direction, with up to 9.5 mm reduction in the 95th-percentile SI error for patients with  >10 mm 5th-to-95th percentile SI tumor motion. The percentage of errors with 3D magnitude  <5 mm was 96.5% for markerless tumor tracking and 84.1% for the

  8. NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited

  9. Accurate Event-Driven Motion Compensation in High-Resolution PET Incorporating Scattered and Random Events

    PubMed Central

    Dinelle, Katie; Cheng, Ju-Chieh; Shilov, Mikhail A.; Segars, William P.; Lidstone, Sarah C.; Blinder, Stephan; Rousset, Olivier G.; Vajihollahi, Hamid; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Wong, Dean F.; Sossi, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    With continuing improvements in spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, small patient movements during PET imaging become a significant source of resolution degradation. This work develops and investigates a comprehensive formalism for accurate motion-compensated reconstruction which at the same time is very feasible in the context of high-resolution PET. In particular, this paper proposes an effective method to incorporate presence of scattered and random coincidences in the context of motion (which is similarly applicable to various other motion correction schemes). The overall reconstruction framework takes into consideration missing projection data which are not detected due to motion, and additionally, incorporates information from all detected events, including those which fall outside the field-of-view following motion correction. The proposed approach has been extensively validated using phantom experiments as well as realistic simulations of a new mathematical brain phantom developed in this work, and the results for a dynamic patient study are also presented. PMID:18672420

  10. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  11. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  12. Categorizing identity from facial motion.

    PubMed

    Girges, Christine; Spencer, Janine; O'Brien, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Advances in marker-less motion capture technology now allow the accurate replication of facial motion and deformation in computer-generated imagery (CGI). A forced-choice discrimination paradigm using such CGI facial animations showed that human observers can categorize identity solely from facial motion cues. Animations were generated from motion captures acquired during natural speech, thus eliciting both rigid (head rotations and translations) and nonrigid (expressional changes) motion. To limit interferences from individual differences in facial form, all animations shared the same appearance. Observers were required to discriminate between different videos of facial motion and between the facial motions of different people. Performance was compared to the control condition of orientation-inverted facial motion. The results show that observers are able to make accurate discriminations of identity in the absence of all cues except facial motion. A clear inversion effect in both tasks provided consistency with previous studies, supporting the configural view of human face perception. The accuracy of this motion capture technology thus allowed stimuli to be generated that closely resembled real moving faces. Future studies may wish to implement such methodology when studying human face perception.

  13. Markerless monocular tracking system for guided external eye surgery.

    PubMed

    Monserrat, C; Rupérez, M J; Alcañiz, M; Mataix, J

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel markerless monocular tracking system aimed at guiding ophthalmologists during external eye surgery. This new tracking system performs a very accurate tracking of the eye by detecting invariant points using only textures that are present in the sclera, i.e., without using traditional features like the pupil and/or cornea reflections, which remain partially or totally occluded in most surgeries. Two known algorithms that compute invariant points and correspondences between pairs of images were implemented in our system: Scalable Invariant Feature Transforms (SIFT) and Speed Up Robust Features (SURF). The results of experiments performed on phantom eyes show that, with either algorithm, the developed system tracks a sphere at a 360° rotation angle with an error that is lower than 0.5%. Some experiments have also been carried out on images of real eyes showing promising behavior of the system in the presence of blood or surgical instruments during real eye surgery.

  14. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  15. Highly accurate analytic formulae for projectile motion subjected to quadratic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    The classical phenomenon of motion of a projectile fired (thrown) into the horizon through resistive air charging a quadratic drag onto the object is revisited in this paper. No exact solution is known that describes the full physical event under such an exerted resistance force. Finding elegant analytical approximations for the most interesting engineering features of dynamical behavior of the projectile is the principal target. Within this purpose, some analytical explicit expressions are derived that accurately predict the maximum height, its arrival time as well as the flight range of the projectile at the highest ascent. The most significant property of the proposed formulas is that they are not restricted to the initial speed and firing angle of the object, nor to the drag coefficient of the medium. In combination with the available approximations in the literature, it is possible to gain information about the flight and complete the picture of a trajectory with high precision, without having to numerically simulate the full governing equations of motion.

  16. Can a Rescuer or Simulated Patient Accurately Assess Motion During Cervical Spine Stabilization Practice Sessions?

    PubMed Central

    Shrier, Ian; Boissy, Patrick; Brière, Simon; Mellette, Jay; Fecteau, Luc; Matheson, Gordon O.; Garza, Daniel; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Segal, Eli; Boulay, John; Steele, Russell J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Health care providers must be prepared to manage all potential spine injuries as if they are unstable. Therefore, most sport teams devote resources to training for sideline cervical spine (C-spine) emergencies. Objective: To determine (1) how accurately rescuers and simulated patients can assess motion during C-spine stabilization practice and (2) whether providing performance feedback to rescuers influences their choice of stabilization technique. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Training studio. Patients or Other Participants: Athletic trainers, athletic therapists, and physiotherapists experienced at managing suspected C-spine injuries. Intervention(s): Twelve lead rescuers (at the patient's head) performed both the head-squeeze and trap-squeeze C-spine stabilization maneuvers during 4 test scenarios: lift-and-slide and log-roll placement on a spine board and confused patient trying to sit up or rotate the head. Main Outcome Measure(s): Interrater reliability between rescuer and simulated patient quality scores for subjective evaluation of C-spine stabilization during trials (0 = best, 10 = worst), correlation between rescuers' quality scores and objective measures of motion with inertial measurement units, and frequency of change in preference for the head-squeeze versus trap-squeeze maneuver. Results: Although the weighted κ value for interrater reliability was acceptable (0.71–0.74), scores varied by 2 points or more between rescuers and simulated patients for approximately 10% to 15% of trials. Rescuers' scores correlated with objective measures, but variability was large: 38% of trials scored as 0 or 1 by the rescuer involved more than 10° of motion in at least 1 direction. Feedback did not affect the preference for the lift-and-slide placement. For the log-roll placement, 6 of 8 participants who preferred the head squeeze at baseline preferred the trap squeeze after feedback. For the confused patient, 5 of 5 participants initially preferred

  17. 3-D geometry calibration and markerless electromagnetic tracking with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Barrett, Johnny; Wang, Zhonghua; Litvin, Andrew; Hamadeh, Ali; Beaudet, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The design of mobile X-ray C-arm equipment with image tomography and surgical guidance capabilities involves the retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning in three-dimensional space. Geometry misrepresentations can cause degradation of the reconstruction results with the appearance of blurred edges, image artifacts, and even false structures. It may also amplify surgical instrument tracking errors leading to improper implant placement. In our prior publications we have proposed a C-arm 3D positioner calibration method comprising separate intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration steps. Following this approach, in the present paper, we extend the intrinsic geometry calibration of C-gantry beyond angular positions in the orbital plane into angular positions on a unit sphere of isocentric rotation. Our method makes deployment of markerless interventional tool guidance with use of high-resolution fluoro images and electromagnetic tracking feasible at any angular position of the tube-detector assembly. Variations of the intrinsic parameters associated with C-arm motion are measured off-line as functions of orbital and lateral angles. The proposed calibration procedure provides better accuracy, and prevents unnecessary workflow steps for surgical navigation applications. With a slight modification, the Misalignment phantom, a tool for intrinsic geometry calibration, is also utilized to obtain an accurate 'image-to-sensor' mapping. We show simulation results, image quality and navigation accuracy estimates, and feasibility data acquired with the prototype system. The experimental results show the potential of high-resolution CT imaging (voxel size below 0.5 mm) and confident navigation in an interventional surgery setting with a mobile C-arm.

  18. Accurate upper body rehabilitation system using kinect.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjana; Bhowmick, Brojeshwar; Chakravarty, Kingshuk; Sinha, Aniruddha; Das, Abhijit

    2016-08-01

    The growing importance of Kinect as a tool for clinical assessment and rehabilitation is due to its portability, low cost and markerless system for human motion capture. However, the accuracy of Kinect in measuring three-dimensional body joint center locations often fails to meet clinical standards of accuracy when compared to marker-based motion capture systems such as Vicon. The length of the body segment connecting any two joints, measured as the distance between three-dimensional Kinect skeleton joint coordinates, has been observed to vary with time. The orientation of the line connecting adjoining Kinect skeletal coordinates has also been seen to differ from the actual orientation of the physical body segment. Hence we have proposed an optimization method that utilizes Kinect Depth and RGB information to search for the joint center location that satisfies constraints on body segment length and as well as orientation. An experimental study have been carried out on ten healthy participants performing upper body range of motion exercises. The results report 72% reduction in body segment length variance and 2° improvement in Range of Motion (ROM) angle hence enabling to more accurate measurements for upper limb exercises.

  19. Feasibility Study for Markerless Tracking of Lung Tumors in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a method for markerless tracking of lung tumors in electronic portal imaging device (EPID) movies and to analyze intra- and interfractional variations in tumor motion. Methods and Materials: EPID movies were acquired during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) given to 40 patients with 49 pulmonary targets and retrospectively analyzed. Tumor visibility and tracking accuracy were determined by three observers. Tumor motion of 30 targets was analyzed in detail via four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and EPID in the superior-inferior direction for intra- and interfractional variations. Results: Tumor visibility was sufficient for markerless tracking in 47% of the EPID movies. Tumor size and visibility in the DRR were correlated with visibility in the EPID images. The difference between automatic and manual tracking was a maximum of 2 mm for 98.3% in the x direction and 89.4% in the y direction. Motion amplitudes in 4DCT images (range, 0.7-17.9 mm; median, 4.9 mm) were closely correlated with amplitudes in the EPID movies. Intrafractional and interfractional variability of tumor motion amplitude were of similar magnitude: 1 mm on average to a maximum of 4 mm. A change in moving average of more than {+-}1 mm, {+-}2 mm, and {+-}4 mm were observed in 47.1%, 17.1%, and 4.5% of treatment time for all trajectories, respectively. Mean tumor velocity was 3.4 mm/sec, to a maximum 61 mm/sec. Conclusions: Tracking of pulmonary tumors in EPID images without implanted markers was feasible in 47% of all treatment beams. 4DCT is representative of the evaluation of mean breathing motion on average, but larger deviations occurred in target motion between treatment planning and delivery effort a monitoring during delivery.

  20. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W; Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Klash, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  1. Accurate respiration measurement using DC-coupled continuous-wave radar sensor for motion-adaptive cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Ruijiang; Zhang, Hualiang; Fung, Albert Y C; Torres, Carlos; Jiang, Steve B; Li, Changzhi

    2012-11-01

    Accurate respiration measurement is crucial in motion-adaptive cancer radiotherapy. Conventional methods for respiration measurement are undesirable because they are either invasive to the patient or do not have sufficient accuracy. In addition, measurement of external respiration signal based on conventional approaches requires close patient contact to the physical device which often causes patient discomfort and undesirable motion during radiation dose delivery. In this paper, a dc-coupled continuous-wave radar sensor was presented to provide a noncontact and noninvasive approach for respiration measurement. The radar sensor was designed with dc-coupled adaptive tuning architectures that include RF coarse-tuning and baseband fine-tuning, which allows the radar sensor to precisely measure movement with stationary moment and always work with the maximum dynamic range. The accuracy of respiration measurement with the proposed radar sensor was experimentally evaluated using a physical phantom, human subject, and moving plate in a radiotherapy environment. It was shown that respiration measurement with radar sensor while the radiation beam is on is feasible and the measurement has a submillimeter accuracy when compared with a commercial respiration monitoring system which requires patient contact. The proposed radar sensor provides accurate, noninvasive, and noncontact respiration measurement and therefore has a great potential in motion-adaptive radiotherapy.

  2. Markerless tracking of small lung tumors for stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sörnsen de Koste, John R. van Dahele, Max; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R.; Mostafavi, Hassan; Sloutsky, Alex

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: (1) To validate retrospective markerless tracking software for small lung tumors by comparing tracked motion in 4-dimensional planning computed tomography (4DCT) derived kV projection images and known tumor motion in the same 4DCT. (2) To evaluate variability of tumor motion using kV projection images from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans acquired on different days. Methods: Nonclinical tumor tracking software (TTS) used a normalized cross correlation algorithm to track the tumor on enhanced kV projection images (e.g., from a CBCT scan). The reference dataset consisted of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from one phase of a planning 4DCT. TTS matches two in-plane coordinates and obtains the out-of-plane coordinate by triangulating with match results from other projections. (1) To validate TTS, tracking results were compared with known 4DCT tumor motion for two patients (A and B). Projection images (1 image/1°) were digitally reconstructed for each 4DCT phase. From these, kV projection series were composed simulating full breathing cycles every 20° of gantry rotation [breathing period = 20°/(6°/s) = 3.33 s]. Reference templates were 360 “tumor enhanced” DRRs from the 4DCT expiration phase. TTS-derived tumor motion was compared to known tumor motion on 4DCT. (2) For five patients, TTS-assessed motion during clinical CBCT acquisition was compared with motion on the planning 4DCT, and the motion component in the Y (cranio–caudal)-direction was compared with the motion of an external marker box (RPM, real-time position management). Results: (1) Validation results: TTS for case A (tumor 6.2 cm{sup 3}, 32 mm axial diameter) over 360° showed mean motion X (medial–lateral) = 3.4, Y = 11.5, and Z (ventral–dorsal) = 4.9 mm (1 SD < 1.0 mm). Corresponding 4DCT motion was X = 3.1, Y = 11.3, and Z = 5.1 mm. Correlation coefficients between TTS tumor motion and displacement of the tumor’s center of mass (CoM) on 4DCT were 0.64, 0

  3. Double calibration: an accurate, reliable and easy-to-use method for 3D scapular motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Brochard, Sylvain; Lempereur, Mathieu; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2011-02-24

    The most recent non-invasive methods for the recording of scapular motion are based on an acromion marker (AM) set and a single calibration (SC) of the scapula in a resting position. However, this method fails to accurately measure scapular kinematics above 90° of arm elevation, due to soft tissue artifacts of the skin and muscles covering the acromion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, and inter-trial and inter-session repeatability of a double calibration method (DC) in comparison with SC. The SC and DC data were measured with an optoelectronic system during arm flexion and abduction at different angles of elevation (0-180°). They were compared with palpation of the scapula using a scapula locator. DC data was not significantly different from palpation for 5/6 axes of rotation tested (Y, X, and Z in abduction and flexion), where as SC showed significant differences for 5/6 axes. The root mean square errors ranged from 2.96° to 4.48° for DC and from 6° to 9.19° for SC. The inter-trial repeatability was good to excellent for SC and DC. The inter-session repeatability was moderate to excellent for SC and moderate to good for DC. Coupling AM and DC is an easy-to-use method, which yields accurate and reliable measurements of scapular kinematics for the complete range of arm motion. It can be applied to the measurement of shoulder motion in many fields (sports, orthopaedics, and rehabilitation), especially when large ranges of arm motion are required.

  4. Markerless 3D motion capture for animal locomotion studies

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, William Irvin; Hirasaki, Eishi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining quantitative data describing the movements of animals is an essential step in understanding their locomotor biology. Outside the laboratory, measuring animal locomotion often relies on video-based approaches and analysis is hampered because of difficulties in calibration and often the limited availability of possible camera positions. It is also usually restricted to two dimensions, which is often an undesirable over-simplification given the essentially three-dimensional nature of many locomotor performances. In this paper we demonstrate a fully three-dimensional approach based on 3D photogrammetric reconstruction using multiple, synchronised video cameras. This approach allows full calibration based on the separation of the individual cameras and will work fully automatically with completely unmarked and undisturbed animals. As such it has the potential to revolutionise work carried out on free-ranging animals in sanctuaries and zoological gardens where ad hoc approaches are essential and access within enclosures often severely restricted. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of video-based 3D photogrammetry with examples from primates and birds, as well as discussing the current limitations of this technique and illustrating the accuracies that can be obtained. All the software required is open source so this can be a very cost effective approach and provides a methodology of obtaining data in situations where other approaches would be completely ineffective. PMID:24972869

  5. Cloth Simulation Based Motion Capture of Dressed Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, Nils; Rosenhahn, Bodo; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    Commonly, marker based as well as markerless motion capture systems assume that the tracked person is wearing tightly fitting clothes. Unfortunately, this restriction cannot be satisfied in many situations and most preexisting video data does not adhere to it either. In this work we propose a graphics based vision approach for tracking humans markerlessly without making this assumption. Instead, a physically based simulation of the clothing the tracked person is wearing is used to guide the tracking algorithm.

  6. An Efficient and Accurate Formalism for the Treatment of Large Amplitude Intramolecular Motion.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Guillaume; Miki, Kenji; Vignoles, Gérard L; Wong, Bryan M; Simmons, Chris S

    2012-08-14

    We propose a general approach to describe large amplitude motions (LAM) with multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) in molecules or reaction intermediates, which is useful for the computation of thermochemical or kinetic data. The kinetic part of the LAM Lagrangian is derived using a Z-matrix internal coordinate representation within a new numerical procedure. This derivation is exact for a classical system, and the uncertainties on the prediction of observable quantities largely arise from uncertainties on the LAM potential energy surface (PES) itself. In order to rigorously account for these uncertainties, we present an approach based on Bayesian theory to infer a parametrized physical model of the PES using ab initio calculations. This framework allows for quantification of uncertainties associated with a PES model as well as the forward propagation of these uncertainties to the quantity of interest. A selection and generalization of some treatments accounting for the coupling of the LAM with other internal or external DOF are also presented. Finally, we discuss and validate the approach with two applications: the calculation of the partition function of 1,3-butadiene and the calculation of the high-pressure reaction rate of the CH(3) + H → CH(4) recombination.

  7. An Efficient and Accurate Formalism for the Treatment of Large Amplitude Intramolecular Motion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We propose a general approach to describe large amplitude motions (LAM) with multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) in molecules or reaction intermediates, which is useful for the computation of thermochemical or kinetic data. The kinetic part of the LAM Lagrangian is derived using a Z-matrix internal coordinate representation within a new numerical procedure. This derivation is exact for a classical system, and the uncertainties on the prediction of observable quantities largely arise from uncertainties on the LAM potential energy surface (PES) itself. In order to rigorously account for these uncertainties, we present an approach based on Bayesian theory to infer a parametrized physical model of the PES using ab initio calculations. This framework allows for quantification of uncertainties associated with a PES model as well as the forward propagation of these uncertainties to the quantity of interest. A selection and generalization of some treatments accounting for the coupling of the LAM with other internal or external DOF are also presented. Finally, we discuss and validate the approach with two applications: the calculation of the partition function of 1,3-butadiene and the calculation of the high-pressure reaction rate of the CH3 + H → CH4 recombination. PMID:22904694

  8. Accurate and portable weigh-in-motion system for manifesting air cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodine, Robert N.; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Jordan, John K.

    1995-12-01

    An automated and portable weigh-in-motion system has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the purpose of manifesting cargo onto aircraft. The system has an accuracy range of plus or minus 3.0% to plus or minus 6.0% measuring gross vehicle weight and locating the center of balance of moving vehicles at speeds of 1 to 5 mph. This paper reviews the control/user interface system and weight determination algorithm developed to acquire, process, and interpret multiple sensor inputs. The development effort resulted in a self- zeroing, user-friendly system capable of weighing a wide range of vehicles in any random order. The control system is based on the STANDARD (STD) bus and incorporates custom- designed data acquisition and sensor fusion hardware controlled by a personal computer (PC) based single-board computer. The user interface is written in the 'C' language to display number of axles, axle weight, axle spacing, gross weight, and center of balance. The weighing algorithm developed functions with any linear weight sensor and a set of four axle switches per sensor.

  9. Accurate and portable weigh-in-motion system for manifesting air cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Nodine, R.N.; Scudiere, M.B.; Jordan, J.K.

    1995-12-01

    An automated and portable weigh-in-motion system has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the purpose of manifesting cargo onto aircraft. The system has an accuracv range of {plus_minus} 3.0% to {plus_minus} 6.0% measuring gross vehicle weight and locating the center of balance of moving vehicles at speeds of 1 to 5 mph. This paper reviews the control/user interface system and weight determination algorithm developed to acquire, process, and interpret multiple sensor inputs. The development effort resulted in a self-zeroing, user-friendly system capable of weighing a wide range of vehicles in any random order. The control system is based on the STANDARD (STD) bus and incorporates custom-designed data acquisition and sensor fusion hardware controlled by a personal computer (PC) based single-board computer. The user interface is written in the ``C`` language to display number of axles, axle weight, axle spacing, gross weight, and center of balance. The weighing algorithm developed will function with any linear weight sensor and a set of four axle switches per sensor.

  10. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2-9.9 mm, which was 0.4-2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT.

  11. A Marker-less Monitoring System for Movement Analysis of Infants Using Video Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Keisuke; Osawa, Yuko; Bu, Nan; Tsuji, Tokuo; Tsuji, Toshio; Ishii, Idaku; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Orito, Kensuke; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Noda, Shunichi

    This paper proposes a marker-less motion measurement and analysis system for infants. This system calculates eight types of evaluation indices related to the movement of an infant such as “amount of body motion” and “activity of body” from binary images that are extracted from video images using the background difference and frame difference. Thus, medical doctors can intuitively understand the movements of infants without long-term observations, and this may be helpful in supporting their diagnoses and detecting disabilities and diseases in the early stages. The distinctive feature of this system is that the movements of infants can be measured without using any markers for motion capture and thus it is expected that the natural and inherent tendencies of infants can be analyzed and evaluated. In this paper, the evaluation indices and features of movements between full-term infants (FTIs) and low birth weight infants (LBWIs) are compared using the developed prototype. We found that the amount of body motion and symmetry of upper and lower body movements of LBWIs became lower than those of FTIs. The difference between the movements of FTIs and LBWIs can be evaluated using the proposed system.

  12. Fluorescent reporters for markerless genomic integration in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Nienke W. M.; van der Horst, Thijs; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Nijland, Reindert

    2017-01-01

    We present integration vectors for Staphylococcus aureus encoding the fluorescent reporters mAmetrine, CFP, sGFP, YFP, mCherry and mKate. The expression is driven either from the sarA-P1 promoter or from any other promoter of choice. The reporter can be inserted markerless in the chromosome of a wide range of S. aureus strains. The integration site chosen does not disrupt any open reading frame, provides good expression, and has no detectable effect on the strains physiology. As an intermediate construct, we present a set of replicating plasmids containing the same fluorescent reporters. Also in these reporter plasmids the sarA-P1 promoter can be replaced by any other promoter of interest for expression studies. Cassettes from the replication plasmids can be readily swapped with the integration vector. With these constructs it becomes possible to monitor reporters of separate fluorescent wavelengths simultaneously. PMID:28266573

  13. Markerless video analysis for movement quantification in pediatric epilepsy monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haiping; Eng, How-Lung; Mandal, Bappaditya; Chan, Derrick W S; Ng, Yen-Ling

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a markerless video analytic system for quantifying body part movements in pediatric epilepsy monitoring. The system utilizes colored pajamas worn by a patient in bed to extract body part movement trajectories, from which various features can be obtained for seizure detection and analysis. Hence, it is non-intrusive and it requires no sensor/marker to be attached to the patient's body. It takes raw video sequences as input and a simple user-initialization indicates the body parts to be examined. In background/foreground modeling, Gaussian mixture models are employed in conjunction with HSV-based modeling. Body part detection follows a coarse-to-fine paradigm with graph-cut-based segmentation. Finally, body part parameters are estimated with domain knowledge guidance. Experimental studies are reported on sequences captured in an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit at a local hospital. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system in pediatric epilepsy monitoring and seizure detection.

  14. Markerless three-dimensional tracking of masticatory movement.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuto; Yamada, Takafumi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ikebe, Kazunori

    2016-02-08

    Conventional methods for measuring mandibular movement are expensive and require headgear and a marker attached to the mandibular incisors. These make assessment of normal chewing difficult. The aim of the present study was to test the validity of a markerless three-dimensional system for tracking masticatory movement by comparing it with a conventional method using an incisal marker. The study investigated 100 chewing cycles in 10 participants. The jaw tracking system consisted of a camera capable of recording depth and red, green, and blue data simultaneously, a laptop computer, and data analysis software. Depth data for each participant's face, tracked in real time, produced a computed 3D mask. The most prominent point of the soft tissue under the lip was defined as the chin point. A dental clasp cemented to the labial surface of the mandibular incisors was defined as the incisal point. The movement of these two measuring points was simultaneously recorded during mastication of chewing gum for 20s. To conduct the same analysis on each cycle from the two measuring points, all cycles were normalized by dividing by the corresponding vertical displacement because of their size variation. The findings showed excellent intramethod correlation for normalized horizontal displacement at every level (>0.9; except for 2 out of 19 levels; 0.896 and 0.898), and a lack of proportional bias. These findings suggest a correlation between the chewing cycles from two measuring points, the incisor and the chin, further suggesting the feasibility of a markerless system for tracking masticatory movement.

  15. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  16. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  17. Accurate measurement of muscle belly length in the motion analysis laboratory: potential for the assessment of contracture.

    PubMed

    Fry, N R; Childs, C R; Eve, L C; Gough, M; Robinson, R O; Shortland, A P

    2003-04-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound imaging was combined with motion analysis technology to measure distances between remote anatomical landmarks. The length of the belly of the medial gastrocnemius muscle in five normal adults (nine limbs) was estimated using this technique. Our results in vivo were similar to the reported data for the lengths of muscles in cadavers, and were consistent with the expected relationship between muscle belly length and ankle joint angle. Experiments in vitro demonstrated that the accuracy of the device was better than 2 mm over 20 cm. Measurements on the same subject on different occasions showed that the results were repeatable in vivo. Rendering of the reconstructed volume of a foam phantom gave results comparable to photographic images. This validated technique could be used to measure muscle lengths in children with spastic cerebral palsy and indicate which muscles had fixed shortening, and to what extent.

  18. Markerless EPID image guided dynamic multi-leaf collimator tracking for lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmann, J.; Keall, P.; Berbeco, R.

    2013-06-01

    Compensation of target motion during the delivery of radiotherapy has the potential to improve treatment accuracy, dose conformity and sparing of healthy tissue. We implement an online image guided therapy system based on soft tissue localization (STiL) of the target from electronic portal images and treatment aperture adaptation with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC). The treatment aperture is moved synchronously and in real time with the tumor during the entire breathing cycle. The system is implemented and tested on a Varian TX clinical linear accelerator featuring an AS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquiring images at a frame rate of 12.86 Hz throughout the treatment. A position update cycle for the treatment aperture consists of four steps: in the first step at time t = t0 a frame is grabbed, in the second step the frame is processed with the STiL algorithm to get the tumor position at t = t0, in a third step the tumor position at t = ti + δt is predicted to overcome system latencies and in the fourth step, the DMLC control software calculates the required leaf motions and applies them at time t = ti + δt. The prediction model is trained before the start of the treatment with data representing the tumor motion. We analyze the system latency with a dynamic chest phantom (4D motion phantom, Washington University). We estimate the average planar position deviation between target and treatment aperture in a clinical setting by driving the phantom with several lung tumor trajectories (recorded from fiducial tracking during radiotherapy delivery to the lung). DMLC tracking for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy without fiducial markers was successfully demonstrated. The inherent system latency is found to be δt = (230 ± 11) ms for a MV portal image acquisition frame rate of 12.86 Hz. The root mean square deviation between tumor and aperture position is smaller than 1 mm. We demonstrate the feasibility of real-time markerless DMLC

  19. Standardized Markerless Gene Integration for Pathway Engineering in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Cory; Shabbir-Hussain, Murtaza; Frogue, Keith; Blenner, Mark; Wheeldon, Ian

    2016-12-22

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a promising microbial host due to its native capacity to produce lipid-based chemicals. Engineering stable production strains requires genomic integration of modified genes, avoiding episomal expression that requires specialized media to maintain selective pressures. Here, we develop a CRISPR-Cas9-based tool for targeted, markerless gene integration into the Y. lipolytica genome. A set of genomic loci was screened to identify sites that were accepting of gene integrations without impacting cell growth. Five sites were found to meet these criteria. Expression levels from a GFP expression cassette were consistent when inserted into AXP, XPR2, A08, and D17, with reduced expression from MFE1. The standardized tool is comprised of five pairs of plasmids (one homologous donor plasmid and a CRISPR-Cas9 expression plasmid), with each pair targeting gene integration into one of the characterized sites. To demonstrate the utility of the tool we rapidly engineered a semisynthetic lycopene biosynthesis pathway by integrating four different genes at different loci. The capability to integrate multiple genes without the need for marker recovery and into sites with known expression levels will enable more rapid and reliable pathway engineering in Y. lipolytica.

  20. A multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to accurately monitor heart rate against motion artefact during exercise.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-10-12

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from -17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from -15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate.

  1. A Multi-Channel Opto-Electronic Sensor to Accurately Monitor Heart Rate against Motion Artefact during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from −17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from −15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate. PMID:26473860

  2. A time accurate prediction of the viscous flow in a turbine stage including a rotor in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavalikul, Akamol

    In this current study, the flow field in the Pennsylvania State University Axial Flow Turbine Research Facility (AFTRF) was simulated. This study examined four sets of simulations. The first two sets are for an individual NGV and for an individual rotor. The last two sets use a multiple reference frames approach for a complete turbine stage with two different interface models: a steady circumferential average approach called a mixing plane model, and a time accurate flow simulation approach called a sliding mesh model. The NGV passage flow field was simulated using a three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes finite volume solver (RANS) with a standard kappa -- epsilon turbulence model. The mean flow distributions on the NGV surfaces and endwall surfaces were computed. The numerical solutions indicate that two passage vortices begin to be observed approximately at the mid axial chord of the NGV suction surface. The first vortex is a casing passage vortex which occurs at the corner formed by the NGV suction surface and the casing. This vortex is created by the interaction of the passage flow and the radially inward flow, while the second vortex, the hub passage vortex, is observed near the hub. These two vortices become stronger towards the NGV trailing edge. By comparing the results from the X/Cx = 1.025 plane and the X/Cx = 1.09 plane, it can be concluded that the NGV wake decays rapidly within a short axial distance downstream of the NGV. For the rotor, a set of simulations was carried out to examine the flow fields associated with different pressure side tip extension configurations, which are designed to reduce the tip leakage flow. The simulation results show that significant reductions in tip leakage mass flow rate and aerodynamic loss reduction are possible by using suitable tip platform extensions located near the pressure side corner of the blade tip. The computations used realistic turbine rotor inlet flow conditions in a linear cascade arrangement

  3. Scaling laws and accurate small-amplitude stationary solution for the motion of a planar vortex filament in the Cartesian form of the local induction approximation.

    PubMed

    Van Gorder, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    We provide a formulation of the local induction approximation (LIA) for the motion of a vortex filament in the Cartesian reference frame (the extrinsic coordinate system) which allows for scaling of the reference coordinate. For general monotone scalings of the reference coordinate, we derive an equation for the planar solution to the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation governing the LIA. We proceed to solve this equation perturbatively in small amplitude through an application of multiple-scales analysis, which allows for accurate computation of the period of the planar vortex filament. The perturbation result is shown to agree strongly with numerical simulations, and we also relate this solution back to the solution obtained in the arclength reference frame (the intrinsic coordinate system). Finally, we discuss nonmonotone coordinate scalings and their application for finding self-intersections of vortex filaments. These self-intersecting vortex filaments are likely unstable and collapse into other structures or dissipate completely.

  4. Establishment of a Counter-selectable Markerless Mutagenesis System in Veillonella atypica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Qi, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    Using an alternative sigma factor ecf3 as target, we successfully established the first markerless mutagenesis system in the Veillonella genus. This system will be a valuable tool for mutagenesis of multiple genes for gene function analysis as well as for gene regulation studies in Veillonella. PMID:25771833

  5. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  6. Suitability of markerless EPID tracking for tumor position verification in gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serpa, Marco; Baier, Kurt; Guckenberger, Matthias; Cremers, Florian; Meyer, Juergen

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To maximize the benefits of respiratory gated radiotherapy (RGRT) of lung tumors real-time verification of the tumor position is required. This work investigates the feasibility of markerless tracking of lung tumors during beam-on time in electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images of the MV therapeutic beam. Methods: EPID movies were acquired at ∼2 fps for seven lung cancer patients with tumor peak-to-peak motion ranges between 7.8 and 17.9 mm (mean: 13.7 mm) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. The external breathing motion of the abdomen was synchronously measured. Both datasets were retrospectively analyzed inPortalTrack, an in-house developed tracking software. The authors define a three-step procedure to run the simulations: (1) gating window definition, (2) gated-beam delivery simulation, and (3) tumor tracking. First, an amplitude threshold level was set on the external signal, defining the onset of beam-on/-off signals. This information was then mapped onto a sequence of EPID images to generate stamps of beam-on/-hold periods throughout the EPID movies in PortalTrack, by obscuring the frames corresponding to beam-off times. Last, tumor motion in the superior-inferior direction was determined on portal images by the tracking algorithm during beam-on time. The residual motion inside the gating window as well as target coverage (TC) and the marginal target displacement (MTD) were used as measures to quantify tumor position variability. Results: Tumor position monitoring and estimation from beam's-eye-view images during RGRT was possible in 67% of the analyzed beams. For a reference gating window of 5 mm, deviations ranging from 2% to 86% (35% on average) were recorded between the reference and measured residual motion. TC (range: 62%–93%; mean: 77%) losses were correlated with false positives incidence rates resulting mostly from intra-/inter-beam baseline drifts, as well as sudden cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in exhale positions. Both

  7. A learning-based markerless approach for full-body kinematics estimation in-natura from a single image.

    PubMed

    Drory, Ami; Li, Hongdong; Hartley, Richard

    2017-04-11

    We present a supervised machine learning approach for markerless estimation of human full-body kinematics for a cyclist from an unconstrained colour image. This approach is motivated by the limitations of existing marker-based approaches restricted by infrastructure, environmental conditions, and obtrusive markers. By using a discriminatively learned mixture-of-parts model, we construct a probabilistic tree representation to model the configuration and appearance of human body joints. During the learning stage, a Structured Support Vector Machine (SSVM) learns body parts appearance and spatial relations. In the testing stage, the learned models are employed to recover body pose via searching in a test image over a pyramid structure. We focus on the movement modality of cycling to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach. In natura estimation of cycling kinematics using images is challenging because of human interaction with a bicycle causing frequent occlusions. We make no assumptions in relation to the kinematic constraints of the model, nor the appearance of the scene. Our technique finds multiple quality hypotheses for the pose. We evaluate the precision of our method on two new datasets using loss functions. Our method achieves a score of 91.1 and 69.3 on mean Probability of Correct Keypoint (PCK) measure and 88.7 and 66.1 on the Average Precision of Keypoints (APK) measure for the frontal and sagittal datasets respectively. We conclude that our method opens new vistas to robust user-interaction free estimation of full body kinematics, a prerequisite to motion analysis.

  8. A New Accurate 3D Measurement Tool to Assess the Range of Motion of the Tongue in Oral Cancer Patients: A Standardized Model.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Simone; van Alphen, Maarten J A; Jacobi, Irene; Smeele, Ludwig E; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Balm, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    In oral cancer treatment, function loss such as speech and swallowing deterioration can be severe, mostly due to reduced lingual mobility. Until now, there is no standardized measurement tool for tongue mobility and pre-operative prediction of function loss is based on expert opinion instead of evidence based insight. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a triple-camera setup for the measurement of tongue range of motion (ROM) in healthy adults and its feasibility in patients with partial glossectomy. A triple-camera setup was used, and 3D coordinates of the tongue in five standardized tongue positions were achieved in 15 healthy volunteers. Maximum distances between the tip of the tongue and the maxillary midline were calculated. Each participant was recorded twice, and each movie was analysed three times by two separate raters. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability were the main outcome measures. Secondly, feasibility of the method was tested in ten patients treated for oral tongue carcinoma. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability all showed high correlation coefficients of >0.9 in both study groups. All healthy subjects showed perfect symmetrical tongue ROM. In patients, significant differences in lateral tongue movements were found, due to restricted tongue mobility after surgery. This triple-camera setup is a reliable measurement tool to assess three-dimensional information of tongue ROM. It constitutes an accurate tool for objective grading of reduced tongue mobility after partial glossectomy.

  9. Fiducial marker and marker-less soft-tissue detection using fast MV fluoroscopy on a new generation EPID: Investigating the influence of pulsing artifacts and artifact suppression techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Poels, Kenneth Verellen, Dirk; Van de Vondel, Iwein; El Mazghari, Rafik; De Ridder, Mark; Depuydt, Tom

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Because frame rates on current clinical available electronic portal imaging devices (EPID’s) are limited to 7.5 Hz, a new commercially available PerkinElmer EPID (XRD 1642 AP19) with a maximum frame rate of 30 Hz and a new scintillator (Kyokko PI200) with improved sensitivity (light output) for megavolt (MV) irradiation was evaluated. In this work, the influence of MV pulse artifacts and pulsing artifact suppression techniques on fiducial marker and marker-less detection of a lung lesion was investigated, because target localization is an important component of uncertainty in geometrical verification of real-time tumor tracking. Methods: Visicoil™ markers with a diameter of 0.05 and 0.075 cm were used for MV marker tracking with a frame rate of, respectively, 7.5, 15, and 30 Hz. A 30 Hz readout of the detector was obtained by a 2 × 2 pixel binning, reducing spatial resolution. Static marker detection was conducted in function of increasing phantom thickness. Additionally, marker-less tracking was conducted and compared with the ground-truth fiducial marker motion. Performance of MV target detection was investigated by comparing the least-square sine wave fit of the detected marker positions with the predefined sine wave motion. For fiducial marker detection, a Laplacian-of-Gaussian enhancement was applied after which normalized cross correlation was used to find the most probable marker position. Marker-less detection was performed by using the scale and orientation adaptive mean shift tracking algorithm. For each MV fluoroscopy, a free running (FR-nF) (ignoring MV pulsing during readout) acquisition mode was compared with two acquisition modes intending to reduce MV pulsing artifacts, i.e., combined wavelet-FFT filtering (FR-wF) and electronic readout synchronized with respect to MV pulses. Results: A 0.05 cm Visicoil marker resulted in an unacceptable root-mean square error (RMSE) > 0.2 cm with a maximum frame rate of 30 Hz during FR-nF readout

  10. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-01-01

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  11. Size unlimited markerless deletions by a transconjugative plasmid-system in Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Rachinger, Michael; Bauch, Melanie; Strittmatter, Axel; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Daniel, Rolf; Liebl, Wolfgang; Liesegang, Heiko; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2013-09-20

    Conjugative shuttle vectors of the pKVM series, based on an IncP transfer origin and the pMAD vector with a temperature sensitive replication were constructed to establish a markerless gene deletion protocol for Bacilli without natural competence such as the exoenzyme producer Bacillus licheniformis. The pKVM plasmids can be conjugated to strains of B. licheniformis and B. subtilis. For chromosomal gene deletion, regions flanking the target gene are fused and cloned in a pKVM vector prior to conjugative transfer from Escherichia coli to B. licheniformis. Appropriate markers on the vector backbone allow for the identification of the integration at the target locus and thereafter the vector excision, both events taking place via homologous recombination. The functionality of the deletion system was demonstrated with B. licheniformis by a markerless 939 bp in-frame deletion of the yqfD gene and the deletion of a 31 kbp genomic segment carrying a PBSX-like prophage.

