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Sample records for accurate mass database

  1. Accurate mass tag retention time database for urine proteome analysis by chromatography--mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Agron, I A; Avtonomov, D M; Kononikhin, A S; Popov, I A; Moshkovskii, S A; Nikolaev, E N

    2010-05-01

    Information about peptides and proteins in urine can be used to search for biomarkers of early stages of various diseases. The main technology currently used for identification of peptides and proteins is tandem mass spectrometry, in which peptides are identified by mass spectra of their fragmentation products. However, the presence of the fragmentation stage decreases sensitivity of analysis and increases its duration. We have developed a method for identification of human urinary proteins and peptides. This method based on the accurate mass and time tag (AMT) method does not use tandem mass spectrometry. The database of AMT tags containing more than 1381 AMT tags of peptides has been constructed. The software for database filling with AMT tags, normalizing the chromatograms, database application for identification of proteins and peptides, and their quantitative estimation has been developed. The new procedures for peptide identification by tandem mass spectra and the AMT tag database are proposed. The paper also lists novel proteins that have been identified in human urine for the first time. PMID:20632944

  2. Identification of "Known Unknowns" Utilizing Accurate Mass Data and Chemical Abstracts Service Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Cleven, Curtis D.; Brown, Stacy D.

    2011-02-01

    In many cases, an unknown to an investigator is actually known in the chemical literature. We refer to these types of compounds as "known unknowns." Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry is a particularly good source of these substances as it contains over 54 million entries. Accurate mass measurements can be used to query the CAS Registry by either molecular formulae or average molecular weights. Searching the database by the web-based version of SciFinder is the preferred approach when molecular formulae are available. However, if a definitive molecular formula cannot be ascertained, searching the database with STN Express by average molecular weights is a viable alternative. The results from either approach are refined by employing the number of associated references or minimal sample history as orthogonal filters. These approaches were shown to be successful in identifying "known unknowns" noted in LC-MS and even GC-MS analyses in our laboratory. In addition, they were demonstrated in the identification of a variety of compounds of interest to others.

  3. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Otter, Don E; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-17

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching. PMID:27428379

  4. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation. PMID:26819907

  5. Hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis with accurate-mass database and parallel reaction monitoring for high-throughput screening and quantification of multi-xenobiotics in honey.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Jinzhen; Jin, Yue; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhai, Lifei; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Yongxin; Zhou, Jinhui

    2016-01-15

    This study reports a rapid, automated screening and quantification method for the determination of multi-xenobiotic residues in honey using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) with a user-built accurate-mass database plus parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). The database contains multi-xenobiotic information including formulas, adduct types, theoretical exact mass and retention time, characteristic fragment ions, ion ratios, and mass accuracies. A simple sample preparation method was developed to reduce xenobiotic loss in the honey samples. The screening method was validated based on retention time deviation, mass accuracy via full scan-data-dependent MS/MS (full scan-ddMS2), multi-isotope ratio, characteristic ion ratio, sensitivity, and positive/negative switching performance between the spiked sample and corresponding standard solution. The quantification method based on the PRM mode is a promising new quantitative tool which we validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, recovery (accuracy), repeatability (precision), decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), matrix effects, and carry-over. The optimized methods proposed in this study enable the automated screening and quantification of 157 compounds in less than 15 min in honey. The results of this study, as they represent a convenient protocol for large-scale screening and quantification, also provide a research approach for analysis of various contaminants in other matrices. PMID:26724099

  6. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    proteins can also be extensively modified by PTMs26-31 or by their interactions with other biomolecules or small molecules.32,33 Thus, it is highly desirable that proteins, the primary functional macromolecules involved in almost all biological activities, can be studied directly and systematically to determine their diverse properties and interplay. Such proteome-wide analysis is expected to provide a wealth of biological information, such as sequence, quantity, PTMs, interactions, activities, subcellular distribution and structure of proteins, which is critical to the comprehensive understanding of the biological systems. However, the de novo analysis of proteins isolated from cells, tissues or bodily fluids poses significant challenges due to the tremendous complexity and depth of the proteome, which necessitates high-throughput and highly sensitive analytical techniques. It is therefore not surprising that mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable technology for proteome analysis.

  7. Fast and accurate estimation for astrophysical problems in large databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.

    2010-10-01

    A recent flood of astronomical data has created much demand for sophisticated statistical and machine learning tools that can rapidly draw accurate inferences from large databases of high-dimensional data. In this Ph.D. thesis, methods for statistical inference in such databases will be proposed, studied, and applied to real data. I use methods for low-dimensional parametrization of complex, high-dimensional data that are based on the notion of preserving the connectivity of data points in the context of a Markov random walk over the data set. I show how this simple parameterization of data can be exploited to: define appropriate prototypes for use in complex mixture models, determine data-driven eigenfunctions for accurate nonparametric regression, and find a set of suitable features to use in a statistical classifier. In this thesis, methods for each of these tasks are built up from simple principles, compared to existing methods in the literature, and applied to data from astronomical all-sky surveys. I examine several important problems in astrophysics, such as estimation of star formation history parameters for galaxies, prediction of redshifts of galaxies using photometric data, and classification of different types of supernovae based on their photometric light curves. Fast methods for high-dimensional data analysis are crucial in each of these problems because they all involve the analysis of complicated high-dimensional data in large, all-sky surveys. Specifically, I estimate the star formation history parameters for the nearly 800,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog, determine redshifts for over 300,000 galaxies in the SDSS photometric catalog, and estimate the types of 20,000 supernovae as part of the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Accurate predictions and classifications are imperative in each of these examples because these estimates are utilized in broader inference problems

  8. Fast and accurate database searches with MS-GF+Percolator.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Viktor; Kim, Sangtae; Navarro, José C F; Sjölund, Erik; Smith, Richard D; Käll, Lukas

    2014-02-01

    One can interpret fragmentation spectra stemming from peptides in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics experiments using so-called database search engines. Frequently, one also runs post-processors such as Percolator to assess the confidence, infer unique peptides, and increase the number of identifications. A recent search engine, MS-GF+, has shown promising results, due to a new and efficient scoring algorithm. However, MS-GF+ provides few statistical estimates about the peptide-spectrum matches, hence limiting the biological interpretation. Here, we enabled Percolator processing for MS-GF+ output and observed an increased number of identified peptides for a wide variety of data sets. In addition, Percolator directly reports p values and false discovery rate estimates, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, for peptide-spectrum matches, peptides, and proteins, functions that are useful for the whole proteomics community. PMID:24344789

  9. Fast and accurate database searches with MS-GF+Percolator

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, Viktor; Kim, Sangtae; Navarro, Jose' C.; Sjolund, Erik; Smith, Richard D.; Kall, Lukas

    2014-02-28

    To identify peptides and proteins from the large number of fragmentation spectra in mass spectrometrybased proteomics, researches commonly employ so called database search engines. Additionally, postprocessors like Percolator have been used on the results from such search engines, to assess confidence, infer peptides and generally increase the number of identifications. A recent search engine, MS-GF+, has previously been showed to out-perform these classical search engines in terms of the number of identified spectra. However, MS-GF+ generates only limited statistical estimates of the results, hence hampering the biological interpretation. Here, we enabled Percolator-processing for MS-GF+ output, and observed an increased number of identified peptides for a wide variety of datasets. In addition, Percolator directly reports false discovery rate estimates, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, as well as p values, for peptide-spectrum matches, peptides and proteins, functions useful for the whole proteomics community.