  12. SU-C-18A-04: 3D Markerless Registration of Lung Based On Coherent Point Drift: Application in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J; Guo, X; Yang, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated a new probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift for real time 3D markerless registration of the lung motion during radiotherapy. Method: 4DCT image datasets Dir-lab (www.dir-lab.com) have been used for creating 3D boundary element model of the lungs. For the first step, the 3D surface of the lungs in respiration phases T0 and T50 were segmented and divided into a finite number of linear triangular elements. Each triangle is a two dimensional object which has three vertices (each vertex has three degree of freedom). One of the main features of the lungs motion is velocity coherence so the vertices that creating the mesh of the lungs should also have features and degree of freedom of lung structure. This means that the vertices close to each other tend to move coherently. In the next step, we implemented a probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift to calculate nonlinear displacement of vertices between different expiratory phases. Results: The method has been applied to images of 10-patients in Dir-lab dataset. The normal distribution of vertices to the origin for each expiratory stage were calculated. The results shows that the maximum error of registration between different expiratory phases is less than 0.4 mm (0.38 SI, 0.33 mm AP, 0.29 mm RL direction). This method is a reliable method for calculating the vector of displacement, and the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of lung structure in radiotherapy. Conclusions: We evaluated a new 3D registration method for distribution set of vertices inside lungs mesh. In this technique, lungs motion considering velocity coherence are inserted as a penalty in regularization function. The results indicate that high registration accuracy is achievable with CPD. This method is helpful for calculating of displacement vector and analyzing possible physiological and anatomical changes during treatment.

  13. Markerless view-independent registration of multiple distorted projectors on extruded surfaces using an uncalibrated camera.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Behzad; Majumder, Aditi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first algorithm to geometrically register multiple projectors in a view-independent manner (i.e. wallpapered) on a common type of curved surface, vertically extruded surface, using an uncalibrated camera without attaching any obtrusive markers to the display screen. Further, it can also tolerate large non-linear geometric distortions in the projectors as is common when mounting short throw lenses to allow a compact set-up. Our registration achieves sub-pixel accuracy on a large number of different vertically extruded surfaces and the image correction to achieve this registration can be run in real time on the GPU. This simple markerless registration has the potential to have a large impact on easy set-up and maintenance of large curved multi-projector displays, common for visualization, edutainment, training and simulation applications.

  14. A Study on Markerless AR-Based Infant Education System Using CBIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Seoksoo

    Block play is widely known to be effective to help a child develop emotionally and physically based on learning by a sense of sight and touch. But block play can not expect to have learning effects through a sense of hearing. Therefore, in this study, such limitations are overcome by a method that recognizes an object made up of blocks, not a marker-based method generally used for an AR environment, a matching technology enabling an object to be perceived in every direction, and a technology combining images of the real world with 2D/3D images/pictures/sounds of a similar object. Also, an education system for children aged 3~5 is designed to implement markerless AR with the CBIR method.

  15. Automatic PSO-Based Deformable Structures Markerless Tracking in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaghloul, Haroun; Batouche, Mohammed; Jessel, Jean-Pierre

    An automatic and markerless tracking method of deformable structures (digestive organs) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy intervention that uses the (PSO) behavour and the preoperative a priori knowledge is presented. The associated shape to the global best particles of the population determines a coarse representation of the targeted organ (the gallbladder) in monocular laparoscopic colored images. The swarm behavour is directed by a new fitness function to be optimized to improve the detection and tracking performance. The function is defined by a linear combination of two terms, namely, the human a priori knowledge term (H) and the particle's density term (D). Under the limits of standard (PSO) characteristics, experimental results on both synthetic and real data show the effectiveness and robustness of our method. Indeed, it outperforms existing methods without need of explicit initialization (such as active contours, deformable models and Gradient Vector Flow) on accuracy and convergence rate.

  16. Coarse-to-fine markerless gait analysis based on PCA and Gauss-Laguerre decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Michela; Schmid, Maurizio; Conforto, Silvia; Carli, Marco; Neri, Alessandro; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2005-04-01

    Human movement analysis is generally performed through the utilization of marker-based systems, which allow reconstructing, with high levels of accuracy, the trajectories of markers allocated on specific points of the human body. Marker based systems, however, show some drawbacks that can be overcome by the use of video systems applying markerless techniques. In this paper, a specifically designed computer vision technique for the detection and tracking of relevant body points is presented. It is based on the Gauss-Laguerre Decomposition, and a Principal Component Analysis Technique (PCA) is used to circumscribe the region of interest. Results obtained on both synthetic and experimental tests provide significant reduction of the computational costs, with no significant reduction of the tracking accuracy.

  17. Development of a Markerless Deletion System for the Fish-Pathogenic Bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Esther; Álvarez, Beatriz; Duchaud, Eric; Guijarro, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a Gram-negative fish pathogen that causes important economic losses in aquaculture worldwide. Although the genome of this bacterium has been determined, the function and relative importance of genes in relation to virulence remain to be established. To investigate their respective contribution to the bacterial pathogenesis, effective tools for gene inactivation are required. In the present study, a markerless gene deletion system has been successfully developed for the first time in this bacterium. Using this method, the F. psychrophilum fcpB gene, encoding a predicted cysteine protease homologous to Streptococcus pyogenes streptopain, was deleted. The developed system involved the construction of a conjugative plasmid that harbors the flanking sequences of the fcpB gene and an I-SceI meganuclease restriction site. Once this plasmid was integrated in the genome by homologous recombination, the merodiploid was resolved by the introduction of a plasmid expressing I-SceI under the control of the fpp2 F. psychrophilum inducible promoter. The resulting deleted fcpB mutant presented a decrease in extracellular proteolytic activity compared to the parental strain. However, there were not significant differences between their LD50 in an intramuscularly challenged rainbow trout infection model. The mutagenesis approach developed in this work represents an improvement over the gene inactivation tools existing hitherto for this “fastidious” bacterium. Unlike transposon mutagenesis and gene disruption, gene markerless deletion has less potential for polar effects and allows the mutation of virtually any non-essential gene or gene clusters. PMID:25692569

  18. The Combination of Laser Scanning and Structure from Motion Technology for Creation of Accurate Exterior and Interior Orthophotos of ST. Nicholas Baroque Church

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koska, B.; Křemen, T.

    2013-02-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology is used for creation of building documentation and 3D building model from its emerging at the turn of the millennium. Photogrammetry has even longer tradition in this field. Both technologies have some technical limitations if they are used for creation of a façade or even an interior orthophoto, but combination of both technologies seems profitable. Laser scanning can be used for creation of an accurate 3D model and photogrammetry for consequent application of high quality colour information. Both technologies were used in synergy to create the building plans, 2D drawing documentation of facades and interior views and the orthophotos of St. Nicholas Baroque church in Prague. The case study is described in details in the paper.

  19. Non-invasive determination of coupled motion of the scapula and humerus--an in-vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Massimini, Daniel F; Warner, Jon J P; Li, Guoan

    2011-02-03

    Measuring the motion of the scapula and humerus with sub-millimeter levels of accuracy in six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) is a challenging problem. The current methods to measure shoulder joint motion via the skin do not produce clinically significant levels of accuracy. Thus, the purpose of this study was to validate a non-invasive markerless dual fluoroscopic imaging system (DFIS) model-based tracking technique for measuring dynamic in-vivo shoulder kinematics. Our DFIS tracks the positions of bones based on their projected silhouettes to contours on recorded pairs of fluoroscopic images. For this study, we compared markerlessly tracking the bones of the scapula and humerus to track them with implanted titanium spheres using a radiostereometric analysis (RSA) while manually manipulating a cadaver specimen's arms. Additionally, we report the repeatability of the DFIS to track the scapula and humerus during dynamic shoulder motion. The difference between the markerless model-based tracking technique and the RSA was ±0.3 mm in translation and ±0.5° in rotation. Furthermore, the repeatability of the markerless DFIS model-based tracking technique for the scapula and humerus was ±0.2 mm and ±0.4°, respectively. The model-based tracking technique achieves an accuracy that is similar to an invasive RSA tracking technique and is highly suited for non-invasively studying the in-vivo motion of the shoulder. This technique could be used to investigate the scapular and humeral biomechanics in both healthy individuals and in patients with various pathologies under a variety of dynamic shoulder motions encountered during the activities of daily living.

  20. Automated markerless full field hard x-ray microscopic tomography at sub-50nm 3-dimension spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wang J.; Yu-chen Chen, K.; Yuan, W.; Tkachuk, A.; Erdonmez, C.

    2012-04-04

    A full field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) has been developed and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The capabilities we developed in auto-tomography, local tomography, and spectroscopic imaging that overcome many of the limitations and difficulties in existing transmission x-ray microscopes are described and experimentally demonstrated. Sub-50 nm resolution in 3-dimension (3D) with markerless automated tomography has been achieved. These capabilities open up scientific opportunities in many research fields.

  1. Automated markerless full field hard x-ray microscopic tomography at sub-50 nm 3-dimension spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jun; Karen Chen Yuchen; Yuan Qingxi; Tkachuk, Andrei; Hornberger, Benjamin; Feser, Michael; Erdonmez, Can

    2012-04-02

    A full field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) has been developed and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The capabilities we developed in auto-tomography, local tomography, and spectroscopic imaging that overcome many of the limitations and difficulties in existing transmission x-ray microscopes are described and experimentally demonstrated. Sub-50 nm resolution in 3-dimension (3D) with markerless automated tomography has been achieved. These capabilities open up scientific opportunities in many research fields.

  2. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  3. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Michael E; Bruder, Mark R; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-05-09

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium.

  4. Automatic orientation and 3D modelling from markerless rock art imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerma, J. L.; Navarro, S.; Cabrelles, M.; Seguí, A. E.; Hernández, D.

    2013-02-01

    This paper investigates the use of two detectors and descriptors on image pyramids for automatic image orientation and generation of 3D models. The detectors and descriptors replace manual measurements and are used to detect, extract and match features across multiple imagery. The Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and the Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) will be assessed based on speed, number of features, matched features, and precision in image and object space depending on the adopted hierarchical matching scheme. The influence of applying in addition Area Based Matching (ABM) with normalised cross-correlation (NCC) and least squares matching (LSM) is also investigated. The pipeline makes use of photogrammetric and computer vision algorithms aiming minimum interaction and maximum accuracy from a calibrated camera. Both the exterior orientation parameters and the 3D coordinates in object space are sequentially estimated combining relative orientation, single space resection and bundle adjustment. The fully automatic image-based pipeline presented herein to automate the image orientation step of a sequence of terrestrial markerless imagery is compared with manual bundle block adjustment and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) which serves as ground truth. The benefits of applying ABM after FBM will be assessed both in image and object space for the 3D modelling of a complex rock art shelter.

  5. Marker-less systems for tracking working postures--results from two experiments.

    PubMed

    Pinzke, S; Kopp, L

    2001-10-01

    Two experiments are performed to examine the usability of different marker-less approaches in image analysis and computer vision for automatic registration of OWAS (Ovako working posture analysing system) postures from video film. In experiment 1, a parametric method based on image analysis routines is developed both for separating the subject from its background and for relating the shapes of the extracted subject to OWAS postures. All 12 analysed images were correctly classified by the method. In experiment 2 a computer neural network is taught to relate postures of a subject to OWAS postures. When the network was trained with 53 images the rest of the set of 138 images was correctly classified. The experiments described in this paper show promising results regarding the use of image analysis and computer vision for tracking and assessing working postures. However, further research is needed including tests of different human models, neural networks, and template matching for making the OWAS method more useful in identifying and evaluating potentially harmful working postures.

  6. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Michael E.; Bruder, Mark R.; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A.; Chou, C. Perry

    2016-01-01

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium. PMID:27157668

  7. Cloning-independent markerless gene editing in Streptococcus sanguinis: novel insights in type IV pilus biology.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ishwori; Berry, Jamie-Lee; Hall, Alexander M J; Pelicic, Vladimir

    2016-11-29

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a naturally competent opportunistic human pathogen, is a Gram-positive workhorse for genomics. It has recently emerged as a model for the study of type IV pili (Tfp)-exceptionally widespread and important prokaryotic filaments. To enhance genetic manipulation of Streptococcus sanguinis, we have developed a cloning-independent methodology, which uses a counterselectable marker and allows sophisticated markerless gene editing in situ We illustrate the utility of this methodology by answering several questions regarding Tfp biology by (i) deleting single or mutiple genes, (ii) altering specific bases in genes of interest, and (iii) engineering genes to encode proteins with appended affinity tags. We show that (i) the last six genes in the pil locus harbouring all the genes dedicated to Tfp biology play no role in piliation or Tfp-mediated motility, (ii) two highly conserved Asp residues are crucial for enzymatic activity of the prepilin peptidase PilD and (iii) that pilin subunits with a C-terminally appended hexa-histidine (6His) tag are still assembled into functional Tfp. The methodology for genetic manipulation we describe here should be broadly applicable.

  8. An analysis of human motion detection systems use during elder exercise routines.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Havens, Timothy C; Rantz, Marilyn; Keller, James; Casanova Abbott, Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Human motion analysis provides motion pattern and body pose estimations. This study integrates computer-vision techniques and explores a markerless human motion analysis system. Using human-computer interaction (HCI) methods and goals, researchers use a computer interface to provide feedback about range of motion to users. A total of 35 adults aged 65 and older perform three exercises in a public gym while human motion capture methods are used. Following exercises, participants are shown processed human motion images captured during exercises on a customized interface. Standardized questionnaires are used to elicit responses from users during interactions with the interface. A matrix of HCI goals (effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction) and emerging themes are used to describe interactions. Sixteen users state the interface would be useful, but not necessarily for safety purposes. Users want better image quality, when expectations are matched satisfaction increases, and unclear meaning of motion measures decreases satisfaction.

  9. WE-AB-303-03: A Scheme for Real-Time, Marker-Less and Low-Dose Tumor Tracking Using Scattering Imaging: Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H; Medin, P; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In-treatment tumor localization is critical for the management of tumor motion in lung cancer radiotherapy. Conventional tumor-tracking methods using a kV or MV x-ray projection has limited contrast. To facilitate real-time, marker-less and low-dose in-treatment image tumor tracking, we propose a novel scheme using Compton scatter imaging. This study reports Monte Carlo (MC) simulations on this scheme for the purpose of proof-of-principle. Methods: A slit x-ray beam along the patient superior-inferior (SI) direction is directed to the patient, intersecting the patient lung at a 2D plane containing majority part of the tumor motion trajectory. X-ray photons are scattered due to Compton effect from this plane, which are spatially collimated by, e.g., a pinhole, on one side of the plane and then captured by a detector behind it. The captured image, after correcting for x-ray attenuation and scatter angle variation, reflects the electron density, which allows visualization of the instantaneous anatomy on this plane. We performed MC studies on a phantom and a patient case for the initial test of this proposed method. Results: In the phantom case, the contrast-resolution calculated using tumor/lung as foreground/background for kV fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, and scattering image were 0.0625, 0.6993, and 0.5290, respectively. In the patient case, tumor motion can be clearly observed in the scatter images. Compared to fluoroscopy, scattering imaging also significantly reduced imaging dose because of its narrower beam design. Conclusion: MC simulation studies demonstrated the potential of the proposed scheme in terms of capturing the instantaneous anatomy of a patient on a 2D plane. Clear visualization of the tumor will probably facilitate ‘marker-less’ and ‘real-time’ tumor tracking with low imaging dose. NIH (1R01CA154747-01, 1R21CA178787-01A1 and 1R21EB017978-01A1)

  10. Markerless gating for lung cancer radiotherapy based on machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Li, Ruijiang; Tang, Xiaoli; Dy, Jennifer G.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-03-01

    In lung cancer radiotherapy, radiation to a mobile target can be delivered by respiratory gating, for which we need to know whether the target is inside or outside a predefined gating window at any time point during the treatment. This can be achieved by tracking one or more fiducial markers implanted inside or near the target, either fluoroscopically or electromagnetically. However, the clinical implementation of marker tracking is limited for lung cancer radiotherapy mainly due to the risk of pneumothorax. Therefore, gating without implanted fiducial markers is a promising clinical direction. We have developed several template-matching methods for fluoroscopic marker-less gating. Recently, we have modeled the gating problem as a binary pattern classification problem, in which principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) are combined to perform the classification task. Following the same framework, we investigated different combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques (PCA and four nonlinear manifold learning methods) and two machine learning classification methods (artificial neural networks—ANN and SVM). Performance was evaluated on ten fluoroscopic image sequences of nine lung cancer patients. We found that among all combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques and classification methods, PCA combined with either ANN or SVM achieved a better performance than the other nonlinear manifold learning methods. ANN when combined with PCA achieves a better performance than SVM in terms of classification accuracy and recall rate, although the target coverage is similar for the two classification methods. Furthermore, the running time for both ANN and SVM with PCA is within tolerance for real-time applications. Overall, ANN combined with PCA is a better candidate than other combinations we investigated in this work for real-time gated radiotherapy.

  11. Random transposon vectors pUTTns for the markerless integration of exogenous genes into gram-negative eubacteria chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Wang, Guangli; Shen, Bin; Wang, Rong; Song, Yao; Li, Shunpeng; Jiang, Jiandong

    2009-11-01

    A set of random transposon vectors pUTTns that facilitates the markerless integration of new functions into the chromosome of gram-negative bacteria has been developed. The vectors, which are derived from mini-Tn5 transposons, are located on a R6K-based suicide delivery plasmid that provides the IS50(R) transposase tnp gene in cis, but they are external to the mobile element. The vectors' conjugal transfer to recipients is mediated by RP4 mobilization functions in the donor. Internal to the mini-Tn5 element is a cassette that contains a selectable antibiotic resistance marker (kanamycin, chloramphenicol, or tetracycline resistance gene), a counter-selectable marker (sacB), a 430-bp repeat of the sacB gene 3' end acted as the directly-repeated (DR) sequence, and modified multiple cloning sites (MCS). After two total rounds of transposon integration and recombination between the two DRs, only the exogenous DNA inserted into the MCS (passenger genes) and a single 430-bp scar sacBDR fragment remained in the chromosome after excision. The utility of these vectors was demonstrated by integrating the organophosphorus insecticide hydrolase gene (mpd) into the chromosome of Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Paracoccus species. Sequential integration of another organophosphorus insecticide hydrolase gene (oph) into the previously engineered bacteria, without bringing any selectable markers, was also successful. These engineered bacteria were relatively stable. Cell viability and original degrading characteristics were not affected compared with the original recipients. This shows that the developed system is very useful for the markerless integration of exogenous genes into the chromosome of gram-negative eubacteria.

  12. A quantitative assessment of using the Kinect for Xbox 360 for respiratory surface motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnowami, M.; Alnwaimi, B.; Tahavori, F.; Copland, M.; Wells, K.

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes a quantitative assessment of the Microsoft Kinect for X-box360TM for potential application in tracking respiratory and body motion in diagnostic imaging and external beam radiotherapy. However, the results can also be used in many other biomedical applications. We consider the performance of the Kinect in controlled conditions and find mm precision at depths of 0.8-1.5m. We also demonstrate the use of the Kinect for monitoring respiratory motion of the anterior surface. To improve the performance of respiratory monitoring, we fit a spline model of the chest surface through the depth data as a method of a marker-less monitoring of a respiratory motion. In addition, a comparison between the Kinect camera with and without zoom lens and a marker-based system was used to evaluate the accuracy of using the Kinect camera as a respiratory tracking system.

  13. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Stephen Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  14. Real-time soft tissue motion estimation for lung tumors during radiotherapy delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rottmann, Joerg; Keall, Paul; Berbeco, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To provide real-time lung tumor motion estimation during radiotherapy treatment delivery without the need for implanted fiducial markers or additional imaging dose to the patient. Methods: 2D radiographs from the therapy beam's-eye-view (BEV) perspective are captured at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz with a frame grabber allowing direct RAM access to the image buffer. An in-house developed real-time soft tissue localization algorithm is utilized to calculate soft tissue displacement from these images in real-time. The system is tested with a Varian TX linear accelerator and an AS-1000 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device operating at a resolution of 512 × 384 pixels. The accuracy of the motion estimation is verified with a dynamic motion phantom. Clinical accuracy was tested on lung SBRT images acquired at 2 fps. Results: Real-time lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images without fiducial markers is successfully demonstrated. For the phantom study, a mean tracking error <1.0 mm [root mean square (rms) error of 0.3 mm] was observed. The tracking rms accuracy on BEV images from a lung SBRT patient (≈20 mm tumor motion range) is 1.0 mm. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate for the first time real-time markerless lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images alone. The described system can operate at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz and does not require prior knowledge to establish traceable landmarks for tracking on the fly. The authors show that the geometric accuracy is similar to (or better than) previously published markerless algorithms not operating in real-time. PMID:24007146

  15. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23353051

  17. A simple method for isolation and construction of markerless cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kouji; Keta, Sumie; Uesaka, Kazuma; Kato, Akihiro; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Ihara, Kunio; Omata, Tatsuo; Aichi, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas) secrete free fatty acids (FFAs) into the external medium and hence have been used for the studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels. While the wild-type strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is highly sensitive to exogenously added linolenic acid, mutants defective in the aas gene are known to be resistant to the externally provided fatty acid. In this study, the wild-type Synechocystis cells were shown to be sensitive to lauric, oleic, and linoleic acids as well, and the resistance to these fatty acids was shown to be enhanced by inactivation of the aas gene. On the basis of these observations, we developed an efficient method to isolate aas-deficient mutants from cultures of Synechocystis cells by counter selection using linoleic acid or linolenic acid as the selective agent. A variety of aas mutations were found in about 70 % of the FFA-resistant mutants thus selected. Various aas mutants were isolated also from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, using lauric acid as a selective agent. Selection using FFAs was useful also for construction of markerless aas knockout mutants from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Thus, genetic engineering of FFA-producing cyanobacterial strains would be greatly facilitated by the use of the FFAs for counter selection.

  18. Vision-based and marker-less surgical tool detection and tracking: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bouget, David; Allan, Max; Stoyanov, Danail; Jannin, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in surgical practice for example with Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS). To overcome challenges coming from deported eye-to-hand manipulation, robotic and computer-assisted systems have been developed. Having real-time knowledge of the pose of surgical tools with respect to the surgical camera and underlying anatomy is a key ingredient for such systems. In this paper, we present a review of the literature dealing with vision-based and marker-less surgical tool detection. This paper includes three primary contributions: (1) identification and analysis of data-sets used for developing and testing detection algorithms, (2) in-depth comparison of surgical tool detection methods from the feature extraction process to the model learning strategy and highlight existing shortcomings, and (3) analysis of validation techniques employed to obtain detection performance results and establish comparison between surgical tool detectors. The papers included in the review were selected through PubMed and Google Scholar searches using the keywords: "surgical tool detection", "surgical tool tracking", "surgical instrument detection" and "surgical instrument tracking" limiting results to the year range 2000 2015. Our study shows that despite significant progress over the years, the lack of established surgical tool data-sets, and reference format for performance assessment and method ranking is preventing faster improvement.

  19. Automatic human body modeling for vision-based motion capture system using B-spline parameterization of the silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume-i-Capó, Antoni; Varona, Javier; González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Mas, Ramon; Perales, Francisco J.

    2012-02-01

    Human motion capture has a wide variety of applications, and in vision-based motion capture systems a major issue is the human body model and its initialization. We present a computer vision algorithm for building a human body model skeleton in an automatic way. The algorithm is based on the analysis of the human shape. We decompose the body into its main parts by computing the curvature of a B-spline parameterization of the human contour. This algorithm has been applied in a context where the user is standing in front of a camera stereo pair. The process is completed after the user assumes a predefined initial posture so as to identify the main joints and construct the human model. Using this model, the initialization problem of a vision-based markerless motion capture system of the human body is solved.

  20. A highly efficient single-step, markerless strategy for multi-copy chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Liang, Youyun; Zhang, Mingzi M; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in genome editing capabilities for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chromosomal integration of large biochemical pathways for stable industrial production remains challenging. In this work, we developed a simple platform for high-efficiency, single-step, markerless, multi-copy chromosomal integration of full biochemical pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this Di-CRISPR (delta integration CRISPR-Cas) platform based on the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated systems (Cas), we specifically designed guide RNA sequences to target multiple delta sites in the yeast genome. The generation of double stranded breaks at the delta sites allowed simultaneous integration of multiple copies of linearized donor DNA containing large biochemical pathways. With our newly developed Di-CRISPR platform, we were able to attain highly efficient and markerless integration of large biochemical pathways and achieve an unprecedented 18-copy genomic integration of a 24 kb combined xylose utilization and (R,R)-2,3-butanediol (BDO) production pathway in a single step, thus generating a strain that was able to produce BDO directly from xylose. The simplicity and high efficiency of the Di-CRISPR platform could provide a superior alternative to high copy plasmids and would render this platform an invaluable tool for genome editing and metabolic engineering in S. cerevisiae.

  1. An upp-based markerless gene replacement method for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering in Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chi; Gong, Ting; Zuo, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Fengjie; Fan, Xu; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-06-01

    A markerless gene replacement method was adapted by combining a suicide plasmid, pEX18Tc, with a counterselectable marker, the upp gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase), for the medium-chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA(MCL))-producing strain Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01. An NK-01 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant background strain was first constructed by deleting the chromosomal upp gene. The suicide plasmid pEX18Tc, carrying a functional allele of the upp gene of P. mendocina NK-01, was used to construct the vectors to delete the algA (encoding mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase) and phaZ (encoding PHA(MCL) depolymerase) genes, and a 30 kb chromosomal fragment in the 5-FU resistant background host. The genes were removed efficiently from the genome of P. mendocina NK-01 and left a markerless chromosomal mutant. In addition, two exogenous genes were inserted into the phaC1 (PHA(MCL) polymerase) loci of Pseudomonas putida KT-∆UPP simultaneously. Thus, we constructed a genetically stable and marker-free P. putida KT2440 mutant with integrated mpd (encoding methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH)) and pytH (encoding a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (PytH)) gene on the chromosome. The upp-based counterselection system could be further adapted for P. mendocina NK-01 and P. putida KT2440 and used for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering.

  2. Visual motion integration for perception and pursuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, L. S.; Beutter, B. R.; Lorenceau, J.

    2000-01-01

    To examine the relationship between visual motion processing for perception and pursuit, we measured the pursuit eye-movement and perceptual responses to the same complex-motion stimuli. We show that humans can both perceive and pursue the motion of line-figure objects, even when partial occlusion makes the resulting image motion vastly different from the underlying object motion. Our results show that both perception and pursuit can perform largely accurate motion integration, i.e. the selective combination of local motion signals across the visual field to derive global object motion. Furthermore, because we manipulated perceived motion while keeping image motion identical, the observed parallel changes in perception and pursuit show that the motion signals driving steady-state pursuit and perception are linked. These findings disprove current pursuit models whose control strategy is to minimize retinal image motion, and suggest a new framework for the interplay between visual cortex and cerebellum in visuomotor control.

  3. Markerless attenuation correction for carotid MRI surface receiver coils in combined PET/MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldib, Mootaz; Bini, Jason; Robson, Philip M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Faul, David D.; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of attenuation of MR coils on quantitative carotid PET/MR exams. Additionally, an automated attenuation correction method for flexible carotid MR coils was developed and evaluated. The attenuation of the carotid coil was measured by imaging a uniform water phantom injected with 37 MBq of 18F-FDG in a combined PET/MR scanner for 24 min with and without the coil. In the same session, an ultra-short echo time (UTE) image of the coil on top of the phantom was acquired. Using a combination of rigid and non-rigid registration, a CT-based attenuation map was registered to the UTE image of the coil for attenuation and scatter correction. After phantom validation, the effect of the carotid coil attenuation and the attenuation correction method were evaluated in five subjects. Phantom studies indicated that the overall loss of PET counts due to the coil was 6.3% with local region-of-interest (ROI) errors reaching up to 18.8%. Our registration method to correct for attenuation from the coil decreased the global error and local error (ROI) to 0.8% and 3.8%, respectively. The proposed registration method accurately captured the location and shape of the coil with a maximum spatial error of 2.6 mm. Quantitative analysis in human studies correlated with the phantom findings, but was dependent on the size of the ROI used in the analysis. MR coils result in significant error in PET quantification and thus attenuation correction is needed. The proposed strategy provides an operator-free method for attenuation and scatter correction for a flexible MRI carotid surface coil for routine clinical use.

  4. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  5. A dual-Kinect approach to determine torso surface motion for respiratory motion correction in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Heß, Mirco Büther, Florian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P.; Gigengack, Fabian

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is commonly used to reduce blurring effects and attenuation correction artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET). Established clinically available methods that employ body-attached hardware for acquiring respiration signals rely on the assumption that external surface motion and internal organ motion are well correlated. In this paper, the authors present a markerless method comprising two Microsoft Kinects for determining the motion on the whole torso surface and aim to demonstrate its validity and usefulness—including the potential to study the external/internal correlation and to provide useful information for more advanced correction approaches. Methods: The data of two Kinects are used to calculate 3D representations of a patient’s torso surface with high spatial coverage. Motion signals can be obtained for any position by tracking the mean distance to a virtual camera with a view perpendicular to the surrounding surface. The authors have conducted validation experiments including volunteers and a moving high-precision platform to verify the method’s suitability for providing meaningful data. In addition, the authors employed it during clinical {sup 18}F-FDG-PET scans and exemplarily analyzed the acquired data of ten cancer patients. External signals of abdominal and thoracic regions as well as data-driven signals were used for gating and compared with respect to detected displacement of present lesions. Additionally, the authors quantified signal similarities and time shifts by analyzing cross-correlation sequences. Results: The authors’ results suggest a Kinect depth resolution of approximately 1 mm at 75 cm distance. Accordingly, valid signals could be obtained for surface movements with small amplitudes in the range of only few millimeters. In this small sample of ten patients, the abdominal signals were better suited for gating the PET data than the thoracic signals and the correlation of data-driven signals was

  6. Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1985-02-01

    Brownian motion, the doubly random motion of small particles suspended in a liquid due to molecular collisions, and its implications and applications in the history of modern science are discussed. Topics examined include probabilistic phenomena, the kinetic theory of gases, Einstein's atomic theory of Brownian motion, particle displacement, diffusion measurements, the determination of the mass of the atom and of Avogadro's number, the statistical mechanics of thermodynamics, nonequilibrium systems, Langevin's equation of motion, time-reversed evolution, mathematical analogies, and applications in economics and radio navigation. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  7. Structured light-based motion tracking in the limited view of an MR head coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erikshøj, M.; Olesen, O. V.; Conradsen, K.; Højgaard, L.; Larsen, R.

    2013-02-01

    A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions of the facial surface. The point clouds are continuously realigned to a reference scan to obtain pose estimates. The system has been tested on a mannequin head performing controlled rotational and translational axial movements within the head coil outside the range of the magnetic field. The RMS of the residual error of the rotation was 0.11° and the RMS difference in the translation with the control system was 0.17 mm, within the trackable range of movement.

  8. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  9. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  10. Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a period-long activity using battery powered cars rolling in a circular motion on a tile floor. Students measure the time and distance as the car moves to derive the equation for centripetal acceleration. (MVL)

  11. Autoadaptive motion modelling for MR-based respiratory motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian F; Kolbitsch, Christoph; McClelland, Jamie R; Rueckert, Daniel; King, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    the autoadaptive motion model yielded 21.45% more accurate motion estimations compared to a non-adaptive motion model 10 min after a change in breathing pattern. On real data we demonstrated the method's ability to maintain motion estimation accuracy despite a drift in the respiratory baseline. Due to the cardiac gating of the imaging data, the method is currently limited to one update per heart beat and the calibration requires approximately 12 min of scanning. Furthermore, the method has a prediction latency of 800 ms. These limitations may be overcome in future work by altering the acquisition protocol.

  12. A Support System for Motion Training Using Motion Capture and Acceleration Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Onai, Rikio

    This paper presents a support system for motion training for dances, sports, gestures, etc. In our previous study, we developed a prototype system for supporting motion training using motion caputure, i.e., marker tracking using a DV camera. The prototype system scores a user's motion by comparing tracking data of the user and a model with DP matching. The prototype system has a limit that it cannot accurately obtain acceleration of each part of the body because marker tracking using a DV camera cannot obtain three dimensional motion. By this limit, two different motions sometimes cannot be distinguished. For more effective motion training, in this study, we propose a system combining motion capture and acceleration sensors. We have examined the effectiveness of using acceleration sensors in motion training by comparing the proposed system with the prototype system. Experimental results have shown that two different motions can be more clearly distinguished by using the acceleration sensors.

  13. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  14. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  15. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... but it is more common in children, pregnant women, and people taking certain medicines. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy feeling and cold sweats. It can then lead to dizziness and nausea and vomiting. Your brain senses movement by getting signals from your inner ears, eyes, ...

  16. Evaluation of the effect of respiratory and anatomical variables on a Fourier technique for markerless, self-sorted 4D-CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergalasova, I.; Cai, J.; Giles, W.; Segars, W. P.; Yin, F. F.

    2013-10-01

    A novel technique based on Fourier transform theory has been developed that directly extracts respiratory information from projections without the use of external surrogates. While the feasibility has been demonstrated with three patients, a more extensive validation is necessary. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of a variety of respiratory and anatomical scenarios on the performance of the technique with the 4D digital extended cardiac torso phantom. FT-phase and FT-magnitude methods were each applied to identify peak-inspiration projections and quantitatively compared to the gold standard of visual identification. Both methods proved to be robust across the studied scenarios with average differences in respiratory phase <10% and percentage of projections assigned within 10% of the gold standard >90%, when incorporating minor modifications to region-of-interest (ROI) selection and/or low-frequency location for select cases of DA and lung percentage in the field of view of the projection. Nevertheless, in the instance where one method initially faltered, the other method prevailed and successfully identified peak-inspiration projections. This is promising because it suggests that the two methods provide complementary information to each other. To ensure appropriate clinical adaptation of markerless, self-sorted four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), perhaps an optimal integration of the two methods can be developed.

  17. BIOACCESSIBILITY TESTS ACCURATELY ESTIMATE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of soil-borne Pb to wild birds may be more accurately quantified if the bioavailability of that Pb is known. To better understand the bioavailability of Pb to birds, we measured blood Pb concentrations in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) fed diets containing Pb-contaminated soils. Relative bioavailabilities were expressed by comparison with blood Pb concentrations in quail fed a Pb acetate reference diet. Diets containing soil from five Pb-contaminated Superfund sites had relative bioavailabilities from 33%-63%, with a mean of about 50%. Treatment of two of the soils with P significantly reduced the bioavailability of Pb. The bioaccessibility of the Pb in the test soils was then measured in six in vitro tests and regressed on bioavailability. They were: the “Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure” (RBALP) at pH 1.5, the same test conducted at pH 2.5, the “Ohio State University In vitro Gastrointestinal” method (OSU IVG), the “Urban Soil Bioaccessible Lead Test”, the modified “Physiologically Based Extraction Test” and the “Waterfowl Physiologically Based Extraction Test.” All regressions had positive slopes. Based on criteria of slope and coefficient of determination, the RBALP pH 2.5 and OSU IVG tests performed very well. Speciation by X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that, on average, most of the Pb in the sampled soils was sorbed to minerals (30%), bound to organic matter 24%, or present as Pb sulfate 18%. Ad

  18. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  19. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  20. Local intensity feature tracking and motion modeling for respiratory signal extraction in cone beam CT projections.

    PubMed

    Dhou, Salam; Motai, Yuichi; Hugo, Geoffrey D

    2013-02-01

    Accounting for respiration motion during imaging can help improve targeting precision in radiation therapy. We propose local intensity feature tracking (LIFT), a novel markerless breath phase sorting method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan images. The contributions of this study are twofold. First, LIFT extracts the respiratory signal from the CBCT projections of the thorax depending only on tissue feature points that exhibit respiration. Second, the extracted respiratory signal is shown to correlate with standard respiration signals. LIFT extracts feature points in the first CBCT projection of a sequence and tracks those points in consecutive projections forming trajectories. Clustering is applied to select trajectories showing an oscillating behavior similar to the breath motion. Those "breathing" trajectories are used in a 3-D reconstruction approach to recover the 3-D motion of the lung which represents the respiratory signal. Experiments were conducted on datasets exhibiting regular and irregular breathing patterns. Results showed that LIFT-based respiratory signal correlates with the diaphragm position-based signal with an average phase shift of 1.68 projections as well as with the internal marker-based signal with an average phase shift of 1.78 projections. LIFT was able to detect the respiratory signal in all projections of all datasets.

  1. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  2. Development of a markerless genetic exchange system for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and its use in generating a strain with increased transformation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kimberly L; Bender, Kelly S; Wall, Judy D

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), whereas a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this in-frame deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1,000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

  3. Development of a Markerless Genetic Exchange System in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Its Use in Generating a Strain with Increased Transformation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Bender, Kelly S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2009-07-21

    In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); whereas, a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this inframe deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system, that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

  4. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  5. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Christopher C.; Ehrsson, H. Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates. PMID:27994538

  6. The Effects of Grade Level, Type of Motion, Cueing Strategy, Pictorial Complexity, and Color on Children's Interpretation of Implied Motion in Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the ability of 64 kindergarten and third-grade children to interpret implied motion in pictures accurately. Third graders were more adept at identifying implied motion. Results also show that postural motion was more effective than a flow-line condition in conveying motion, and that cues and relevant pictorial background information…

  7. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  8. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  9. SU-E-J-59: Feasibility of Markerless Tumor Tracking by Sequential Dual-Energy Fluoroscopy On a Clinical Tumor Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Dhont, J; Poels, K; Verellen, D; Tournel, K; Gevaert, T; Steenbeke, F; Burghelea, M; De Ridder, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of markerless tumor tracking through the implementation of a novel dual-energy imaging approach into the clinical dynamic tracking (DT) workflow of the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Two sequential 20 s (11 Hz) fluoroscopy sequences were acquired at the start of one fraction for 7 patients treated for primary and metastatic lung cancer with DT on the Vero system. Sequences were acquired using 2 on-board kV imaging systems located at ±45° from the MV beam axis, at respectively 60 kVp (3.2 mAs) and 120 kVp (2.0 mAs). Offline, a normalized cross-correlation algorithm was applied to match the high (HE) and low energy (LE) images. Per breathing phase (inhale, exhale, maximum inhale and maximum exhale), the 5 best-matching HE and LE couples were extracted for DE subtraction. A contrast analysis according to gross tumor volume was conducted based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Improved tumor visibility was quantified using an improvement ratio. Results: Using the implanted fiducial as a benchmark, HE-LE sequence matching was effective for 13 out of 14 imaging angles. Overlying bony anatomy was removed on all DE images. With the exception of two imaging angles, the DE images showed no significantly improved tumor visibility compared to HE images, with an improvement ratio averaged over all patients of 1.46 ± 1.64. Qualitatively, it was observed that for those imaging angles that showed no significantly improved CNR, the tumor tissue could not be reliably visualized on neither HE nor DE images due to a total or partial overlap with other soft tissue. Conclusion: Dual-energy subtraction imaging by sequential orthogonal fluoroscopy was shown feasible by implementing an additional LE fluoroscopy sequence. However, for most imaging angles, DE images did not provide improved tumor visibility over single-energy images. Optimizing imaging angles is likely to improve tumor visibility and the efficacy of dual-energy imaging. This work was in

  10. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals.

  11. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  12. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, D. C.; Goorvitch, D.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schrodinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  13. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  14. A Programmable System for Motion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlin, Brent C.

    2003-01-01

    The need for improved flow measurements in the flow path of aeronautics testing facilities has led the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a new motion control system. The new system is programmable, offering a flexibility unheard of in previous systems. The motion control system is PLC-based, which leads to highly accurate positioning ability, as well as reliability. The user interface is a software-based HMI package, which also adds flexibility to the overall system. The system also has the ability to create and execute motion profiles. This paper discusses the system's operation, control implementation, and experiences.