  10. Microbalance accurately measures extremely small masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patashnick, H.

    1970-01-01

    Oscillating fiber microbalance has a vibrating quartz fiber as balance arm to hold the mass to be weighed. Increasing fiber weight decreases its resonant frequency. Scaler and timer measure magnitude of the shift. This instrument withstands considerable physical abuse and has calibration stability at normal room temperatures.

  11. Accurate measurements of mass and center of mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Object is measured for mass and center of mass with accuracies of 0.01% and 0.14 respectively, using method that eliminates errors in alignment, leveling, and calibration. Method is applied to scientific instruments, recorder turntables, flywheels, and other devices that require precise balancing.

  12. Application of the accurate mass and time tag approach in studies of the human blood lipidome

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jie; Sorensen, Christina M.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Jiang, Hongliang; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-08-15

    We report a preliminary demonstration of the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach for lipidomics. Initial data-dependent LC-MS/MS analyses of human plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte lipids were performed in order to identify lipid molecular species in conjunction with complementary accurate mass and isotopic distribution information. Identified lipids were used to populate initial lipid AMT tag databases containing 250 and 45 entries for those species detected in positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) modes, respectively. The positive ESI database was then utilized to identify human plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte lipids in high-throughput quantitative LC-MS analyses based on the AMT tag approach. We were able to define the lipid profiles of human plasma, erythrocytes, and lymphocytes based on qualitative and quantitative differences in lipid abundance. In addition, we also report on the optimization of a reversed-phase LC method for the separation of lipids in these sample types.

  13. Identification of "Known Unknowns" Utilizing Accurate Mass Data and ChemSpider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Williams, Antony J.; Pshenichnov, Alexey; Tkachenko, Valery

    2012-01-01

    In many cases, an unknown to an investigator is actually known in the chemical literature, a reference database, or an internet resource. We refer to these types of compounds as "known unknowns." ChemSpider is a very valuable internet database of known compounds useful in the identification of these types of compounds in commercial, environmental, forensic, and natural product samples. The database contains over 26 million entries from hundreds of data sources and is provided as a free resource to the community. Accurate mass mass spectrometry data is used to query the database by either elemental composition or a monoisotopic mass. Searching by elemental composition is the preferred approach. However, it is often difficult to determine a unique elemental composition for compounds with molecular weights greater than 600 Da. In these cases, searching by the monoisotopic mass is advantageous. In either case, the search results are refined by sorting the number of references associated with each compound in descending order. This raises the most useful candidates to the top of the list for further evaluation. These approaches were shown to be successful in identifying "known unknowns" noted in our laboratory and for compounds of interest to others.

  14. Proteome Analyses Using Accurate Mass and Elution Time Peptide Tags with Capillary LC Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, Eric F.; Ferguson, Patrick L.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-09-01

    We describe the application of capillary liquid chromatography (LC) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometric instrumentation for the rapid characterization of microbial proteomes. Previously (Lipton et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 99, 2002, 11049) the peptides from a series of growth conditions of Deinococcus radiodurans have been characterized using capillary LC MS/MS and accurate mass measurements which are logged in an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database. Using this AMT tag database, detected peptides can be assigned using measurements obtained on a TOF due to the additional use of elution time data as a constraint. When peptide matches are obtained using AMT tags (i.e. using both constraints) unique matches of a mass spectral peak occurs 88% of the time. Not only are AMT tag matches unique in most cases, the coverage of the proteome is high; {approx}3500 unique peptide AMT tags are found on average per capillary LC run. From the results of the AMT tag database search, {approx}900 ORFs detected using LC-TOFMS, with {approx}500 ORFs covered by at least two AMT tags. These results indicate that AMT databases searches with modest mass and elution time criteria can provide proteomic information for approximately one thousand proteins in a single run of <3 hours. The advantage of this method over using MS/MS based techniques is the large number of identifications that occur in a single experiment as well as the basis for improved quantitation. For MS/MS experiments, the number of peptide identifications is severely restricted because of the time required to dissociate the peptides individually. These results demonstrate the utility of the AMT tag approach using capillary LC-TOF MS instruments, and also show that AMT tags developed using other instrumentation can be effectively utilized.

  15. JCZS: An Intermolecular Potential Database for Performing Accurate Detonation and Expansion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; McGee, B.C.

    1998-11-03

    Exponential-13,6 (EXP-13,6) potential pammeters for 750 gases composed of 48 elements were determined and assembled in a database, referred to as the JCZS database, for use with the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler equation of state (JCZ3-EOS)~l) The EXP- 13,6 force constants were obtained by using literature values of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, by using corresponding states (CS) theory, by matching pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and by using molecular volume to determine the approach radii with the well depth estimated from high-pressure isen- tropes. The JCZS database was used to accurately predict detonation velocity, pressure, and temperature for 50 dif- 3 Accurate predictions were also ferent explosives with initial densities ranging from 0.25 glcm3 to 1.97 g/cm . obtained for pure liquid shock Hugoniots, static properties of nitrogen, and gas detonations at high initial pressures.

  16. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25164376

  17. Accurate mass spectrometry based protein quantification via shared peptides.

    PubMed

    Dost, Banu; Bandeira, Nuno; Li, Xiangqian; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Bafna, Vineet

    2012-04-01

    In mass spectrometry-based protein quantification, peptides that are shared across different protein sequences are often discarded as being uninformative with respect to each of the parent proteins. We investigate the use of shared peptides which are ubiquitous (~50% of peptides) in mass spectrometric data-sets for accurate protein identification and quantification. Different from existing approaches, we show how shared peptides can help compute the relative amounts of the proteins that contain them. Also, proteins with no unique peptide in the sample can still be analyzed for relative abundance. Our article uses shared peptides in protein quantification and makes use of combinatorial optimization to reduce the error in relative abundance measurements. We describe the topological and numerical properties required for robust estimates, and use them to improve our estimates for ill-conditioned systems. Extensive simulations validate our approach even in the presence of experimental error. We apply our method to a model of Arabidopsis thaliana root knot nematode infection, and investigate the differential role of several protein family members in mediating host response to the pathogen. PMID:22414154

  18. Veterans Affairs databases are accurate for gout-related health care utilization: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of Veterans Affairs (VA) databases for gout-related health care utilization. Methods This retrospective study utilized VA administrative and clinical databases. A random sample of gout patients with visits (outpatient, inpatient or emergent/urgent care) with or without the diagnosis of gout (International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision, common modification ICD-9-CM code of 274.x or 274.xx) at the Birmingham VA hospital was selected. A blinded abstractor performed a review of VA electronic health records for the documentation of gout or gout-related terms (gouty arthritis, tophaceous gout, tophus/tophi, acute gout, chronic gout, podagra, urate stones, urate or uric acid crystals and so on) in the chief complaint, history of present illness or assessment and plan for the visit; this constituted the gold standard for gout-related utilization. The accuracy of database-derived gout-related claims was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV). Results Of 108 potential visits, 85 outpatient, inpatient or urgent care/emergency room visits to a health care provider (85 patients: 84 men and 1 woman with a mean age of 63 years) and retrievable data from medical records constituted the analyzed dataset. Administrative claims for gout-related utilization with ICD-9 code for gout were accurate with a PPV of 86%, specificity of 95%, sensitivity of 86% and NPV of 95%. Conclusions VA databases are accurate for gout-related visits. These findings support their use for studies of health services and outcome studies. It remains to be seen if these findings are generalizable to other settings and databases. PMID:24377421

  19. Mass spectrometry-based protein identification with accurate statistical significance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Assigning statistical significance accurately has become increasingly important as metadata of many types, often assembled in hierarchies, are constructed and combined for further biological analyses. Statistical inaccuracy of metadata at any level may propagate to downstream analyses, undermining the validity of scientific conclusions thus drawn. From the perspective of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, even though accurate statistics for peptide identification can now be achieved, accurate protein level statistics remain challenging. Results: We have constructed a protein ID method that combines peptide evidences of a candidate protein based on a rigorous formula derived earlier; in this formula the database P-value of every peptide is weighted, prior to the final combination, according to the number of proteins it maps to. We have also shown that this protein ID method provides accurate protein level E-value, eliminating the need of using empirical post-processing methods for type-I error control. Using a known protein mixture, we find that this protein ID method, when combined with the Sorić formula, yields accurate values for the proportion of false discoveries. In terms of retrieval efficacy, the results from our method are comparable with other methods tested. Availability and implementation: The source code, implemented in C++ on a linux system, is available for download at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/qmbp/qmbp_ms/RAId/RAId_Linux_64Bit. Contact: yyu@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25362092

  20. A Statistical Method for Assessing Peptide Identification Confidence in Accurate Mass and Time Tag Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2011-07-15

    High-throughput proteomics is rapidly evolving to require high mass measurement accuracy for a variety of different applications. Increased mass measurement accuracy in bottom-up proteomics specifically allows for an improved ability to distinguish and characterize detected MS features, which may in turn be identified by, e.g., matching to entries in a database for both precursor and fragmentation mass identification methods. Many tools exist with which to score the identification of peptides from LC-MS/MS measurements or to assess matches to an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database, but these two calculations remain distinctly unrelated. Here we present a statistical method, Statistical Tools for AMT tag Confidence (STAC), which extends our previous work incorporating prior probabilities of correct sequence identification from LC-MS/MS, as well as the quality with which LC-MS features match AMT tags, to evaluate peptide identification confidence. Compared to existing tools, we are able to obtain significantly more high-confidence peptide identifications at a given false discovery rate and additionally assign confidence estimates to individual peptide identifications. Freely available software implementations of STAC are available in both command line and as a Windows graphical application.

  1. The Basingstoke Orthopaedic Database: a high quality accurate information system for audit.

    PubMed

    Barlow, I W; Flynn, N A; Britton, J M

    1994-11-01

    The accuracy of a computerised audit system custom produced for the Orthopaedic Department has been validated by comparison with operating theatre records and patients' case notes. The study revealed only 2.5 per cent missed entries; of the recorded entries information regarding the nature of the operation was found to be 92.5 per cent complete and 98 per cent accurate. The high percentage accuracy reflects the high degree of medical input in operation of the system. The Basingstoke Orthopaedic Database is flexible, cheap and easy to maintain. Data is stored in a form that is readily applicable to standard software packages. PMID:7598401

  2. Accurate Mass Determinations in Decay Chains with Missing Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-C; Gunion, John F.; Han Zhenyu; Engelhardt, Dalit; McElrath, Bob

    2008-06-27

    Many beyond the standard model theories include a stable dark matter candidate that yields missing or invisible energy in collider detectors. If observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, we must determine if its mass and other properties (and those of its partners) predict the correct dark matter relic density. We give a new procedure for determining its mass with small error.

  3. Accurate mass determinations in decay chains with missing energy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Engelhardt, Dalit; Gunion, John F; Han, Zhenyu; McElrath, Bob

    2008-06-27

    Many beyond the standard model theories include a stable dark matter candidate that yields missing or invisible energy in collider detectors. If observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, we must determine if its mass and other properties (and those of its partners) predict the correct dark matter relic density. We give a new procedure for determining its mass with small error. PMID:18643654

  4. Integrated database for rapid mass movements in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaedicke, C.; Lied, K.; Kronholm, K.

    2009-03-01

    Rapid gravitational slope mass movements include all kinds of short term relocation of geological material, snow or ice. Traditionally, information about such events is collected separately in different databases covering selected geographical regions and types of movement. In Norway the terrain is susceptible to all types of rapid gravitational slope mass movements ranging from single rocks hitting roads and houses to large snow avalanches and rock slides where entire mountainsides collapse into fjords creating flood waves and endangering large areas. In addition, quick clay slides occur in desalinated marine sediments in South Eastern and Mid Norway. For the authorities and inhabitants of endangered areas, the type of threat is of minor importance and mitigation measures have to consider several types of rapid mass movements simultaneously. An integrated national database for all types of rapid mass movements built around individual events has been established. Only three data entries are mandatory: time, location and type of movement. The remaining optional parameters enable recording of detailed information about the terrain, materials involved and damages caused. Pictures, movies and other documentation can be uploaded into the database. A web-based graphical user interface has been developed allowing new events to be entered, as well as editing and querying for all events. An integration of the database into a GIS system is currently under development. Datasets from various national sources like the road authorities and the Geological Survey of Norway were imported into the database. Today, the database contains 33 000 rapid mass movement events from the last five hundred years covering the entire country. A first analysis of the data shows that the most frequent type of recorded rapid mass movement is rock slides and snow avalanches followed by debris slides in third place. Most events are recorded in the steep fjord terrain of the Norwegian west coast, but

  5. RAId_DbS: Method for Peptide ID using Database Search with Accurate Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2007-03-01

    The key to proteomics studies, essential in systems biology, is peptide identification. Under tandem mass spectrometry, each spectrum generated consists of a list of mass/charge peaks along with their intensities. Software analysis is then required to identify from the spectrum peptide candidates that best interpret the spectrum. The library search, which compares the spectral peaks against theoretical peaks generated by each peptide in a library, is among the most popular methods. This method, although robust, lacks good quantitative statistical underpinning. As we show, many library search algorithms suffer from statistical instability. The need for a better statistical basis prompted us to develop RAId_DbS. Taking into account the skewness in the peak intensity distribution while scoring peptides, RAId_DbS provides an accurate statistical significance assignment to each peptide candidate. RAId_DbS will be a valuable tool especially when one intends to identify proteins through peptide identifications.