  15. A programmable motion phantom for quality assurance of motion management in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, L; Kron, T; Johnston, P N; McDermott, L N; Taylor, M L; Callahan, J; Franich, R D

    2012-03-01

    A commercially available motion phantom (QUASAR, Modus Medical) was modified for programmable motion control with the aim of reproducing patient respiratory motion in one dimension in both the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions, as well as, providing controllable breath-hold and sinusoidal patterns for the testing of radiotherapy gating systems. In order to simulate realistic patient motion, the DC motor was replaced by a stepper motor. A separate 'chest-wall' motion platform was also designed to accommodate a variety of surrogate marker systems. The platform employs a second stepper motor that allows for the decoupling of the chest-wall and insert motion. The platform's accuracy was tested by replicating patient traces recorded with the Varian real-time position management (RPM) system and comparing the motion platform's recorded motion trace with the original patient data. Six lung cancer patient traces recorded with the RPM system were uploaded to the motion platform's in-house control software and subsequently replicated through the phantom motion platform. The phantom's motion profile was recorded with the RPM system and compared to the original patient data. Sinusoidal and breath-hold patterns were simulated with the motion platform and recorded with the RPM system to verify the systems potential for routine quality assurance of commercial radiotherapy gating systems. There was good correlation between replicated and actual patient data (P 0.003). Mean differences between the location of maxima in replicated and patient data-sets for six patients amounted to 0.034 cm with the corresponding minima mean equal to 0.010 cm. The upgraded motion phantom was found to replicate patient motion accurately as well as provide useful test patterns to aid in the quality assurance of motion management methods and technologies.

  16. Computational Time-Accurate Body Movement: Methodology, Validation, and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    used that had a leading-edge sweep angle of 45 deg and a NACA 64A010 symmetrical airfoil section. A cross section of the pylon is a symmetrical...25 2. Information Flow for the Time-Accurate Store Trajectory Prediction Process . . . . . . . . . 26 3. Pitch Rates for NACA -0012 Airfoil...section are comparisons of the computational results to data for a NACA -0012 airfoil following a predefined pitching motion. Validation of the

  17. Comparison of Motion Blur Measurement Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    2008-01-01

    Motion blur is a significant display property for which accurate, valid measurement methods are needed. Recent measurements of a set of eight displays by a set of six measurement devices provide an opportunity to evaluate techniques of measurement and of the analysis of those measurements.

  18. A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step-counting error.

    PubMed

    Abel, Mark G; Peritore, Nicole; Shapiro, Robert; Mullineaux, David R; Rodriguez, Kelly; Hannon, James C

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the effect that walking speed, gender, leg length, motion sensor tilt angle, brand, and placement have on motion sensor step-counting error. Fifty-nine participants performed treadmill walking trials at 6 speeds while wearing 5 motion sensor brands placed on the anterior (Digiwalker, DW; Walk4Life, WFL; New Lifestyles, NL; Omron, OM), midaxillary (DW; WFL; NL; ActiGraph, AG), and posterior (DW, WFL, NL) aspects of the waistline. The anterior-placed NL and midaxillary-placed AG were the most accurate motion sensors. Motion sensor step-count error tended to decrease at faster walking speeds, with lesser tilt angles, and with an anterior waistline placement. Gender and leg length had no effect on motion sensor step-count error. We conclude that the NL and AG yielded the most accurate step counts at a range of walking speeds in individuals with different physical characteristics.

  19. Visualizing and Quantifying Oceanic Motion.

    PubMed

    Rossby, T

    2016-01-01

    Here I review the use of two highly complementary acoustical technologies for measuring currents in the ocean: acoustically tracked neutrally buoyant floats and vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The beauty of floats lies in their ability to efficiently and accurately visualize fluid motion in fronts and vortices and the dispersion caused by mesoscale eddy processes. Floats complement classical hydrography by articulating mechanisms and pathways by which waters spread out from their source region. Vessel-mounted ADCPs can profile the water column at O(1 km) horizontal resolution to depths greater than 1,000 m. These vessel-based scans capture in detail the cross-stream structure of fronts and eddies as well as the impact of bathymetry on currents. Sustained sampling along selected routes builds up valuable databases both for statistical studies of the submesoscale velocity field and for accurate estimates of fluid transport, as well as how these vary over time.

  20. Visualizing and Quantifying Oceanic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, T.

    2016-01-01

    Here I review the use of two highly complementary acoustical technologies for measuring currents in the ocean: acoustically tracked neutrally buoyant floats and vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The beauty of floats lies in their ability to efficiently and accurately visualize fluid motion in fronts and vortices and the dispersion caused by mesoscale eddy processes. Floats complement classical hydrography by articulating mechanisms and pathways by which waters spread out from their source region. Vessel-mounted ADCPs can profile the water column at O(1 km) horizontal resolution to depths greater than 1,000 m. These vessel-based scans capture in detail the cross-stream structure of fronts and eddies as well as the impact of bathymetry on currents. Sustained sampling along selected routes builds up valuable databases both for statistical studies of the submesoscale velocity field and for accurate estimates of fluid transport, as well as how these vary over time.

  1. SimPACE: generating simulated motion corrupted BOLD data with synthetic-navigated acquisition for the development and evaluation of SLOMOCO: a new, highly effective slicewise motion correction

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Erik B.; Lowe, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Head motion in functional MRI and resting-state MRI is a major problem. Existing methods do not robustly reflect the true level of motion artifact for in vivo fMRI data. The primary issue is that current methods assume motion is synchronized to the volume acquisition and thus ignore intra-volume motion. This manuscript covers three sections in the use of gold-standard motion-corrupted data to pursue an intra-volume motion correction. First, we present a way to get motion corrupted data with accurately known motion at the slice acquisition level. This technique simulates important data acquisition-related motion artifacts while acquiring real BOLD MRI data. It is based on a novel motion-injection pulse sequence that introduces known motion independently for every slice: Simulated Prospective Acquisition CorrEction (SimPACE). Secondly, with data acquired using SimPACE, we evaluate several motion correction and characterization techniques, including several commonly used BOLD signal- and motion parameter-based metrics. Finally, we introduce and evaluate a novel, slice-based motion correction technique. Our novel method, SLice-Oriented MOtion COrrection (SLOMOCO) performs better than the volumetric methods and, moreover, accurately detects the motion of independent slices, in this case equivalent to the known injected motion. We demonstrate that SLOMOCO can model and correct for nearly all effects of motion in BOLD data. Also, none of the commonly used motion metrics was observed to robustly identify motion corrupted events, especially in the most realistic scenario of sudden head movement. For some popular metrics, performance was poor even when using the ideal known slice motion instead of volumetric parameters. This has negative implications for methods relying on these metrics, such as recently proposed motion correction methods such as data censoring and global signal regression. PMID:24969568

  2. Motion field and optical flow: Qualitative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verri, Alessandro; Poggio, Tomaso

    1986-12-01

    The optical flow, a 2-D field that can be associated with the variation of the image brightness pattern, and the 2-D motion field, the projection on the image plane of the 3-D velocity field of a moving scene, are in general different, unless very special conditions are satisfied. The optical flow, therefore, is ill suited for computing structure from motion, and for reconstructing the 3-D velocity field, problems that require an accurate estimate of the 2-D motion field. A different use of the optical flow is suggested. Stable field and the 3-D structure of the scene, and they can usually be obtained from the optical flow. The smoothed optical flow and 2-D motion field, interpreted as vector fields tangent to flows of planar dynamical systems, may have the same qualitative properties from the point of view of the theory of structural stability of dynamical systems.

  3. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  4. Dual motion valve with single motion input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A dual motion valve includes two dual motion valve assemblies with a rotary input which allows the benefits of applying both rotary and axial motion to a rotary sealing element with a plurality of ports. The motion of the rotary sealing element during actuation provides axial engagement of the rotary sealing element with a stationary valve plate which also has ports. Fluid passages are created through the valve when the ports of the rotary sealing element are aligned with the ports of the stationary valve plate. Alignment is achieved through rotation of the rotary sealing element with respect to the stationary valve plate. The fluid passages provide direct paths which minimize fluid turbulence created in the fluid as it passes through the valve.

  5. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  6. Accurate measurement of the pulse wave delay with imaging photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Sidorov, Igor S.; Babayan, Laura; Volynsky, Maxim A.; Giniatullin, Rashid; Mamontov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the cardiovascular parameters using noncontact video-based or imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG) is usually considered as inaccurate because of strong influence of motion artefacts. To optimize this technique we performed a simultaneous recording of electrocardiogram and video frames of the face for 36 healthy volunteers. We found that signal disturbances originate mainly from the stochastically enhanced dichroic notch caused by endogenous cardiovascular mechanisms, with smaller contribution of the motion artefacts. Our properly designed algorithm allowed us to increase accuracy of the pulse-transit-time measurement and visualize propagation of the pulse wave in the facial region. Thus, the accurate measurement of the pulse wave parameters with this technique suggests a sensitive approach to assess local regulation of microcirculation in various physiological and pathological states. PMID:28018731

  7. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  8. Accurate orbit propagation with planetary close encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baù, Giulio; Milani Comparetti, Andrea; Guerra, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    We tackle the problem of accurately propagating the motion of those small bodies that undergo close approaches with a planet. The literature is lacking on this topic and the reliability of the numerical results is not sufficiently discussed. The high-frequency components of the perturbation generated by a close encounter makes the propagation particularly challenging both from the point of view of the dynamical stability of the formulation and the numerical stability of the integrator. In our approach a fixed step-size and order multistep integrator is combined with a regularized formulation of the perturbed two-body problem. When the propagated object enters the region of influence of a celestial body, the latter becomes the new primary body of attraction. Moreover, the formulation and the step-size will also be changed if necessary. We present: 1) the restarter procedure applied to the multistep integrator whenever the primary body is changed; 2) new analytical formulae for setting the step-size (given the order of the multistep, formulation and initial osculating orbit) in order to control the accumulation of the local truncation error and guarantee the numerical stability during the propagation; 3) a new definition of the region of influence in the phase space. We test the propagator with some real asteroids subject to the gravitational attraction of the planets, the Yarkovsky and relativistic perturbations. Our goal is to show that the proposed approach improves the performance of both the propagator implemented in the OrbFit software package (which is currently used by the NEODyS service) and of the propagator represented by a variable step-size and order multistep method combined with Cowell's formulation (i.e. direct integration of position and velocity in either the physical or a fictitious time).

  9. Image-guided tumor motion modeling and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wu, Y.; Liu, W.; Christensen, J.; Tai, A.; Li, A. X.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important procedure in the treatment of cancer in the thorax and abdomen. However, its efficacy can be severely limited by breathing induced tumor motion. Tumor motion causes uncertainty in the tumor's location and consequently limits the radiation dosage (for fear of damaging normal tissue). This paper describes a novel signal model for tumor motion tracking/prediction that can potentially improve RT results. Using CT and breathing sensor data, it provides a more accurate characterization of the breathing and tumor motion than previous work and is non-invasive. The efficacy of our model is demonstrated on patient data.

  10. Motion through syntactic frames.

    PubMed

    Feist, Michele I

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of Talmy's (1985, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the fact of motion in motion verbs, while a second class, S-languages, tends to encode manner. In the experimental literature, it was reasoned that speakers may be expected to extend novel verbs in accordance with the lexicalization patterns of their native languages. However, the results regarding this prediction are mixed. In this paper, I examine the interplay between the meaning encoded in the motion verb itself and the meaning encoded in the motion description construction, offering a Gricean explanation for co-occurrence patterns and, by extension, for the mixed results. I then explore the implications of this argument for research on possible language effects on thought in this domain.

  11. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  12. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  13. Measurement of visual motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hildreth, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the measurement of visual motion and the use of relative movement to locate the boundaries of physical objects in the environment. It investigates the nature of the computations that are necessary to perform this analysis by any vision system, biological or artificial. Contents: Introduction. Background. Computation of the Velocity Field. An Algorithm to Compute the Velocity Field. The Computation of Motion Discontinuities. Perceptual Studies of Motion Measurement. The Psychophysics of Discontinuity Detection. Neurophysiological Studies of Motion. Summary and Conclusions. References. Author and Subject Indexes.

  14. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  15. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  16. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  17. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  18. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of…

  19. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  20. Naive Conceptions of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Two experiments were conducted to characterize the system of beliefs that make up the naive impetus theory of motion and to determine what effects physics instruction has on students' conceptions of motion. Thirteen college students were asked to solve several quantitative problems and were interviewed about their answers in the first experiment.…

  1. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  2. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  3. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  4. Predictability of the Earth's polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive, experimental study of the predictability of the polar motion using a homogeneous BIH (Bureau International de l'Heure) data set is presented. Based on knowledge of the physics of the annual and the Chandler wobbles, the numerical model for the polar motion is constructed by allowing the wobble periods to vary. Using an optimum base length of 6 years for prediction, this floating-period model, equipped with a non-linear least-squares estimator, is found to yield polar motion predictions accurate from 0.012 to 0.024 inches depending on the prediction length up to one year, corresponding to a predictability of 91-83%. This represents a considerable improvement over the conventional fixed-period predictor, which does not respond to variations in the apparent wobble periods. The superiority of the floating-period predictor to other predictors based on critically different numerical models is also demonstrated.

  5. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  6. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  11. Reducing motion artifacts in photoplethysmograms by using relative sensor motion: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijshoff, Ralph W. C. G. R.; Mischi, Massimo; Veen, Jeroen; van der Lee, Alexander M.; Aarts, Ronald M.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, photoplethysmograms (PPGs) are mostly used to determine a patient's blood oxygenation and pulse rate. However, PPG morphology conveys more information about the patient's cardiovascular status. Extracting this information requires measuring clean PPG waveforms that are free of artifacts. PPGs are highly susceptible to motion, which can distort the PPG-derived data. Part of the motion artifacts are considered to result from sensor-tissue motion and sensor deformation. It is hypothesized that these motion artifacts correlate with movement of the sensor with respect to the skin. This hypothesis has been proven true in a laboratory setup. In vitro PPGs have been measured in a skin perfusion phantom that is illuminated by a laser diode. Optical motion artifacts are generated in the PPG by translating the laser diode with respect to the PPG photodiode. The optical motion artifacts have been reduced significantly in vitro, by using a normalized least-mean-square algorithm with only a single coefficient that uses the laser's displacement as a reference for the motion artifacts. Laser displacement has been measured accurately via self-mixing interferometry by a compact laser diode with a ball lens integrated into the package, which can be easily integrated into a commercial sensor.

  12. Robotics-based synthesis of human motion.

    PubMed

    Khatib, O; Demircan, E; De Sapio, V; Sentis, L; Besier, T; Delp, S

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of human motion is a complex procedure that involves accurate reconstruction of movement sequences, modeling of musculoskeletal kinematics, dynamics and actuation, and characterization of reliable performance criteria. Many of these processes have much in common with the problems found in robotics research. Task-based methods used in robotics may be leveraged to provide novel musculoskeletal modeling methods and physiologically accurate performance predictions. In this paper, we present (i) a new method for the real-time reconstruction of human motion trajectories using direct marker tracking, (ii) a task-driven muscular effort minimization criterion and (iii) new human performance metrics for dynamic characterization of athletic skills. Dynamic motion reconstruction is achieved through the control of a simulated human model to follow the captured marker trajectories in real-time. The operational space control and real-time simulation provide human dynamics at any configuration of the performance. A new criteria of muscular effort minimization has been introduced to analyze human static postures. Extensive motion capture experiments were conducted to validate the new minimization criterion. Finally, new human performance metrics were introduced to study in details an athletic skill. These metrics include the effort expenditure and the feasible set of operational space accelerations during the performance of the skill. The dynamic characterization takes into account skeletal kinematics as well as muscle routing kinematics and force generating capacities. The developments draw upon an advanced musculoskeletal modeling platform and a task-oriented framework for the effective integration of biomechanics and robotics methods.

  13. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  14. Motion of multiple helical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    In 1912 Joukowsky deduced that in an unbounded ideal fluid a set of helical vortices--when these are equal, coaxial and symmetrically arranged--would translate and rotate steadily while the vortices preserve their form and relative position. Each vortex is an infinite tube whose cross-section is circular (with radius a) and whose centerline is a helix of pitch L and radius R. The motion is thus determined by three non-dimensional parameters only: the number of vortices N, the vortex radius α = a / R and the vortex pitch τ = L / 2 πR . Here, we express the linear and angular velocities of the vortices as the sum of the mutually induced velocities found by Okulov (2004) and the self-induced velocities found by Velasco Fuentes (2015). We verified that our results are accurate over the whole range of values of the vortices' pitch and radius by numerically computing the vortex motion with two smoothed versions of the Biot-Savart law. It was found that the translation velocity U grows with the number of vortices (N) but decreases as the vortices' radius and pitch (a and τ, respectively) increase; in contrast, the rotation velocity Ω grows with N and a but has a local minimum around τ = 1 for fixed values of N and a.

  15. Inverse planning incorporating organ motion.

    PubMed

    Li, J G; Xing, L

    2000-07-01

    Accurate targeting is important in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The positional uncertainties of structures with respect to the external beams arise in part from random organ motion and patient setup errors. While it is important to improve immobilization and reduce the influence of organ motion, the residual effects should be included in the IMRT plan design. Current inverse planning algorithms follow the conventional approach and include uncertainties by assuming population-based margins to the target and sensitive structures. Margin around a structure represents a "hard boundary" and the fact that a structure has a spatial probability distribution has been completely ignored. With increasing understanding of spatial uncertainties of structures and the technical capability of fine-tuning the dose distribution on an individual beamlet level in IMRT, it seems timely and important to fully utilize the information in the planning process. This will reduce the "effective" margins of the structures and facilitate dose escalation. Instead of specifying a "hard margin," we describe an inverse planning algorithm which takes into consideration positional uncertainty in terms of spatial probability distribution. The algorithm was demonstrated by assuming that the random organ motion can be represented by a three-dimensional Gaussian distribution function. Other probability distributions can be dealt with similarly. In particular, the commonly used "hard margin" is a special case of the current approach with a uniform probability distribution within a specified range. The algorithm was applied to plan treatment for a prostate case and a pancreatic case. The results were compared with those obtained by adding a margin to the clinical target volume. Better sparing of the sensitive structures were obtained in both cases using the proposed method for approximately the same target coverage.

  16. Assessment of Psychophysiological Responses During Motion Sickness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoud, Cynthia S.; Toscano, William B.; Cowings, Patricia; Freidman, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate a methodology designed to accurately trace the temporal progression of motion sickness and space motion sickness symptoms. With this method, subjects continuously monitor their own motion sickness symptoms during exposure to a provocative stimulus as symptoms occur, in contrast to previous methods during which subjects report symptoms verbally at discrete time intervals. This method not only is comparable to previous methods in the type of symptoms that subjects report, but subjects report symptoms more frequently. Frequent reporting of motion sickness symptoms allows researchers to detail the waxing and waning of motion sickness symptoms for each individual. Previous research has shown that physiological responses to motion sickness stimuli are characterized by unique individual differences in response patterns. By improving our assessment of motion sickness symptoms with continuous monitoring of symptoms, the relationship between specific physiological responses and sickness levels can be more accurately determined for each individual. Results from this study show significant positive relationships between skin conductance levels and symptom levels for ten individuals; a significant positive relationship between temperature and symptom levels for 5 of 10 individuals; and both positive and negative relationships between respiration, heart rate, blood volume pulse and symptom levels. Continuous monitoring of motion sickness symptoms can be used to more accurately assess motion sickness to aid in the evaluation of countermeasures. In addition, recognition of the onset of symptoms that are strongly related to specific physiological responses could be used as cues to initiate procedures (e.g., Autogenic Feedback Training) to prevent the development of severe motion sickness symptoms.

  17. Visualizing motion in video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lisa M.; Crayne, Susan

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we present a visualization system and method for measuring, inspecting and analyzing motion in video. Starting from a simple motion video, the system creates a still image representation which we call a digital strobe photograph. Similar to visualization techniques used in conventional film photography to capture high-speed motion using strobe lamps or very fast shutters, and to capture time-lapse motion where the shutter is left open, this methodology creates a single image showing the motion of one or a small number of objects over time. Based on digital background subtraction, we assume that the background is stationary or at most slowing changing and that the camera position is fixed. The method is capable of displaying the motion based on a parameter indicating the time step between successive movements. It can also overcome problems of visualizing movement that is obscured by previous movements. The method is used in an educational software tool for children to measure and analyze various motions. Examples are given using simple physical objects such as balls and pendulums, astronomical events such as the path of the stars around the north pole at night, or the different types of locomotion used by snakes.

  18. Motion coherence affects human perception and pursuit similarly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    2000-01-01

    Pursuit and perception both require accurate information about the motion of objects. Recovering the motion of objects by integrating the motion of their components is a difficult visual task. Successful integration produces coherent global object motion, while a failure to integrate leaves the incoherent local motions of the components unlinked. We compared the ability of perception and pursuit to perform motion integration by measuring direction judgments and the concomitant eye-movement responses to line-figure parallelograms moving behind stationary rectangular apertures. The apertures were constructed such that only the line segments corresponding to the parallelogram's sides were visible; thus, recovering global motion required the integration of the local segment motion. We investigated several potential motion-integration rules by using stimuli with different object, vector-average, and line-segment terminator-motion directions. We used an oculometric decision rule to directly compare direction discrimination for pursuit and perception. For visible apertures, the percept was a coherent object, and both the pursuit and perceptual performance were close to the object-motion prediction. For invisible apertures, the percept was incoherently moving segments, and both the pursuit and perceptual performance were close to the terminator-motion prediction. Furthermore, both psychometric and oculometric direction thresholds were much higher for invisible apertures than for visible apertures. We constructed a model in which both perception and pursuit are driven by a shared motion-processing stage, with perception having an additional input from an independent static-processing stage. Model simulations were consistent with our perceptual and oculomotor data. Based on these results, we propose the use of pursuit as an objective and continuous measure of perceptual coherence. Our results support the view that pursuit and perception share a common motion

  19. Deblurring for spatial and temporal varying motion with optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Xue, Dongfeng; Hui, Zhao

    2016-05-01

    A way to estimate and remove spatially and temporally varying motion blur is proposed, which is based on an optical computing system. The translation and rotation motion can be independently estimated from the joint transform correlator (JTC) system without iterative optimization. The inspiration comes from the fact that the JTC system is immune to rotation motion in a Cartesian coordinate system. The work scheme of the JTC system is designed to keep switching between the Cartesian coordinate system and polar coordinate system in different time intervals with the ping-pang handover. In the ping interval, the JTC system works in the Cartesian coordinate system to obtain a translation motion vector with optical computing speed. In the pang interval, the JTC system works in the polar coordinate system. The rotation motion is transformed to the translation motion through coordinate transformation. Then the rotation motion vector can also be obtained from JTC instantaneously. To deal with continuous spatially variant motion blur, submotion vectors based on the projective motion path blur model are proposed. The submotion vectors model is more effective and accurate at modeling spatially variant motion blur than conventional methods. The simulation and real experiment results demonstrate its overall effectiveness.

  20. A frequency domain based rigid motion artifact reduction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hai; Huang, Xiaojie; Pan, Wenyu; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2009-10-01

    During a CT scan, patients' conscious or unconscious motions would result in motion artifacts which undermine the image quality and hamper doctors' accurate diagnosis and therapy. It is desirable to develop a precise motion estimation and artifact reduction method in order to produce high-resolution images. Rigid motion can be decomposed into two components: translational motion and rotational motion. Since considering the rotation and translation simultaneously is very difficult, most former studies on motion artifact reduction ignore rotation. The extended HLCC based method considering the rotation and translation simultaneously relies on a searching algorithm which leads to expensive computing cost. Therefore, a novel method which does not rely on searching is desirable. In this paper, we focus on parallel-beam CT. We first propose a frequency domain based method to estimate rotational motion, which is not affected by translational motion. It realizes the separation of rotation estimation and translation estimation. Then we combine this method with the HLCC based method to construct a new method for general rigid motion called separative estimation and collective correction method. Furthermore, we present numerical simulation results to show the accuracy and robustness of our approach.

  1. Motion Recognition and Modifying Motion Generation for Imitation Robot Based on Motion Knowledge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzawa, Yuki; Kato, Shohei; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    A knowledge-based approach to imitation learning of motion generation for humanoid robots and an imitative motion generation system based on motion knowledge learning and modification are described. The system has three parts: recognizing, learning, and modifying parts. The first part recognizes an instructed motion distinguishing it from the motion knowledge database by the continuous hidden markov model. When the motion is recognized as being unfamiliar, the second part learns it using locally weighted regression and acquires a knowledge of the motion. When a robot recognizes the instructed motion as familiar or judges that its acquired knowledge is applicable to the motion generation, the third part imitates the instructed motion by modifying a learned motion. This paper reports some performance results: the motion imitation of several radio gymnastics motions.

  2. Inflation and cyclotron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the Universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that slow roll conditions on the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field satisfying unconventional dispersion relations.

  3. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-08-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  4. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  5. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  6. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  7. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  8. Motion Sickness: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... soon as the motion stops. The more you travel, the more easily you'll adjust to being ... at least 30 to 60 minutes before you travel. Expect drowsiness as a side effect. Consider scopolamine ( ...

  9. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  10. Motion Alters Color Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang-Wook; Kang, Min-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Chromatic induction compellingly demonstrates that chromatic context as well as spectral lights reflected from an object determines its color appearance. Here, we show that when one colored object moves around an identical stationary object, the perceived saturation of the stationary object decreases dramatically whereas the saturation of the moving object increases. These color appearance shifts in the opposite directions suggest that normalization induced by the object’s motion may mediate the shift in color appearance. We ruled out other plausible alternatives such as local adaptation, attention, and transient neural responses that could explain the color shift without assuming interaction between color and motion processing. These results demonstrate that the motion of an object affects both its own color appearance and the color appearance of a nearby object, suggesting a tight coupling between color and motion processing. PMID:27824098

  11. Explanations of Superluminal Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, P. A. G.

    Recent developments in models of core-jet sources with apparent superluminal motions are reviewed. Emphasis is given to new versions of the so-called "Christmas tree" model and the relativistic beaming model.

  12. Sensing human hand motions for controlling dexterous robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Beth A.; Churchill, Philip J.; Little, Arthur D.

    1988-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM) system is designed to control dexterous robot hands such as the UTAH/MIT and Stanford/JPL hands. It is the first commercially available device which makes it possible to accurately and confortably track the complex motion of the human finger joints. The DHM is adaptable to a wide variety of human hand sizes and shapes, throughout their full range of motion.

  13. Dynamical correction of control laws for marine ships' accurate steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veremey, Evgeny I.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this work is the analytical synthesis problem for marine vehicles autopilots design. Despite numerous known methods for a solution, the mentioned problem is very complicated due to the presence of an extensive population of certain dynamical conditions, requirements and restrictions, which must be satisfied by the appropriate choice of a steering control law. The aim of this paper is to simplify the procedure of the synthesis, providing accurate steering with desirable dynamics of the control system. The approach proposed here is based on the usage of a special unified multipurpose control law structure that allows decoupling a synthesis into simpler particular optimization problems. In particular, this structure includes a dynamical corrector to support the desirable features for the vehicle's motion under the action of sea wave disturbances. As a result, a specialized new method for the corrector design is proposed to provide an accurate steering or a trade-off between accurate steering and economical steering of the ship. This method guaranties a certain flexibility of the control law with respect to an actual environment of the sailing; its corresponding turning can be realized in real time onboard.

  14. Precision grid and hand motion for accurate needle insertion in brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Carl S.; Schwartz, Jonathon A.; Moore, Jason Z.; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Shih, Albert J.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: In prostate brachytherapy, a grid is used to guide a needle tip toward a preplanned location within the tissue. During insertion, the needle deflects en route resulting in target misplacement. In this paper, 18-gauge needle insertion experiments into phantom were performed to test effects of three parameters, which include the clearance between the grid hole and needle, the thickness of the grid, and the needle insertion speed. Measurement apparatus that consisted of two datum surfaces and digital depth gauge was developed to quantify needle deflections. Methods: The gauge repeatability and reproducibility (GR and R) test was performed on the measurement apparatus, and it proved to be capable of measuring a 2 mm tolerance from the target. Replicated experiments were performed on a 2{sup 3} factorial design (three parameters at two levels) and analysis included averages and standard deviation along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find significant single and two-way interaction factors. Results: Results showed that grid with tight clearance hole and slow needle speed increased precision and accuracy of needle insertion. The tight grid was vital to enhance precision and accuracy of needle insertion for both slow and fast insertion speed; additionally, at slow speed the tight, thick grid improved needle precision and accuracy. Conclusions: In summary, the tight grid is important, regardless of speed. The grid design, which shows the capability to reduce the needle deflection in brachytherapy procedures, can potentially be implemented in the brachytherapy procedure.

  15. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  16. Experimental Study of Short-Time Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Riegler, David; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We report our progress on the study of short-time Brownian motion of optically-trapped microspheres. In earlier work, we observed the instantaneous velocity of microspheres in gas and in liquid, verifying a prediction by Albert Einstein from 1907. We now report a more accurate test of the energy equipartition theorem for a particle in liquid. We also observe boundary effects on Brownian motion in liquid by setting a wall near the trapped particle, which changes the dynamics of the motion. We find that the velocity autocorrelation of the particle decreases faster as the particle gets closer to the wall.

  17. Shear velocity criterion for incipient motion of sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of incipient motion has had great importance to the theory of sediment transport. The most commonly used methods are based on the concept of critical shear stress and employ an approach similar, or identical, to the Shields diagram. An alternative method that uses the movability number, defined as the ratio of the shear velocity to the particle’s settling velocity, was employed in this study. A large amount of experimental data were used to develop an empirical incipient motion criterion based on the movability number. It is shown that this approach can provide a simple and accurate method of computing the threshold condition for sediment motion.

  18. Hierarchical motion estimation with smoothness constraints and postprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kan; Van Eycken, Luc; Oosterlinck, Andre J.

    1996-01-01

    How to acquire accurate and reliable motion parameters from an image sequence is a knotty problem for many applications in image processing, image recognition, and video coding, especially when scenes involve moving objects with various shapes and sizes as well as very fast and complicated motion. In this paper, an improved pel-based motion estimation (ME) algorithm with smoothness constraints is presented, which is based on the investigation and the comparison of different existing pel-based ME (or optical flow) algorithms. Then, in order to cope with various moving objects and their complex motion, a hierarchical ME algorithm with smoothness constraints and postprocessing is proposed. The experimental results show that the motion parameters obtained by the hierarchical ME algorithm are quite creditable and seem to be close to the real physical motion fields if the luminance intensity changes are due to the motion of objects. The hierarchical ME algorithm still provides approximate and smooth vector fields even for scenes that involve some motion-irrelevant intensity changes or blurring caused by violent motion.

  19. Inter-fraction variations in respiratory motion models.

    PubMed

    McClelland, J R; Hughes, S; Modat, M; Qureshi, A; Ahmad, S; Landau, D B; Ourselin, S; Hawkes, D J

    2011-01-07

    Respiratory motion can vary dramatically between the planning stage and the different fractions of radiotherapy treatment. Motion predictions used when constructing the radiotherapy plan may be unsuitable for later fractions of treatment. This paper presents a methodology for constructing patient-specific respiratory motion models and uses these models to evaluate and analyse the inter-fraction variations in the respiratory motion. The internal respiratory motion is determined from the deformable registration of Cine CT data and related to a respiratory surrogate signal derived from 3D skin surface data. Three different models for relating the internal motion to the surrogate signal have been investigated in this work. Data were acquired from six lung cancer patients. Two full datasets were acquired for each patient, one before the course of radiotherapy treatment and one at the end (approximately 6 weeks later). Separate models were built for each dataset. All models could accurately predict the respiratory motion in the same dataset, but had large errors when predicting the motion in the other dataset. Analysis of the inter-fraction variations revealed that most variations were spatially varying base-line shifts, but changes to the anatomy and the motion trajectories were also observed.

  20. Fast image interpolation for motion estimation using graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Francis; Kokaram, Anil

    2004-05-01

    Motion estimation and compensation is the key to high quality video coding. Block matching motion estimation is used in most video codecs, including MPEG-2, MPEG-4, H.263 and H.26L. Motion estimation is also a key component in the digital restoration of archived video and for post-production and special effects in the movie industry. Sub-pixel accurate motion vectors can improve the quality of the vector field and lead to more efficient video coding. However sub-pixel accuracy requires interpolation of the image data. Image interpolation is a key requirement of many image processing algorithms. Often interpolation can be a bottleneck in these applications, especially in motion estimation due to the large number pixels involved. In this paper we propose using commodity computer graphics hardware for fast image interpolation. We use the full search block matching algorithm to illustrate the problems and limitations of using graphics hardware in this way.

  1. Time-accurate unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic calculations for wings using Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1988-01-01

    A time-accurate approach to simultaneously solve the Euler flow equations and modal structural equations of motion is presented for computing aeroelastic responses of wings. The Euler flow eauations are solved by a time-accurate finite difference scheme with dynamic grids. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved using the linear acceleration method. The aeroelastic configuration adaptive dynamic grids are time accurately generated using the aeroelastically deformed shape of the wing. The unsteady flow calculations are validated wih experiment, both for a semi-infinite wing and a wall-mounted cantilever rectangular wings. Aeroelastic responses are computed for a rectangular wing using the modal data generated by the finite-element method. The robustness of the present approach in computing unsteady flows and aeroelastic responses that are beyond the capability of earlier approaches using the potential equations are demonstrated.

  2. Martian Landscapes in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Sarah; McEwen, Alfred; Kirk, Randolph; Howington-Kraus, Elpitha; Chojnacki, Matthew; Runyon, Kirby; Cremonese, Gabriele; Re, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    RISE orthorectified image sequences makes it possible to conduct accurate change detection studies of active processes on Mars. Some examples of studies of active landscapes on Mars using HiRISE DTMs and orthoimage sequences include: dune and ripple motion (Bridges et al., 2012, Nature), recurring slope lineae (RSL) (McEwen et al., 2011, Science; McEwen et al., 2013, Nature Geoscience), gully activity (Dundas et al., 2012, Icarus), and polar processes (Hansen et al., 2011, Science; Portyankina et al. 2013, Icarus,). These studies encompass images from multiple Mars years and seasons. Sequences of orthoimages make it possible to generate animated gifs or movies to visualize temporal changes (http://www.uahirise.org/sim/). They can also be brought into geospatial software to quantitatively map and record changes. The ability to monitor the surface of Mars at high spatial resolution with frequent repeat images has opened up our insight into seasonal and interannual changes, further increasing our understanding of Mars as an active planet.

  3. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-07

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  4. Tissue feature-based intra-fractional motion tracking for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei; Gu, Jia; Liu, Wu

    2013-06-01

    Real-time knowledge of tumor position during radiation therapy is essential to overcome the adverse effect of intra-fractional organ motion. The goal of this work is to develop a tumor tracking strategy by effectively utilizing the inherent image features of stereoscopic x-ray images acquired during dose delivery. In stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation delivery, two orthogonal x-ray images are acquired either simultaneously or sequentially. The essence of markerless tumor tracking is the reliable identification of inherent points with distinct tissue features on each projection image and their association between two images. The identification of the feature points on a planar x-ray image is realized by searching for points with high intensity gradient. The feature points are associated by using the scale invariance features transform descriptor. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by using images of a motion phantom and four archived clinical cases acquired using either a CyberKnife equipped with a stereoscopic x-ray imaging system, or a LINAC equipped with an onboard kV imager and an electronic portal imaging device. In the phantom study, the results obtained using the proposed method agree with the measurements to within 2 mm in all three directions. In the clinical study, the mean error is 0.48 ± 0.46 mm for four patient data with 144 sequential images. In this work, a tissue feature-based tracking method for stereoscopic x-ray image guided radiation therapy is developed. The technique avoids the invasive procedure of fiducial implantation and may greatly facilitate the clinical workflow.

  5. Video-based early cerebral palsy prediction using motion segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Hodjat; Aamo, Ole Morten; Stavdahl, Øyvind; Dragon, Ralf; Adde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Analysing distinct motion patterns that occur during infancy can be a way through early prediction of cerebral palsy. This analysis can only be performed by well-trained expert clinicians, and hence can not be widespread, specially in poor countries. In order to decrease the need for experts, computer-based methods can be applied. If individual motions of different body parts are available, these methods could achieve more accurate results with better clinical insight. Thus far, motion capture systems or the like were needed in order to provide such data. However, these systems not only need laboratory and experts to set up the experiment, but they could be intrusive for the infant's motions. In this paper we build up our prediction method on a solution based on a single video camera, that is far less intrusive and a lot cheaper. First, the motions of different body parts are separated, then, motion features are extracted and used to classify infants to healthy or affected. Our experimental results show that visually obtained motion data allows cerebral palsy detection as accurate as state-of-the-art electromagnetic sensor data.

  6. Yugoslav strong motion network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Vladimir

    1985-04-01

    Data concerning ground motion and the response of structures during strong earthquakes are necessary for seismic hazard evaluation and the definition of design criteria for structures to be constructed in seismically active zones. The only way to obtain such data is the installation of a strong-motion instrument network. The Yugoslav strong-motion programme was created in 1972 to recover strong-motion response data used by the structural engineering community in developing earthquake resistant design. Instruments, accelerographs SMA-1 and seismoscopes WM-1, were installed in free-field stations and on structures (high-rise buildings, dams, bridges, etc.). A total number of 176 accelerographs and 137 seismoscopes have been installed and are operating in Yugoslavia. The strong-motion programme in Yugoslavia consists of five subactivities: network design, network operation, data processing, network management and research as well as application. All these activities are under the responsibility of IZIIS in cooperation with the Yugoslav Association of Seismology. By 1975 in the realisation of this project participated the CALTECH as cooperative institution in the joint American-Yugoslav cooperative project. The results obtained which are presented in this paper, and their application in the aseismic design justify the necessity for the existence of such a network in Yugoslavia.

  7. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  8. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  9. Brownian motion of graphene.

    PubMed

    Maragó, Onofrio M; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Saija, Rosalba; Privitera, Giulia; Gucciardi, Pietro G; Iatì, Maria Antonia; Calogero, Giuseppe; Jones, Philip H; Borghese, Ferdinando; Denti, Paolo; Nicolosi, Valeria; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2010-12-28

    Brownian motion is a manifestation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical mechanics. It regulates systems in physics, biology, chemistry, and finance. We use graphene as prototype material to unravel the consequences of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in two dimensions, by studying the Brownian motion of optically trapped graphene flakes. These orient orthogonal to the light polarization, due to the optical constants anisotropy. We explain the flake dynamics in the optical trap and measure force and torque constants from the correlation functions of the tracking signals, as well as comparing experiments with a full electromagnetic theory of optical trapping. The understanding of optical trapping of two-dimensional nanostructures gained through our Brownian motion analysis paves the way to light-controlled manipulation and all-optical sorting of biological membranes and anisotropic macromolecules.

  10. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  11. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  12. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  13. SU-E-J-186: Using 4DCT-Based Motion Modeling to Predict Motion and Duty Cycle On Successive Days of Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Myronakis, M; Cai, W; Dhou, S; Cifter, F; Lewis, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if 4DCT-based motion modeling and external surrogate motion measured during treatment simulation can enhance prediction of residual tumor motion and duty cycle during treatment delivery. Methods: This experiment was conducted using simultaneously recorded tumor and external surrogate motion acquired over multiple fractions of lung cancer radiotherapy. These breathing traces were combined with the XCAT phantom to simulate CT images. Data from the first day was used to estimate the residual tumor motion and duty cycle both directly from the 4DCT (the current clinical standard), and from external-surrogate based motion modeling. The accuracy of these estimated residual tumor motions and duty cycles are evaluated by comparing to the measured internal/external motions from other treatment days. Results: All calculations were done for 25% and 50% duty cycles. The results indicated that duty cycle derived from 4DCT information alone is not enough to accurately predict duty cycles during treatment. Residual tumor motion was determined from the recorded data and compared with the estimated residual tumor motion from 4DCT. Relative differences in residual tumor motion varied from −30% to 55%, suggesting that more information is required to properly predict residual tumor motion. Compared to estimations made from 4DCT, in three out of four patients examined, the 30 seconds of motion modeling data was able to predict the duty cycle with better accuracy than 4DCT. No improvement was observed in prediction of residual tumor motion for this dataset. Conclusion: Motion modeling during simulation has the potential to enhance 4DCT and provide more information about target motion, duty cycles, and delivered dose. Based on these four patients, 30 seconds of motion modeling data produced improve duty cycle estimations but showed no measurable improvement in residual tumor motion prediction. More patient data is needed to verify this Result. I would like to

  14. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  15. Motion in microfluidic ratchets.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Katuri, J; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-11-15

    The ubiquitous random motion of mesoscopic active particles, such as cells, can be "rectified" or directed by embedding the particles in systems containing local and periodic asymmetric cues. Incorporated on lab-on-a-chip devices, these microratchet-like structures can be used to self-propel fluids, transport particles, and direct cell motion in the absence of external power sources. In this Focus article we discuss recent advances in the use of ratchet-like geometries in microfluidics which could open new avenues in biomedicine for applications in diagnosis, cancer biology, and bioengineering.

  16. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  17. SU-E-J-189: Determination of Markerless Lung Tumor Position in Real Time: A Feasibility Study Using a Novel Tomo-Cinegraphy Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, B; Hu, E; Yu, C; Lee, M; Lasio, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A Tomo-Cinegraphy (TC) is a method to generate a series of temporal tomographic images from projection images of the on-board imager (OBI) while gantry is moving. It is to test if this technique is useful to determine a lung tumor position during treatments. Methods: Tomographic image via background subtraction, TIBS uses a priori anatomical information from a previous CT scan to isolate a SOI from a planar kV image by factoring out the attenuations by tissues outside the SOI (background). This idea was extended to a TC, which enables to generate tomographic images of same geometry from the projection of different gantry angles and different breathing phases. Projection images of a lung patient for CBCT acquisition are used to generate TC images. A region of interest (ROI) is selected around a tumor adding 2cm margins. Center of mass (COM) of the ROI is traced to determine tumor position for every projection images. Results: Tumor is visible in the TC images while the OBI projections are not. The coordinates of the COMs represent the temporal tumor positions. While, it is not possible to trace the tumor motion using the projection images. A source of time delay is the time to acquire projection images, which is always less than a second. Conclusion: TC allows tracking the tumor positions without fiducial markers in real time for some lung patients, if the projection images are acquired during treatments. Partially supported by NIH R01CA133539.

  18. Induced motion at texture-defined motion boundaries.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, A; Benton, C P; McOwan, P W

    1999-01-01

    When a static textured background is covered and uncovered by a moving bar of the same mean luminance we can clearly see the motion of the bar. Texture-defined motion provides an example of a naturally occurring second-order motion. Second-order motion sequences defeat standard spatio-temporal energy models of motion perception. It has been proposed that second-order stimuli are analysed by separate systems, operating in parallel with luminance-defined motion processing, which incorporate identifiable pre-processing stages that make second-order patterns visible to standard techniques. However, the proposal of multiple paths to motion analysis remains controversial. Here we describe the behaviour of a model that recovers both luminance-defined and an important class of texture-defined motion. The model also accounts for the induced motion that is seen in some texture-defined motion sequences. We measured the perceived direction and speed of both the contrast envelope and induced motion in the case of a contrast modulation of static noise textures. Significantly, the model predicts the perceived speed of the induced motion seen at second-order texture boundaries. The induced motion investigated here appears distinct from classical induced effects resulting from motion contrast or the movement of a reference frame. PMID:10643088

  19. Algorithm for backrub motions in protein design

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Ivelin; Keedy, Daniel; Richardson, Jane S.; Richardson, David C.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The Backrub is a small but kinematically efficient side-chain-coupled local backbone motion frequently observed in atomic-resolution crystal structures of proteins. A backrub shifts the Cα–Cβ orientation of a given side-chain by rigid-body dipeptide rotation plus smaller individual rotations of the two peptides, with virtually no change in the rest of the protein. Backrubs can therefore provide a biophysically realistic model of local backbone flexibility for structure-based protein design. Previously, however, backrub motions were applied via manual interactive model-building, so their incorporation into a protein design algorithm (a simultaneous search over mutation and backbone/side-chain conformation space) was infeasible. Results: We present a combinatorial search algorithm for protein design that incorporates an automated procedure for local backbone flexibility via backrub motions. We further derive a dead-end elimination (DEE)-based criterion for pruning candidate rotamers that, in contrast to previous DEE algorithms, is provably accurate with backrub motions. Our backrub-based algorithm successfully predicts alternate side-chain conformations from ≤0.9 Å resolution structures, confirming the suitability of the automated backrub procedure. Finally, the application of our algorithm to redesign two different proteins is shown to identify a large number of lower-energy conformations and mutation sequences that would have been ignored by a rigid-backbone model. Availability: Contact authors for source code. Contact: brd+ismb08@cs.duke.edu PMID:18586714

  20. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  1. Earthquake ground motion amplification for surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Daniel C.; Tsai, Victor C.

    2017-01-01

    Surface waves from earthquakes are known to cause strong damage, especially for larger structures such as skyscrapers and bridges. However, common practice in characterizing seismic hazard at a specific site considers the effect of near-surface geology on only vertically propagating body waves. Here we show that surface waves have a unique and different frequency-dependent response to known geologic structure and that this amplification can be analytically calculated in a manner similar to current hazard practices. Applying this framework to amplification in the Los Angeles Basin, we find that peak ground accelerations for certain large regional earthquakes are underpredicted if surface waves are not properly accounted for and that the frequency of strongest ground motion amplification can be significantly different. Including surface-wave amplification in hazards calculations is therefore essential for accurate predictions of strong ground motion for future San Andreas Fault ruptures.

  2. A world in motion

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  3. Superluminal motion (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  4. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  5. Planets in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  6. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... review the actual safety data or call the patient’s obstetric provider for suggestions. Web-based information may be found at the websites www.Motherisk.org and www.Reprotox.org . PREVENTION Nonpharmacologic interventions to prevent or treat motion sickness include the ...

  7. Introducing Simple Harmonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2002-01-01

    Explains the origin and significance of harmonic motion which is an important topic that has wide application in the world. Describes the phenomenon by using an auxiliary circle to help illustrate the key relationships between acceleration, displacement, time, velocity, and phase. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  8. Theory of orthodontic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepe, S.; Pepe, W. D.; Strauss, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory of orthodontic motion is developed that can be applied to determine the forces necessary to induce a given tooth to move to the predetermined desirable position. It is assumed that the natural (nonorthodontic) forces may be represented by a periodic function and the orthodontic forces may be superimposed upon the natural forces. A simple expression is derived for the applied stress.

  9. Solar Motion from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treschman, Keith

    2009-01-01

    At noon throughout the year the Sun has a north-south and east-west motion around the meridian. Earliest/latest sunrises and sunsets do not occur at the solstices and the effect is more pronounced with decreasing latitude. This phenomenon is calculated for 25 Australian cities and the following observations are recorded: (1) The latest sunrise…

  10. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  11. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  12. Marbles in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen; Meyers, Bernice; Schmidt, William

    1999-01-01

    Marbles were successfully used to help primary students develop concepts of motion. Marble-unit activities began with shaking and rattling inference bags and predicting by listening just how many marbles were in each bag. Students made qualitative and quantitative observations of the marbles, manipulated marbles with a partner, and observed…

  13. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  14. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  15. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  16. The effects of aging on the perception of depth from motion parallax.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Successful navigation in the world requires effective visuospatial processing. Unfortunately, older adults have many visuospatial deficits, which can have severe real-world consequences. Although some of these age effects are well documented, some others, such as the perception of depth from motion parallax, are poorly understood. Depth perception from motion parallax requires intact retinal image motion and pursuit eye movement processing. Decades of research have shown that both motion processing and pursuit eye movements are affected by age; it follows that older adults may also be less sensitive to depth from motion parallax. The goals of the present study were to characterize motion parallax depth thresholds in older adults, and to explain older adults' sensitivity to depth from motion parallax in terms of motion and pursuit deficits. Younger and older adults' motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy were measured. Observers' depth thresholds across several different stimulus conditions were measured, as well. Older adults had higher motion thresholds and less accurate pursuit than younger adults. They were also less sensitive to depth from motion parallax at slow and moderate pursuit speeds. Although older adults had higher motion thresholds than younger adults, they used the available motion signals optimally, and age differences in motion processing could not account for the older adults' increased depth thresholds. Rather, these age effects can be explained by changes in older adults' pursuit signals.

  17. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  18. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown.

  20. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p < 0.050). One participant showed an increase in motion of 8.2 mm (p < 0.001) with vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (<1 mm) in kidney motion. No relationship was observed for abdominal wall motion and motion changes in the left kidney (r = 0.345, p = 0.402) or right kidney (r = 0.527, p = 0.145). Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion.

  1. Global form and motion processing in healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Hannah C; Phillips, Louise H; Pilz, Karin S

    2016-05-01

    The ability to perceive biological motion has been shown to deteriorate with age, and it is assumed that older adults rely more on the global form than local motion information when processing point-light walkers. Further, it has been suggested that biological motion processing in ageing is related to a form-based global processing bias. Here, we investigated the relationship between older adults' preference for form information when processing point-light actions and an age-related form-based global processing bias. In a first task, we asked older (>60years) and younger adults (19-23years) to sequentially match three different point-light actions; normal actions that contained local motion and global form information, scrambled actions that contained primarily local motion information, and random-position actions that contained primarily global form information. Both age groups overall performed above chance in all three conditions, and were more accurate for actions that contained global form information. For random-position actions, older adults were less accurate than younger adults but there was no age-difference for normal or scrambled actions. These results indicate that both age groups rely more on global form than local motion to match point-light actions, but can use local motion on its own to match point-light actions. In a second task, we investigated form-based global processing biases using the Navon task. In general, participants were better at discriminating the local letters but faster at discriminating global letters. Correlations showed that there was no significant linear relationship between performance in the Navon task and biological motion processing, which suggests that processing biases in form- and motion-based tasks are unrelated.

  2. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  3. Adaptive motion mapping in pancreatic SBRT patients using Fourier transforms

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bernard L.; Schefter, Tracey; Miften, Moyed

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent studies suggest that 4DCT is unable to accurately measure respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion. In this work, we assessed the daily motion of pancreatic tumors treated with SBRT, and developed adaptive strategies to predict and account for this motion. Materials and Methods The daily motion trajectory of pancreatic tumors during CBCT acquisition was calculated using a model which reconstructs the instantaneous 3D position in each 2D CBCT projection image. We developed a metric (termed “Spectral Coherence,” SC) based on the Fourier frequency spectrum of motion in the SI direction, and analyzed the ability of SC to predict motion-based errors and classify patients according to motion characteristics. Results The amplitude of daily motion exceeded the predictions of pre-treatment 4DCT imaging by an average of 3.0 mm, 2.3 mm, and 3.5 mm in the AP/LR/SI directions. SC was correlated with daily motion differences and tumor dose coverage. In a simulated adaptive protocol, target margins were adjusted based on SC, resulting in significant increases in mean target D95, D99, and minimum dose. Conclusions Our Fourier-based approach differentiates between consistent and inconsistent motion characteristics of respiration and correlates with daily motion deviations from pre-treatment 4DCT. The feasibility of an SC-based adaptive protocol was demonstrated, and this patient-specific respiratory information was used to improve target dosimetry by expanding coverage in inconsistent breathers while shrinking treatment volumes in consistent breathers. PMID:25890573

  4. Accurate estimation of sigma(exp 0) using AIRSAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Rignot, Eric

    1995-01-01

    During recent years signature analysis, classification, and modeling of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data as well as estimation of geophysical parameters from SAR data have received a great deal of interest. An important requirement for the quantitative use of SAR data is the accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient sigma(exp 0). In terrain with relief variations radar signals are distorted due to the projection of the scene topography into the slant range-Doppler plane. The effect of these variations is to change the physical size of the scattering area, leading to errors in the radar backscatter values and incidence angle. For this reason the local incidence angle, derived from sensor position and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data must always be considered. Especially in the airborne case, the antenna gain pattern can be an additional source of radiometric error, because the radar look angle is not known precisely as a result of the the aircraft motions and the local surface topography. Consequently, radiometric distortions due to the antenna gain pattern must also be corrected for each resolution cell, by taking into account aircraft displacements (position and attitude) and position of the backscatter element, defined by the DEM data. In this paper, a method to derive an accurate estimation of the backscattering coefficient using NASA/JPL AIRSAR data is presented. The results are evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy, radiometric variations of sigma(exp 0), and precision of the estimated forest biomass.

  5. Strategy for accurate liver intervention by an optical tracking system

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qinyong; Yang, Rongqian; Cai, Ken; Guan, Peifeng; Xiao, Weihu; Wu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided navigation for radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors requires the accurate guidance of needle insertion into a tumor target. The main challenge of image-guided navigation for radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors is the occurrence of liver deformations caused by respiratory motion. This study reports a strategy of real-time automatic registration to track custom fiducial markers glued onto the surface of a patient’s abdomen to find the respiratory phase, in which the static preoperative CT is performed. Custom fiducial markers are designed. Real-time automatic registration method consists of the automatic localization of custom fiducial markers in the patient and image spaces. The fiducial registration error is calculated in real time and indicates if the current respiratory phase corresponds to the phase of the static preoperative CT. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed strategy, a liver simulator is constructed and two volunteers are involved in the preliminary experiments. An ex-vivo porcine liver model is employed to further verify the strategy for liver intervention. Experimental results demonstrate that real-time automatic registration method is rapid, accurate, and feasible for capturing the respiratory phase from which the static preoperative CT anatomical model is generated by tracking the movement of the skin-adhered custom fiducial markers. PMID:26417501

  6. An Accurate and Dynamic Computer Graphics Muscle Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, David Asher

    1997-01-01

    A computer based musculo-skeletal model was developed at the University in the departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering. This model accurately represents human shoulder kinematics. The result of this model is the graphical display of bones moving through an appropriate range of motion based on inputs of EMGs and external forces. The need existed to incorporate a geometric muscle model in the larger musculo-skeletal model. Previous muscle models did not accurately represent muscle geometries, nor did they account for the kinematics of tendons. This thesis covers the creation of a new muscle model for use in the above musculo-skeletal model. This muscle model was based on anatomical data from the Visible Human Project (VHP) cadaver study. Two-dimensional digital images from the VHP were analyzed and reconstructed to recreate the three-dimensional muscle geometries. The recreated geometries were smoothed, reduced, and sliced to form data files defining the surfaces of each muscle. The muscle modeling function opened these files during run-time and recreated the muscle surface. The modeling function applied constant volume limitations to the muscle and constant geometry limitations to the tendons.

  7. Scalable sensing electronics towards a motion capture suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daniel; Gisby, Todd A.; Xie, Shane; Anderson, Iain A.

    2013-04-01

    Being able to accurately record body motion allows complex movements to be characterised and studied. This is especially important in the film or sport coaching industry. Unfortunately, the human body has over 600 skeletal muscles, giving rise to multiple degrees of freedom. In order to accurately capture motion such as hand gestures, elbow or knee flexion and extension, vast numbers of sensors are required. Dielectric elastomer (DE) sensors are an emerging class of electroactive polymer (EAP) that is soft, lightweight and compliant. These characteristics are ideal for a motion capture suit. One challenge is to design sensing electronics that can simultaneously measure multiple sensors. This paper describes a scalable capacitive sensing device that can measure up to 8 different sensors with an update rate of 20Hz.

  8. Triboelectrification based motion sensor for human-machine interfacing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiqing; Chen, Jun; Wen, Xiaonan; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Jin; Su, Yuanjie; Zhu, Guang; Wu, Wenzuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-05-28

    We present triboelectrification based, flexible, reusable, and skin-friendly dry biopotential electrode arrays as motion sensors for tracking muscle motion and human-machine interfacing (HMI). The independently addressable, self-powered sensor arrays have been utilized to record the electric output signals as a mapping figure to accurately identify the degrees of freedom as well as directions and magnitude of muscle motions. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique was employed to analyse the frequency spectra of the obtained electric signals and thus to determine the motion angular velocities. Moreover, the motion sensor arrays produced a short-circuit current density up to 10.71 mA/m(2), and an open-circuit voltage as high as 42.6 V with a remarkable signal-to-noise ratio up to 1000, which enables the devices as sensors to accurately record and transform the motions of the human joints, such as elbow, knee, heel, and even fingers, and thus renders it a superior and unique invention in the field of HMI.

  9. Scalable Photogrammetric Motion Capture System "mosca": Development and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Wide variety of applications (from industrial to entertainment) has a need for reliable and accurate 3D information about motion of an object and its parts. Very often the process of movement is rather fast as in cases of vehicle movement, sport biomechanics, animation of cartoon characters. Motion capture systems based on different physical principles are used for these purposes. The great potential for obtaining high accuracy and high degree of automation has vision-based system due to progress in image processing and analysis. Scalable inexpensive motion capture system is developed as a convenient and flexible tool for solving various tasks requiring 3D motion analysis. It is based on photogrammetric techniques of 3D measurements and provides high speed image acquisition, high accuracy of 3D measurements and highly automated processing of captured data. Depending on the application the system can be easily modified for different working areas from 100 mm to 10 m. The developed motion capture system uses from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for video sequences of object motion acquisition. All cameras work in synchronization mode at frame rate up to 100 frames per second under the control of personal computer providing the possibility for accurate calculation of 3D coordinates of interest points. The system was used for a set of different applications fields and demonstrated high accuracy and high level of automation.

  10. Self-Motion Holds a Special Status in Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Roy; Szpiro-Grinberg, Sarit; Lamy, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Agency plays an important role in self-recognition from motion. Here, we investigated whether our own movements benefit from preferential processing even when the task is unrelated to self-recognition, and does not involve agency judgments. Participants searched for a moving target defined by its known shape among moving distractors, while continuously moving the computer mouse with one hand. They thereby controlled the motion of one item, which was randomly either the target or any of the distractors, while the other items followed pre-recorded motion pathways. Performance was more accurate and less prone to degradation as set size increased when the target was the self-controlled item. An additional experiment confirmed that participant-controlled motion was not physically more salient than motion recorded offline. We found no evidence that self-controlled items captured attention. Taken together, these results suggest that visual events are perceived more accurately when they are the consequences of our actions, even when self-motion is task irrelevant. PMID:21998629

  11. On a PCA-based lung motion model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H; Jia, Xun; Zhao, Tianyu; Liu, Weifeng; Wuenschel, Sara; Lamb, James; Yang, Deshan; Low, Daniel A; Jiang, Steve B

    2014-01-01

    Respiration-induced organ motion is one of the major uncertainties in lung cancer radiotherapy and is crucial to be able to accurately model the lung motion. Most work so far has focused on the study of the motion of a single point (usually the tumor center of mass), and much less work has been done to model the motion of the entire lung. Inspired by the work of Zhang et al (2007 Med. Phys. 34 4772–81), we believe that the spatiotemporal relationship of the entire lung motion can be accurately modeled based on principle component analysis (PCA) and then a sparse subset of the entire lung, such as an implanted marker, can be used to drive the motion of the entire lung (including the tumor). The goal of this work is twofold. First, we aim to understand the underlying reason why PCA is effective for modeling lung motion and find the optimal number of PCA coefficients for accurate lung motion modeling. We attempt to address the above important problems both in a theoretical framework and in the context of real clinical data. Second, we propose a new method to derive the entire lung motion using a single internal marker based on the PCA model. The main results of this work are as follows. We derived an important property which reveals the implicit regularization imposed by the PCA model. We then studied the model using two mathematical respiratory phantoms and 11 clinical 4DCT scans for eight lung cancer patients. For the mathematical phantoms with cosine and an even power (2n) of cosine motion, we proved that 2 and 2n PCA coefficients and eigenvectors will completely represent the lung motion, respectively. Moreover, for the cosine phantom, we derived the equivalence conditions for the PCA motion model and the physiological 5D lung motion model (Low et al 2005 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 63 921–9). For the clinical 4DCT data, we demonstrated the modeling power and generalization performance of the PCA model. The average 3D modeling error using PCA was within

  12. On a PCA-based lung motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Jia, Xun; Zhao, Tianyu; Liu, Weifeng; Wuenschel, Sara; Lamb, James; Yang, Deshan; Low, Daniel A.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-09-01

    Respiration-induced organ motion is one of the major uncertainties in lung cancer radiotherapy and is crucial to be able to accurately model the lung motion. Most work so far has focused on the study of the motion of a single point (usually the tumor center of mass), and much less work has been done to model the motion of the entire lung. Inspired by the work of Zhang et al (2007 Med. Phys. 34 4772-81), we believe that the spatiotemporal relationship of the entire lung motion can be accurately modeled based on principle component analysis (PCA) and then a sparse subset of the entire lung, such as an implanted marker, can be used to drive the motion of the entire lung (including the tumor). The goal of this work is twofold. First, we aim to understand the underlying reason why PCA is effective for modeling lung motion and find the optimal number of PCA coefficients for accurate lung motion modeling. We attempt to address the above important problems both in a theoretical framework and in the context of real clinical data. Second, we propose a new method to derive the entire lung motion using a single internal marker based on the PCA model. The main results of this work are as follows. We derived an important property which reveals the implicit regularization imposed by the PCA model. We then studied the model using two mathematical respiratory phantoms and 11 clinical 4DCT scans for eight lung cancer patients. For the mathematical phantoms with cosine and an even power (2n) of cosine motion, we proved that 2 and 2n PCA coefficients and eigenvectors will completely represent the lung motion, respectively. Moreover, for the cosine phantom, we derived the equivalence conditions for the PCA motion model and the physiological 5D lung motion model (Low et al 2005 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 63 921-9). For the clinical 4DCT data, we demonstrated the modeling power and generalization performance of the PCA model. The average 3D modeling error using PCA was within 1

  13. Automated motion correction based on target tracking for dynamic nuclear medicine studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinhua; Tetrault, Tracy; Fahey, Fred; Treves, Ted

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear medicine dynamic studies of kidneys, bladder and stomach are important diagnostic tools. Accurate generation of time-activity curves from regions of interest (ROIs) requires that the patient remains motionless for the duration of the study. This is not always possible since some dynamic studies may last from several minutes to one hour. Several motion correction solutions have been explored. Motion correction using external point sources is inconvenient and not accurate especially when motion results from breathing, organ motion or feeding rather than from body motion alone. Centroid-based motion correction assumes that activity distribution is only inside the single organ (without background) and uniform, but this approach is impractical in most clinical studies. In this paper, we present a novel technique of motion correction that first tracks the organ of interest in a dynamic series then aligns the organ. The implementation algorithm for target tracking-based motion correction consists of image preprocessing, target detection, target positioning, motion estimation and prediction, tracking (new search region generation) and target alignment. The targeted organ is tracked from the first frame to the last one in the dynamic series to generate a moving trajectory of the organ. Motion correction is implemented by aligning the organ ROIs in the image series to the location of the organ in the first image. The proposed method of motion correction has been applied to several dynamic nuclear medicine studies including radionuclide cystography, dynamic renal scintigraphy, diuretic renography and gastric emptying scintigraphy.

  14. Long Trajectory for the Development of Sensitivity to Global and Biological Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadad, Bat-Sheva; Maurer, Daphne; Lewis, Terri L.

    2011-01-01

    We used a staircase procedure to test sensitivity to (1) global motion in random-dot kinematograms moving at 4 degrees and 18 degrees s[superscript -1] and (2) biological motion. Thresholds were defined as (1) the minimum percentage of signal dots (i.e. the maximum percentage of noise dots) necessary for accurate discrimination of upward versus…

  15. Racing carbon atoms. Atomic motion reaction coordinates and structural effects on Newtonian kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Andujar-De Sanctis, Ivonne L; Singleton, Daniel A

    2012-10-19

    Intramolecular (13)C kinetic isotope effects were determined for the dimerization of methacrolein. Trajectory studies accurately predict the isotope effects and support an origin in Newton's second law of motion, with no involvement of zero-point energy or transition state recrossing. Atomic motion reaction coordinate diagrams are introduced as a way to qualitatively understand the selectivity.

  16. Visible Motion Blur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of measuring motion blur is disclosed comprising obtaining a moving edge temporal profile r(sub 1)(k) of an image of a high-contrast moving edge, calculating the masked local contrast m(sub1)(k) for r(sub 1)(k) and the masked local contrast m(sub 2)(k) for an ideal step edge waveform r(sub 2)(k) with the same amplitude as r(sub 1)(k), and calculating the measure or motion blur Psi as a difference function, The masked local contrasts are calculated using a set of convolution kernels scaled to simulate the performance of the human visual system, and Psi is measured in units of just-noticeable differences.

  17. Dynamics of Oceanic Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    Sciences, Harvard University This project researched the dynamics of oceanic motions: aspects of the theory and mod- eling of fundamental dynamical and...84-C-0461 Published 1. Pinardi, N. (1985) Quasigeostrophic Energetics and Oceanic Mesoscale Dynamics, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA (Ph.D. Thesis...Layer Model to the Harvard Quasigeostrophic Model, Harvard University , Cam- bridge, MA (Ph.D. thesis). 15. Robinson, A.R., M.A. Spell and N. Pinardi

  18. Pit disassembly motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Pittman, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed for the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The facility will recover plutonium from excess nuclear weapon pits defined in START II and START III treaties. The plutonium will be stored and used to produce mixed oxide reactor fuel at another new DOE facility. Because of radiation dose issues, much of the pit disassembly work and material transfer will be automated. Automated material handling systems will interface with disassembly lathes, conversion reactors that produce oxide for storage, robotic container welding stations, vault retrieval systems, and nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation. The goal is to use common motion control hardware for material transfer and possibly common motion controllers for the unique PDCF systems. The latter is complicated by the different directions manufactures are considering for distributed control, such as Firewire, SERCOS, etc., and by the unique control requirements of machines such as lathes compared to controls for an integrated NDA system. The current design approach is to standardize where possible, use network cables to replace wire bundles where possible, but to first select hardware and motion controllers that meet specific machine or process requirements.

  19. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  20. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively. PMID:25207868

  1. Second Order Accurate Finite Difference Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-20

    a study of the idealized material has direct applications to some polymer structures (4, 5). Wave propagation studies in hyperelastic materials have...34Acceleration Wave Propagation in Hyperelastic Rods of Variable Cross- section. Wave Motion, V4, pp. 173-180, 1982. 9. M. Hirao and N. Sugimoto...Waves in Hyperelastic Road," Quart. Appl. Math., V37, pp. 377-399, 1979. 11. G. A. Sod. "A Survey of Several Finite Difference Methods for Systems of

  2. Tangle-Free Finite Element Mesh Motion for Ablation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droba, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Mesh motion is the process by which a computational domain is updated in time to reflect physical changes in the material the domain represents. Such a technique is needed in the study of the thermal response of ablative materials, which erode when strong heating is applied to the boundary. Traditionally, the thermal solver is coupled with a linear elastic or biharmonic system whose sole purpose is to update mesh node locations in response to altering boundary heating. Simple mesh motion algorithms rely on boundary surface normals. In such schemes, evolution in time will eventually cause the mesh to intersect and "tangle" with itself, causing failure. Furthermore, such schemes are greatly limited in the problems geometries on which they will be successful. This paper presents a comprehensive and sophisticated scheme that tailors the directions of motion based on context. By choosing directions for each node smartly, the inevitable tangle can be completely avoided and mesh motion on complex geometries can be modeled accurately.

  3. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-01-01

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity. PMID:24421761

  4. Tethered body problems and relative motion orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, J. B., Jr.; Wolf, H.

    1972-01-01

    Selected problems dealing with orbiting tethered body systems have been studied. In addition, a relative motion orbit determination program was developed. Results from these tasks are described and discussed. The expected tethered body motions were examined, analytically, to ascertain what influence would be played by the physical parameters of the tether, the gravity gradient and orbit eccentricity. After separating the motion modes these influences were determined; and, subsequently, the effects of oscillations and/or rotations, on tether force, were described. A study was undertaken, by examining tether motions, to see what type of control actions would be needed to accurately place a mass particle at a prescribed position relative to a main vehicle. Other applications for tethers were studied. Principally these were concerned with the producing of low-level gee forces by means of stabilized tether configurations; and, the initiation of free transfer trajectories from tether supported vehicle relative positions.

  5. Three-dimensional motion measurements using feature tracking.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Johnny; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2008-04-01

    Feature tracking was developed to efficiently compute motion measurements from volumetric ultrasound images. Prior studies have demonstrated the motion magnitude accuracy and computation speed of feature tracking. However, the previous feature tracking implementations were limited by performance of their calculations in rectilinear coordinates. Also, the previous feature tracking approaches did not fully explore the three dimensional (3- D) nature of volumetric image analysis or utilize the 3-D directional information from the tracking calculations. This study presents an improved feature tracking method which achieves further computation speed gains by performing all calculations in the native spherical coordinates of the 3-D ultrasound image. The novel method utilizes a statistical analysis of tracked directions of motion to achieve better rejection of false tracking matches. Results from in vitro tracking of a speckle target show that the new feature tracking method is significantly faster than correlation search and can accurately determine target motion magnitude and 3-D direction.

  6. Control of joint motion simulators for biomechanical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a hierarchical adaptive algorithm for controlling upper extremity human joint motion simulators. A joint motion simulator is a computer-controlled, electromechanical system which permits the application of forces to the tendons of a human cadaver specimen in such a way that the cadaver joint under study achieves a desired motion in a physiologic manner. The proposed control scheme does not require knowledge of the cadaver specimen dynamic model, and solves on-line the indeterminate problem which arises because human joints typically possess more actuators than degrees of freedom. Computer simulation results are given for an elbow/forearm system and wrist/hand system under hierarchical control. The results demonstrate that any desired normal joint motion can be accurately tracked with the proposed algorithm. These simulation results indicate that the controller resolved the indeterminate problem redundancy in a physiologic manner, and show that the control scheme was robust to parameter uncertainty and to sensor noise.

  7. Rigid motion correction of dual opposed planar projections in single photon imaging.

    PubMed

    Angelis, Georgios I; Ryder, William; Gillam, John; Boisson, Frederic; Kyme, Andre; Fulton, Roger; Meikle, Steven; Kench, Peter

    2017-03-23

    Awake and/or freely moving small animal single photon emission imaging allows the continuous study of molecules exhibiting slow kinetics without the need to restrain or anaesthetise the animals. Estimating motion free projections in freely moving small animal planar imaging can be considered as a limited angle tomography problem, except that we wish to estimate the 2D planar projections rather than the 3D volume, where the angular sampling in all three axes depends on the rotational motion of the animal. In this study, we hypothesise that the motion corrected planar projections estimated by reconstructing an estimate of the 3D volume using an iterative motion compensating reconstruction algorithm and integrating it along the projection path, will closely match the true, motion-less, planar distribution regardless of the object motion. We tested this hypothesis for the case of rigid motion using Monte- Carlo simulations and experimental phantom data based on a dual opposed detector system, where object motion was modelled with 6 degrees of freedom. In addition, we investigated the quantitative accuracy of the regional activity extracted from the geometric mean of opposing motion corrected planar projections. Results showed that it is feasible to estimate qualitatively accurate motion-corrected projections for a wide range of motions around all 3 axes. Errors in the geometric mean estimates of regional activity were relatively small and within 10% of expected true values. In addition, quantitative regional errors were dependent on the observed motion, as well as on the surrounding activity of overlapping organs. We conclude that both qualitatively and quantitatively accurate motion-free projections of the tracer distribution in a freely moving animal can be estimated from dual opposed detectors using a rigid-motion correction approach within an iterative reconstruction framework and we expect this approach can be extended to the case of non-rigid motion.

  8. Estimating joint kinematics from skin motion observation: modelling and validation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Alon; Senesh, Merav

    2011-11-01

    Modelling of soft tissue motion is required in many areas, such as computer animation, surgical simulation, 3D motion analysis and gait analysis. In this paper, we will focus on the use of modelling of skin deformation during 3D motion analysis. The most frequently used method in 3D human motion analysis involves placing markers on the skin of the analysed segment which is composed of the rigid bone and the surrounding soft tissues. Skin and soft tissue deformations introduce a significant artefact which strongly influences the resulting bone position, orientation and joint kinematics. For this study, we used a statistical solid dynamics approach which is a combination of several previously reported tools: the point cluster technique (PCT) and a Kalman filter which was added to the PCT. The methods were tested and evaluated on controlled human-arm motions, using an optical motion capture system (Vicon(TM)). The addition of a Kalman filter to the PCT for rigid body motion estimation results in a smoother signal that better represents the joint motion. Calculations indicate less signal distortion than when using a digital low-pass filter. Furthermore, adding a Kalman filter to the PCT substantially reduces the dispersion of the maximal and minimal instantaneous frequencies. For controlled human movements, the result indicated that adding a Kalman filter to the PCT produced a more accurate signal. However, it could not be concluded that the proposed Kalman filter is better than a low-pass filter for estimation of the motion. We suggest that implementation of a Kalman filter with a better biomechanical motion model will be more likely to improve the results.

  9. Super-resolution without explicit subpixel motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Milanfar, Peyman; Protter, Matan; Elad, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The need for precise (subpixel accuracy) motion estimates in conventional super-resolution has limited its applicability to only video sequences with relatively simple motions such as global translational or affine displacements. In this paper, we introduce a novel framework for adaptive enhancement and spatiotemporal upscaling of videos containing complex activities without explicit need for accurate motion estimation. Our approach is based on multidimensional kernel regression, where each pixel in the video sequence is approximated with a 3-D local (Taylor) series, capturing the essential local behavior of its spatiotemporal neighborhood. The coefficients of this series are estimated by solving a local weighted least-squares problem, where the weights are a function of the 3-D space-time orientation in the neighborhood. As this framework is fundamentally based upon the comparison of neighboring pixels in both space and time, it implicitly contains information about the local motion of the pixels across time, therefore rendering unnecessary an explicit computation of motions of modest size. The proposed approach not only significantly widens the applicability of super-resolution methods to a broad variety of video sequences containing complex motions, but also yields improved overall performance. Using several examples, we illustrate that the developed algorithm has super-resolution capabilities that provide improved optical resolution in the output, while being able to work on general input video with essentially arbitrary motion.

  10. Motion compensation requirements for a high resolution spotlight SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, J. S. A.; Haslam, G. E.; Liang, D. F.; Widnall, W. S.

    1986-07-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence is developing a high resolution airborne spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR). To attain the high contrast, high resolution and low geometric distortion objectives of the project, it is essential that very accurate motion compensation be applied to the radar returns to minimize the effects on SAR image quality of spurious antenna phase center motion. The motion compensation system being developed for the project includes a gimballed master inertial navigation system (INS) located near the center of gravity of the host aircraft, a strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) comprising gyroscope and accelerometer triads mounted on the radar antenna, as well as Doppler velocity and barometric altitude sensors for damping the inertial systems. The role of the master INS is to enable high accuracy alignment of the strapdown IMU. The raw sensor data are integrated using a U-D factorized Kalman filter to obtain optimal estimates of the motion of the radar antenna phase center while the SAR window is open. The data are used to adjust both the radar pulse repetition frequency and the phase and displacement of the radar returns. An analysis of the motion compensation requirements was carried out, leading to the specification of the motion compensation sensor configuration and accuracy. The performance of the motion compensation system has been evaluated by detailed computer simulation. This evaluation accounted for all major system error sources, including errors associated with sensors, transfer alignment and computation, with the system operating in a moderately turbulent environment.

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in motion Nanotechnology in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-02-01

    , Toshio Ando from the University of Kanazawa provides an overview of developments that have allowed atomic force microscopy to move from rates of the order of one frame a minute to over a thousand frames per second in constant height mode, as reported by Mervyn Miles and colleagues at Bristol University and University College London [8]. Among the pioneers in the field, Ando's group demonstrated the ability to record the Brownian motion of myosin V molecules on mica with image capture rates of 100 x 100 pixels in 80 ms over a decade ago [9]. The developments unleash the potential of atomic force microscopy to observe the dynamics of biological and materials systems. If seeing is believing, the ability to present real motion pictures of the nanoworld cannot fail to capture the public imagination and stimulate burgeoning new avenues of scientific endeavour. Nearly 350 years on from the publication Micrographia, images in microscopy have moved from the page to the movies. References [1] Binnig G, Quate C F, and Gerber Ch 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930-3 [2] Ando T 2012 Nanotechnology 23 062001 [3] J G 1934 Nature 134 635-6 [4] Bharadwaj P, Anger P and Novotny L 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044017 [5] The Nobel Prize in Physics 1986 Nobelprize.org [6] Kim K K, Reina A, Shi Y, Park H, Li L-J, Lee Y H and Kong J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 285205 [7] Phillips D B, Grieve J A, Olof S N, Kocher S J, Bowman R, Padgett M J, Miles M J and Carberry D M 2011 Nanotechnology 22 285503 [8] Picco L M, Bozec L, Ulcinas A, Engledew D J, Antognozzi M, Horton M A and Miles M J 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044030 [9] Ando T, Kodera N, Takai E, Maruyama D, Saito K and Toda A 2001 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98 12468

  12. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  13. Maximum likelihood estimates of polar motion parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Clark R.; Vicente, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    Two estimators developed by Jeffreys (1940, 1968) are described and used in conjunction with polar-motion data to determine the frequency (Fc) and quality factor (Qc) of the Chandler wobble. Data are taken from a monthly polar-motion series, satellite laser-ranging results, and optical astrometry and intercompared for use via interpolation techniques. Maximum likelihood arguments were employed to develop the estimators, and the assumption that polar motion relates to a Gaussian random process is assessed in terms of the accuracies of the estimators. The present results agree with those from Jeffreys' earlier study but are inconsistent with the later estimator; a Monte Carlo evaluation of the estimators confirms that the 1968 method is more accurate. The later estimator method shows good performance because the Fourier coefficients derived from the data have signal/noise levels that are superior to those for an individual datum. The method is shown to be valuable for general spectral-analysis problems in which isolated peaks must be analyzed from noisy data.

  14. Human motion analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussing, Keith; Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and supported the development of a physiologically-based human motion model. Subsequently this model aided the derivation and analysis of motion-based observables, particularly changes in the motion of various body components resulting from load variations. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, development of the human motion model, and use of the model in the observable analysis. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and modeling results will also be presented.

  15. GROUND MOTION ASSESSMENT BASED ON WEAK MOTION DATA IN TAIWAN Ground Motion Assessment Based on Weak Motion Data in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, A.; D'Amico, S.; Malagnini, L.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we characterize the scaling of the ground motions for frequencies ranging between 0.25 and 5 Hz, obtaining results for seismic attenuation, geometrical spreading, and source parameters in Taiwan. We regressed this large number of weak-motion data in order to characterize the regional propagation and the absolute source scaling. Stochastic simulations are generated for finite-fault ruptures using the obtained parameters to predict the absolute peaks of the ground acceleration and velocity for several magnitude and distance range, as well as beyond the magnitude range of the weak-motion data set on which they are calculated. The predictions are then compared with recorded strong motion data and empirical ground motion prediction equation obtained for the study region. We showed that our regional parameters, obtained from independent weak-motion database, may be applied for evaluation of ground motion parameters for earthquakes of magnitude up to 7.6.

  16. PET Motion Compensation for Radiation Therapy Using a CT-Based Mid-Position Motion Model: Methodology and Clinical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kruis, Matthijs F.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, José S.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional positron emission tomography (4D PET) imaging of the thorax produces sharper images with reduced motion artifacts. Current radiation therapy planning systems, however, do not facilitate 4D plan optimization. When images are acquired in a 2-minute time slot, the signal-to-noise ratio of each 4D frame is low, compromising image quality. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the construction of mid-position 3D PET scans, with motion compensated using a 4D computed tomography (CT)-derived motion model. Methods and Materials: All voxels of 4D PET were registered to the time-averaged position by using a motion model derived from the 4D CT frames. After the registration the scans were summed, resulting in a motion-compensated 3D mid-position PET scan. The method was tested with a phantom dataset as well as data from 27 lung cancer patients. Results: PET motion compensation using a CT-based motion model improved image quality of both phantoms and patients in terms of increased maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) values and decreased apparent volumes. In homogenous phantom data, a strong relationship was found between the amplitude-to-diameter ratio and the effects of the method. In heterogeneous patient data, the effect correlated better with the motion amplitude. In case of large amplitudes, motion compensation may increase SUV{sub max} up to 25% and reduce the diameter of the 50% SUV{sub max} volume by 10%. Conclusions: 4D CT-based motion-compensated mid-position PET scans provide improved quantitative data in terms of uptake values and volumes at the time-averaged position, thereby facilitating more accurate radiation therapy treatment planning of pulmonary lesions.