  6. A highly accurate method for the determination of mass and center of mass of a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.; Egwuatu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An extremely accurate method for the measurement of mass and the lateral center of mass of a spacecraft has been developed. The method was needed for the Voyager spacecraft mission requirement which limited the uncertainty in the knowledge of lateral center of mass of the spacecraft system weighing 750 kg to be less than 1.0 mm (0.04 in.). The method consists of using three load cells symmetrically located at 120 deg apart on a turntable with respect to the vertical axis of the spacecraft and making six measurements for each load cell. These six measurements are taken by cyclic rotations of the load cell turntable and of the spacecraft, about the vertical axis of the measurement fixture. This method eliminates all alignment, leveling, and load cell calibration errors for the lateral center of mass determination, and permits a statistical best fit of the measurement data. An associated data reduction computer program called MASCM has been written to implement this method and has been used for the Voyager spacecraft.

  7. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  8. Alignment of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry datasets using accurate mass information.

    PubMed

    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Derks, Rico; Deelder, André M; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Palmblad, Magnus

    2009-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a powerful technique for the analysis of small soluble compounds in biological fluids. A major drawback of CE is the poor migration time reproducibility, which makes it difficult to combine data from different experiments and correctly assign compounds. A number of alignment algorithms have been developed but not all of them can cope with large and irregular time shifts between CE-MS runs. Here we present a genetic algorithm designed for alignment of CE-MS data using accurate mass information. The utility of the algorithm was demonstrated on real data, and the results were compared with one of the existing packages. The new algorithm showed a significant reduction of elution time variation in the aligned datasets. The importance of mass accuracy for the performance of the algorithm was also demonstrated by comparing alignments of datasets from a standard time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with those from the new ultrahigh resolution TOF maXis (Bruker Daltonics). PMID:19826795

  9. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a wide range of biological and medical applications. Their identification by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenging task. A new open-source de novo peptide identification engine CycloBranch was developed and successfully applied in identification or detailed characterization of 11 linear, cyclic, branched, and branch-cyclic peptides. CycloBranch is based on annotated building block databases the size of which is defined by the user according to ribosomal or nonribosomal peptide origin. The current number of involved nonisobaric and isobaric building blocks is 287 and 521, respectively. Contrary to all other peptide sequencing tools utilizing either peptide libraries or peptide fragment libraries, CycloBranch represents a true de novo sequencing engine developed for accurate mass spectrometric data. It is a stand-alone and cross-platform application with a graphical and user-friendly interface; it supports mzML, mzXML, mgf, txt, and baf file formats and can be run in parallel on multiple threads. It can be downloaded for free from http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/cyclobranch/, where the User's manual and video tutorials can be found.

  10. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  11. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  12. The volatile compound BinBase mass spectral database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Volatile compounds comprise diverse chemical groups with wide-ranging sources and functions. These compounds originate from major pathways of secondary metabolism in many organisms and play essential roles in chemical ecology in both plant and animal kingdoms. In past decades, sampling methods and instrumentation for the analysis of complex volatile mixtures have improved; however, design and implementation of database tools to process and store the complex datasets have lagged behind. Description The volatile compound BinBase (vocBinBase) is an automated peak annotation and database system developed for the analysis of GC-TOF-MS data derived from complex volatile mixtures. The vocBinBase DB is an extension of the previously reported metabolite BinBase software developed to track and identify derivatized metabolites. The BinBase algorithm uses deconvoluted spectra and peak metadata (retention index, unique ion, spectral similarity, peak signal-to-noise ratio, and peak purity) from the Leco ChromaTOF software, and annotates peaks using a multi-tiered filtering system with stringent thresholds. The vocBinBase algorithm assigns the identity of compounds existing in the database. Volatile compound assignments are supported by the Adams mass spectral-retention index library, which contains over 2,000 plant-derived volatile compounds. Novel molecules that are not found within vocBinBase are automatically added using strict mass spectral and experimental criteria. Users obtain fully annotated data sheets with quantitative information for all volatile compounds for studies that may consist of thousands of chromatograms. The vocBinBase database may also be queried across different studies, comprising currently 1,537 unique mass spectra generated from 1.7 million deconvoluted mass spectra of 3,435 samples (18 species). Mass spectra with retention indices and volatile profiles are available as free download under the CC-BY agreement (http

  13. DeconMSn: A Software Tool for accurate parent ion monoisotopic mass determination for tandem mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-04-01

    We present a new software tool for tandem MS analyses that: • accurately calculates the monoisotopic mass and charge of high–resolution parent ions • accurately operates regardless of the mass selected for fragmentation • performs independent of instrument settings • enables optimal selection of search mass tolerance for high mass accuracy experiments • is open source and thus can be tailored to individual needs • incorporates a SVM-based charge detection algorithm for analyzing low resolution tandem MS spectra • creates multiple output data formats (.dta, .MGF) • handles .RAW files and .mzXML formats • compatible with SEQUEST, MASCOT, X!Tandem

  14. Leg mass characteristics of accurate and inaccurate kickers--an Australian football perspective.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2013-01-01

    Athletic profiling provides valuable information to sport scientists, assisting in the optimal design of strength and conditioning programmes. Understanding the influence these physical characteristics may have on the generation of kicking accuracy is advantageous. The aim of this study was to profile and compare the lower limb mass characteristics of accurate and inaccurate Australian footballers. Thirty-one players were recruited from the Western Australian Football League to perform ten drop punt kicks over 20 metres to a player target. Players were separated into accurate (n = 15) and inaccurate (n = 16) groups, with leg mass characteristics assessed using whole body dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans. Accurate kickers demonstrated significantly greater relative lean mass (P ≤ 0.004) and significantly lower relative fat mass (P ≤ 0.024) across all segments of the kicking and support limbs, while also exhibiting significantly higher intra-limb lean-to-fat mass ratios for all segments across both limbs (P ≤ 0.009). Inaccurate kickers also produced significantly larger asymmetries between limbs than accurate kickers (P ≤ 0.028), showing considerably lower lean mass in their support leg. These results illustrate a difference in leg mass characteristics between accurate and inaccurate kickers, highlighting the potential influence these may have on technical proficiency of the drop punt. PMID:23687978

  15. MASS MEASUREMENTS BY AN ACCURATE AND SENSITIVE SELECTED ION RECORDING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace-level components of mixtures were successfully identified or confirmed by mass spectrometric accurate mass measurements, made at high resolution with selected ion recording, using GC and LC sample introduction. Measurements were made at 20 000 or 10 000 resolution, respecti...

  16. Unified and Isomer-Specific NMR Metabolomics Database for the Accurate Analysis of 13C–1H HSQC Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new metabolomics database and query algorithm for the analysis of 13C–1H HSQC spectra is introduced, which unifies NMR spectroscopic information on 555 metabolites from both the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) and Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). The new database, termed Complex Mixture Analysis by NMR (COLMAR) 13C–1H HSQC database, can be queried via an interactive, easy to use web interface at http://spin.ccic.ohio-state.edu/index.php/hsqc/index. Our new HSQC database separately treats slowly exchanging isomers that belong to the same metabolite, which permits improved query in cases where lowly populated isomers are below the HSQC detection limit. The performance of our new database and query web server compares favorably with the one of existing web servers, especially for spectra of samples of high complexity, including metabolite mixtures from the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Escherichia coli. For such samples, our web server has on average a 37% higher accuracy (true positive rate) and a 82% lower false positive rate, which makes it a useful tool for the rapid and accurate identification of metabolites from 13C–1H HSQC spectra at natural abundance. This information can be combined and validated with NMR data from 2D TOCSY-type spectra that provide connectivity information not present in HSQC spectra. PMID:25333826

  17. Unified and isomer-specific NMR metabolomics database for the accurate analysis of (13)C-(1)H HSQC spectra.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Li, Da-Wei; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Cabrera, Oscar A; Megraw, Timothy; Zhang, Fengli; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-02-20

    A new metabolomics database and query algorithm for the analysis of (13)C-(1)H HSQC spectra is introduced, which unifies NMR spectroscopic information on 555 metabolites from both the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) and Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). The new database, termed Complex Mixture Analysis by NMR (COLMAR) (13)C-(1)H HSQC database, can be queried via an interactive, easy to use web interface at http://spin.ccic.ohio-state.edu/index.php/hsqc/index . Our new HSQC database separately treats slowly exchanging isomers that belong to the same metabolite, which permits improved query in cases where lowly populated isomers are below the HSQC detection limit. The performance of our new database and query web server compares favorably with the one of existing web servers, especially for spectra of samples of high complexity, including metabolite mixtures from the model organisms Drosophila melanogaster and Escherichia coli. For such samples, our web server has on average a 37% higher accuracy (true positive rate) and a 82% lower false positive rate, which makes it a useful tool for the rapid and accurate identification of metabolites from (13)C-(1)H HSQC spectra at natural abundance. This information can be combined and validated with NMR data from 2D TOCSY-type spectra that provide connectivity information not present in HSQC spectra. PMID:25333826

  18. Support Vector Machines for Improved Peptide Identification from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Database Search

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2009-05-06

    Accurate identification of peptides is a current challenge in mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics. The standard approach uses a search routine to compare tandem mass spectra to a database of peptides associated with the target organism. These database search routines yield multiple metrics associated with the quality of the mapping of the experimental spectrum to the theoretical spectrum of a peptide. The structure of these results make separating correct from false identifications difficult and has created a false identification problem. Statistical confidence scores are an approach to battle this false positive problem that has led to significant improvements in peptide identification. We have shown that machine learning, specifically support vector machine (SVM), is an effective approach to separating true peptide identifications from false ones. The SVM-based peptide statistical scoring method transforms a peptide into a vector representation based on database search metrics to train and validate the SVM. In practice, following the database search routine, a peptides is denoted in its vector representation and the SVM generates a single statistical score that is then used to classify presence or absence in the sample

  19. Accurate Mass Searching of Individual Lipid Species Candidate from High-resolution Mass Spectra for Shotgun Lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Huang, Yingying; Han, Xianlin

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE With the increased mass accuracy and resolution in commercialized mass spectrometers, new development on shotgun lipidomics could be expected with increased speed, dynamic range, and coverage over lipid species and classes. However, we found that the major issue by using high mass accuracy/resolution instruments to search lipid species is the partial overlap between the two 13C atom-containing isotopologue of a species M (i.e., M+2 isotopologue) and the ion of a species less a double bond than M (assigned here as L). This partial overlap alone could cause a mass shift of the species L to the lower mass end up to 12 ppm around m/z 750 as well as significant peak broadening. METHODS We developed an approach for accurate mass searching by exploring one of the major features of shotgun lipidomics data that lipid species of a class are present in ion clusters where neighboring masses from different species differ by one or a few double bonds. In the approach, a mass-searching window of 18 ppm (from −15 to 3 ppm) was first searched for an entire group of species of a lipid class. Then accurate mass searching of the plus one 13C isotopologue of individual species was used to eliminate the potential false positive. RESULTS The approach was extensively validated through comparing with the species determined by the multi-dimensional MS-based shotgun lipidomics platform. The newly developed strategy of accurate mass search enables identifying the overlapped L species and acquiring the corresponding peak intensities. CONCLUSIONS We believe that this novel approach could substantially broaden the applications of high mass accurate/resolution mass spectrometry for shotgun lipidomics. PMID:25178724

  20. Efficient Use of an Adapting Database of Ab Initio Calculations To Generate Accurate Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, M C; Jones, R E

    2016-02-01

    We develop and demonstrate a method to efficiently use density functional calculations to drive classical dynamics of complex atomic and molecular systems. The method has the potential to scale to systems and time scales unreachable with current ab initio molecular dynamics schemes. It relies on an adapting dataset of independently computed Hellmann-Feynman forces for atomic configurations endowed with a distance metric. The metric on configurations enables fast database lookup and robust interpolation of the stored forces. We discuss mechanisms for the database to adapt to the needs of the evolving dynamics, while maintaining accuracy, and other extensions of the basic algorithm. PMID:26669825

  1. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  2. DETERMINING ION COMPOSITIONS USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the past decade, we have used double focusing mass spectrometers to determine
    compositions of ions observed in mass spectra produced from compounds introduced by GC
    based on measured exact masses of the ions and their +1 and +2 isotopic profiles arising from atoms of ...

  3. Accurate on-line mass flow measurements in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-12-13

    This work demonstrates the possible advantages and the challenges of accurate on-line measurements of the CO2 mass flow rate during supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) operations. Only the mass flow rate is constant along the column in SFC. The volume flow rate is not. The critical importance of accurate measurements of mass flow rates for the achievement of reproducible data and the serious difficulties encountered in supercritical fluid chromatography for its assessment were discussed earlier based on the physical properties of carbon dioxide. In this report, we experimentally demonstrate the problems encountered when performing mass flow rate measurements and the gain that can possibly be achieved by acquiring reproducible data using a Coriolis flow meter. The results obtained show how the use of a highly accurate mass flow meter permits, besides the determination of accurate values of the mass flow rate, a systematic, constant diagnosis of the correct operation of the instrument and the monitoring of the condition of the carbon dioxide pump. PMID:24210558

  4. Invited Article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olliges, Jordan D.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  5. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved. PMID:19044695

  6. A Support Vector Machine model for the prediction of proteotypic peptides for accurate mass and time proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Cannon, William R.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Shah, Anuj R.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Lipton, Mary S.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2008-07-01