  17. A model for the pilot's use of motion cues in roll-axis tracking tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Simulated target-following and disturbance-regulation tasks were explored with subjects using visual-only and combined visual and motion cues. The effects of motion cues on task performance and pilot response behavior were appreciably different for the two task configurations and were consistent with data reported in earlier studies for similar task configurations. The optimal-control model for pilot/vehicle systems provided a task-independent framework for accounting for the pilot's use of motion cues. Specifically, the availability of motion cues was modeled by augmenting the set of perceptual variables to include position, rate, acceleration, and accleration-rate of the motion simulator, and results were consistent with the hypothesis of attention-sharing between visual and motion variables. This straightforward informational model allowed accurate model predictions of the effects of motion cues on a variety of response measures for both the target-following and disturbance-regulation tasks.

  18. Global velocity constrained cloud motion prediction for short-term solar forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanjun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chongyang; Hu, Chuanping

    2016-09-01

    Cloud motion is the primary reason for short-term solar power output fluctuation. In this work, a new cloud motion estimation algorithm using a global velocity constraint is proposed. Compared to the most used Particle Image Velocity (PIV) algorithm, which assumes the homogeneity of motion vectors, the proposed method can capture the accurate motion vector for each cloud block, including both the motional tendency and morphological changes. Specifically, global velocity derived from PIV is first calculated, and then fine-grained cloud motion estimation can be achieved by global velocity based cloud block researching and multi-scale cloud block matching. Experimental results show that the proposed global velocity constrained cloud motion prediction achieves comparable performance to the existing PIV and filtered PIV algorithms, especially in a short prediction horizon.

  19. Rotational motion of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, N.; Asmar, S. W.; Konopliv, A. S.

    2012-09-01

    Vesta is the second most massive body of the asteroid belt and contains a giant impact and a differentiated interior. Constraints on internal structure can be inferred from various observations such as gravity field measurements [1]. Especially, detailed knowledge of the rotational motion can help constrain the mass distribution inside the body, which in turn can lead to information on its history. Here, we compute the polar motion, precession-nutation, and length-of-day variations of Vesta. The Vesta's Pole position in space has been obtained by Dawn mission [1] and the orbital pole of Vesta at J2000 can be obtained from the Horizons ephemerides [2]. The obliquity, defined as the angle between the normal to the orbital plane and the figure axis, brings information on the moment of inertia if it has reached its equilibrium position [3], the present value from observations is around 27 degrees. That is far from the ˜ 0.03 deg expected for the equilibrium position. In addition, the required timescale to fully damped the obliquity appears to be very long following the same approach developed in [4]. Thus, it appears that the obliquity of Vesta has not yet relaxed in its Cassini state. The figure of Vesta appears to be triaxial and the Sun exerts a non-zero torque. By following the approach developed for the Earth [e.g. 5] and Ceres [4], we compute the nutation of Vesta. The nutational motion of Vesta is dominated by the semi-annual nutation (996 milli-arcseconds or 1.26 m surface displacement) related to the large obliquity of Vesta, and then terms related to harmonics and also to the planet's mean longitude. The detection of such small displacement requires tracking of Vesta's surface with high precision. The precession time of the axis of Vesta is very long, about 179,000 years.

  20. Motion analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Human motion analysis is the task of converting actual human movements into computer readable data. Such movement information may be obtained though active or passive sensing methods. Active methods include physical measuring devices such as goniometers on joints of the body, force plates, and manually operated sensors such as a Cybex dynamometer. Passive sensing de-couples the position measuring device from actual human contact. Passive sensors include Selspot scanning systems (since there is no mechanical connection between the subject's attached LEDs and the infrared sensing cameras), sonic (spark-based) three-dimensional digitizers, Polhemus six-dimensional tracking systems, and image processing systems based on multiple views and photogrammetric calculations.

  1. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.; Stewart, D. F.; Davis, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Space motion sickness clinical characteristics, time course, prediction of susceptibility, and effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated. Although there is wide individual variability, there appear to be typical patterns of symptom development. The duration of symptoms ranges from several hours to four days with the majority of individuals being symptom free by the end of third day. The etiology of this malady remains uncertain but evidence points to reinterpretation of otolith inputs as being a key factor in the response of the neurovestibular system. Prediction of susceptibility and severity remains unsatisfactory. Countermeasures tried include medications, preflight adaptation, and autogenic feedback training. No countermeasure is entirely successful in eliminating or alleviating symptoms.

  2. Motion dynamics of submersibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalske, Seppo

    1991-04-01

    A literature survey of motion dynamics of subsea vehicles of a general shape was performed. Hydrodynamic tests were carried out with an existing tethered remotely operated vehicle and with its full scale model. The experiments give data of maneuvering capabilities, and of hydrodynamic characteristics of small subsea vehicles. A simulation method was developed on this basis to compute the vehicle trajectory in the time domain as a function of different control commands. The method can be applied to any subsea vehicle controlled by thruster units.

  3. Role of orientation reference selection in motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Black, F. Owen

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of this proposal is to understand the relationship between human orientation control and motion sickness susceptibility. Three areas related to orientation control will be investigated. These three areas are (1) reflexes associated with the control of eye movements and posture, (2) the perception of body rotation and position with respect to gravity, and (3) the strategies used to resolve sensory conflict situations which arise when different sensory systems provide orientation cues which are not consistent with one another or with previous experience. Of particular interest is the possibility that a subject may be able to ignore an inaccurate sensory modality in favor of one or more other sensory modalities which do provide accurate orientation reference information. We refer to this process as sensory selection. This proposal will attempt to quantify subjects' sensory selection abilities and determine if this ability confers some immunity to the development of motion sickness symptoms. Measurements of reflexes, motion perception, sensory selection abilities, and motion sickness susceptibility will concentrate on pitch and roll motions since these seem most relevant to the space motion sickness problem. Vestibulo-ocular (VOR) and oculomotor reflexes will be measured using a unique two-axis rotation device developed in our laboratory over the last seven years. Posture control reflexes will be measured using a movable posture platform capable of independently altering proprioceptive and visual orientation cues. Motion perception will be quantified using closed loop feedback technique developed by Zacharias and Young (Exp Brain Res, 1981). This technique requires a subject to null out motions induced by the experimenter while being exposed to various confounding sensory orientation cues. A subject's sensory selection abilities will be measured by the magnitude and timing of his reactions to changes in sensory environments. Motion sickness

  4. Optimised motion tracking for positron emission tomography studies of brain function in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Kyme, Andre Z; Zhou, Victor W; Meikle, Steven R; Baldock, Clive; Fulton, Roger R

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive molecular imaging technique using positron-emitting radioisotopes to study functional processes within the body. High resolution PET scanners designed for imaging rodents and non-human primates are now commonplace in preclinical research. Brain imaging in this context, with motion compensation, can potentially enhance the usefulness of PET by avoiding confounds due to anaesthetic drugs and enabling freely moving animals to be imaged during normal and evoked behaviours. Due to the frequent and rapid motion exhibited by alert, awake animals, optimal motion correction requires frequently sampled pose information and precise synchronisation of these data with events in the PET coincidence data stream. Motion measurements should also be as accurate as possible to avoid degrading the excellent spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art scanners. Here we describe and validate methods for optimised motion tracking suited to the correction of motion in awake rats. A hardware based synchronisation approach is used to achieve temporal alignment of tracker and scanner data to within 10 ms. We explored the impact of motion tracker synchronisation error, pose sampling rate, rate of motion, and marker size on motion correction accuracy. With accurate synchronisation (<100 ms error), a sampling rate of >20 Hz, and a small head marker suitable for awake animal studies, excellent motion correction results were obtained in phantom studies with a variety of continuous motion patterns, including realistic rat motion (<5% bias in mean concentration). Feasibility of the approach was also demonstrated in an awake rat study. We conclude that motion tracking parameters needed for effective motion correction in preclinical brain imaging of awake rats are achievable in the laboratory setting. This could broaden the scope of animal experiments currently possible with PET.

  5. Image-based motion estimation for cardiac CT via image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammin, J.; Taguchi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Images reconstructed from tomographic projection data are subject to motion artifacts from organs that move during the duration of the scan. The effect can be reduced by taking the motion into account in the reconstruction algorithm if an estimate of the deformation exists. This paper presents the estimation of the three-dimensional cardiac motion by registering reconstructed images from cardiac quiet phases as a first step towards motion-compensated cardiac image reconstruction. The non-rigid deformations of the heart are parametrized on a coarse grid on the image volume and are interpolated with cubic b-splines. The optimization problem of finding b-spline coefficients that best describe the observed deformations is ill-posed due to the large number of parameters and the resulting motion vector field is sensitive to the choice of initial parameters. Particularly challenging is the task to capture the twisting motion of the heart. The motion vector field from a dynamic computer phantom of the human heart is used to initialize the transformation parameters for the optimization process with realistic starting values. The results are evaluated by comparing the registered images and the obtained motion vector field to the case when the registration is performed without using prior knowledge about the expected cardiac motion. We find that the registered images are similar for both approaches, but the motion vector field obtained from motion estimation initialized with the phantom describes the cardiac contraction and twisting motion more accurately.

  6. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  7. Algebraic Nonlinear Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troupe, J.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-11-01

    Finite-dimensional Lie algebras of vector fields determine geometrical collective models in quantum and classical physics. Every set of vector fields on Euclidean space that generates the Lie algebra sl(3, R) and contains the angular momentum algebra so(3) is determined. The subset of divergence-free sl(3, R) vector fields is proven to be indexed by a real numberΛ. TheΛ=0 solution is the linear representation that corresponds to the Riemann ellipsoidal model. The nonlinear group action on Euclidean space transforms a certain family of deformed droplets among themselves. For positiveΛ, the droplets have a neck that becomes more pronounced asΛincreases; for negativeΛ, the droplets contain a spherical bubble of radius |Λ|1/3. The nonlinear vector field algebra is extended to the nonlinear general collective motion algebra gcm(3) which includes the inertia tensor. The quantum algebraic models of nonlinear nuclear collective motion are given by irreducible unitary representations of the nonlinear gcm(3) Lie algebra. These representations model fissioning isotopes (Λ>0) and bubble and two-fluid nuclei (Λ<0).

  8. Waves in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGourty, L.; Rideout, K.

    2005-12-01

    "Waves in Motion" This teaching unit was created by Leslie McGourty and Ken Rideout under the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at MIT Haystack Observatory during the summer of 2005. The RET program is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The goals of this teaching unit are to deepen students' understanding about waves, wave motion, and the electromagnetic spectrum as a whole. Specifically students will comprehend the role radio waves play in our daily lives and in the investigation of the universe. The lessons can be used in a high school physics, earth science or astronomy curriculum. The unit consists of a series of interlocking lectures, activities, and investigations that can be used as stand alone units to supplement a teacher's existing curriculum, as an independent investigation for a student, or as a long exploration into radio astronomy with a theme of waves in space: how and where they carry their information. Special emphasis is given to the Relativity theories in honor of the "World Year of Physics" to celebrate Einstein's 1905 contributions. The lessons are currently being implemented at the high school level, the preliminary results of which will be presented. At the end of the academic year, the units will be evaluated and updated, reflecting student input and peer review after which they will be posted on the internet for teachers to use in their classrooms.

  9. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  10. New model accurately predicts reformate composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ancheyta-Juarez, J.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. )

    1994-01-31

    Although naphtha reforming is a well-known process, the evolution of catalyst formulation, as well as new trends in gasoline specifications, have led to rapid evolution of the process, including: reactor design, regeneration mode, and operating conditions. Mathematical modeling of the reforming process is an increasingly important tool. It is fundamental to the proper design of new reactors and revamp of existing ones. Modeling can be used to optimize operating conditions, analyze the effects of process variables, and enhance unit performance. Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo has developed a model of the catalytic reforming process that accurately predicts reformate composition at the higher-severity conditions at which new reformers are being designed. The new AA model is more accurate than previous proposals because it takes into account the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate constants of each chemical reaction.

  11. Accurate colorimetric feedback for RGB LED clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Kwong; Ashdown, Ian

    2006-08-01

    We present an empirical model of LED emission spectra that is applicable to both InGaN and AlInGaP high-flux LEDs, and which accurately predicts their relative spectral power distributions over a wide range of LED junction temperatures. We further demonstrate with laboratory measurements that changes in LED spectral power distribution with temperature can be accurately predicted with first- or second-order equations. This provides the basis for a real-time colorimetric feedback system for RGB LED clusters that can maintain the chromaticity of white light at constant intensity to within +/-0.003 Δuv over a range of 45 degrees Celsius, and to within 0.01 Δuv when dimmed over an intensity range of 10:1.

  12. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  13. An Accurate, Simplified Model Intrabeam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-05-23

    Beginning with the general Bjorken-Mtingwa solution for intrabeam scattering (IBS) we derive an accurate, greatly simplified model of IBS, valid for high energy beams in normal storage ring lattices. In addition, we show that, under the same conditions, a modified version of Piwinski's IBS formulation (where {eta}{sub x,y}{sup 2}/{beta}{sub x,y} has been replaced by {Eta}{sub x,y}) asymptotically approaches the result of Bjorken-Mtingwa.

  14. An accurate registration technique for distorted images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapena, Michele; Shaw, Richard A.; Linde, Peter; Dravins, Dainis

    1990-01-01

    Accurate registration of International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) images is crucial because the variability of the geometrical distortions that are introduced by the SEC-Vidicon cameras ensures that raw science images are never perfectly aligned with the Intensity Transfer Functions (ITFs) (i.e., graded floodlamp exposures that are used to linearize and normalize the camera response). A technique for precisely registering IUE images which uses a cross correlation of the fixed pattern that exists in all raw IUE images is described.

  15. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  16. New motion illusion caused by pictorial motion lines.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Miura, Kayo

    2008-01-01

    Motion lines (MLs) are a pictorial technique used to represent object movement in a still picture. This study explored how MLs contribute to motion perception. In Experiment 1, we reported the creation of a motion illusion caused by MLs: random displacements of objects with MLs on each frame were perceived as unidirectional global motion along the pictorial motion direction implied by MLs. In Experiment 2, we showed that the illusory global motion in the peripheral visual field captured the perceived motion direction of random displacement of objects without MLs in the central visual field, and confirmed that the results in Experiment 1 did not stem simply from response bias, but resulted from perceptual processing. In Experiment 3, we showed that the spatial arrangement of orientation information rather than ML length is important for the illusory global motion. Our results indicate that the ML effect is based on perceptual processing rather than response bias, and that comparison of neighboring orientation components may underlie the determination of pictorial motion direction with MLs.

  17. Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Exposure to Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Clement, G. R.; Rupert, A. H.; Reschke, M. F.; Harm, D. L.; Guedry, F. E.

    2007-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive accurate spatial orientation awareness. Adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the otolith system are integrated with other sensory information lead to perceptual and postural disturbances upon return to Earth s gravity. The primary goals of this ground-based research investigation are to explore physiological mechanisms and operational implications of tilt-translation disturbances during and following re-entry, and to evaluate a tactile prosthesis as a countermeasure for improving control of whole-body orientation during tilt and translation motion.

  18. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  19. A common framework for the analysis of complex motion? Standstill and capture illusions

    PubMed Central

    Dürsteler, Max R.

    2014-01-01

    A series of illusions was created by presenting stimuli, which consisted of two overlapping surfaces each defined by textures of independent visual features (i.e., modulation of luminance, color, depth, etc.). When presented concurrently with a stationary 2-D luminance texture, observers often fail to perceive the motion of an overlapping stereoscopically defined depth-texture. This illusory motion standstill arises due to a failure to represent two independent surfaces (one for luminance and one for depth textures) and motion transparency (the ability to perceive motion of both surfaces simultaneously). Instead the stimulus is represented as a single non-transparent surface taking on the stationary nature of the luminance-defined texture. By contrast, if it is the 2D-luminance defined texture that is in motion, observers often perceive the stationary depth texture as also moving. In this latter case, the failure to represent the motion transparency of the two textures gives rise to illusionary motion capture. Our past work demonstrated that the illusions of motion standstill and motion capture can occur for depth-textures that are rotating, or expanding / contracting, or else spiraling. Here I extend these findings to include stereo-shearing. More importantly, it is the motion (or lack thereof) of the luminance texture that determines how the motion of the depth will be perceived. This observation is strongly in favor of a single pathway for complex motion that operates on luminance-defines texture motion signals only. In addition, these complex motion illusions arise with chromatically-defined textures with smooth transitions between their colors. This suggests that in respect to color motion perception the complex motions' pathway is only able to accurately process signals from isoluminant colored textures with sharp transitions between colors, and/or moving at high speeds, which is conceivable if it relies on inputs from a hypothetical dual opponent color

  20. Tvashtar in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This five-frame sequence of New Horizons images captures the giant plume from Io's Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter earlier this year, this first-ever 'movie' of an Io plume clearly shows motion in the cloud of volcanic debris, which extends 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the moon's surface. Only the upper part of the plume is visible from this vantage point -- the plume's source is 130 kilometers (80 miles) below the edge of Io's disk, on the far side of the moon.

    The appearance and motion of the plume is remarkably similar to an ornamental fountain on Earth, replicated on a gigantic scale. The knots and filaments that allow us to track the plume's motion are still mysterious, but this movie is likely to help scientists understand their origin, as well as provide unique information on the plume dynamics.

    Io's hyperactive nature is emphasized by the fact that two other volcanic plumes are also visible off the edge of Io's disk: Masubi at the 7 o'clock position, and a very faint plume, possibly from the volcano Zal, at the 10 o'clock position. Jupiter illuminates the night side of Io, and the most prominent feature visible on the disk is the dark horseshoe shape of the volcano Loki, likely an enormous lava lake. Boosaule Mons, which at 18 kilometers (11 miles) is the highest mountain on Io and one of the highest mountains in the solar system, pokes above the edge of the disk on the right side.

    The five images were obtained over an 8-minute span, with two minutes between frames, from 23:50 to 23:58 Universal Time on March 1, 2007. Io was 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from New Horizons; the image is centered at Io coordinates 0 degrees north, 342 degrees west.

    The pictures were part of a sequence designed to look at Jupiter's rings, but planners included Io in the sequence because the moon was passing behind Jupiter's rings at the time.

  1. Correlation of Experimental and Theoretical Steady-State Spinning Motion for a Current Fighter Airplane Using Rotation-Balance Aerodynamic Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    required for accurate simulation of spinning motions. Attempts to analytically model departure and spin entry characteristics using measured static...rate of the airplane. Simulated flight motions using measured large angle static aerodynamics did produce more representative motions in the stall...NASA Langley began a program to measure aerodynamic data on airplane models under constant rotating conditions. This program resulted in the

  2. Cervical Spinal Motion During Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Ten fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cinefluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The data are currently being analyzed. A...paper entitled Segmental cervical spine motion during orotracheal intubation of the intact and injured spine with and without external stabilization was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

  3. Collective motion of dimers.

    PubMed

    Penington, Catherine J; Korvasová, Karolína; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2012-11-01

    We consider a discrete agent-based model on a one-dimensional lattice and a two-dimensional square lattice, where each agent is a dimer occupying two sites. Agents move by vacating one occupied site in favor of a nearest-neighbor site and obey either a strict simple exclusion rule or a weaker constraint that permits partial overlaps between dimers. Using indicator variables and careful probability arguments, a discrete-time master equation for these processes is derived systematically within a mean-field approximation. In the continuum limit, nonlinear diffusion equations that describe the average agent occupancy of the dimer population are obtained. In addition, we show that multiple species of interacting subpopulations give rise to advection-diffusion equations. Averaged discrete simulation data compares very well with the solution to the continuum partial differential equation models. Since many cell types are elongated rather than circular, this work offers insight into population-level behavior of collective cellular motion.

  4. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  5. Relativistic Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Over the past one hundred years, Brownian motion theory has contributed substantially to our understanding of various microscopic phenomena. Originally proposed as a phenomenological paradigm for atomistic matter interactions, the theory has since evolved into a broad and vivid research area, with an ever increasing number of applications in biology, chemistry, finance, and physics. The mathematical description of stochastic processes has led to new approaches in other fields, culminating in the path integral formulation of modern quantum theory. Stimulated by experimental progress in high energy physics and astrophysics, the unification of relativistic and stochastic concepts has re-attracted considerable interest during the past decade. Focusing on the framework of special relativity, we review, here, recent progress in the phenomenological description of relativistic diffusion processes. After a brief historical overview, we will summarize basic concepts from the Langevin theory of nonrelativistic Brownian motions and discuss relevant aspects of relativistic equilibrium thermostatistics. The introductory parts are followed by a detailed discussion of relativistic Langevin equations in phase space. We address the choice of time parameters, discretization rules, relativistic fluctuation-dissipation theorems, and Lorentz transformations of stochastic differential equations. The general theory is illustrated through analytical and numerical results for the diffusion of free relativistic Brownian particles. Subsequently, we discuss how Langevin-type equations can be obtained as approximations to microscopic models. The final part of the article is dedicated to relativistic diffusion processes in Minkowski spacetime. Since the velocities of relativistic particles are bounded by the speed of light, nontrivial relativistic Markov processes in spacetime do not exist; i.e., relativistic generalizations of the nonrelativistic diffusion equation and its Gaussian solutions

  6. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  7. How Accurate Are Transition States from Simulations of Enzymatic Reactions?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rate expression of traditional transition state theory (TST) assumes no recrossing of the transition state (TS) and thermal quasi-equilibrium between the ground state and the TS. Currently, it is not well understood to what extent these assumptions influence the nature of the activated complex obtained in traditional TST-based simulations of processes in the condensed phase in general and in enzymes in particular. Here we scrutinize these assumptions by characterizing the TSs for hydride transfer catalyzed by the enzyme Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase obtained using various simulation approaches. Specifically, we compare the TSs obtained with common TST-based methods and a dynamics-based method. Using a recently developed accurate hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential, we find that the TST-based and dynamics-based methods give considerably different TS ensembles. This discrepancy, which could be due equilibrium solvation effects and the nature of the reaction coordinate employed and its motion, raises major questions about how to interpret the TSs determined by common simulation methods. We conclude that further investigation is needed to characterize the impact of various TST assumptions on the TS phase-space ensemble and on the reaction kinetics. PMID:24860275

  8. Harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James

    2008-09-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that seeks to map the spatial distribution of tissue stiffness. Ultrasound radiation force excitation and motion tracking using pulse-echo ultrasound have been used in numerous methods. Dynamic radiation force is used in vibrometry to cause an object or tissue to vibrate, and the vibration amplitude and phase can be measured with exceptional accuracy. This paper presents a model that simulates harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium incorporating 3-D beam shapes for radiation force excitation and motion tracking. A parameterized analysis using this model provides a platform to optimize motion detection for vibrometry applications in tissue. An experimental method that produces a multifrequency radiation force is also presented. Experimental harmonic motion detection of simultaneous multifrequency vibration is demonstrated using a single transducer. This method can accurately detect motion with displacement amplitude as low as 100 to 200 nm in bovine muscle. Vibration phase can be measured within 10 degrees or less. The experimental results validate the conclusions observed from the model and show multifrequency vibration induction and measurements can be performed simultaneously.

  9. Designing the optimal convolution kernel for modeling the motion blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Motion blur acts on an image like a two dimensional low pass filter, whose spatial frequency characteristic depends both on the trajectory of the relative motion between the scene and the camera and on the velocity vector variation along it. When motion during exposure is permitted, the conventional, static notions of both the image exposure and the scene-toimage mapping become unsuitable and must be revised to accommodate the image formation dynamics. This paper develops an exact image formation model for arbitrary object-camera relative motion with arbitrary velocity profiles. Moreover, for any motion the camera may operate in either continuous or flutter shutter exposure mode. Its result is a convolution kernel, which is optimally designed for both the given motion and sensor array geometry, and hence permits the most accurate computational undoing of the blurring effects for the given camera required in forensic and high security applications. The theory has been implemented and a few examples are shown in the paper.

  10. Motion-based morphological segmentation of wildlife video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Naveen M.; Canagarajah, Nishan

    2005-03-01

    Segmentation of objects in a video sequence is a key stage in most content-based retrieval systems. By further analysing the behaviour of these objects, it is possible to extract semantic information suitable for higher level content analysis. Since interesting content in a video is usually provided by moving objects, motion is a key feature to be used for pre content analysis segmentation. A motion based segmentation algorithm is presented in this paper that is both efficient and robust. The algorithm is also robust to the type of camera motion. The framework presented consists of three stages. These are the motion estimation stage, foreground detection stage and the refinement stage. An iteration of the first two stages, adaptively altering the motion estimation parameters each time, results in a joint segmentation and motion estimation approach that is extremely fast and accurate. Two dimensional histograms are used as a tool to carry out the foreground detection. The last stage uses morphological approaches as well as a prediction of foreground regions in future frames to further refine the segmentation. In this paper, results obtained from traditional approaches are compared with that of the proposed framework in the wildlife domain.

  11. Harmonic Motion Detection in a Vibrating Scattering Medium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality that seeks to map the spatial distribution of tissue stiffness. Ultrasound radiation force excitation and motion tracking using pulse-echo ultrasound have been used in numerous methods. Dynamic radiation force is used in vibrometry to cause an object or tissue to vibrate, and the vibration amplitude and phase can be measured with exceptional accuracy. This paper presents a model that simulates harmonic motion detection in a vibrating scattering medium incorporating 3-D beam shapes for radiation force excitation and motion tracking. A parameterized analysis using this model provides a platform to optimize motion detection for vibrometry applications in tissue. An experimental method that produces a multifrequency radiation force is also presented. Experimental harmonic motion detection of simultaneous multifrequency vibration is demonstrated using a single transducer. This method can accurately detect motion with displacement amplitude as low as 100 to 200 nm in bovine muscle. Vibration phase can be measured within 10° or less. The experimental results validate the conclusions observed from the model and show multifrequency vibration induction and measurements can be performed simultaneously. PMID:18986892

  12. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  13. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  14. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  15. Determining accurate distances to nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, Alceste Zoe

    2005-11-01

    Determining accurate distances to nearby or distant galaxies is a very simple conceptually, yet complicated in practice, task. Presently, distances to nearby galaxies are only known to an accuracy of 10-15%. The current anchor galaxy of the extragalactic distance scale is the Large Magellanic Cloud, which has large (10-15%) systematic uncertainties associated with it, because of its morphology, its non-uniform reddening and the unknown metallicity dependence of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. This work aims to determine accurate distances to some nearby galaxies, and subsequently help reduce the error in the extragalactic distance scale and the Hubble constant H 0 . In particular, this work presents the first distance determination of the DIRECT Project to M33 with detached eclipsing binaries. DIRECT aims to obtain a new anchor galaxy for the extragalactic distance scale by measuring direct, accurate (to 5%) distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, with detached eclipsing binaries. It involves a massive variability survey of these galaxies and subsequent photometric and spectroscopic follow-up of the detached binaries discovered. In this work, I also present a catalog of variable stars discovered in one of the DIRECT fields, M31Y, which includes 41 eclipsing binaries. Additionally, we derive the distance to the Draco Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, with ~100 RR Lyrae found in our first CCD variability study of this galaxy. A "hybrid" method of discovering Cepheids with ground-based telescopes is described next. It involves applying the image subtraction technique on the images obtained from ground-based telescopes and then following them up with the Hubble Space Telescope to derive Cepheid period-luminosity distances. By re-analyzing ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), we demonstrate that this method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. I finally present photometry for the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 20a

  16. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  17. Motion-Matching: A Challenge Game to Generate Motion Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Brookes, David; Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Undreiu, Adriana

    2009-10-01

    Motion is a topic that is taught from elementary grades through to university at various levels of sophistication. It is an area that can be challenging for learning in a conceptually meaningful way, and formal kinematics instruction can sometimes seem dry and boring. Thus, the nature of students' initial introduction to motion is important in sparking their interest, shaping their perspective, and developing conceptual understanding of motion. The kinematic concepts we want students to acquire for basic motions are: position, time, speed, direction, velocity, velocity change, change rate, and acceleration, all with respect to a frame of reference. In this article we describe a challenge game used as an "opener" to motion, in which students themselves essentially generate these concepts, in everyday language, from a perceived need for them.

  18. A novel CT acquisition and analysis technique for breathing motion modeling

    PubMed Central

    Low, Daniel A.; White, Benjamin M.; Lee, Percy P.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Jani, Shyam S.; Wu, Xiao; Lamb, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report on a novel technique for providing artifact-free quantitative 4DCT image datasets for breathing motion modeling. Methods Commercial clinical four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) methods have trouble managing irregular breathing. The resulting images contain motion-induced artifacts that can distort structures and inaccurately characterize breathing motion. We have developed a novel scanning and analysis method for motion-correlated CT that utilizes standard repeated fast helical acquisitions, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a published breathing motion model. Results The motion model differs from the CT-measured motion by an average of 0.72 mm, indicating the precision of the motion model. The integral of the divergence of one of the motion model parameters is predicted to be a constant 1.11 and is found in this case to be 1.09, indicating the accuracy of the motion model. Conclusions The proposed technique shows promise for providing motion-artifact free images at user-selected breathing phases, accurate Hounsfield units, and noise characteristics similar to non-4D CT techniques, at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4DCT techniques. PMID:23640212

  19. Evaluating the Influence of Spatial Resampling for Motion Correction in Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lisha; He, Hongjian; Zhang, Han; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    Head motion is one of major concerns in current resting-state functional MRI studies. Image realignment including motion estimation and spatial resampling is often applied to achieve rigid-body motion correction. While the accurate estimation of motion parameters has been addressed in most studies, spatial resampling could also produce spurious variance, and lead to unexpected errors on the amplitude of BOLD signal. In this study, two simulation experiments were designed to characterize these variance related with spatial resampling. The fluctuation amplitude of spurious variance was first investigated using a set of simulated images with estimated motion parameters from a real dataset, and regions more likely to be affected by spatial resampling were found around the peripheral regions of the cortex. The other simulation was designed with three typical types of motion parameters to represent different extents of motion. It was found that areas with significant correlation between spurious variance and head motion scattered all over the brain and varied greatly from one motion type to another. In the last part of this study, four popular motion regression approaches were applied respectively and their performance in reducing spurious variance was compared. Among them, Friston 24 and Voxel-specific 12 model (Friston et al., 1996), were found to have the best outcomes. By separating related effects during fMRI analysis, this study provides a better understanding of the characteristics of spatial resampling and the interpretation of motion-BOLD relationship. PMID:28082860

  20. Motion Predicts Clinical Callus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jacob; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Lujan, Trevor; Peindl, Richard; Kellam, James; Anderson, Donald D.; Lack, William

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mechanotransduction is theorized to influence fracture-healing, but optimal fracture-site motion is poorly defined. We hypothesized that three-dimensional (3-D) fracture-site motion as estimated by finite element (FE) analysis would influence callus formation for a clinical series of supracondylar femoral fractures treated with locking-plate fixation. Methods: Construct-specific FE modeling simulated 3-D fracture-site motion for sixty-six supracondylar femoral fractures (OTA/AO classification of 33A or 33C) treated at a single institution. Construct stiffness and directional motion through the fracture were investigated to assess the validity of construct stiffness as a surrogate measure of 3-D motion at the fracture site. Callus formation was assessed radiographically for all patients at six, twelve, and twenty-four weeks postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses examined the effects of longitudinal motion, shear (transverse motion), open fracture, smoking, and diabetes on callus formation. Construct types were compared to determine whether their 3-D motion profile was associated with callus formation. Results: Shear disproportionately increased relative to longitudinal motion with increasing bridge span, which was not predicted by our assessment of construct stiffness alone. Callus formation was not associated with open fracture, smoking, or diabetes at six, twelve, or twenty-four weeks. However, callus formation was associated with 3-D fracture-site motion at twelve and twenty-four weeks. Longitudinal motion promoted callus formation at twelve and twenty-four weeks (p = 0.017 for both). Shear inhibited callus formation at twelve and twenty-four weeks (p = 0.017 and p = 0.022, respectively). Titanium constructs with a short bridge span demonstrated greater longitudinal motion with less shear than did the other constructs, and this was associated with greater callus formation (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study of

  1. Structure Sensor for mobile markerless augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgus, T.; Bux, R.; Franz, A. M.; Johnen, W.; Heim, E.; Fangerau, M.; Müller, M.; Yen, K.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2016-03-01

    3D Visualization of anatomical data is an integral part of diagnostics and treatment in many medical disciplines, such as radiology, surgery and forensic medicine. To enable intuitive interaction with the data, we recently proposed a new concept for on-patient visualization of medical data which involves rendering of subsurface structures on a mobile display that can be moved along the human body. The data fusion is achieved with a range imaging device attached to the display. The range data is used to register static 3D medical imaging data with the patient body based on a surface matching algorithm. However, our previous prototype was based on the Microsoft Kinect camera and thus required a cable connection to acquire color and depth data. The contribution of this paper is two-fold. Firstly, we replace the Kinect with the Structure Sensor - a novel cable-free range imaging device - to improve handling and user experience and show that the resulting accuracy (target registration error: 4.8+/-1.5 mm) is comparable to that achieved with the Kinect. Secondly, a new approach to visualizing complex 3D anatomy based on this device, as well as 3D printed models of anatomical surfaces, is presented. We demonstrate that our concept can be applied to in vivo data and to a 3D printed skull of a forensic case. Our new device is the next step towards clinical integration and shows that the concept cannot only be applied during autopsy but also for presentation of forensic data to laypeople in court or medical education.

  2. Spectroscopically Accurate Line Lists for Application in Sulphur Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, D. S.; Azzam, A. A. A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

    2013-09-01

    Monitoring sulphur chemistry is thought to be of great importance for exoplanets. Doing this requires detailed knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of sulphur containing molecules such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [1], sulphur dioxide (SO2), and sulphur trioxide (SO3). Each of these molecules can be found in terrestrial environments, produced in volcano emissions on Earth, and analysis of their spectroscopic data can prove useful to the characterisation of exoplanets, as well as the study of planets in our own solar system, with both having a possible presence on Venus. A complete, high temperature list of line positions and intensities for H32 2 S is presented. The DVR3D program suite is used to calculate the bound ro-vibration energy levels, wavefunctions, and dipole transition intensities using Radau coordinates. The calculations are based on a newly determined, spectroscopically refined potential energy surface (PES) and a new, high accuracy, ab initio dipole moment surface (DMS). Tests show that the PES enables us to calculate the line positions accurately and the DMS gives satisfactory results for line intensities. Comparisons with experiment as well as with previous theoretical spectra will be presented. The results of this study will form an important addition to the databases which are considered as sources of information for space applications; especially, in analysing the spectra of extrasolar planets, and remote sensing studies for Venus and Earth, as well as laboratory investigations and pollution studies. An ab initio line list for SO3 was previously computed using the variational nuclear motion program TROVE [2], and was suitable for modelling room temperature SO3 spectra. The calculations considered transitions in the region of 0-4000 cm-1 with rotational states up to J = 85, and includes 174,674,257 transitions. A list of 10,878 experimental transitions had relative intensities placed on an absolute scale, and were provided in a form suitable

  3. A novel spinal kinematic analysis using X-ray imaging and vicon motion analysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong K; Lee, Nam G; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights a novel spinal kinematic analysis method and the feasibility of X-ray imaging measurements to accurately assess thoracic spine motion. The advanced X-ray Nash-Moe method and analysis were used to compute the segmental range of motion in thoracic vertebra pedicles in vivo. This Nash-Moe X-ray imaging method was compared with a standardized method using the Vicon 3-dimensional motion capture system. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent and significant correlation between the two methods (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.05), suggesting that the analysis of spinal segmental range of motion using X-ray imaging measurements was accurate and comparable to the conventional 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Clinically, this novel finding is compelling evidence demonstrating that measurements with X-ray imaging are useful to accurately decipher pathological spinal alignment and movement impairments in idiopathic scoliosis (IS).

  4. Accurate taxonomic assignment of short pyrosequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Clemente, José C; Jansson, Jesper; Valiente, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Ambiguities in the taxonomy dependent assignment of pyrosequencing reads are usually resolved by mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor in a reference taxonomy of all those sequences that match the read. This conservative approach has the drawback of mapping a read to a possibly large clade that may also contain many sequences not matching the read. A more accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can be made by mapping each read to the node in the reference taxonomy that provides the best precision and recall. We show that given a suffix array for the sequences in the reference taxonomy, a short read can be mapped to the node of the reference taxonomy with the best combined value of precision and recall in time linear in the size of the taxonomy subtree rooted at the lowest common ancestor of the matching sequences. An accurate taxonomic assignment of short reads can thus be made with about the same efficiency as when mapping each read to the lowest common ancestor of all matching sequences in a reference taxonomy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several metagenomic datasets of marine and gut microbiota.

  5. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  6. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  7. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  8. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  9. Topographic Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Dietrich, J. T.; Courville, B. C.; Jensen, J.; Carbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    The production of high-resolution topographic datasets is of increasing concern and application throughout the geomorphic sciences, and river science is no exception. Consequently, a wide range of topographic measurement methods have evolved. Despite the range of available methods, the production of high resolution, high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) generally requires a significant investment in personnel time, hardware and/or software. However, image-based methods such as digital photogrammetry have steadily been decreasing in costs. Initially developed for the purpose of rapid, inexpensive and easy three dimensional surveys of buildings or small objects, the "structure from motion" photogrammetric approach (SfM) is a purely image based method which could deliver a step-change if transferred to river remote sensing, and requires very little training and is extremely inexpensive. Using the online SfM program Microsoft Photosynth, we have created high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) of rivers from ordinary photographs produced from a multi-step workflow that takes advantage of free and open source software. This process reconstructs real world scenes from SfM algorithms based on the derived positions of the photographs in three-dimensional space. One of the products of the SfM process is a three-dimensional point cloud of features present in the input photographs. This point cloud can be georeferenced from a small number of ground control points collected via GPS in the field. The georeferenced point cloud can then be used to create a variety of digital elevation model products. Among several study sites, we examine the applicability of SfM in the Pedernales River in Texas (USA), where several hundred images taken from a hand-held helikite are used to produce DEMs of the fluvial topographic environment. This test shows that SfM and low-altitude platforms can produce point clouds with point densities considerably better than airborne LiDAR, with

  10. Correction of Doppler Rada Data for Aircraft Motion Using Surface Measurements and Recursive Least-Squares Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S.; Haddad, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Observations of Doppler velocity of hydrometeors form airborne Doppler weather radars normally contains a component due to the aircraft motion. Accurate hydrometeor velocity measurements thus require correction by subtracting this velocity from the observed velocity.

  11. The Man Who Mastered Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radetsky, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Explains the principles of the science of motion and examines Thomas Kane's deductive approach to the study of dynamics. Also recounts Kane's advances in explaining classic mechanics and discusses the advantages of his methods in the formulation of equations of motion and in applications to space technology. (ML)

  12. Statistical description of tectonic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations regarding tectonic motions. The topics discussed include statistics of crustal deformation, Earth rotation studies, using multitaper spectrum analysis techniques applied to both space-geodetic data and conventional astrometric estimates of the Earth's polar motion, and the development, design, and installation of high-stability geodetic monuments for use with the global positioning system.

  13. An open architecture motion controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossol, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    Nomad, an open architecture motion controller, is described. It is formed by a combination of TMOS, C-WORKS, and other utilities. Nomad software runs in a UNIX environment and provides for sensor-controlled robotic motions, with user replaceable kinematics. It can also be tailored for highly specialized applications. Open controllers such as Nomad should have a major impact on the robotics industry.