    Motivation: The standard approach to identifying peptides based on accurate mass and elution time (AMT) compares these profiles obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometer to a database of peptides previously identified from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) studies. It would be advantageous, with respect to both accuracy and cost, to only search for those peptides that are detectable by MS (proteotypic). Results: We present a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model that uses a simple descriptor space based on 35 properties of amino acid content, charge, hydrophilicity, and polarity for the quantitative prediction of proteotypic peptides. Using three independently derived AMT databases (Shewanella oneidensis, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia pestis) for training and validation within and across species, the SVM resulted in an average accuracy measure of ~0.8 with a standard deviation of less than 0.025. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these results are achievable with a small set of 12 variables and can achieve high proteome coverage. Availability: http://omics.pnl.gov/software/STEPP.php

  7. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  8. Main-Sequence Effective Temperatures from a Revised Mass-Luminosity Relation Based on Accurate Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Z.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Yaz Gökçe, E.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Şenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-04-01

    The mass-luminosity (M-L), mass-radius (M-R), and mass-effective temperature (M-{{T}eff}) diagrams for a subset of galactic nearby main-sequence stars with masses and radii accurate to ≤slant 3% and luminosities accurate to ≤slant 30% (268 stars) has led to a putative discovery. Four distinct mass domains have been identified, which we have tentatively associated with low, intermediate, high, and very high mass main-sequence stars, but which nevertheless are clearly separated by three distinct break points at 1.05, 2.4, and 7 {{M}⊙ } within the studied mass range of 0.38-32 {{M}⊙ }. Further, a revised mass-luminosity relation (MLR) is found based on linear fits for each of the mass domains identified. The revised, mass-domain based MLRs, which are classical (L\\propto {{M}α }), are shown to be preferable to a single linear, quadratic, or cubic equation representing an alternative MLR. Stellar radius evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly evident on the M-R diagram, but it is not clear on the M-{{T}eff} diagram based on published temperatures. Effective temperatures can be calculated directly using the well known Stephan-Boltzmann law by employing the accurately known values of M and R with the newly defined MLRs. With the calculated temperatures, stellar temperature evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly visible on the M-{{T}eff} diagram. Our study asserts that it is now possible to compute the effective temperature of a main-sequence star with an accuracy of ˜6%, as long as its observed radius error is adequately small (\\lt 1%) and its observed mass error is reasonably small (\\lt 6%).

  9. Dual Polarity Accurate Mass Calibration for ESI and MALDI Mass Spectrometry Using Maltooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Clowers, Brian H.; Dodds, Eric D.; Seipert, Richard R.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2009-01-01

    In view of the fact that memory effects associated with instrument calibration hinder the use of many m/z and tuning standards, identification of robust, comprehensive, inexpensive, and memory-free calibration standards are of particular interest to the mass spectrometry community. Glucose and its isomers are known to have a residue mass of 162.05282 Da; therefore, both linear and branched forms of poly-hexose oligosaccharides possess well defined masses making them ideal candidates for mass calibration. Using a wide range of maltooligosaccharides (MOS) derived from commercially available beers, ions with m/z ratios from ~500 Da to 2500 Da or more have been observed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and time of flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The mixtures of MOS were further characterized using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS). In addition to providing well defined series of positive and negative calibrant ions using either ESI or MALDI, the MOS are not encumbered by memory effects and are thus well suited mass calibration and instrument tuning standards for carbohydrate analysis. PMID:18655765

  10. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  11. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  12. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  13. A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Trojanowicz, Marek; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of accurate-mass multi-residue screening methods using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been evaluated, including over 625 multiclass food contaminants as case study. Aspects such as the selectivity and confirmation capability provided by HRMS with different acquisition modes (full-scan or full-scan combined with collision induced dissociation (CID) with no precursor ion isolation), and chromatographic separation along with main limitations such as sensitivity or automated data processing have been examined. Compound identification was accomplished with retention time matching and accurate mass measurements of the targeted ions for each analyte (mainly (de)protonated molecules). Compounds with the same nominal mass (isobaric species) were very frequent due to the large number of compounds included. Although 76% of database compounds were involved in isobaric groups, they were resolved in most cases (99% of these isobaric species were distinguished by retention time, resolving power, isotopic profile or fragment ions). Only three pairs could not be resolved with these tools. In-source CID fragmentation was evaluated in depth, although the results obtained in terms of information provided were not as thorough as those obtained using fragmentation experiments without precursor ion isolation (all ion mode). The latter acquisition mode was found to be the best suited for this type of large-scale screening method instead of classic product ion scan, as provided excellent fragmentation information for confirmatory purposes for an unlimited number of compounds. Leaving aside the sample treatment limitations, the main weaknesses noticed are basically the relatively low sensitivity for compounds which does not map well against electrospray ionization and also quantitation issues such as those produced by signal suppression due to either matrix effects from coeluting matrix or from

  14. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Liu, Tao; Jacobs, Jon M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, David J.; Zhang, Rui; Calvano, Steven E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-01

    Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. We describe here an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide mass and time tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations and the database serves as a ‘look-up’ table for peptide identification. The mass and time tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, which yielded 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied to the comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration without depletion of high abundant proteins. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated with both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 28 proteins were observed to be significantly changed following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response mediators.

  15. An accurate and efficient algorithm for Peptide and ptm identification by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ning, Kang; Ng, Hoong Kee; Leong, Hon Wai

    2007-01-01

    Peptide identification by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the most important problems in proteomics. Recent advances in high throughput MS/MS experiments result in huge amount of spectra. Unfortunately, identification of these spectra is relatively slow, and the accuracies of current algorithms are not high with the presence of noises and post-translational modifications (PTMs). In this paper, we strive to achieve high accuracy and efficiency for peptide identification problem, with special concern on identification of peptides with PTMs. This paper expands our previous work on PepSOM with the introduction of two accurate modified scoring functions: Slambda for peptide identification and Slambda* for identification of peptides with PTMs. Experiments showed that our algorithm is both fast and accurate for peptide identification. Experiments on spectra with simulated and real PTMs confirmed that our algorithm is accurate for identifying PTMs. PMID:18546510

  16. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags for High-Throughput Microbial Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard D. ); Anderson, Gordon A. ); Lipton, Mary S. ); Masselon, Christophe D. ); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana ); Shen, Yufeng ); Udseth, Harold R. )

    2002-08-01

    We describe and demonstrate a global strategy that extends the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness, and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of peptide accurate mass tags (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestion. The two-stage strategy exploits Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry to validate peptide AMTs for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from potential mass tags identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods, providing greater confidence in identifications as well as the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/MS, and thus with greater sensitivity and increased throughput. A single high resolution capillary liquid chromatography separation combined with high sensitivity, high resolution and ac-curate FT-ICR measurements has been shown capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of significantly more than 10 5 components with mass accuracies of -1 ppm, sufficient for broad protein identification using AMTs. Other attractions of the approach include the broad and relatively unbiased proteome coverage, the capability for exploiting stable isotope labeling methods to realize high precision for relative protein abundance measurements, and the projected potential for study of mammalian proteomes when combined with additional sample fractionation. Using this strategy, in our first application we have been able to identify AMTs for 60% of the potentially expressed proteins in the organism Deinococcus radiodurans.