  14. Insights into mechanism kinematics for protein motion simulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The high demanding computational requirements necessary to carry out protein motion simulations make it difficult to obtain information related to protein motion. On the one hand, molecular dynamics simulation requires huge computational resources to achieve satisfactory motion simulations. On the other hand, less accurate procedures such as interpolation methods, do not generate realistic morphs from the kinematic point of view. Analyzing a protein’s movement is very similar to serial robots; thus, it is possible to treat the protein chain as a serial mechanism composed of rotational degrees of freedom. Recently, based on this hypothesis, new methodologies have arisen, based on mechanism and robot kinematics, to simulate protein motion. Probabilistic roadmap method, which discretizes the protein configurational space against a scoring function, or the kinetostatic compliance method that minimizes the torques that appear in bonds, aim to simulate protein motion with a reduced computational cost. Results In this paper a new viewpoint for protein motion simulation, based on mechanism kinematics is presented. The paper describes a set of methodologies, combining different techniques such as structure normalization normalization processes, simulation algorithms and secondary structure detection procedures. The combination of all these procedures allows to obtain kinematic morphs of proteins achieving a very good computational cost-error rate, while maintaining the biological meaning of the obtained structures and the kinematic viability of the obtained motion. Conclusions The procedure presented in this paper, implements different modules to perform the simulation of the conformational change suffered by a protein when exerting its function. The combination of a main simulation procedure assisted by a secondary structure process, and a side chain orientation strategy, allows to obtain a fast and reliable simulations of protein motion. PMID:24923224

  15. Ego-motion based on EM for bionic navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Wang, L. J.; Liu, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Researches have proved that flying insects such as bees can achieve efficient and robust flight control, and biologists have explored some biomimetic principles regarding how they control flight. Based on those basic studies and principles acquired from the flying insects, this paper proposes a different solution of recovering ego-motion for low level navigation. Firstly, a new type of entropy flow is provided to calculate the motion parameters. Secondly, EKF, which has been used for navigation for some years to correct accumulated error, and estimation-Maximization, which is always used to estimate parameters, are put together to determine the ego-motion estimation of aerial vehicles. Numerical simulation on MATLAB has proved that this navigation system provides more accurate position and smaller mean absolute error than pure optical flow navigation. This paper has done pioneering work in bionic mechanism to space navigation.

  16. Wadaiko performance enhances synchronized motion of mentally disabled persons.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Eriko; Sakuma, Haruo

    2013-02-01

    People with mental disabilities tend to lack communication skills and have difficulty with interpersonal relationships. Interpersonal communication skills were examined in two people with Down Syndrome with regard to playing wadaiko (Japanese drum). Motion analysis compared single play and two-person play in which one participant was more skillful than the other. The effect of wadaiko play was quantified using two different methodologies: motion delay and hit-timing analysis and visual analog-scale (VAS) ratings before and after play. The motion analysis indicated that the study participants became mutually synchronized in playing wadaiko, and that a participant played more accurately when he played with a senior member. VAS ratings indicated that participants felt more positive after practicing wadaiko than before and self-confidence improved. Synchronized gestures of wadaiko performance may be an effective therapy for people with limited communication skills.

  17. Bacterial turbulence in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Smriga, Steven; Stocker, Roman; Secchi, Eleonora; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Piazza, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Dense suspensions of motile bacteria exhibit collective dynamics akin to those observed in classic, high Reynolds number turbulence, yet this analogy has remained largely qualitative. Here we present experiments in which a dense suspension of Bacillus subtilis bacteria was flown through narrow microchannels and the velocity statistics of the flowing suspension were accurately quantified with a recently developed velocimetry technique. This revealed a robust intermittency phenomenon, whereby the average velocity profile of the flowing suspension oscillated between a plug-like flow and a parabolic flow. This intermittency is a hallmark of classic turbulence and was associated with the presence of collective structures in the suspension. Furthermore, quantification of the Reynolds stress profile revealed a direct link between the turbulent nature of the suspension and its anomalous viscosity.

  18. The Equations of Oceanic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena and climate is based on the integration of dynamic equations. The Equations of Oceanic Motions derives and systematically classifies the most common dynamic equations used in physical oceanography, from large scale thermohaline circulations to those governing small scale motions and turbulence. After establishing the basic dynamical equations that describe all oceanic motions, M|ller then derives approximate equations, emphasizing the assumptions made and physical processes eliminated. He distinguishes between geometric, thermodynamic and dynamic approximations and between the acoustic, gravity, vortical and temperature-salinity modes of motion. Basic concepts and formulae of equilibrium thermodynamics, vector and tensor calculus, curvilinear coordinate systems, and the kinematics of fluid motion and wave propagation are covered in appendices. Providing the basic theoretical background for graduate students and researchers of physical oceanography and climate science, this book will serve as both a comprehensive text and an essential reference.

  19. Crowding of biological motion stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hanako; Watanabe, Katsumi; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2013-03-26

    It is difficult to identify a target in the peripheral visual field when it is flanked by distractors. In the present study, we investigated this "crowding" effect for biological motion stimuli. Three walking biological motion stimuli were presented horizontally in the periphery with various distances between them, and observers reported the walking direction of the central figure. When the inter-walker distance was small, discriminating the direction became difficult. Moreover, the reported direction for the central target was not simply noisier, but reflected a degree of pooling of the three directions from the target and two flankers. However, when the two flanking distractors were scrambled walking biological motion stimuli, crowding was not seen. This result suggests that the crowding of biological motion stimuli occurs at a high-level of motion perception.

  20. The Perception of Auditory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  1. Motion words selectively modulate direction discrimination sensitivity for threshold motion

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Andrea; Skujevskis, Māris; Baggio, Giosuè

    2013-01-01

    Can speech selectively modulate the sensitivity of a sensory system so that, in the presence of a suitable linguistic context, the discrimination of certain perceptual features becomes more or less likely? In this study, participants heard upward or downward motion words followed by a single visual field of random dots moving upwards or downwards. The time interval between the onsets of the auditory and the visual stimuli was varied parametrically. Motion direction could be either discriminable (suprathreshold motion) or non-discriminable (threshold motion). Participants had to judge whether the dots were moving upward or downward. Results show a double dissociation between discrimination sensitivity (d′) and reaction times depending on whether vertical motion was above or at threshold. With suprathreshold motion, responses were faster for congruent directions of words and dots, but sensitivity was equal across conditions. With threshold motion, sensitivity was higher for congruent directions of words and dots, but responses were equally fast across conditions. The observed differences in sensitivity and response times were largest when the dots appeared 450 ms after word onset, that is, consistently with electrophysiology, at the time the up/down semantics of the word had become available. These data suggest that word meanings can alter the balance between signal and noise within the visual system and affect the perception of low-level sensory features. PMID:23596407

  2. Accurate Mobile Urban Mapping via Digital Map-Based SLAM †

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyunchul; Jeong, Jinyong; Cho, Younggun; Kim, Ayoung

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents accurate urban map generation using digital map-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). Throughout this work, our main objective is generating a 3D and lane map aiming for sub-meter accuracy. In conventional mapping approaches, achieving extremely high accuracy was performed by either (i) exploiting costly airborne sensors or (ii) surveying with a static mapping system in a stationary platform. Mobile scanning systems recently have gathered popularity but are mostly limited by the availability of the Global Positioning System (GPS). We focus on the fact that the availability of GPS and urban structures are both sporadic but complementary. By modeling both GPS and digital map data as measurements and integrating them with other sensor measurements, we leverage SLAM for an accurate mobile mapping system. Our proposed algorithm generates an efficient graph SLAM and achieves a framework running in real-time and targeting sub-meter accuracy with a mobile platform. Integrated with the SLAM framework, we implement a motion-adaptive model for the Inverse Perspective Mapping (IPM). Using motion estimation derived from SLAM, the experimental results show that the proposed approaches provide stable bird’s-eye view images, even with significant motion during the drive. Our real-time map generation framework is validated via a long-distance urban test and evaluated at randomly sampled points using Real-Time Kinematic (RTK)-GPS. PMID:27548175

  3. Accurate Mobile Urban Mapping via Digital Map-Based SLAM †.

    PubMed

    Roh, Hyunchul; Jeong, Jinyong; Cho, Younggun; Kim, Ayoung

    2016-08-18

    This paper presents accurate urban map generation using digital map-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). Throughout this work, our main objective is generating a 3D and lane map aiming for sub-meter accuracy. In conventional mapping approaches, achieving extremely high accuracy was performed by either (i) exploiting costly airborne sensors or (ii) surveying with a static mapping system in a stationary platform. Mobile scanning systems recently have gathered popularity but are mostly limited by the availability of the Global Positioning System (GPS). We focus on the fact that the availability of GPS and urban structures are both sporadic but complementary. By modeling both GPS and digital map data as measurements and integrating them with other sensor measurements, we leverage SLAM for an accurate mobile mapping system. Our proposed algorithm generates an efficient graph SLAM and achieves a framework running in real-time and targeting sub-meter accuracy with a mobile platform. Integrated with the SLAM framework, we implement a motion-adaptive model for the Inverse Perspective Mapping (IPM). Using motion estimation derived from SLAM, the experimental results show that the proposed approaches provide stable bird's-eye view images, even with significant motion during the drive. Our real-time map generation framework is validated via a long-distance urban test and evaluated at randomly sampled points using Real-Time Kinematic (RTK)-GPS.

  4. Quaternion correlation for tracking crystal motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qiwei; Latourte, Félix; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    During in situ mechanical tests performed on polycrystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope, crystal orientation maps may be recorded at different stages of deformation from electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The present study introduces a novel correlation technique that exploits the crystallographic orientation field as a surface pattern to measure crystal motions. Introducing a quaternion-based formalism reveals crystal symmetry that is very convenient to handle and orientation extraction. Spatial regularization is provided by a penalty to deviation of displacement fields from being the solution to a homogeneous linear elastic problem. This procedure allows the large scale features of the displacement field to be captured, mostly from grain boundaries, and a fair interpolation of the displacement to be obtained within the grains. From these data, crystal rotations can be estimated very accurately. Both synthetic and real experimental cases are considered to illustrate the method.

  5. Aging persons' estimates of vehicular motion.

    PubMed

    Schiff, W; Oldak, R; Shah, V

    1992-12-01

    Estimated arrival times of moving autos were examined in relation to viewer age, gender, motion trajectory, and velocity. Direct push-button judgments were compared with verbal estimates derived from velocity and distance, which were based on assumptions that perceivers compute arrival time from perceived distance and velocity. Experiment 1 showed that direct estimates of younger Ss were most accurate. Older women made the shortest (highly cautious) estimates of when cars would arrive. Verbal estimates were much lower than direct estimates, with little correlation between them. Experiment 2 extended target distances and velocities of targets, with the results replicating the main findings of Experiment 1. Judgment accuracy increased with target velocity, and verbal estimates were again poorer estimates of arrival time than direct ones, with different patterns of findings. Using verbal estimates to approximate judgments in traffic situations appears questionable.

  6. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  7. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  8. LSM: perceptually accurate line segment merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Naila; Khan, Nazar

    2016-11-01

    Existing line segment detectors tend to break up perceptually distinct line segments into multiple segments. We propose an algorithm for merging such broken segments to recover the original perceptually accurate line segments. The algorithm proceeds by grouping line segments on the basis of angular and spatial proximity. Then those line segment pairs within each group that satisfy unique, adaptive mergeability criteria are successively merged to form a single line segment. This process is repeated until no more line segments can be merged. We also propose a method for quantitative comparison of line segment detection algorithms. Results on the York Urban dataset show that our merged line segments are closer to human-marked ground-truth line segments compared to state-of-the-art line segment detection algorithms.

  9. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  10. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  11. Obtaining accurate translations from expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James; Blaxter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The genomes of an increasing number of species are being investigated through the generation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). However, ESTs are prone to sequencing errors and typically define incomplete transcripts, making downstream annotation difficult. Annotation would be greatly improved with robust polypeptide translations. Many current solutions for EST translation require a large number of full-length gene sequences for training purposes, a resource that is not available for the majority of EST projects. As part of our ongoing EST programs investigating these "neglected" genomes, we have developed a polypeptide prediction pipeline, prot4EST. It incorporates freely available software to produce final translations that are more accurate than those derived from any single method. We describe how this integrated approach goes a long way to overcoming the deficit in training data.

  12. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  13. Accurate radio positions with the Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, M. J.; Gulkis, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Rayner, P. T.

    1979-01-01

    The Tidbinbilla interferometer (Batty et al., 1977) is designed specifically to provide accurate radio position measurements of compact radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere with high sensitivity. The interferometer uses the 26-m and 64-m antennas of the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla, near Canberra. The two antennas are separated by 200 m on a north-south baseline. By utilizing the existing antennas and the low-noise traveling-wave masers at 2.29 GHz, it has been possible to produce a high-sensitivity instrument with a minimum of capital expenditure. The north-south baseline ensures that a good range of UV coverage is obtained, so that sources lying in the declination range between about -80 and +30 deg may be observed with nearly orthogonal projected baselines of no less than about 1000 lambda. The instrument also provides high-accuracy flux density measurements for compact radio sources.

  14. Magnetic ranging tool accurately guides replacement well

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which accurately guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole location in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.

  15. Motion-guided attention promotes adaptive communications during social navigation

    PubMed Central

    Lemasson, B. H.; Anderson, J. J.; Goodwin, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Animals are capable of enhanced decision making through cooperation, whereby accurate decisions can occur quickly through decentralized consensus. These interactions often depend upon reliable social cues, which can result in highly coordinated activities in uncertain environments. Yet information within a crowd may be lost in translation, generating confusion and enhancing individual risk. As quantitative data detailing animal social interactions accumulate, the mechanisms enabling individuals to rapidly and accurately process competing social cues remain unresolved. Here, we model how motion-guided attention influences the exchange of visual information during social navigation. We also compare the performance of this mechanism to the hypothesis that robust social coordination requires individuals to numerically limit their attention to a set of n-nearest neighbours. While we find that such numerically limited attention does not generate robust social navigation across ecological contexts, several notable qualities arise from selective attention to motion cues. First, individuals can instantly become a local information hub when startled into action, without requiring changes in neighbour attention level. Second, individuals can circumvent speed–accuracy trade-offs by tuning their motion thresholds. In turn, these properties enable groups to collectively dampen or amplify social information. Lastly, the minority required to sway a group's short-term directional decisions can change substantially with social context. Our findings suggest that motion-guided attention is a fundamental and efficient mechanism underlying collaborative decision making during social navigation. PMID:23325772

  16. Human heading estimation during visually simulated curvilinear motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, L. S.; Perrone, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that humans cannot estimate their direction of forward translation (heading) from the resulting retinal motion (flow field) alone when rotation rates are higher than approximately 1 deg/sec. It has been argued that either oculomotor or static depth cues are necessary to disambiguate the rotational and translational components of the flow field and, thus, to support accurate heading estimation. We have re-examined this issue using visually simulated motion along a curved path towards a layout of random points as the stimulus. Our data show that, in this curvilinear motion paradigm, five of six observers could estimate their heading relatively accurately and precisely (error and uncertainty < approximately 4 deg), even for rotation rates as high as 16 deg/sec, without the benefit of either oculomotor or static depth cues signaling rotation rate. Such performance is inconsistent with models of human self-motion estimation that require rotation information from sources other than the flow field to cancel the rotational flow.

  17. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  18. Highly accurate fast lung CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Jan; Heldmann, Stefan; Kipshagen, Till; Fischer, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Lung registration in thoracic CT scans has received much attention in the medical imaging community. Possible applications range from follow-up analysis, motion correction for radiation therapy, monitoring of air flow and pulmonary function to lung elasticity analysis. In a clinical environment, runtime is always a critical issue, ruling out quite a few excellent registration approaches. In this paper, a highly efficient variational lung registration method based on minimizing the normalized gradient fields distance measure with curvature regularization is presented. The method ensures diffeomorphic deformations by an additional volume regularization. Supplemental user knowledge, like a segmentation of the lungs, may be incorporated as well. The accuracy of our method was evaluated on 40 test cases from clinical routine. In the EMPIRE10 lung registration challenge, our scheme ranks third, with respect to various validation criteria, out of 28 algorithms with an average landmark distance of 0.72 mm. The average runtime is about 1:50 min on a standard PC, making it by far the fastest approach of the top-ranking algorithms. Additionally, the ten publicly available DIR-Lab inhale-exhale scan pairs were registered to subvoxel accuracy at computation times of only 20 seconds. Our method thus combines very attractive runtimes with state-of-the-art accuracy in a unique way.

  19. Innovative modeling of Tuned Liquid Column Damper motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, A.; Lo Iacono, F.; Navarra, G.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a new model for the liquid motion within a Tuned Liquid Column Damper (TLCD) device is developed, based on the mathematical tool of fractional calculus. Although the increasing use of these devices for structural vibration control, it is shown that existing model does not always lead to accurate prediction of the liquid motion. A better model is then needed for accurate simulation of the behavior of TLCD systems. As regards, it has been demonstrated how correctly including the first linear liquid sloshing mode, through the equivalent mechanical analogy well established in literature, produces numerical results that highly match the corresponding experimental ones. Since the apparent effect of sloshing is the deviation of the natural frequency from the theoretical one, the authors propose a fractional differential equation of motion. The latter choice is supported by the fact that the introduction a fractional derivative of order α alters simultaneously both the resonant frequency and the degree of damping of the system. It will be shown, through an extensive experimental analysis, how the proposed model accurately describes liquid surface displacements.

  20. 5 CFR 1201.55 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for extension of time, a motion for postponement of a hearing, or any other procedural motion must first contact the other party to determine whether there is any objection to the motion, and must state... motion. Judges, in their discretion, may grant or deny motions for extensions of time to file...

  1. Scaling relationship between rotation and translation motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Rotation motion and its effects are not well known and our knowledge about translation motions is much better than that of the rotation motions. Since rotation motions show to have a close relationship with translation motions, deriving such relationship might improve our understanding on rotation motions. Rotation motion can be obtained by taking a spatial derivative of translation motion. Therefore, rotation motion is always accompanied by translation motions. Although rotation motion cannot be detected by strong motion record, the rotation-induced centrifugal acceleration and gravity effects are recorded in a strong-motion record. In this study we derive empirical relationships for rotation motion and its effects. Results show that rotation motion and its effects are small and can be ignored in weak motion, but they grow up very fast as the increasing of translation motion and become important in near-fault ground motions. We also found that those abnormal strong-motion records observed in near-fault are closely related to rotation motions.

  2. Thermal motion of the STIS optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Taylor, Mary Jane; Shaw, Richard; Robinson, Richard; Hill, Robert S.

    1997-01-01

    Various tests have been done of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using internal wavecals to measure thermal motion of the spectral format on the detectors. In most cases, the spectral format moves less than the specification not to exceed 0.2 pixels per hour. Primary causes of the motion are (1) changes to the thermal design dictated by the warmer Aft Shroud environment and (2) on-orbit power cycling of Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) electronics to minimize the effects of radiation hits on the MAMA detectors. The rear portion of the STIS optical bench is too warm to be held at a constant temperature by internal heaters. Electronics swing in temperature with an orbital and daily frequency. The thermal drift of the optical formats is not negligible, but is well behaved in most circumstances. The observer is advised to examine the trade-off between the most accurate wavelengths with best spectral/spatial resolutions versus increased overheads that directly affect the observing times. A long term concern is that the Aft Shroud thermal environment is predicted to heat up as much as one Centigrade degree per year. Progressively more of the bench would move out of thermal control. Thus the external cooler for STIS, being considered for the Third Servicing Mission is of major importance to the long term operation of STIS.

  3. Proper Motion of Stars Near SGRA*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becklin, Eric

    1997-07-01

    Sgr A* may be a black hole with a mass close to a million solar masses. Radial velocity data suggest that a large unseen mass coincides with SgrA*, but uncertainties in the shapes of the stellar orbits and the possiblity of distributed forms of dark matter being present have limited our ability to determine a precise mass for SgrA*. Proper motions measured over the lifetime of NICMOS will yield an accurate mass for Sgr A* and hence settle the issue of its black hole character. The locations of the Galactic Center sources will be measured one per year. At several epochs, NGC 4147, a globular cluster with low velocity dispersion and lying at a distance where the same exposure pattern as on the Galactic Center can be used, will also be observed as a check on the fidelity of the proper motions. N.B. This program requires 1 orbit in cycle 10 and 2 in cycle 11. The phase I exposure list could not handle these entries.

  4. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  5. Mab's orbital motion explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K.; de Pater, I.; Showalter, M. R.

    2015-07-01

    We explored the hypothesis that Mab's anomalous orbital motion, as deduced from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data (Showalter, M.R., Lissauer, J.J. [2006]. Science (New York, NY) 311, 973-977), is the result of gravitational interactions with a putative suite of large bodies in the μ-ring. We conducted simulations to compute the gravitational effect of Mab (a recently discovered Uranian moon) on a cloud of test particles. Subsequently, by employing the data extracted from the test particle simulations, we executed random walk simulations to compute the back-reaction of nearby perturbers on Mab. By generating simulated observation metrics, we compared our results to the data retrieved from the HST. Our results indicate that the longitude residual change noted in the HST data (Δλr,Mab ≈ 1 deg) is well matched by our simulations. The eccentricity variations (ΔeMab ≈10-3) are however typically two orders of magnitude too small. We present a variety of reasons that could account for this discrepancy. The nominal scenario that we investigated assumes a perturber ring mass (mring) of 1 mMab (Mab's mass) and a perturber ring number density (ρn,ring) of 10 perturbers per 3 RHill,Mab (Mab's Hill radius). This effectively translates to a few tens of perturbers with radii of approximately 2-3 km, depending on the albedo assumed. The results obtained also include an interesting litmus test: variations of Mab's inclination on the order of the eccentricity changes should be observable. Our work provides clues for further investigation into the tantalizing prospect that the Mab/μ-ring system is undergoing re-accretion after a recent catastrophic disruption.

  6. Human motion analysis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Prussing, Keith; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and the derivation of motionbased observables, and changes in these fundamental properties arising from load variations. Analyses were conducted to characterize the motion properties of various body components such as leg swing, arm swing, head motion, and full body motion. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, extraction of motion characteristics, and analysis of these data. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and analysis results will also be presented.

  7. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  8. Open architecture CMM motion controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, David; Spence, Allan D.; Bigg, Steve; Heslip, Joe; Peterson, John

    2001-12-01

    Although initially the only Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) sensor available was a touch trigger probe, technological advances in sensors and computing have greatly increased the variety of available inspection sensors. Non-contact laser digitizers and analog scanning touch probes require very well tuned CMM motion control, as well as an extensible, open architecture interface. This paper describes the implementation of a retrofit CMM motion controller designed for open architecture interface to a variety of sensors. The controller is based on an Intel Pentium microcomputer and a Servo To Go motion interface electronics card. Motor amplifiers, safety, and additional interface electronics are housed in a separate enclosure. Host Signal Processing (HSP) is used for the motion control algorithm. Compared to the usual host plus DSP architecture, single CPU HSP simplifies integration with the various sensors, and implementation of software geometric error compensation. Motion control tuning is accomplished using a remote computer via 100BaseTX Ethernet. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is used to enter geometric error compensation data, and to optimize the motion control tuning parameters. It is shown that this architecture achieves the required real time motion control response, yet is much easier to extend to additional sensors.

  9. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.

  10. A database of macromolecular motions.

    PubMed Central

    Gerstein, M; Krebs, W

    1998-01-01

    We describe a database of macromolecular motions meant to be of general use to the structural community. The database, which is accessible on the World Wide Web with an entry point at http://bioinfo.mbb.yale.edu/MolMovDB , attempts to systematize all instances of protein and nucleic acid movement for which there is at least some structural information. At present it contains >120 motions, most of which are of proteins. Protein motions are further classified hierarchically into a limited number of categories, first on the basis of size (distinguishing between fragment, domain and subunit motions) and then on the basis of packing. Our packing classification divides motions into various categories (shear, hinge, other) depending on whether or not they involve sliding over a continuously maintained and tightly packed interface. In addition, the database provides some indication about the evidence behind each motion (i.e. the type of experimental information or whether the motion is inferred based on structural similarity) and attempts to describe many aspects of a motion in terms of a standardized nomenclature (e.g. the maximum rotation, the residue selection of a fixed core, etc.). Currently, we use a standard relational design to implement the database. However, the complexity and heterogeneity of the information kept in the database makes it an ideal application for an object-relational approach, and we are moving it in this direction. Specifically, in terms of storing complex information, the database contains plausible representations for motion pathways, derived from restrained 3D interpolation between known endpoint conformations. These pathways can be viewed in a variety of movie formats, and the database is associated with a server that can automatically generate these movies from submitted coordinates. PMID:9722650

  11. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    measurements of the test persons, there is a very good correlation (ρ= 0.917) between the respiratory motion phases received by the radar system and the external motion monitor. Our concept of using an array of transmitting antennas turned out to be widely insensitive to the positioning of the test persons. A time shift between the respiratory motion curves recorded with the radar system and the motion curves from the external respiratory monitor was observed which indicates a slight difference between internal organ motion and motion detected by the external respiratory monitor. The simulations were in good accordance with the measurements.Conclusions: A continuous wave radar operating in the near field of the antennas can be used to determine the respiratory motion of humans accurately. In contrast to trigger systems used today, the radar system is able to measure motion inside the body. If such a monitor was routinely available in clinical CT, it would be possible optimizing the scan start with respect to the respiratory state of the patient. Breathing commands would potentially widely be avoided, and as far as uncooperative patients or children are concerned, less sedation might be necessary. Further applications of the radar system could be in radiation therapy or interventional imaging for instance.

  12. A motion artifact generation and assessment system for the rapid testing of surface biopotential electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cömert, Alper; Hyttinen, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Dry electrodes can reduce cost while increasing the usability and comfort of wearable monitoring systems. They are, however, susceptible to motion artifacts. The present electrode testing methods lack reliability and do not separate the factors that affect the motion artifact. In this paper, we introduce a first generation motion artifact generation and assessment system that generates the speed, amplitude, and pattern-wise programmable movement of the electrode. The system simultaneously measures electrode-skin impedance, the motion artifact, and one channel of an electrocardiogram that contains the motion artifact and monitors the mounting force applied to the electrode. We demonstrate the system by comparing the applied movement and the measured signals for electrode movements up to 6 mm and movement frequencies from 0.4 Hz to 4 Hz. Results show that the impedance change and surface potential are visually clearly related to the applied motion, with average correlations of 0.89 and 0.64, respectively. The applied force, electrode location, and electrode structure all affect the motion artifact. The setup enables the motion of the electrode to be accurately controlled. The system can be used as a precursor to the testing of integrated systems because it enables thorough, repeatable, and robust motion artifact studies. The system allows a deeper insight into motion artifacts and the interplay of the various factors that affect them.

  13. Neural mechanisms of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, G. H.; Daunton, N. G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that there might be a neuro-homoral cerebrospinal fluid link in motion sickness was directly tested by blocking the flow of CSF from the third into the fourth ventricle in cats. Evidence obtained thus far is consistent with the hypothesis. Cats with demonstrably sound plugs did not vomit in response to an accelerative motion sickness stimulus, whereas cats with imperfect 'leaky' plugs vomited with little or no delay in latency. Althoough there are several putative candidates, the identification of a humoral motion sickness substance is a matter of conjecture.

  14. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy.

  15. Steady-State Pursuit Is Driven by Object Motion Rather Than the Vector Average of Local Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, B. R.; Lorenceau, J. D.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that humans can pursue the motion of objects whose trajectories can be recovered only by spatio-temporal integration of local motion signals. We now explore the integration rule used to derive the target-motion signal driving pursuit. We measured the pursuit response of 4 observers (2 naive) to the motion of a line-figure diamond viewed through two vertical bar apertures (0.2 cd/square m). The comers were always occluded so that only four line segments (93 cd/square m) were visible behind the occluding foreground (38 cd/square m). The diamond was flattened (40 & 140 degree vertex angles) such that vector averaging of the local normal motions and vertical integration (e.g. IOC) yield very I or different predictions, analogous to using a Type II plaid. The diamond moved along Lissajous-figure trajectories (Ax = Ay = 2 degrees; TFx = 0.8 Hz; TFy = 0.4 Hz). We presented only 1.25 cycles and used 6 different randomly interleaved initial relative phases to minimize the role of predictive strategies. Observers were instructed to track the diamond and reported that its motion was always coherent (unlike type II plaids). Saccade-free portions of the horizontal and vertical eye-position traces sampled at 240 Hz were fit by separate sinusoids. Pursuit gain with respect to the diamond averaged 0.7 across subjects and directions. The ratio of the mean vertical to horizontal amplitude of the pursuit response was 1.7 +/- 0.7 averaged across subjects (1SD). This is close to the prediction of 1.0 from vertical motion-integration rules, but far from 7.7 predicted by vector averaging and infinity predicted by segment- or terminator-tracking strategies. Because there is no retinal motion which directly corresponds to the diamond's motion, steady-state pursuit of our "virtual" diamond is not closed-loop in the traditional sense. Thus, accurate pursuit is unlikely to result simply from local retinal negative feedback. We conclude that the signal driving steady

  16. Does a pneumotach accurately characterize voice function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Gage; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A study is presented which addresses how a pneumotach might adversely affect clinical measurements of voice function. A pneumotach is a device, typically a mask, worn over the mouth, in order to measure time-varying glottal volume flow. By measuring the time-varying difference in pressure across a known aerodynamic resistance element in the mask, the glottal volume flow waveform is estimated. Because it adds aerodynamic resistance to the vocal system, there is some concern that using a pneumotach may not accurately portray the behavior of the voice. To test this hypothesis, experiments were performed in a simplified airway model with the principal dimensions of an adult human upper airway. A compliant constriction, fabricated from silicone rubber, modeled the vocal folds. Variations of transglottal pressure, time-averaged volume flow, model vocal fold vibration amplitude, and radiated sound with subglottal pressure were performed, with and without the pneumotach in place, and differences noted. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  17. Accurate thermoplasmonic simulation of metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Da-Miao; Liu, Yan-Nan; Tian, Fa-Lin; Pan, Xiao-Min; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Thermoplasmonics leads to enhanced heat generation due to the localized surface plasmon resonances. The measurement of heat generation is fundamentally a complicated task, which necessitates the development of theoretical simulation techniques. In this paper, an efficient and accurate numerical scheme is proposed for applications with complex metallic nanostructures. Light absorption and temperature increase are, respectively, obtained by solving the volume integral equation (VIE) and the steady-state heat diffusion equation through the method of moments (MoM). Previously, methods based on surface integral equations (SIEs) were utilized to obtain light absorption. However, computing light absorption from the equivalent current is as expensive as O(NsNv), where Ns and Nv, respectively, denote the number of surface and volumetric unknowns. Our approach reduces the cost to O(Nv) by using VIE. The accuracy, efficiency and capability of the proposed scheme are validated by multiple simulations. The simulations show that our proposed method is more efficient than the approach based on SIEs under comparable accuracy, especially for the case where many incidents are of interest. The simulations also indicate that the temperature profile can be tuned by several factors, such as the geometry configuration of array, beam direction, and light wavelength.

  18. Accurate method for computing correlated color temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Changjun; Cui, Guihua; Melgosa, Manuel; Ruan, Xiukai; Zhang, Yaoju; Ma, Long; Xiao, Kaida; Luo, M Ronnier

    2016-06-27

    For the correlated color temperature (CCT) of a light source to be estimated, a nonlinear optimization problem must be solved. In all previous methods available to compute CCT, the objective function has only been approximated, and their predictions have achieved limited accuracy. For example, different unacceptable CCT values have been predicted for light sources located on the same isotemperature line. In this paper, we propose to compute CCT using the Newton method, which requires the first and second derivatives of the objective function. Following the current recommendation by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) for the computation of tristimulus values (summations at 1 nm steps from 360 nm to 830 nm), the objective function and its first and second derivatives are explicitly given and used in our computations. Comprehensive tests demonstrate that the proposed method, together with an initial estimation of CCT using Robertson's method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 58, 1528-1535 (1968)], gives highly accurate predictions below 0.0012 K for light sources with CCTs ranging from 500 K to 106 K.

  19. Accurate Theoretical Thermochemistry for Fluoroethyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Ganyecz, Ádám; Kállay, Mihály; Csontos, József

    2017-02-09

    An accurate coupled-cluster (CC) based model chemistry was applied to calculate reliable thermochemical quantities for hydrofluorocarbon derivatives including radicals 1-fluoroethyl (CH3-CHF), 1,1-difluoroethyl (CH3-CF2), 2-fluoroethyl (CH2F-CH2), 1,2-difluoroethyl (CH2F-CHF), 2,2-difluoroethyl (CHF2-CH2), 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl (CF3-CH2), 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl (CF3-CHF), and pentafluoroethyl (CF3-CF2). The model chemistry used contains iterative triple and perturbative quadruple excitations in CC theory, as well as scalar relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections. To obtain heat of formation values with better than chemical accuracy perturbative quadruple excitations and scalar relativistic corrections were inevitable. Their contributions to the heats of formation steadily increase with the number of fluorine atoms in the radical reaching 10 kJ/mol for CF3-CF2. When discrepancies were found between the experimental and our values it was always possible to resolve the issue by recalculating the experimental result with currently recommended auxiliary data. For each radical studied here this study delivers the best heat of formation as well as entropy data.

  20. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  1. Accurate methods for large molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Mark S; Mullin, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Spencer R; Roskop, Luke B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Boatz, Jerry A

    2009-07-23

    Three exciting new methods that address the accurate prediction of processes and properties of large molecular systems are discussed. The systematic fragmentation method (SFM) and the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method both decompose a large molecular system (e.g., protein, liquid, zeolite) into small subunits (fragments) in very different ways that are designed to both retain the high accuracy of the chosen quantum mechanical level of theory while greatly reducing the demands on computational time and resources. Each of these methods is inherently scalable and is therefore eminently capable of taking advantage of massively parallel computer hardware while retaining the accuracy of the corresponding electronic structure method from which it is derived. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a sophisticated approach for the prediction of nonbonded and intermolecular interactions. Therefore, the EFP method provides a way to further reduce the computational effort while retaining accuracy by treating the far-field interactions in place of the full electronic structure method. The performance of the methods is demonstrated using applications to several systems, including benzene dimer, small organic species, pieces of the alpha helix, water, and ionic liquids.

  2. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  3. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  4. Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring: how accurate is enough?

    PubMed

    Rice, Mark J; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2013-10-01

    Evaluating the accuracy of medical devices has traditionally been a blend of statistical analyses, at times without contextualizing the clinical application. There have been a number of recent publications on the accuracy of a continuous noninvasive hemoglobin measurement device, the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-oximeter, focusing on the traditional statistical metrics of bias and precision. In this review, which contains material presented at the Innovations and Applications of Monitoring Perfusion, Oxygenation, and Ventilation (IAMPOV) Symposium at Yale University in 2012, we critically investigated these metrics as applied to the new technology, exploring what is required of a noninvasive hemoglobin monitor and whether the conventional statistics adequately answer our questions about clinical accuracy. We discuss the glucose error grid, well known in the glucose monitoring literature, and describe an analogous version for hemoglobin monitoring. This hemoglobin error grid can be used to evaluate the required clinical accuracy (±g/dL) of a hemoglobin measurement device to provide more conclusive evidence on whether to transfuse an individual patient. The important decision to transfuse a patient usually requires both an accurate hemoglobin measurement and a physiologic reason to elect transfusion. It is our opinion that the published accuracy data of the Masimo Radical-7 is not good enough to make the transfusion decision.

  5. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  6. Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement.

    PubMed

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H

    2014-06-11

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

  7. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  8. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis using advanced ground motion intensity measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tothong, P.; Luco, N.

    2007-01-01

    One of the objectives in performance-based earthquake engineering is to quantify the seismic reliability of a structure at a site. For that purpose, probabilistic seismic demand analysis (PSDA) is used as a tool to estimate the mean annual frequency of exceeding a specified value of a structural demand parameter (e.g. interstorey drift). This paper compares and contrasts the use, in PSDA, of certain advanced scalar versus vector and conventional scalar ground motion intensity measures (IMs). One of the benefits of using a well-chosen IM is that more accurate evaluations of seismic performance are achieved without the need to perform detailed ground motion record selection for the nonlinear dynamic structural analyses involved in PSDA (e.g. record selection with respect to seismic parameters such as earthquake magnitude, source-to-site distance, and ground motion epsilon). For structural demands that are dominated by a first mode of vibration, using inelastic spectral displacement (Sdi) can be advantageous relative to the conventionally used elastic spectral acceleration (Sa) and the vector IM consisting of Sa and epsilon (??). This paper demonstrates that this is true for ordinary and for near-source pulse-like earthquake records. The latter ground motions cannot be adequately characterized by either Sa alone or the vector of Sa and ??. For structural demands with significant higher-mode contributions (under either of the two types of ground motions), even Sdi (alone) is not sufficient, so an advanced scalar IM that additionally incorporates higher modes is used.

  9. Δ μ binaries among stars with large proper motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovritchev, M. Yu.; Kulikova, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based on observations performed with the Pulkovo normal astrograph in 2008-2015 and data from sky surveys (DSS, 2MASS, SDSS DR12, WISE), we have investigated the motions of 1308 stars with proper motions larger than 300 mas yr-1 down to magnitude 17. The main idea of our search for binary stars based on this material is reduced to comparing the quasi-mean (POSS2-POSS1; an epoch difference of ≈50 yr) and quasi-instantaneous (2МASS, SDSS, WISE, Pulkovo; an epoch difference of ≈10 yr) proper motions. If the difference is statistically significant compared to the proper motion errors, then the object may be considered as a Δ μ-binary candidate. One hundred and twenty one stars from among those included in the observational program satisfy this requirement. Additional confirmations of binarity for a number of stars have been obtained by comparing the calculated proper motions with the data from several programs of stellar trigonometric parallax determinations and by analyzing the asymmetry of stellar images on sky-survey CCD frames. Analysis of the highly accurate SDSS photometric data for four stars (J0656+3827, J0838+3940, J1229+5332, J2330+4639) allows us to reach a conclusion about the probability that these Δ μ binaries are white dwarf +Mdwarf pairs.

  10. On feature motion decorrelation in ultrasound speckle tracking.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tianzhu; Yung, Lingsing; Yu, Weichuan

    2013-02-01

    Speckle tracking methods refer to motion tracking methods based on speckle patterns in ultrasound images. They are commonly used in ultrasound based elasticity imaging techniques to reveal mechanical properties of tissues for clinical diagnosis. In speckle tracking, feature motion decorrelation exists when speckle patterns are not identical before and after tissue motion and deformation. Feature motion decorrelation violates the underlying assumption of most speckle tracking methods. Consequently, the estimation accuracy of current methods is greatly limited. In this paper, two types of speckle pattern variations, the geometric transformation and the intensity change of speckle patterns, are studied. We show that a coupled filtering method is able to compensate for both types of variations. It provides accurate strain estimations even when tissue deformation or rotation is extremely large. We also show that in most cases, an affine warping method that only compensates for the geometric transformation is able to achieve a similar performance as the coupled filtering method. Feature motion decorrelation in B-mode images is also studied. Finally, we show that in typical elastography studies, speckle tracking methods without modeling local shearing or rotation will fail when tissue deformation is large.

  11. Spatial correlation of probabilistic earthquake ground motion and loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesson, R.L.; Perkins, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial correlation of annual earthquake ground motions and losses can be used to estimate the variance of annual losses to a portfolio of properties exposed to earthquakes A direct method is described for the calculations of the spatial correlation of earthquake ground motions and losses. Calculations for the direct method can be carried out using either numerical quadrature or a discrete, matrix-based approach. Numerical results for this method are compared with those calculated from a simple Monte Carlo simulation. Spatial correlation of ground motion and loss is induced by the systematic attenuation of ground motion with distance from the source, by common site conditions, and by the finite length of fault ruptures. Spatial correlation is also strongly dependent on the partitioning of the variability, given an event, into interevent and intraevent components. Intraevent variability reduces the spatial correlation of losses. Interevent variability increases spatial correlation of losses. The higher the spatial correlation, the larger the variance in losses to a port-folio, and the more likely extreme values become. This result underscores the importance of accurately determining the relative magnitudes of intraevent and interevent variability in ground-motion studies, because of the strong impact in estimating earthquake losses to a portfolio. The direct method offers an alternative to simulation for calculating the variance of losses to a portfolio, which may reduce the amount of calculation required.