  17. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass haloes, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realizations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate-mass galaxies in 1012 M⊙ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k ≤ 0.15 h Mpc-1, and with only 3-per cent error for k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at github.com/junkoda/cola_halo.

  18. iPE-MMR: An integrated approach to accurately assign monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric data

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Jung; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Hokeun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Hyung, Seok-Won; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Kyong-Chul; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Su-Jin; Tolic, Nikola; Slysz, Gordon W.; Moore, Ronald J.; Zhao, Rui; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lee, Hookeun; Camp, David G.; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assignment of monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) data is a fundamental and critically important step for successful peptide identifications in mass spectrometry based proteomics. Here we describe an integrated approach that combines three previously reported methods of treating MS/MS data for precursor mass refinement. This combined method, “integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement” (iPE-MMR), integrates steps: 1) generation of refined MS/MS data by DeconMSn; 2) additional refinement of the resultant MS/MS data by a modified version of PE-MMR; 3) elimination of systematic errors of precursor masses using DtaRefinery. iPE-MMR is the first method that utilizes all MS information from multiple MS scans of a precursor ion including multiple charge states, in an MS scan, to determine precursor mass. By combining these methods, iPE-MMR increases sensitivity in peptide identification and provides increased accuracy when applied to complex high-throughput proteomics data. PMID:20863060

  19. RADARS, a bioinformatics solution that automates proteome mass spectral analysis, optimises protein identification, and archives data in a relational database.

    PubMed

    Field, Helen I; Fenyö, David; Beavis, Ronald C

    2002-01-01

    RADARS, a rapid, automated, data archiving and retrieval software system for high-throughput proteomic mass spectral data processing and storage, is described. The majority of mass spectrometer data files are compatible with RADARS, for consistent processing. The system automatically takes unprocessed data files, identifies proteins via in silico database searching, then stores the processed data and search results in a relational database suitable for customized reporting. The system is robust, used in 24/7 operation, accessible to multiple users of an intranet through a web browser, may be monitored by Virtual Private Network, and is secure. RADARS is scalable for use on one or many computers, and is suited to multiple processor systems. It can incorporate any local database in FASTA format, and can search protein and DNA databases online. A key feature is a suite of visualisation tools (many available gratis), allowing facile manipulation of spectra, by hand annotation, reanalysis, and access to all procedures. We also described the use of Sonar MS/MS, a novel, rapid search engine requiring 40 MB RAM per process for searches against a genomic or EST database translated in all six reading frames. RADARS reduces the cost of analysis by its efficient algorithms: Sonar MS/MS can identifiy proteins without accurate knowledge of the parent ion mass and without protein tags. Statistical scoring methods provide close-to-expert accuracy and brings robust data analysis to the non-expert user. PMID:11788990

  20. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry as a technique for characterization of complex lysimeter leachate samples.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Marshall, Samantha J; Saeed, Mansoor; Earll, Mark; Hadfield, Stephen T; Richardson, Kevan; Rawlinson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Lysimeter studies can be used to identify and quantify soil degradates of agrochemicals (metabolites) that have the potential to leach to groundwater. However, the apparent metabolic profile of such lysimeter leachate samples will often be significantly more complex than would be expected in true groundwater samples. This is particularly true for S-metolachlor, which has an extremely complex metabolic pathway. Consequently, it was not practically possible to apply a conventional analytical approach to identify all metabolites in an S-metolachlor lysimeter study, because there was insufficient mass to enable the use of techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Recent advances in high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry, however, allow innovative screening approaches to characterize leachate samples to a greater extent than previously possible. Leachate from the S-metolachlor study was screened for accurate masses (±5 ppm of the nominal mass) corresponding to more than 400 hypothetical metabolite structures. A refined list of plausible metabolites was constructed from these data to provide a comprehensive description of the most likely metabolites present. The properties of these metabolites were then evaluated using a principal component analysis model, based on molecular descriptors, to visualize the entire chemical space and to cluster the metabolites into a number of subclasses. This characterization and principal component analysis evaluation enabled the selection of suitable representative metabolites that were subsequently used as exemplars to assess the toxicological relevance of the leachate as a whole. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1401-1412. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627902

  1. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using 16O/18O Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Liu, Tao; Jacobs, Jon M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, David J.; Zhang, Rui; Calvano, Steve E.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. Herein we describe an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O peptide labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy to identify and quantify peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide accurate mass and LC-elution time AMT tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations to provide the basis for subsequent peptide identifications. The AMT tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, providing 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied without depletion for high abundant proteins for comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated by both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 25 proteins, including several known inflammatory response mediators, were observed to change significantly following LPS administration. PMID:15753121

  2. MS2Analyzer: A Software for Small Molecule Substructure Annotations from Accurate Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analysis and interpretation of the large number of tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) obtained in metabolomics experiments is a bottleneck in discovery-driven research. MS/MS mass spectral libraries are small compared to all known small molecule structures and are often not freely available. MS2Analyzer was therefore developed to enable user-defined searches of thousands of spectra for mass spectral features such as neutral losses, m/z differences, and product and precursor ions from MS/MS spectra in MSP/MGF files. The software is freely available at http://fiehnlab.ucdavis.edu/projects/MS2Analyzer/. As the reference query set, 147 literature-reported neutral losses and their corresponding substructures were collected. This set was tested for accuracy of linking neutral loss analysis to substructure annotations using 19 329 accurate mass tandem mass spectra of structurally known compounds from the NIST11 MS/MS library. Validation studies showed that 92.1 ± 6.4% of 13 typical neutral losses such as acetylations, cysteine conjugates, or glycosylations are correct annotating the associated substructures, while the absence of mass spectra features does not necessarily imply the absence of such substructures. Use of this tool has been successfully demonstrated for complex lipids in microalgae. PMID:25263576

  3. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  4. Influence of mass resolution on species matching in accurate mass and retention time (AMT) tag proteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Masselon, Christophe D; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Brugière, Sabine; Dupierris, Véronique; Garin, Jérôme

    2008-04-01

    Diverse mass spectrometric instruments have been used to provide data for accurate mass and retention time (AMT) tag proteomics analyses, including ion trap, quadrupole time-of-flight, and Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). An important attribute of these instruments, beside mass accuracy, is their spectral resolution. In fact, the ability to separate peaks with close m/z values is likely to play a major role in enabling species identification and matching in analyses of very complex proteomics samples. In FTMS, resolution is directly proportional to the detection period and can therefore be easily tuned. We took advantage of this feature to investigate the effect of resolution on species identification and matching in an AMT tag experiment. Using an Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein extract as prototypical 'real-life' sample, we have compared the number of detected features, the optimal mass tolerance for species matching, the number of matched species and the false discovery rate obtained at various resolution settings. It appears that while the total number of matches is not significantly affected by a reduction of resolution in the range investigated, the confidence level of identifications significantly drops as evidenced by the estimated false discovery rate. PMID:18320544

  5. Proteomics of Soil and Sediment: Protein Identification by De Novo Sequencing of Mass Spectra Complements Traditional Database Searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Rizzo, A. I.; Waldbauer, J.