  12. Motion-compensated compressed sensing for dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Rajagopalan; Kim, Yookyung; Nadar, Mariappan S.; Bilgin, Ali

    2010-08-01

    The recently introduced Compressed Sensing (CS) theory explains how sparse or compressible signals can be reconstructed from far fewer samples than what was previously believed possible. The CS theory has attracted significant attention for applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) where long acquisition times have been problematic. This is especially true for dynamic MRI applications where high spatio-temporal resolution is needed. For example, in cardiac cine MRI, it is desirable to acquire the whole cardiac volume within a single breath-hold in order to avoid artifacts due to respiratory motion. Conventional MRI techniques do not allow reconstruction of high resolution image sequences from such limited amount of data. Vaswani et al. recently proposed an extension of the CS framework to problems with partially known support (i.e. sparsity pattern). In their work, the problem of recursive reconstruction of time sequences of sparse signals was considered. Under the assumption that the support of the signal changes slowly over time, they proposed using the support of the previous frame as the "known" part of the support for the current frame. While this approach works well for image sequences with little or no motion, motion causes significant change in support between adjacent frames. In this paper, we illustrate how motion estimation and compensation techniques can be used to reconstruct more accurate estimates of support for image sequences with substantial motion (such as cardiac MRI). Experimental results using phantoms as well as real MRI data sets illustrate the improved performance of the proposed technique.

  13. Direct and indirect measures of speech articulator motions using low power EM sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T; Burnett, G; Gable, T; Holzrichter, J F; Ng, L

    1999-05-12

    Low power Electromagnetic (EM) Wave sensors can measure general properties of human speech articulator motions, as speech is produced. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J.Acoust.Soc.Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). Experiments have demonstrated extremely accurate pitch measurements (< 1 Hz per pitch cycle) and accurate onset of voiced speech. Recent measurements of pressure-induced tracheal motions enable very good spectra and amplitude estimates of a voiced excitation function. The use of the measured excitation functions and pitch synchronous processing enable the determination of each pitch cycle of an accurate transfer function and, indirectly, of the corresponding articulator motions. In addition, direct measurements have been made of EM wave reflections from articulator interfaces, including jaw, tongue, and palate, simultaneously with acoustic and glottal open/close signals. While several types of EM sensors are suitable for speech articulator measurements, the homodyne sensor has been found to provide good spatial and temporal resolution for several applications.

  14. A primer on motion visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Sven P

    2007-03-01

    Motion visual evoked potentials (motion VEPs) have been used since the late 1960s to investigate the properties of human visual motion processing, and continue to be a popular tool with a possible future in clinical diagnosis. This review first provides a synopsis of the characteristics of motion VEPs and then summarizes important methodological aspects. A subsequent overview illustrates how motion VEPs have been applied to study basic functions of human motion processing and shows perspectives for their use as a diagnostic tool.

  15. Superdiffusive trajectories in Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Duplat, Jérôme; Kheifets, Simon; Li, Tongcang; Raizen, Mark G; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    The Brownian motion of a microscopic particle in a fluid is one of the cornerstones of statistical physics and the paradigm of a random process. One of the most powerful tools to quantify it was provided by Langevin, who explicitly accounted for a short-time correlated "thermal" force. The Langevin picture predicts ballistic motion, ~t(2) at short-time scales, and diffusive motion ~t at long-time scales, where x is the displacement of the particle during time t, and the average is taken over the thermal distribution of initial conditions. The Langevin equation also predicts a superdiffusive regime, where ~t(3), under the condition that the initial velocity is fixed rather than distributed thermally. We analyze the motion of an optically trapped particle in air and indeed find t(3) dispersion. This observation is a direct proof of the existence of the random, rapidly varying force imagined by Langevin.

  16. Projectile Motion in Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naddy, Cory J.; Dudley, Scott C.; Haaland, Ryan K.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the motion that occurs when a particle with an initial velocity to the right is acted upon by a constant downward force. Considers what happens when the speed of the particle approaches the speed of light in particular. (WRM)

  17. Shaft-Motion-Analyzing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.; Collins, John J.; Coleman, Paul T.; Roschak, Edmund J.

    1993-01-01

    Optoelectronic system to monitor motions of turbopump shaft developed. Optical sensors detect passage of reflective triangles on shaft. Optical measurements processed in real time into indications of speed of rotation and of axial and lateral displacements of shaft.

  18. Bayesian estimation of turbulent motion.

    PubMed

    Héas, Patrick; Herzet, Cédric; Mémin, Etienne; Heitz, Dominique; Mininni, Pablo D

    2013-06-01

    Based on physical laws describing the multiscale structure of turbulent flows, this paper proposes a regularizer for fluid motion estimation from an image sequence. Regularization is achieved by imposing some scale invariance property between histograms of motion increments computed at different scales. By reformulating this problem from a Bayesian perspective, an algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate motion, regularization hyperparameters, and to select the most likely physical prior among a set of models. Hyperparameter and model inference are conducted by posterior maximization, obtained by marginalizing out non--Gaussian motion variables. The Bayesian estimator is assessed on several image sequences depicting synthetic and real turbulent fluid flows. Results obtained with the proposed approach exceed the state-of-the-art results in fluid flow estimation.

  19. Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Palta, Manisha; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between liver tumor motion and diaphragm motion. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10 of 14) or liver metastases (4 of 14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice cine–magnetic resonance imaging simulations across the center of the tumor in 3 orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions were obtained using an in-house-developed normalized cross-correlation–based tracking technique. Agreement between the tumor and diaphragm motion was assessed by calculating phase difference percentage, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman analysis (Diff). The distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between the 2 motions. Results: Of all patients, the mean (±standard deviation) phase difference percentage values were 7.1% ± 1.1%, 4.5% ± 0.5%, and 17.5% ± 4.5% in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.98 ± 0.02, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.08 ± 0.06 in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean Diff values were 2.8 ± 1.4 mm, 2.4 ± 1.1 mm, and 2.2 ± 0.5 mm in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. Tumor and diaphragm motions had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was small. Conclusions: This study showed that liver tumor motion had good correlation with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be used as a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion.

  20. New inverse synthetic aperture radar algorithm for translational motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocker, Richard P.; Henderson, Thomas B.; Jones, Scott A.; Frieden, B. R.

    1991-10-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is an imaging technique that shows real promise in classifying airborne targets in real time under all weather conditions. Over the past few years a large body of ISAR data has been collected and considerable effort has been expended to develop algorithms to form high-resolution images from this data. One important goal of workers in this field is to develop software that will do the best job of imaging under the widest range of conditions. The success of classifying targets using ISAR is predicated upon forming highly focused radar images of these targets. Efforts to develop highly focused imaging computer software have been challenging, mainly because the imaging depends on and is affected by the motion of the target, which in general is not precisely known. Specifically, the target generally has both rotational motion about some axis and translational motion as a whole with respect to the radar. The slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities must be first accurately estimated from the data and compensated before the image can be focused. Following slant-range motion compensation, the image is further focused by determining and correcting for target rotation. The use of the burst derivative measure is proposed as a means to improve the computational efficiency of currently used ISAR algorithms. The use of this measure in motion compensation ISAR algorithms for estimating the slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities of an uncooperative target is described. Preliminary tests have been performed on simulated as well as actual ISAR data using both a Sun 4 workstation and a parallel processing transputer array. Results indicate that the burst derivative measure gives significant improvement in processing speed over the traditional entropy measure now employed.

  1. Wrist and forearm postures and motions during typing.

    PubMed

    Serina, E R; Tal, R; Rempel, D

    1999-07-01

    Awkward upper extremity postures and repetitive wrist motions have been identified by some studies as risk factors for upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders during keyboard work. However, accurate body postures and joint motions of typists typing on standardized workstations are not known. A laboratory study was conducted to continuously measure wrist and forearm postures and motions of 25 subjects while they typed for 10-15 min at a standard computer workstation adjusted to the subjects' anthropometry. Electrogoniometers continuously recorded wrist and forearm angles. Joint angular velocities and accelerations were calculated from the postural data. The results indicate that wrist and forearm postures during typing were sustained at non-neutral angles; mean wrist extension angle was 23.4 +/- 10.9 degrees on the left and 19.9 +/- 8.6 degrees on the right. Mean ulnar deviation was 14.7 +/- 10.1 degrees on the left and 18.6 +/- 5.8 degrees on the right. More than 73% of subjects typed with the left or right wrist in greater than 15 degrees extension and more than 20% typed with the left or right wrist in greater than 20 degrees ulnar deviation. Joint angles and motions while typing on an adjusted computer workstation were not predictable based on anthropometry or typing speed and varied widely between subjects. Wrist motions are rapid and are similar in magnitude to wrist motions of industrial workers performing jobs having a high risk for developing cumulative trauma disorders. The magnitude of the dynamic components suggests that wrist joint motions may need to be evaluated as a risk factor for musculoskeletal disorders during typing.

  2. 5D model for accurate representation and visualization of dynamic cardiac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Accurate cardiac modeling is challenging due to the intricate structure and complex contraction patterns of myocardial tissues. Fast imaging techniques can provide 4D structural information acquired as a sequence of 3D images throughout the cardiac cycle. To mode. The beating heart, we created a physics-based surface model that deforms between successive time point in the cardiac cycle. 3D images of canine hearts were acquired during one complete cardiac cycle using the DSR and the EBCT. The left ventricle of the first time point is reconstructed as a triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable mode,, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, is applied to the initial mesh and allows the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resulting 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D model, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. The model faithfully represents structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provide the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allow quantitative assessment of regional myocardial motion. The electrical activation mapping provides spatial and temporal correlation within the cardiac cycle. In procedures which as intra-cardiac catheter ablation, visualization of the dynamic model can be used to accurately localize the foci of myocardial arrhythmias and guide positioning of catheters for optimal ablation.

  3. The Measurement of Visual Motion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    rotates, translates and deforms over time, to yield the dotted curve C2 . The mapping of points from C1 to C2 is much less clear (consider, for example... deforming curve motion; different choices for the velocity field may yield different three-dimensional structures. The computation of a unique velocity...the velocity field, which will allow us to analyze the projected motion of three-dimensional objects 13 L _ allowed to move freely in space, and deform

  4. Tilts in strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.

    2006-01-01

    Most instruments used in seismological practice to record ground motion are pendulum seismographs, velocigraphs, or accelerographs. In most cases it is assumed that seismic instruments are only sensitive to the translational motion of the instrument's base. In this study the full equation of pendulum motion, including the inputs of rotations and tilts, is considered. It is shown that tilting the accelerograph's base can severely impact its response to the ground motion. The method of tilt evaluation using uncorrected strong-motion accelerograms was first suggested by Graizer (1989), and later tested in several laboratory experiments with different strong-motion instruments. The method is based on the difference in the tilt sensitivity of the horizontal and vertical pendulums. The method was applied to many of the strongest records of the Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake of 1994. Examples are shown when relatively large tilts of up to a few degrees occurred during strong earthquake ground motion. Residual tilt extracted from the strong-motion record at the Pacoima Dam-Upper Left Abutment reached 3.1?? in N45??E direction, and was a result of local earthquake-induced tilting due to high-amplitude shaking. This value is in agreement with the residual tilt measured by using electronic level a few days after the earthquake. The method was applied to the building records from the Northridge earthquake. According to the estimates, residual tilt reached 2.6?? on the ground floor of the 12-story Hotel in Ventura. Processing of most of the strongest records of the Northridge earthquake shows that tilts, if happened, were within the error of the method, or less than about 0.5??.

  5. Analysing simple motions using the Doppler effect—‘seeing’ sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonawski, Tamás; Gálik, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    The Doppler effect has seen widespread use in the past hundred years. It is used for medical imaging, for measuring speed, temperature, direction, etc, and it makes the spatial relations of motion easy to map. The Doppler effect also allows GPS receivers to measure the speed of a vehicle significantly more accurately than dashboard speedometers. Its diverse applications have prompted us to revisit the simple motions from kinematics with the help of everyday objects in our experiments.

  6. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    estimate of the age of the universe. In order to do this, you need an unambiguous, absolute distance to another galaxy. We are pleased that the NSF's VLBA has for the first time determined such a distance, and thus provided the calibration standard astronomers have always sought in their quest for accurate distances beyond the Milky Way," said Morris Aizenman, Executive Officer of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Astronomical Sciences. "For astronomers, this measurement is the golden meter stick in the glass case," Aizenman added. The international team of astronomers used the VLBA to measure directly the motion of gas orbiting what is generally agreed to be a supermassive black hole at the heart of NGC 4258. The orbiting gas forms a warped disk, nearly two light-years in diameter, surrounding the black hole. The gas in the disk includes water vapor, which, in parts of the disk, acts as a natural amplifier of microwave radio emission. The regions that amplify radio emission are called masers, and work in a manner similar to the way a laser amplifies light emission. Determining the distance to NGC 4258 required measuring motions of extremely small shifts in position of these masers as they rotate around the black hole. This is equivalent to measuring an angle one ten-thousandth the width of a human hair held at arm's length. "The VLBA is the only instrument in the world that could do this," said Moran. "This work is the culmination of a 20-year effort at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics to measure distances to cosmic masers," said Irwin Shapiro, Director of that institution. Collection of the data for the NGC 4258 project was begun in 1994 and was part of Herrnstein's Ph.D dissertation at Harvard University. Previous observations with the VLBA allowed the scientists to measure the speed at which the gas is orbiting the black hole, some 39 million times more massive than the Sun. They did this by observing the amount of change in the

  7. Slow motion increases perceived intent

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Eugene M.; Burns, Zachary C.; Converse, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor’s intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in “slow motion.” Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  8. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  9. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  10. Accurate glucose detection in a small etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Joerg; Kuebler, Sebastian; Recht, Michael; Torres, Francisco; Roe, Jeffrey; Kiesel, Peter; Bruce, Richard

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a continuous glucose monitor for subcutaneous long-term implantation. This detector contains a double chamber Fabry-Perot-etalon that measures the differential refractive index (RI) between a reference and a measurement chamber at 850 nm. The etalon chambers have wavelength dependent transmission maxima which dependent linearly on the RI of their contents. An RI difference of ▵n=1.5.10-6 changes the spectral position of a transmission maximum by 1pm in our measurement. By sweeping the wavelength of a single-mode Vertical-Cavity-Surface-Emitting-Laser (VCSEL) linearly in time and detecting the maximum transmission peaks of the etalon we are able to measure the RI of a liquid. We have demonstrated accuracy of ▵n=+/-3.5.10-6 over a ▵n-range of 0 to 1.75.10-4 and an accuracy of 2% over a ▵nrange of 1.75.10-4 to 9.8.10-4. The accuracy is primarily limited by the reference measurement. The RI difference between the etalon chambers is made specific to glucose by the competitive, reversible release of Concanavalin A (ConA) from an immobilized dextran matrix. The matrix and ConA bound to it, is positioned outside the optical detection path. ConA is released from the matrix by reacting with glucose and diffuses into the optical path to change the RI in the etalon. Factors such as temperature affect the RI in measurement and detection chamber equally but do not affect the differential measurement. A typical standard deviation in RI is +/-1.4.10-6 over the range 32°C to 42°C. The detector enables an accurate glucose specific concentration measurement.

  11. Accurate Biomass Estimation via Bayesian Adaptive Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, K.; Knuth, K.; Castle, P.

    2005-12-01

    and IKONOS imagery and the 3-D volume estimates. The combination of these then allow for a rapid and hopefully very accurate estimation of biomass.

  12. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  13. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  14. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  15. On an efficient and accurate method to integrate restricted three-body orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murison, Marc A.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a quantitative analysis of the advantages of the Bulirsch-Stoer (1966) method, demonstrating that this method is certainly worth considering when working with small N dynamical systems. The results, qualitatively suspected by many users, are quantitatively confirmed as follows: (1) the Bulirsch-Stoer extrapolation method is very fast and moderately accurate; (2) regularization of the equations of motion stabilizes the error behavior of the method and is, of course, essential during close approaches; and (3) when applicable, a manifold-correction algorithm reduces numerical errors to the limits of machine accuracy. In addition, for the specific case of the restricted three-body problem, even a small eccentricity for the orbit of the primaries drastically affects the accuracy of integrations, whether regularized or not; the circular restricted problem integrates much more accurately.

  16. Lightweight wrist photoplethysmography for heavy exercise: motion robust heart rate monitoring algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of heart rate monitoring based on wrist photoplethysmography (PPG) during heavy exercise is addressed. PPG is susceptible to motion artefacts, which have to be mitigated for accurate heart rate estimation. Motion artefacts are particularly apparent for wrist devices, for example, a smart watch, because of the high mobility of the arms. Proposed is a low complexity highly accurate heart rate estimation method for continuous heart rate monitoring using wrist PPG. The proposed method achieved 2.57% mean absolute error in a test data set where subjects ran for a maximum speed of 17 km/h. PMID:26609397

  17. Pose and motion from contact

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.B.; Erdmann, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the absence of vision, grasping an object often relies on tactile feedback from the fingertips. As the finger pushes the object, the fingertip can feel the contact point move. If the object is known in advance, from this motion the finger may infer the location of the contact point on the object, and thereby, the object pose. This paper primarily investigates the problem of determining the pose (orientation and position) and motion (velocity and angular velocity) of a planar object with known geometry from such contact motion generated by pushing. A dynamic analysis of pushing yields a nonlinear system that relates through contact the object pose and motion to the finger motion. The contact motion on the fingertip thus encodes certain information about the object pose. Nonlinear observability theory is employed to show that such information is sufficient for the finger to observe not only the pose, but also the motion of the object. Therefore, a sensing strategy can be realized as an observer of the nonlinear dynamic system. Two observers are subsequently introduced. The first observer, based on the work of Gautheir, Hammouri, and Othman (1992), has its gain determined by the solution of a Lyapunov-like equation; it can be activated at any time instant during a push. The second observer, based on Newton`s method, solves for the initial (motionless) object pose from three intermediate contact points during a push. Under the Coulomb-friction model, the paper deals with support friction in the plane and/or contact friction between the finger and the object. Extensive simulations have been done to demonstrate the feasibility of the two observers. Preliminary experiments (with an Adept robot) have also been conducted. A contact sensor has been implemented using strain gauges.

  18. Determining Our Motion Through the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    Though we dont notice it from our point of view, were hurtling through space at breakneck speed and one of the contributors to our overall motion through the universe is the Suns revolutionaround the center of our galaxy. A recent study uses an unusual approach to measure the speed of this rotation.Moving While Sitting StillWe know that the Sun zips rapidly around the center of the Milky Way our orbitalspeed is somewhere around250 km/s, or 560,000 mph! Getting a precise measurement of this velocity is useful because we can combine it with the observed proper motion of Sgr A*, the black hole at the center of our galaxy, to determine the distance from us to the center of the Milky Way. This is an important baseline for lots of other measurements.Example particle orbits modeled within the galactic potential. The top panel represents a starwith zero angular momentum, which is scattered into a chaotic orbit after interacting with the galactic nucleus. [Hunt et al. 2016]But how can we measure the Suns revolutionspeed accurately? A team of scientists led by Jason Hunt (Dunlap Institute at University of Toronto, Canada) have suggested a unique approach to pin down this value: look for missing stars in the solar neighborhood.Missing StarsThe stars around us should exhibit a distribution of velocities describing their orbits about the galactic center but those stars with zero angular momentum should have plunged directly into the galactic center long ago. These stars would have been scattered onto chaotic halo orbits after their plunge, resulting in a dearth of stars with zero angular momentum around us today.By looking at the relative speeds of the stars moving around us, then, we should see a dip in the velocity distribution corresponding to the missing zero-angular-momentum stars. By noting the relative velocity at which that dip occurs, we cleverly reveal the negative of our motion around the galactic center.Velocity distribution for stars within 700 pc of the Sun. A dip

  19. Detection of moving objects using motion- and stereo-tuned operators.

    PubMed

    Royden, Constance S; Sannicandro, Sean E; Webber, Laura M

    2015-01-01

    A person moving through the world must be able to identify moving objects in order to interact with them and successfully navigate. While image motion alone is sufficient to identify moving objects under many conditions, there may be some ambiguity as to whether an object is stationary or moving, depending on the object's angle of motion and distance from the observer. Adding a measure of depth from stereo cues can eliminate this ambiguity. Here we show that a model using operators tuned to image motion and stereo disparity can accurately locate moving objects and distinguish between stationary and moving objects in a scene through which an observer is moving.

  20. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1990-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body, a wide variety of technologies was developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development coupled with recent advances in video technology have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System to develop data on shirt-sleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The system is described.

  1. An improved model of motion-related signal changes in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Patriat, Rémi; Reynolds, Richard C; Birn, Rasmus M

    2017-01-01

    Head motion is a significant source of noise in the estimation of functional connectivity from resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). Current strategies to reduce this noise include image realignment, censoring time points corrupted by motion, and including motion realignment parameters and their derivatives as additional nuisance regressors in the general linear model. However, this nuisance regression approach assumes that the motion-induced signal changes are linearly related to the estimated realignment parameters, which is not always the case. In this study we develop an improved model of motion-related signal changes, where nuisance regressors are formed by first rotating and translating a single brain volume according to the estimated motion, re-registering the data, and then performing a principal components analysis (PCA) on the resultant time series of both moved and re-registered data. We show that these "Motion Simulated (MotSim)" regressors account for significantly greater fraction of variance, result in higher temporal signal-to-noise, and lead to functional connectivity estimates that are less affected by motion compared to the most common current approach of using the realignment parameters and their derivatives as nuisance regressors. This improvement should lead to more accurate estimates of functional connectivity, particularly in populations where motion is prevalent, such as patients and young children.

  2. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-04-08

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. Furthermore, this motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.

  3. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Wallace, Duane C.; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D.

    2016-04-08

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na,more » and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. Furthermore, this motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.« less

  4. Atomic motion from the mean square displacement in a monatomic liquid.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duane C; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric D

    2016-05-11

    V-T theory is constructed in the many-body Hamiltonian formulation, and is being developed as a novel approach to liquid dynamics theory. In this theory the liquid atomic motion consists of two contributions, normal mode vibrations in a single representative potential energy valley, and transits, which carry the system across boundaries between valleys. The mean square displacement time correlation function (the MSD) is a direct measure of the atomic motion, and our goal is to determine if the V-T formalism can produce a physically sensible account of this motion. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) data for a system representing liquid Na, and find the motion evolves in three successive time intervals: on the first 'vibrational' interval, the vibrational motion alone gives a highly accurate account of the MD data; on the second 'crossover' interval, the vibrational MSD saturates to a constant while the transit motion builds up from zero; on the third 'random walk' interval, the transit motion produces a purely diffusive random walk of the vibrational equilibrium positions. This motional evolution agrees with, and adds refinement to, the MSD atomic motion as described by current liquid dynamics theories.

  5. Detection of incoherent joint state due to inaccurate bone motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Cédric; Leboeuf, Fabien; Rémy-Néris, Olivier; Brochard, Sylvain; Lempereur, Mathieu; Burdin, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    In biomechanical modelling and motion analysis, the use of personalised data such as bone geometry would provide more accurate and reliable results. However, there are still a limited number of tools used to measure the evolution of articular interactions. This paper proposes a coherence index to describe the articular status of contact surfaces during motion. The index relies on a robust estimation of the evolution of surfacic interactions between the joint surfaces. The index is first compared to distance maps on simulated motions. It is then used to compare two motion capture protocols (two different localisations of the markers for scapula tracking). The results show that the index detects progressive modifications in the joint and allows distinguishing the two protocols, in accordance with the literature. In the future, the index could, among other things, be used to compare/improve biomechanical models and motion analysis protocols.

  6. Non-Negative Matrix Factorization of Partial Track Data for Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of segmenting low level partial feature point tracks belonging to multiple motions. We show that the local velocity vectors at each instant of the trajectory are an effective basis for motion segmentation. We decompose the velocity profiles of point tracks into different motion components and corresponding nonnegative weights using non-negative matrix factorization (NNMF). We then segment the different motions using spectral clustering on the derived weights. We test our algorithm on the Hopkins 155 benchmarking database and several new sequences, demonstrating that the proposed algorithm can accurately segment multiple motions at a speed of a few seconds per frame. We show that our algorithm is particularly successful on low-level tracks from real-world video that are fragmented, noisy and inaccurate

  7. One hybrid model combining singular spectrum analysis and LS + ARMA for polar motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Guo, Jinyun; Liu, Xin; Wei, Xiaobei; Li, Wudong

    2017-01-01

    Accurate real-time polar motion parameters play an important role in satellite navigation and positioning and spacecraft tracking. To meet the needs for real-time and high-accuracy polar motion prediction, a hybrid model that integrated singular spectrum analysis (SSA), least-squares (LS) extrapolation and an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model was proposed. SSA was applied to separate the trend, the annual and the Chandler components from a given polar motion time series. LS extrapolation models were constructed for the separated trend, annual and Chandler components. An ARMA model was established for a synthetic sequence that contained the remaining SSA component and the residual series of LS fitting. In applying this hybrid model, multiple sets of polar motion predictions with lead times of 360 days were made based on an IERS 08 C04 series. The results showed that the proposed method could effectively predict the polar motion parameters.

  8. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  9. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp–Davis–Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. PMID:26758496

  10. Occluded motion alters event perception.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Yousuke; Gyoba, Jiro

    2013-04-01

    We employed audiovisual stream/bounce displays, in which two moving objects with crossing trajectories are more likely to be perceived as bouncing off, rather than streaming through, each other when a brief sound is presented at the coincidence of the two objects. However, Kawachi and Gyoba (Perception 35:1289-1294, 2006b) reported that the presence of an additional moving object near the two objects altered the perception of a bouncing event to that of a streaming event. In this study, we extended this finding and examined whether alteration of the event perception could be induced by the visual context, such as by occluded object motion near the stream/bounce display. The results demonstrated that even when the sound was presented, the continuous occluded motion strongly biased observers' percepts toward the streaming percept during a short occlusion interval (approximately 100 ms). In contrast, when the continuous occluded motion was disrupted by introducing a spatiotemporal gap in the motion trajectory or by removing occlusion cues such as deletion/accretion, the bias toward the streaming percept declined. Thus, we suggest that a representation of object motion generated under a limited occlusion interval interferes with audiovisual event perception.

  11. MR-guided PET motion correction in LOR space using generic projection data for image reconstruction with PRESTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheins, J.; Ullisch, M.; Tellmann, L.; Weirich, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    The BrainPET scanner from Siemens, designed as hybrid MR/PET system for simultaneous acquisition of both modalities, provides high-resolution PET images with an optimum resolution of 3 mm. However, significant head motion often compromises the achievable image quality, e.g. in neuroreceptor studies of human brain. This limitation can be omitted when tracking the head motion and accurately correcting measured Lines-of-Response (LORs). For this purpose, we present a novel method, which advantageously combines MR-guided motion tracking with the capabilities of the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET Reconstruction Software Toolkit) to convert motion-corrected LORs into highly accurate generic projection data. In this way, the high-resolution PET images achievable with PRESTO can also be obtained in presence of severe head motion.

  12. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... procedural matters, the administrative law judge may not grant a written motion prior to the expiration of the time for filing responses. The administrative law judge may deny a written motion without awaiting... filing of a motion does not stay the proceeding. (e) All motions and responses must comply with...

  13. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 224.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions...

  14. 10 CFR 13.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motions. 13.28 Section 13.28 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon, and...

  15. 77 FR 3800 - Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... COMMISSION Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order In the Matter of Accurate NDE & Docket: 150... request ADR with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, on August 9, 2011, Accurate NDE requested ADR to resolve this matter with the NRC. On September 28,...

  16. Types of diaphragmatic motion during hepatic angiography.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, T; Kuroda, C; Fujita, M

    1997-01-01

    To determine the types and causes of diaphragmatic motion during hepatic angiography, the authors used transarterial cut-film portography (TAP) to study movement of the diaphragm during breath-holding. Thirty-three TAP sequences were studied, and the patients' diaphragmatic motions were classified into four categories according to the distance their diaphragms moved. Results showed that the diaphragm was stationary in 33% of the TAP studies, while perpetual motion occurred in 15% of the studies, early-phase motion occurred in 12% and late-phase motion occurred in 40%. Ten sequences showed diaphragmatic motion of more than 10 mm, with eight sequences showing caudal motion and two showing cranial motion. This article discusses the cause of diaphragmatic motion during breath-holding for hepatic angiography and presents suggestions to reduce motion artifacts during the exam.

  17. Projected motion group for vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaru

    1993-12-01

    For the image understanding and patten recognitions, it is important to extract invariant features from given images corresponding to various transformations. Once the invariant features are obtained, we can estimate motion parameters and/or categorize objects into equivalent classes based on some criterions. So many techniques to extract invariant features are proposed, and most of them need exact matching between an image before transformation and another image after transformation. But this matching process is not easy to perform. Then we propose a group theoretical method, which does not require a matching process. In this paper, we show the bases of the representation of the perspective projected motion group and those of the spherical projected motion group explicitly.

  18. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  19. Theoretical motions of hydrofoil systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, Frederick H

    1948-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation that has been undertaken to develop theoretical methods of treating the motions of hydrofoil systems and to determine some of the important parameters. Variations of parameters include three distributions of area between the hydrofoils, two rates of change of downwash angle with angle of attack, three depths of immersion, two dihedral angles, two rates of change of lift with immersion, three longitudinal hydrofoil spacings, two radii of gyration in pitching, and various horizontal and vertical locations of the center of gravity. Graphs are presented to show locations of the center of gravity for stable motion, values of the stability roots, and motions following the sudden application of a vertical force or a pitching moment to the hydrofoil system for numerous sets of values of the parameters.

  20. Optimisation of nonlinear motion cueing algorithm based on genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Houshyar; Mohamed, Shady; Rahim Zadeh, Delpak; Nahavandi, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Motion cueing algorithms (MCAs) are playing a significant role in driving simulators, aiming to deliver the most accurate human sensation to the simulator drivers compared with a real vehicle driver, without exceeding the physical limitations of the simulator. This paper provides the optimisation design of an MCA for a vehicle simulator, in order to find the most suitable washout algorithm parameters, while respecting all motion platform physical limitations, and minimising human perception error between real and simulator driver. One of the main limitations of the classical washout filters is that it is attuned by the worst-case scenario tuning method. This is based on trial and error, and is effected by driving and programmers experience, making this the most significant obstacle to full motion platform utilisation. This leads to inflexibility of the structure, production of false cues and makes the resulting simulator fail to suit all circumstances. In addition, the classical method does not take minimisation of human perception error and physical constraints into account. Production of motion cues and the impact of different parameters of classical washout filters on motion cues remain inaccessible for designers for this reason. The aim of this paper is to provide an optimisation method for tuning the MCA parameters, based on nonlinear filtering and genetic algorithms. This is done by taking vestibular sensation error into account between real and simulated cases, as well as main dynamic limitations, tilt coordination and correlation coefficient. Three additional compensatory linear blocks are integrated into the MCA, to be tuned in order to modify the performance of the filters successfully. The proposed optimised MCA is implemented in MATLAB/Simulink software packages. The results generated using the proposed method show increased performance in terms of human sensation, reference shape tracking and exploiting the platform more efficiently without reaching

  1. Motion compensation by registration-based catheter tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Wimmer, Andreas; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    The treatment of atrial fibrillation has gained increasing importance in the field of computer-aided interventions. State-of-the-art treatment involves the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium under fluoroscopic X-ray image guidance. Due to the rather low soft-tissue contrast of X-ray fluoroscopy, the heart is difficult to see. To overcome this problem, overlay images from pre-operative 3-D volumetric data can be used to add anatomical detail. Unfortunately, these overlay images are static at the moment, i.e., they do not move with respiratory and cardiac motion. The lack of motion compensation may impair X-ray based catheter navigation, because the physician could potentially position catheters incorrectly. To improve overlay-based catheter navigation, we present a novel two stage approach for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation. First, a cascade of boosted classifiers is employed to segment a commonly used circumferential mapping catheter which is firmly fixed at the ostium of the pulmonary vein during ablation. Then, a 2-D/2-D model-based registration is applied to track the segmented mapping catheter. Our novel hybrid approach was evaluated on 10 clinical data sets consisting of 498 fluoroscopic monoplane frames. We obtained an average 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm, with a minimum error of 0.26 mm and a maximum error of 1.62 mm. These results demonstrate that motion compensation using registration-based catheter tracking is both feasible and accurate. Using this approach, we can only estimate in-plane motion. Fortunately, compensating for this is often sufficient for EP procedures where the motion is governed by breathing.

  2. Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

    2003-12-01

    Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players' motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for

  3. Cervical Spinal Motion During Orotracheal Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Sixteen fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cine fluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...intubation was performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The cadaveric spine motion...immobilization reduced motion at the destabilize C4-5 level. Four patients without significant cervical pathology and normal motion of flexion

  4. A Motion Aftereffect from Visual Imagery of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winawer, Jonathan; Huk, Alexander C.; Boroditsky, Lera

    2010-01-01

    Mental imagery is thought to share properties with perception. To what extent does the process of imagining a scene share neural circuits and computational mechanisms with actually perceiving the same scene? Here, we investigated whether mental imagery of motion in a particular direction recruits neural circuits tuned to the same direction of…

  5. Contribution of Visuospatial and Motion-Tracking to Invisible Motion

    PubMed Central

    Battaglini, Luca; Casco, Clara

    2016-01-01

    People experience an object's motion even when it is occluded. We investigate the processing of invisible motion in three experiments. Observers saw a moving circle passing behind an invisible, irregular hendecagonal polygon and had to respond as quickly as possible when the target had “just reappeared” from behind the occluder. Without explicit cues allowing the end of each of the eight hidden trajectories to be predicted (length ranging between 4.7 and 5 deg), we found as expected, if visuospatial attention was involved, anticipation errors, providing that information on pre-occluder motion was available. This indicates that the observers, rather than simply responding when they saw the target, tended to anticipate its reappearance (Experiment 1). The new finding is that, with a fixation mark indicating the center of the invisible trajectory, a linear relationship between the physical and judged occlusion duration is found, but not without it (Experiment 2) or with a fixation mark varying in position from trial to trial (Experiment 3). We interpret the role of central fixation in the differences in distinguishing trajectories smaller than 0.3 deg, by suggesting that it reflects spatiotemporal computation and motion-tracking. These two mechanisms allow visual imagery to form of the point symmetrical to that of the disappearance, with respect to fixation, and then for the occluded moving target to be tracked up to this point. PMID:27683566

  6. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body a wide variety of technologies has been developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development, coupled with recent advances in video technology, have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS) to develop data on shirtsleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on-orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. APAS is a fully integrated system of hardware and software for biomechanics and the analysis of human performance and generalized motion measurement. Major components of the complete system include the video system, the AT compatible computer, and the proprietary software.

  7. Accurate model of electron beam profiles with emittance effects for pierce guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Dongyang; Li, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of electron beam profile is one of the key objectives of electron optics, and the basis for design of the practical electron gun. In this paper, an improved model describing electron beam in Pierce gun with both space charge effects and emittance effects is proposed. The theory developed by Cutler and Hines is still applied for the accelerating region of the Pierce gun, while the motion equations of the electron beams in the anode aperture and drift tunnel are improved by modifying electron optics theory with emittance. As a result, a more universal and accurate formula of the focal length of the lens for the electron beam with both effects is derived for the anode aperture with finite dimension, and a modified universal spread curve considering beam emittance is introduced in drift tunnel region. Based on these improved motion equations of the electron beam, beam profiles with space charge effects and emittance effects can be theoretically predicted, which are subsequently approved to agree well with the experimentally measured ones. The developed model here is helpful to design more applicable Pierce guns at high frequencies.

  8. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  9. Motion Analysis From Television Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, George G.; Keller, Patrick N.

    1982-02-01

    The Department of Defense ranges have relied on photographic instrumentation for gathering data of firings for all types of ordnance. A large inventory of cameras are available on the market that can be used for these tasks. A new set of optical instrumentation is beginning to appear which, in many cases, can directly replace photographic cameras for a great deal of the work being performed now. These are television cameras modified so they can stop motion, see in the dark, perform under hostile environments, and provide real time information. This paper discusses techniques for modifying television cameras so they can be used for motion analysis.

  10. Testing theories of superluminal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, P. A. G.

    1984-09-01

    Relativistic beaming, so-called Christmas tree, gravitational lens, and noncosmological red shift theories of superluminal motion are reviewed. The impact of QUASAT in tests of relativistic beaming theories is discussed. The QUASAT will be able to resolve, and measure motions in, sources of one to a few hundred millijanskys, whose jets are too short to be resolved with Earth-based VLBI. It can help to resolve such jets by the 3:1 increase in baseline; and by improved dynamic range, which makes the jet observable over a larger number of milliarcsec.

  11. Bodrum Strong Motion Network, Mugla, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcik, H. A.; Tanircan, G.; Korkmaz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Gökova is located in southwestern Turkey near the Aegean Sea and surrounded by Datça Peninsula to the south, the island of Kos to the west and Bodrum Peninsula to the north. The Bodrum peninsula with a population of one million in summer season is one of the most populated touristic centers of Turkey. This region is also surrounded by numerous active seismic entities such as Ula-Ören Fault Zone, Gökova Graben etc.. and demonstrates high seismic hazard. In the past, many destructive earthquakes have occurred in southwestern Turkey. One of the destructive historical earthquakes is 1493 Kos event (Mw=6.9) caused heavy damage in Bodrum. In the instrumental period seismic activity in the Gökova region includes the Ms>6.0 earthquakes of 23 April 1933 (Ms=6.4), 23 May 1941 (Ms=6.0), 13 December 1941 (Ms=6.5) events. Intense earthquake activity (Mw5+) occurred in Gulf of Gökova in August 2004 and January 2005. Considering the high seismicity and population of this region, a strong ground motion monitoring system stationed in dense settlements in the Bodrum Peninsula: Bodrum, Turgutreis, Yalıkavak, Çiftlik and Ortakent was deployed on June 2015. The network consists of 5 strong motion recorders, has been set up with the aim of monitoring of regional earthquakes, collecting accurate and reliable data for engineering and scientific research purposes, in particular to provide input for future earthquake rapid reporting and early warning implementation projects on urban environments in the Bodrum peninsula and the surrounding areas. In this poster presentation, we briefly introduce the Bodrum Network and discuss our future plans for further developments.

  12. Alpha motion based on a motion detector, but not on the Müller-Lyer illusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the mechanism of alpha motion, the apparent motion of the Müller-Lyer figure's shaft that occurs when the arrowheads and arrow tails are alternately presented. The following facts were found: (a) reduced exposure duration decreased the amount of alpha motion, and this phenomenon was not explainable by the amount of the Müller-Lyer illusion; (b) the motion aftereffect occurred after adaptation to alpha motion; (c) occurrence of alpha motion became difficult when the temporal frequency increased, and this characteristic of alpha motion was similar to the characteristic of a motion detector that motion detection became difficult when the temporal frequency increased from the optimal frequency. These findings indicated that alpha motion occurs on the basis of a motion detector but not on the Müller-Lyer illusion, and that the mechanism of alpha motion is the same as that of general motion perception.

  13. Accurate estimation of human body orientation from RGB-D sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Zhang, Yongdong; Tang, Sheng; Tang, Jinhui; Hong, Richang; Li, Jintao

    2013-10-01

    Accurate estimation of human body orientation can significantly enhance the analysis of human behavior, which is a fundamental task in the field of computer vision. However, existing orientation estimation methods cannot handle the various body poses and appearances. In this paper, we propose an innovative RGB-D-based orientation estimation method to address these challenges. By utilizing the RGB-D information, which can be real time acquired by RGB-D sensors, our method is robust to cluttered environment, illumination change and partial occlusions. Specifically, efficient static and motion cue extraction methods are proposed based on the RGB-D superpixels to reduce the noise of depth data. Since it is hard to discriminate all the 360 (°) orientation using static cues or motion cues independently, we propose to utilize a dynamic Bayesian network system (DBNS) to effectively employ the complementary nature of both static and motion cues. In order to verify our proposed method, we build a RGB-D-based human body orientation dataset that covers a wide diversity of poses and appearances. Our intensive experimental evaluations on this dataset demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  14. What Learning to See Arbitrary Motion Tells Us about Biological Motion Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiris, Eric; Krebeck, Aurore; Edmonds, Jennifer; Stout, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    In separate studies, observers viewed upright biological motion, inverted biological motion, or arbitrary motion created from systematically randomizing the positions of point-light dots. Results showed that observers (a) could learn to detect the presence of arbitrary motion, (b) could not learn to discriminate the coherence of arbitrary motion,…

  15. Influence of Visual Motion, Suggestion, and Illusory Motion on Self-Motion Perception in the Horizontal Plane

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Steven David; Crane, Benjamin Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A moving visual field can induce the feeling of self-motion or vection. Illusory motion from static repeated asymmetric patterns creates a compelling visual motion stimulus, but it is unclear if such illusory motion can induce a feeling of self-motion or alter self-motion perception. In these experiments, human subjects reported the perceived direction of self-motion for sway translation and yaw rotation at the end of a period of viewing set visual stimuli coordinated with varying inertial stimuli. This tested the hypothesis that illusory visual motion would influence self-motion perception in the horizontal plane. Trials were arranged into 5 blocks based on stimulus type: moving star field with yaw rotation, moving star field with sway translation, illusory motion with yaw, illusory motion with sway, and static arrows with sway. Static arrows were used to evaluate the effect of cognitive suggestion on self-motion perception. Each trial had a control condition; the illusory motion controls were altered versions of the experimental image, which removed the illusory motion effect. For the moving visual stimulus, controls were carried out in a dark room. With the arrow visual stimulus, controls were a gray screen. In blocks containing a visual stimulus there was an 8s viewing interval with the inertial stimulus occurring over the final 1s. This allowed measurement of the visual illusion perception using objective methods. When no visual stimulus was present, only the 1s motion stimulus was presented. Eight women and five men (mean age 37) participated. To assess for a shift in self-motion perception, the effect of each visual stimulus on the self-motion stimulus (cm/s) at which subjects were equally likely to report motion in either direction was measured. Significant effects were seen for moving star fields for both translation (p = 0.001) and rotation (p<0.001), and arrows (p = 0.02). For the visual motion stimuli, inertial motion perception was shifted in the

  16. Three-dimensional motion tracking by Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jean; Kosaka, Akio; Kak, Avinash C.

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, a 3D semantic object motion tracking method based on Kalman filtering is proposed. First, we use a specially designed Color Image Segmentation Editor (CISE) to devise shapes that more accurately describe the object to be tracked. CISE is an integration of edge and region detection, which is based on edge-linking, split-and-merge and the energy minimization for active contour detection. An ROI is further segmented into single motion blobs by considering the constancy of the motion parameters in each blob. Over short time intervals, each blob can be tracked separately and, over longer times, the blobs can be allowed to fragment and coalesce into new blobs as motion evolves. The tracking of each blob is based on a Kalman filter derived from linearization of a constraint equation satisfied by the pinhole model of a camera. The Kalman filter allows the tracker to project the uncertainties associated with a blob center (or with the coordinates of any other features) into the next frame. This projected uncertainty region can then be searched rot eh pixels belonging to the blob. Future work includes investigation of the effects of illumination changes and simultaneous tracking of multiple targets.

  17. Motion compensation in digital subtraction angiography using graphics hardware.

    PubMed

    Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Lell, Michael; Galant, Adam; Hornegger, Joachim

    2006-07-01

    An inherent disadvantage of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is its sensitivity to patient motion which causes artifacts in the subtraction images. These artifacts could often reduce the diagnostic value of this technique. Automated, fast and accurate motion compensation is therefore required. To cope with this requirement, we first examine a method explicitly designed to detect local motions in DSA. Then, we implement a motion compensation algorithm by means of block matching on modern graphics hardware. Both methods search for maximal local similarity by evaluating a histogram-based measure. In this context, we are the first who have mapped an optimizing search strategy on graphics hardware while paralleling block matching. Moreover, we provide an innovative method for creating histograms on graphics hardware with vertex texturing and frame buffer blending. It turns out that both methods can effectively correct the artifacts in most case, as the hardware implementation of block matching performs much faster: the displacements of two 1024 x 1024 images can be calculated at 3 frames/s with integer precision or 2 frames/s with sub-pixel precision. Preliminary clinical evaluation indicates that the computation with integer precision could already be sufficient.

  18. A personalized biomechanical model for respiratory motion prediction.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, B; Mansi, T; Zhang, Jianwen; Khurd, P; Declerck, J; Boettger, T; Navab, Nassir; Bayouth, J; Comaniciu, Dorin; Kamen, A

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging of the thorax or abdominal area is affected by respiratory motion. Nowadays, one-dimensional respiratory surrogates are used to estimate the current state of the lung during its cycle, but with rather poor results. This paper presents a framework to predict the 3D lung motion based on a patient-specific finite element model of respiratory mechanics estimated from two CT images at end of inspiration (EI) and end of expiration (EE). We first segment the lung, thorax and sub-diaphragm organs automatically using a machine-learning algorithm. Then, a biomechanical model of the lung, thorax and sub-diaphragm is employed to compute the 3D respiratory motion. Our model is driven by thoracic pressures, estimated automatically from the EE and EI images using a trust-region approach. Finally, lung motion is predicted by modulating the thoracic pressures. The effectiveness of our approach is evaluated by predicting lung deformation during exhale on five DIR-Lab datasets. Several personalization strategies are tested, showing that an average error of 3.88 +/- 1.54 mm in predicted landmark positions can be achieved. Since our approach is generative, it may constitute a 3D surrogate information for more accurate medical image reconstruction and patient respiratory analysis.

  19. Combined registration and motion correction of longitudinal retinal OCT data

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Al-Louzi, Omar; Bhargava, Pavan; Solomon, Sharon D.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important modality for examination of the eye. To measure layer thicknesses in the retina, automated segmentation algorithms are often used, producing accurate and reliable measurements. However, subtle changes over time are difficult to detect since the magnitude of the change can be very small. Thus, tracking disease progression over short periods of time is difficult. Additionally, unstable eye position and motion alter the consistency of these measurements, even in healthy eyes. Thus, both registration and motion correction are important for processing longitudinal data of a specific patient. In this work, we propose a method to jointly do registration and motion correction. Given two scans of the same patient, we initially extract blood vessel points from a fundus projection image generated on the OCT data and estimate point correspondences. Due to saccadic eye movements during the scan, motion is often very abrupt, producing a sparse set of large displacements between successive B-scan images. Thus, we use lasso regression to estimate the movement of each image. By iterating between this regression and a rigid point-based registration, we are able to simultaneously align and correct the data. With longitudinal data from 39 healthy control subjects, our method improves the registration accuracy by 50% compared to simple alignment to the fovea and 22% when using point-based registration only. We also show improved consistency of repeated total retina thickness measurements. PMID:27231406

  20. Shape and motion from image streams: a factorization method.

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, C; Kanade, T

    1993-01-01

    Inferring scene geometry and camera motion from a stream of images is possible in principle, but it is an ill-conditioned problem when the objects are distant with respect to their size. We have developed a factorization method that can overcome this difficulty by recovering shape and motion without computing depth as an intermediate step. An image stream can be represented by the 2F x P measurement matrix of the image coordinates of P points tracked through F frames. Under orthographic projection this matrix is of rank 3. Using this observation, the factorization method uses the singular value decomposition technique to factor the measurement matrix into two matrices, which represent object shape and camera motion, respectively. The method can also handle and obtain a full solution from a partially filled-in measurement matrix, which occurs when features appear and disappear in the image sequence due to occlusions or tracking failures. The method gives accurate results and does not introduce smoothing in either shape or motion. We demonstrate this with a series of experiments on laboratory and outdoor image streams, with and without occlusions. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:11607434

  1. Robust and sensitive video motion detection for sleep analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Adrienne; Geng, Di; Znamenskiy, Dmitry; Vink, Jelte Peter; de Haan, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a camera-based system combining video motion detection, motion estimation, and texture analysis with machine learning for sleep analysis. The system is robust to time-varying illumination conditions while using standard camera and infrared illumination hardware. We tested the system for periodic limb movement (PLM) detection during sleep, using EMG signals as a reference. We evaluated the motion detection performance both per frame and with respect to movement event classification relevant for PLM detection. The Matthews correlation coefficient improved by a factor of 2, compared to a state-of-the-art motion detection method, while sensitivity and specificity increased with 45% and 15%, respectively. Movement event classification improved by a factor of 6 and 3 in constant and highly varying lighting conditions, respectively. On 11 PLM patient test sequences, the proposed system achieved a 100% accurate PLM index (PLMI) score with a slight temporal misalignment of the starting time (<1 s) regarding one movement. We conclude that camera-based PLM detection during sleep is feasible and can give an indication of the PLMI score.

  2. Combined registration and motion correction of longitudinal retinal OCT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Al-Louzi, Omar; Bhargava, Pavan; Solomon, Sharon D.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important modality for examination of the eye. To measure layer thicknesses in the retina, automated segmentation algorithms are often used, producing accurate and reliable measurements. However, subtle changes over time are difficult to detect since the magnitude of the change can be very small. Thus, tracking disease progression over short periods of time is difficult. Additionally, unstable eye position and motion alter the consistency of these measurements, even in healthy eyes. Thus, both registration and motion correction are important for processing longitudinal data of a specific patient. In this work, we propose a method to jointly do registration and motion correction. Given two scans of the same patient, we initially extract blood vessel points from a fundus projection image generated on the OCT data and estimate point correspondences. Due to saccadic eye movements during the scan, motion is often very abrupt, producing a sparse set of large displacements between successive B-scan images. Thus, we use lasso regression to estimate the movement of each image. By iterating between this regression and a rigid point-based registration, we are able to simultaneously align and correct the data. With longitudinal data from 39 healthy control subjects, our method improves the registration accuracy by 43% compared to simple alignment to the fovea and 8% when using point-based registration only. We also show improved consistency of repeated total retina thickness measurements.

  3. Interactive-rate Motion Planning for Concentric Tube Robots.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luis G; Baykal, Cenk; Alterovitz, Ron

    2014-05-01

    Concentric tube robots may enable new, safer minimally invasive surgical procedures by moving along curved paths to reach difficult-to-reach sites in a patient's anatomy. Operating these devices is challenging due to their complex, unintuitive kinematics and the need to avoid sensitive structures in the anatomy. In this paper, we present a motion planning method that computes collision-free motion plans for concentric tube robots at interactive rates. Our method's high speed enables a user to continuously and freely move the robot's tip while the motion planner ensures that the robot's shaft does not collide with any anatomical obstacles. Our approach uses a highly accurate mechanical model of tube interactions, which is important since small movements of the tip position may require large changes in the shape of the device's shaft. Our motion planner achieves its high speed and accuracy by combining offline precomputation of a collision-free roadmap with online position control. We demonstrate our interactive planner in a simulated neurosurgical scenario where a user guides the robot's tip through the environment while the robot automatically avoids collisions with the anatomical obstacles.

  4. Correcting for systematic effects in ground-based photographic proper motions: The Southern Proper Motion Program as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Altena, William F.; Girard, T. M.; Platais, I.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; López, C. E.

    The derivation of accurate positions and proper motions from ground-based photographic materials requires the minimization of systematic errors due to inaccurate modeling of the telescopes' field-of-view and the magnitude equation. We describe the procedures that have been developed for the Southern Proper Motions Program (SPM) to deal with these important problems. The SPM is based on photographic plates taken at our Carlos Cesco Observatory at El Leoncito, Argentina and will yield absolute proper motions and positions to magnitude B approximately 19 for approximately 1 million stars south of declination -20 degrees. The SPM is a joint program between the Yale Southern Observatory and the Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Argentina. The SPM Catalog 2.0, which is the current version covering the -25 to -40 degree declination zones, provides positions, absolute proper motions, and photographic BV photometry for over 320,000 stars and galaxies. Stars cover the magnitude range 5 < V < 18.5. The standard errors for the best measured stars are: 20 mas for positions in each coordinate; 2 mas/yr for absolute proper motions and 0.05 mag in B and V bandpasses. In addition to the catalog, a list of 7783 stars in 150 CCD calibrating sequences in BV is provided. A new feature of the SPM Catalog is an extensive list of cross-identifications with external special catalogs, which include all major astrometric catalogs, and a large number of astrophysically interesting objects. The catalog is available on the WWW at http://www.astro.yale.edu/astrom/. Our web-side contains several useful plots showing the sky coverage, error distribution, a quick comparison with the Hipparcos proper motions, etc. We would appreciate your comments on the SPM 2.0 and our Web page.

  5. Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance images using tag motion constraints and multi-level b-splines interpolation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yan, Meng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Jie; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Jin, Lianghai; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (TCMR) images is of great significance in clinical diagnosis and the treatment of heart disease. Currently, the harmonic phase analysis method (HARP) and the local sine-wave modeling method (SinMod) have been proven as two state-of-the-art motion estimation methods for TCMR images, since they can directly obtain the inter-frame motion displacement vector field (MDVF) with high accuracy and fast speed. By comparison, SinMod has better performance over HARP in terms of displacement detection, noise and artifacts reduction. However, the SinMod method has some drawbacks: 1) it is unable to estimate local displacements larger than half of the tag spacing; 2) it has observable errors in tracking of tag motion; and 3) the estimated MDVF usually has large local errors. To overcome these problems, we present a novel motion estimation method in this study. The proposed method tracks the motion of tags and then estimates the dense MDVF by using the interpolation. In this new method, a parameter estimation procedure for global motion is applied to match tag intersections between different frames, ensuring specific kinds of large displacements being correctly estimated. In addition, a strategy of tag motion constraints is applied to eliminate most of errors produced by inter-frame tracking of tags and the multi-level b-splines approximation algorithm is utilized, so as to enhance the local continuity and accuracy of the final MDVF. In the estimation of the motion displacement, our proposed method can obtain a more accurate MDVF compared with the SinMod method and our method can overcome the drawbacks of the SinMod method. However, the motion estimation accuracy of our method depends on the accuracy of tag lines detection and our method has a higher time complexity.

  6. Measurement of pelvic motion is a prerequisite for accurate estimation of hip joint work in maximum height squat jumping.

    PubMed

    Blache, Yoann; Bobbert, Maarten; Argaud, Sebastien; Pairot de Fontenay, Benoit; Monteil, Karine M

    2013-08-01

    In experiments investigating vertical squat jumping, the HAT segment is typically defined as a line drawn from the hip to some point proximally on the upper body (eg, the neck, the acromion), and the hip joint as the angle between this line and the upper legs (θUL-HAT). In reality, the hip joint is the angle between the pelvis and the upper legs (θUL-pelvis). This study aimed to estimate to what extent hip joint definition affects hip joint work in maximal squat jumping. Moreover, the initial pelvic tilt was manipulated to maximize the difference in hip joint work as a function of hip joint definition. Twenty-two male athletes performed maximum effort squat jumps in three different initial pelvic tilt conditions: backward (pelvisB), neutral (pelvisN), and forward (pelvisF). Hip joint work was calculated by integrating the hip net joint torque with respect to θUL-HAT (WUL-HAT) or with respect to θUL-pelvis (WUL-pelvis). θUL-HAT was greater than θUL-pelvis in all conditions. WUL-HAT overestimated WULpelvis by 33%, 39%, and 49% in conditions pelvisF, pelvisN, and pelvisB, respectively. It was concluded that θUL-pelvis should be measured when the mechanical output of hip extensor muscles is estimated.

  7. Highly accurate moving object detection in variable bit rate video-based traffic monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chia; Chen, Bo-Hao

    2013-12-01

    Automated motion detection, which segments moving objects from video streams, is the key technology of intelligent transportation systems for traffic management. Traffic surveillance systems use video communication over real-world networks with limited bandwidth, which frequently suffers because of either network congestion or unstable bandwidth. Evidence supporting these problems abounds in publications about wireless video communication. Thus, to effectively perform the arduous task of motion detection over a network with unstable bandwidth, a process by which bit-rate is allocated to match the available network bandwidth is necessitated. This process is accomplished by the rate control scheme. This paper presents a new motion detection approach that is based on the cerebellar-model-articulation-controller (CMAC) through artificial neural networks to completely and accurately detect moving objects in both high and low bit-rate video streams. The proposed approach is consisted of a probabilistic background generation (PBG) module and a moving object detection (MOD) module. To ensure that the properties of variable bit-rate video streams are accommodated, the proposed PBG module effectively produces a probabilistic background model through an unsupervised learning process over variable bit-rate video streams. Next, the MOD module, which is based on the CMAC network, completely and accurately detects moving objects in both low and high bit-rate video streams by implementing two procedures: 1) a block selection procedure and 2) an object detection procedure. The detection results show that our proposed approach is capable of performing with higher efficacy when compared with the results produced by other state-of-the-art approaches in variable bit-rate video streams over real-world limited bandwidth networks. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations support this claim; for instance, the proposed approach achieves Similarity and F1 accuracy rates that are 76

  8. Intensity-Based Registration for Lung Motion Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kunlin; Ding, Kai; Amelon, Ryan E.; Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raghavan, Madhavan L.; Christensen, Gary E.

    Image registration plays an important role within pulmonary image analysis. The task of registration is to find the spatial mapping that brings two images into alignment. Registration algorithms designed for matching 4D lung scans or two 3D scans acquired at different inflation levels can catch the temporal changes in position and shape of the region of interest. Accurate registration is critical to post-analysis of lung mechanics and motion estimation. In this chapter, we discuss lung-specific adaptations of intensity-based registration methods for 3D/4D lung images and review approaches for assessing registration accuracy. Then we introduce methods for estimating tissue motion and studying lung mechanics. Finally, we discuss methods for assessing and quantifying specific volume change, specific ventilation, strain/ stretch information and lobar sliding.

  9. Recursive camera-motion estimation with the trifocal tensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying Kin; Wong, Kin Hong; Chang, Michael Ming Yuen; Or, Siu Hang

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm for pose tracking using the trifocal tensor is proposed. In the EKF, a constant-velocity motion model is used as the dynamic system, and the trifocal-tensor constraint is incorporated into the measurement model. The proposed method has the advantages of those structure- and-motion-based approaches in that the pose sequence can be computed with no prior information on the scene structure. It also has the strengths of those model-based algorithms in which no updating of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure is necessary in the computation. This results in a stable, accurate, and efficient algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperformed other existing EKFs that tackle the same problem. An extension to the pose-tracking algorithm has been made to demonstrate the application of the trifocal constraint to fast recursive 3-D structure recovery.

  10. Interactive Simulation of Diaphragm Motion Through Muscle and Rib Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Pierre-Frédéric; Bourne, Wesley; Bello, Fernando

    Modeling of diaphragm behaviour is of relevance to a number of clinical procedures such as lung cancer radiotherapy and liver access interventions. The heterogeneity in tissue composition of the diaphragm, as well as the various physiological phenomena influencing its behaviour, requires a complex model in order to accurately capture its motion. In this chapter we present a novel methodology based on a heterogenous model composed of mass-spring and tensegrity elements. The physiological boundary conditions have been carefully taken into account and applied to our model. Thus, it incorporates the influence of the rib kinematics, the muscle natural contraction/relaxation and the motion of the sternum. Initial validation results show that the behaviour of the model closely follows that of a real diaphragm.

  11. Observing tectonic plate motions and deformations from satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Klosko, S. M.; Torrence, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The scope of geodesy has been greatly affected by the advent of artificial near-earth satellites. The present paper provides a description of the results obtained from the reduction of data collected with the aid of satellite laser ranging. It is pointed out that dynamic reduction of satellite laser ranging (SLR) data provides very precise positions in three dimensions for the laser tracking network. The vertical components of the stations, through the tracking geometry provided by the global network and the accurate knowledge of orbital dynamics, are uniquely related to the center of mass of the earth. Attention is given to the observations, the methodologies for reducing satellite observations to estimate station positions, Lageos-observed tectonic plate motions, an improved temporal resolution of SLR plate motions, and the SLR vertical datum.

  12. Nomenclature proposal to describe vocal fold motion impairment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Clark A; Mau, Ted; Remacle, Marc; Hess, Markus; Eckel, Hans E; Young, VyVy N; Hantzakos, Anastasios; Yung, Katherine C; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2016-08-01

    The terms used to describe vocal fold motion impairment are confusing and not standardized. This results in a failure to communicate accurately and to major limitations of interpreting research studies involving vocal fold impairment. We propose standard nomenclature for reporting vocal fold impairment. Overarching terms of vocal fold immobility and hypomobility are rigorously defined. This includes assessment techniques and inclusion and exclusion criteria for determining vocal fold immobility and hypomobility. In addition, criteria for use of the following terms have been outlined in detail: vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold paresis, vocal fold immobility/hypomobility associated with mechanical impairment of the crico-arytenoid joint and vocal fold immobility/hypomobility related to laryngeal malignant disease. This represents the first rigorously defined vocal fold motion impairment nomenclature system. This provides detailed definitions to the terms vocal fold paralysis and vocal fold paresis.

  13. A unique formulation of elastic airplane longitudinal equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaim, R. L.; Fullman, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    Control-configured vehicle technology has increased the demand for detailed analysis of dynamic stability and control, handling and ride qualities, and control system dynamics at early stages of preliminary design. An approximate, but reasonably accurate, set of equations of motion are needed for these early analyses. Such a formulation is developed for the longitudinal dynamics of elastic airplanes. It makes use of only rigid-body aerodynamic stability derivatives in formulating the forces and moments due to elastic motion. Verification of accuracy using data for the B-1 airplane shows very good agreement. Frequencies and damping ratios of the coupled modes corresponding to complex roots of the characteristic equations agree closely with four symmetric elastic modes included.

  14. Tropical cyclone motion and recurvature in TCM-90. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Rawinsonde and satellite data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Motion (TCM90) experiment, which was conducted during the summer of 1990 in the Western North pacific, is used to examine tropical cyclone steering motion and recurvature. TCM-90 composite results are compared with those found in a composite study using twenty-one years (1957-77) of Western North Pacific rawinsonde data during the same August-September period and also for all months during this same 21-year period. Both data sets indicate that the composite deep-layer-mean (850-300 mb) winds 5-7 deg from the cyclone center provide an important component of the steering flow for tropical cyclones. However, despite the rawinsonde data enhancements of the TCM-90 experiment, data limitations prevented an accurate observation of steering flow conditions at individual time periods or for the average of only 5-10 time periods when composited together.

  15. Smoothing of respiratory motion traces for motion-compensated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife system has been used successfully for several years to radiosurgically treat tumors without the need for stereotactic fixation or sedation of the patient. It has been shown that tumor motion in the lung, liver, and pancreas can be tracked with acceptable accuracy and repeatability. However, highly precise targeting for tumors in the lower abdomen, especially for tumors which exhibit strong motion, remains problematic. Reasons for this are manifold, like the slow tracking system operating at 26.5 Hz, and using the signal from the tracking camera ''as is''. Since the motion recorded with the camera is used to compensate for system latency by prediction and the predicted signal is subsequently used to infer the tumor position from a correlation model based on x-ray imaging of gold fiducials around the tumor, camera noise directly influences the targeting accuracy. The goal of this work is to establish the suitability of a new smoothing method for respiratory motion traces used in motion-compensated radiotherapy. The authors endeavor to show that better prediction--With a lower rms error of the predicted signal--and/or smoother prediction is possible using this method. Methods: The authors evaluated six commercially available tracking systems (NDI Aurora, PolarisClassic, Polaris Vicra, MicronTracker2 H40, FP5000, and accuTrack compact). The authors first tracked markers both stationary and while in motion to establish the systems' noise characteristics. Then the authors applied a smoothing method based on the a trous wavelet decomposition to reduce the devices' noise level. Additionally, the smoothed signal of the moving target and a motion trace from actual human respiratory motion were subjected to prediction using the MULIN and the nLMS{sub 2} algorithms. Results: The authors established that the noise distribution for a static target is Gaussian and that when the probe is moved such as to mimic human respiration, it remains Gaussian with the

  16. Detecting motion through dynamic refraction.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Perona, Pietro; Shamir, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Refraction causes random dynamic distortions in atmospheric turbulence and in views across a water interface. The latter scenario is experienced by submerged animals seeking to detect prey or avoid predators, which may be airborne or on land. Man encounters this when surveying a scene by a submarine or divers while wishing to avoid the use of an attention-drawing periscope. The problem of inverting random refracted dynamic distortions is difficult, particularly when some of the objects in the field of view (FOV) are moving. On the other hand, in many cases, just those moving objects are of interest, as they reveal animal, human, or machine activity. Furthermore, detecting and tracking these objects does not necessitate handling the difficult task of complete recovery of the scene. We show that moving objects can be detected very simply, with low false-positive rates, even when the distortions are very strong and dominate the object motion. Moreover, the moving object can be detected even if it has zero mean motion. While the object and distortion motions are random and unknown, they are mutually independent. This is expressed by a simple motion feature which enables discrimination of moving object points versus the background.

  17. Novice Rules for Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates several aspects of undergraduate students' rules for projectile motion including general patterns; rules for questions about time, distance, solids and liquids; and changes in rules when asked to ignore air resistance. Reports approach differences by sex and high school physics experience, and that novice rules are situation…

  18. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  19. How Does Force Affect Motion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Whether playing soccer at recess, walking to lunch, or sitting at their desk, children encounter forces every moment of their lives. The connection between force and motion is absolutely amazing to children, so anyone working with them better be prepared for the battery of tough questions they ask: "What made the ball move that way? Why does a…

  20. Faraday's Law and Seawater Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using Faraday's law, one can illustrate how an electromotive force generator, directly utilizing seawater motion, works. The conceptual device proposed is rather simple in its components and can be built in any high school or college laboratory. The description of the way in which the device generates an electromotive force can be instructive not…

  1. Tropical Cyclone Structure and Motion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    that motion and structure changes occur. Specific interactions being studied are with mesoscale convective systems (MCS) that have been hypothesized...of physical complexity included in current mesoscale models allows detailed examination of environmental and mesoscale convective system (MCS) impacts...model experiments. WORK COMPLETED Simulations using the PSU/NCAR mesoscale model investigated the possible role of mesoscale convective systems in

  2. Projectile Motion Gets the Hose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Liyanage, Chinthaka

    2011-01-01

    Students take a weekly quiz in our introductory physics course. During the week in which material focused on projectile motion, we not-so-subtly suggested what problem the students would see on the quiz. The quiz problem was an almost exact replica of a homework problem we worked through in the class preceding the quiz. The goal of the problem is…

  3. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  4. Bacterial motion in narrow capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Liyan; Wasnik, Vaibhav; Emberly, Eldon

    2014-01-01

    Motile bacteria often have to pass through small tortuous pores in soil or tissue of higher organisms. However, their motion in this prevalent type of niche is not fully understood. Here, we modeled it with narrow glass capillaries and identified a critical radius (Rc) for bacterial motion. Near the surface of capillaries narrower than that, the swimming trajectories are helices. In larger capillaries, they swim in distorted circles. Under non-slip condition, the peritrichous Escherichia coli swam in left-handed helices with an Rc of ∼10 μm near glass surface. However, slipping could occur in the fast monotrichous Pseudomonas fluorescens, when a speed threshold was exceeded, and thus both left-handed and right-handed helices were executed in glass capillaries. In the natural non-cylindrical pores, the near-surface trajectories would be spirals and twisted loops. Engaging in such motions reduces the bacterial migration rate. With a given pore size, the run length and the tumbling angle of the bacterium determine the probability and duration of their near-surface motion. Shear flow and chemotaxis potentially enhance it. Based on this observation, the puzzling previous observations on bacterial migration in porous environments can be interpreted. PMID:25764548

  5. Physiology of motion sickness symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.

    1990-01-01

    Motion sickness research is reviewed with the emphasis placed on theories developed to explain its symptomatology. A general review of central nervous system, autonomic nervous system, and neuroendocrine system involvement in the syndrome. Particular attention is given to signs, symptoms, and physiological correlates, methodological issues, and directions for future research based on a dynamic interactive systems model.

  6. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  7. Pendulum Motion and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Thomas F.; King, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    A common example of real-world motion that can be modeled by a differential equation, and one easily understood by the student, is the simple pendulum. Simplifying assumptions are necessary for closed-form solutions to exist, and frequently there is little discussion of the impact if those assumptions are not met. This article presents a…

  8. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  9. Clinical evaluation of motion and position sense in the upper extremities of the elderly using motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuan-yi; Wu, Yi-hui

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure kinesthetic accuracy in healthy older adults by using arm position and motion matching tests. We investigated the effect of task type, joint angle, and matching arm results on kinesthetic accuracy in the upper extremities of 17 healthy right-handed older adults. Blinded subjects were asked to match positions and motions at four reference joint angles: 1) shoulder flexion, 0°-60°; 2) elbow flexion, 90°-135°; 3) wrist extension, 0°-50° in the sagittal plane; and 4) shoulder abduction, 0°-60° in the frontal plane. The absolute difference in angular displacement between the reference and matching arms was calculated to determine kinesthetic accuracy. Results showed that subjects were more accurate at matching motion than position tasks (P=0.03). Shoulder and elbow joints were more sensitive than wrist joints in perceiving passive positions and motions (P<0.05). The effect of the matching arm was found only when matching the joint angles of shoulder abduction and wrist extension (P<0.01). These results are comparable to findings of other studies that used machine-generated kinesthetic stimuli. The manual measurement of kinesthetic accuracy could be effective as a preliminary screening tool for therapists in clinical settings.

  10. Super-Sharp Radio "Vision" Measures Galaxy's Motion in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    . This will allow them to answer important questions about the composition, history and fates of the two galaxies as well as of the Milky Way. "We want to determine the orbits of M31 and M33. That will help us learn about their history, specifically, how close have they come in the past?" Reid explained. "If they have passed very closely, then maybe M33's small size is a result of having material pulled off it by M31 during the close encounter," he added. Accurate knowledge of the motions of both galaxies also will help determine if there's a collision in their future. In addition, orbital analysis can give astronomers valuable clues about the amount and distribution of dark matter in the galaxies. M33's motion in space M33's motion in space, relative to M31 and the Milky Way CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The direct measurement of M33's transverse angular spin is the first time such a measurement has been done accurately. In the 1920s, some astronomers thought they had measured the spin of spiral galaxies, but their results proved to be in error. More recently, radio astronomers have measured the Doppler shift of hydrogen gas in galaxies to determine the spin speed, which, when combined with the angular spin, gives a direct estimate of the distance of the galaxy. The astronomers' task was not simple. Not only did they have to detect an impressively tiny amount of motion across the sky, but they also had to separate the actual motion of M33 from the apparent motion caused by our Solar System's motion around the center of the Milky Way. The motion of the Solar System and the Earth around the Galactic center, some 26,000 light-years away, has been accurately measured using the VLBA over the last decade. "The VLBA is the only telescope system in the world that could do this work," Reid said. "Its extraordinary ability to resolve fine detail is unmatched and was the absolute prerequisite to making these measurements." Reid worked with

  11. Oculometric indices of simulator and aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects on eye scan behavior of both simulator and aircraft motion and sensitivity of an oculometric measure to motion effects was demonstrated. It was found that fixation time is sensitive to motion effects. Differences between simulator motion and no motion conditions during a series of simulated ILS approaches were studied. The mean fixation time for the no motion condition was found to be significantly longer than for the motion conditions. Eye scan parameters based on data collected in flight, and in fixed base simulation were investigated. Motion effects were evident when the subject was viewing a display supplying attitude and flight path information. The nature of the information provided by motion was examined. The mean fixation times for the no motion condition were significantly longer than for either motion condition, while the two motion conditions did not differ. It is shown that motion serves an alerting function, providing a cue or clue to the pilot that something happened. It is suggested that simulation without motion cues may represent an understatement of the true capacity of the pilot.

  12. Inertial Motion-Tracking Technology for Virtual 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In the 1990s, NASA pioneered virtual reality research. The concept was present long before, but, prior to this, the technology did not exist to make a viable virtual reality system. Scientists had theories and ideas they knew that the concept had potential, but the computers of the 1970s and 1980s were not fast enough, sensors were heavy and cumbersome, and people had difficulty blending fluidly with the machines. Scientists at Ames Research Center built upon the research of previous decades and put the necessary technology behind them, making the theories of virtual reality a reality. Virtual reality systems depend on complex motion-tracking sensors to convey information between the user and the computer to give the user the feeling that he is operating in the real world. These motion-tracking sensors measure and report an object s position and orientation as it changes. A simple example of motion tracking would be the cursor on a computer screen moving in correspondence to the shifting of the mouse. Tracking in 3-D, necessary to create virtual reality, however, is much more complex. To be successful, the perspective of the virtual image seen on the computer must be an accurate representation of what is seen in the real world. As the user s head or camera moves, turns, or tilts, the computer-generated environment must change accordingly with no noticeable lag, jitter, or distortion. Historically, the lack of smooth and rapid tracking of the user s motion has thwarted the widespread use of immersive 3-D computer graphics. NASA uses virtual reality technology for a variety of purposes, mostly training of astronauts. The actual missions are costly and dangerous, so any opportunity the crews have to practice their maneuvering in accurate situations before the mission is valuable and instructive. For that purpose, NASA has funded a great deal of virtual reality research, and benefited from the results.

  13. Model-guided respiratory organ motion prediction of the liver from 2D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Preiswerk, Frank; De Luca, Valeria; Arnold, Patrik; Celicanin, Zarko; Petrusca, Lorena; Tanner, Christine; Bieri, Oliver; Salomir, Rares; Cattin, Philippe C

    2014-07-01

    With the availability of new and more accurate tumour treatment modalities such as high-intensity focused ultrasound or proton therapy, accurate target location prediction has become a key issue. Various approaches for diverse application scenarios have been proposed over the last decade. Whereas external surrogate markers such as a breathing belt work to some extent, knowledge about the internal motion of the organs inherently provides more accurate results. In this paper, we combine a population-based statistical motion model and information from 2d ultrasound sequences in order to predict the respiratory motion of the right liver lobe. For this, the motion model is fitted to a 3d exhalation breath-hold scan of the liver acquired before prediction. Anatomical landmarks tracked in the ultrasound images together with the model are then used to reconstruct the complete organ position over time. The prediction is both spatial and temporal, can be computed in real-time and is evaluated on ground truth over long time scales (5.5 min). The method is quantitatively validated on eight volunteers where the ultrasound images are synchronously acquired with 4D-MRI, which provides ground-truth motion. With an average spatial prediction accuracy of 2.4 mm, we can predict tumour locations within clinically acceptable margins.

  14. MR-Based PET Motion Correction Procedure for Simultaneous MR-PET Neuroimaging of Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Christoph; Rota Kops, Elena; Celik, Abdullah; Tellmann, Lutz; Stöcker, Tony; Herzog, Hans; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images are prone to motion artefacts due to the long acquisition time of PET measurements. Recently, simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET have become available in the first generation of Hybrid MR-PET scanners. In this work, the elimination of artefacts due to head motion in PET neuroimages is achieved by a new approach utilising MR-based motion tracking in combination with PET list mode data motion correction for simultaneous MR-PET acquisitions. The method comprises accurate MR-based motion measurements, an intra-frame motion minimising and reconstruction time reducing temporal framing algorithm, and a list mode based PET reconstruction which utilises the Ordinary Poisson Algorithm and avoids axial and transaxial compression. Compared to images uncorrected for motion, an increased image quality is shown in phantom as well as in vivo images. In vivo motion corrected images show an evident increase of contrast at the basal ganglia and a good visibility of uptake in tiny structures such as superior colliculi. PMID:23189127

  15. MR-based PET motion correction procedure for simultaneous MR-PET neuroimaging of human brain.

    PubMed

    Ullisch, Marcus Görge; Scheins, Jürgen Johann; Weirich, Christoph; Rota Kops, Elena; Celik, Abdullah; Tellmann, Lutz; Stöcker, Tony; Herzog, Hans; Shah, Nadim Jon

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images are prone to motion artefacts due to the long acquisition time of PET measurements. Recently, simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and PET have become available in the first generation of Hybrid MR-PET scanners. In this work, the elimination of artefacts due to head motion in PET neuroimages is achieved by a new approach utilising MR-based motion tracking in combination with PET list mode data motion correction for simultaneous MR-PET acquisitions. The method comprises accurate MR-based motion measurements, an intra-frame motion minimising and reconstruction time reducing temporal framing algorithm, and a list mode based PET reconstruction which utilises the Ordinary Poisson Algorithm and avoids axial and transaxial compression. Compared to images uncorrected for motion, an increased image quality is shown in phantom as well as in vivo images. In vivo motion corrected images show an evident increase of contrast at the basal ganglia and a good visibility of uptake in tiny structures such as superior colliculi.

  16. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  17. Nonrigid Registration of 2-D and 3-D Dynamic Cell Nuclei Images for Improved Classification of Subcellular Particle Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun M.; Spector, David L.; Eils, Roland; Rohr, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The observed motion of subcellular particles in fluorescence microscopy image sequences of live cells is generally a superposition of the motion and deformation of the cell and the motion of the particles. Decoupling the two types of movements to enable accurate classification of the particle motion requires the application of registration algorithms. We have developed an intensity-based approach for nonrigid registration of multi-channel microscopy image sequences of cell nuclei. First, based on 3-D synthetic images we demonstrate that cell nucleus deformations change the observed motion types of particles and that our approach allows to recover the original motion. Second, we have successfully applied our approach to register 2-D and 3-D real microscopy image sequences. A quantitative experimental comparison with previous approaches for nonrigid registration of cell microscopy has also been performed. PMID:20840894

  18. WE-AB-303-05: Breathing Motion of Liver Segments From Fiducial Tracking During Robotic Radiosurgery and Comparison with 4D-CT-Derived Fiducial Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J; Pantarotto, J; Nair, V; Cook, G; Plourde, M; Vandervoort, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory-induced motion of liver segments using the positions of implanted fiducials during robotic radiosurgery. This study also compared fiducial motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximum intensity projections (MIP) with motion derived from imaging during treatment. Methods: Forty-two consecutive liver patients treated with liver ablative radiotherapy were accrued to an ethics approved retrospective study. The liver segment in which each fiducial resided was identified. Fiducial positions throughout each treatment fraction were determined using orthogonal kilovoltage images. Any data due to patient repositioning or motion was removed. Mean fiducial positions were calculated. Fiducial positions beyond two standard deviations of the mean were discarded and remaining positions were fit to a line segment using least squares minimization (LSM). For eight patients, fiducial motion was derived from 4D-CT MIPs by calculating the CT number weighted mean position of the fiducial on each slice and fitting a line segment to these points using LSM. Treatment derived fiducial trajectories were corrected for patient rotation and compared to MIP derived trajectories. Results: The mean total magnitude of fiducial motion across all liver segments in left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior (SI) directions were 3.0 ± 0.2 mm, 9.3 ± 0.4 mm, and 20.5 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. Differences in per-segment mean fiducial motion were found with SI motion ranging from 12.6 ± 0.8 mm to 22.6 ± 0.9 mm for segments 3 and 8, respectively. Large, varied differences between treatment and MIP derived motion at simulation were found with the mean difference for SI motion being 2.6 mm (10.8 mm standard deviation). Conclusion: The magnitude of liver fiducial motion was found to differ by liver segment. MIP derived liver fiducial motion differed from motion observed during treatment, implying that 4D-CTs may not accurately capture the

  19. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Bromley, Benjamin C. E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu

    2014-10-01

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  20. Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue from Cine MRI and Tagged MRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Suo, Yuanming; Murano, Emi Z.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help professionals diagnose and treat vocal tract--related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. The authors compared tissue tracking results from 4 widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to cine magnetic…