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics has the potential to elucidate the metabolic pathways and taxa responsible for in situ biogeochemical transformations. However, low rates of protein identification from high resolution mass spectra have been a barrier to the development of proteomics in complex environmental samples. Much of the difficulty lies in the computational challenge of linking mass spectra to their corresponding proteins. Traditional database search methods for matching peptide sequences to mass spectra are often inadequate due to the complexity of environmental proteomes and the large database search space, as we demonstrate with soil and sediment proteomes generated via a range of extraction methods. One alternative to traditional database searching is de novo sequencing, which identifies peptide sequences without the need for a database. BLAST can then be used to match de novo sequences to similar genetic sequences. Assigning confidence to putative identifications has been one hurdle for the implementation of de novo sequencing. We found that accurate de novo sequences can be screened by quality score and length. Screening criteria are verified by comparing the results of de novo sequencing and traditional database searching for well-characterized proteomes from simple biological systems. The BLAST hits of screened sequences are interrogated for taxonomic and functional information. We applied de novo sequencing to organic topsoil and marine sediment proteomes. Peak-rich proteomes, which can result from various extraction techniques, yield thousands of high-confidence protein identifications, an improvement over previous proteomic studies of soil and sediment. User-friendly software tools for de novo metaproteomics analysis have been developed. This "De Novo Analysis" Pipeline is also a faster method of data analysis than constructing a tailored sequence database for traditional database searching.

  6. Proteomics of Soil and Sediment: Protein Identification by De Novo Sequencing of Mass Spectra Complements Traditional Database Searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Rizzo, A. I.; Waldbauer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Proteomics has the potential to elucidate the metabolic pathways and taxa responsible for in situ biogeochemical transformations. However, low rates of protein identification from high resolution mass spectra have been a barrier to the development of proteomics in complex environmental samples. Much of the difficulty lies in the computational challenge of linking mass spectra to their corresponding proteins. Traditional database search methods for matching peptide sequences to mass spectra are often inadequate due to the complexity of environmental proteomes and the large database search space, as we demonstrate with soil and sediment proteomes generated via a range of extraction methods. One alternative to traditional database searching is de novo sequencing, which identifies peptide sequences without the need for a database. BLAST can then be used to match de novo sequences to similar genetic sequences. Assigning confidence to putative identifications has been one hurdle for the implementation of de novo sequencing. We found that accurate de novo sequences can be screened by quality score and length. Screening criteria are verified by comparing the results of de novo sequencing and traditional database searching for well-characterized proteomes from simple biological systems. The BLAST hits of screened sequences are interrogated for taxonomic and functional information. We applied de novo sequencing to organic topsoil and marine sediment proteomes. Peak-rich proteomes, which can result from various extraction techniques, yield thousands of high-confidence protein identifications, an improvement over previous proteomic studies of soil and sediment. User-friendly software tools for de novo metaproteomics analysis have been developed. This "De Novo Analysis" Pipeline is also a faster method of data analysis than constructing a tailored sequence database for traditional database searching.

  7. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  8. Accurate prediction of the ammonia probes of a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of 14NH3, 15NH3, 14ND3 and 15ND3 is carried out variationally using the TROVE approach. Variational calculations are robust and accurate, offering a new way to compute sensitivity coefficients. Particular attention is paid to the Δk = ±3 transitions between the accidentally coinciding rotation-inversion energy levels of the ν2 = 0+, 0-, 1+ and 1- states, and the inversion transitions in the ν4 = 1 state affected by the `giant' l-type doubling effect. These transitions exhibit highly anomalous sensitivities, thus appearing as promising probes of a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ. Moreover, a simultaneous comparison of the calculated sensitivities reveals a sizeable isotopic dependence which could aid an exclusive ammonia detection.

  9. Accurate mass - time tag library for LC/MS-based metabolite profiling of medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Johnson, Sean R.; Piljac-Žegarac, Jasenka; Kappel, Julia; Schäfer, Sarah; Wüst, Matthias; Ketchum, Raymond E. B.; Croteau, Rodney B.; Marques, Joaquim V.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni M.; Soejarto, D. Doel; Lange, B. Markus

    2013-01-01

    We report the development and testing of an accurate mass – time (AMT) tag approach for the LC/MS-based identification of plant natural products (PNPs) in complex extracts. An AMT tag library was developed for approximately 500 PNPs with diverse chemical structures, detected in electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes (both positive and negative polarities). In addition, to enable peak annotations with high confidence, MS/MS spectra were acquired with three different fragmentation energies. The LC/MS and MS/MS data sets were integrated into online spectral search tools and repositories (Spektraris and MassBank), thus allowing users to interrogate their own data sets for the potential presence of PNPs. The utility of the AMT tag library approach is demonstrated by the detection and annotation of active principles in 27 different medicinal plant species with diverse chemical constituents. PMID:23597491

  10. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  11. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass

  12. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26510657

  13. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  14. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  15. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  16. Faster and more accurate graphical model identification of tandem mass spectra using trellises

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengjie; Halloran, John T.; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is the dominant high throughput technology for identifying and quantifying proteins in complex biological samples. Analysis of the tens of thousands of fragmentation spectra produced by an MS/MS experiment begins by assigning to each observed spectrum the peptide that is hypothesized to be responsible for generating the spectrum. This assignment is typically done by searching each spectrum against a database of peptides. To our knowledge, all existing MS/MS search engines compute scores individually between a given observed spectrum and each possible candidate peptide from the database. In this work, we use a trellis, a data structure capable of jointly representing a large set of candidate peptides, to avoid redundantly recomputing common sub-computations among different candidates. We show how trellises may be used to significantly speed up existing scoring algorithms, and we theoretically quantify the expected speedup afforded by trellises. Furthermore, we demonstrate that compact trellis representations of whole sets of peptides enables efficient discriminative learning of a dynamic Bayesian network for spectrum identification, leading to greatly improved spectrum identification accuracy. Contact: bilmes@uw.edu or william-noble@uw.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307634

  17. Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Ultrahigh Mass Accuracy Clarifies Peptide Identification by Database Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Boyne, Michael T.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Li, Mingxi; Zamdborg, Leonid; Wenger, Craig D.; Babai, Shannee; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2009-01-01

    A platform was developed to analyze MS/MS spectra from large peptides with low part-per-million mass accuracy, including a commercial-grade software suite. Termed Middle Down Proteomics, this platform identified 7454 peptides from 2–20 kDa (1472 unique) from 555 proteins after 23 LC-MS/MS injections of Lys-C digests of HeLa-S3 nuclear proteins. Along with greatly increased confidence for both peptide identification (expectation values from 10−89 to 10−4) and characterization (up to 18% of peptides were modified in some LC-MS/MS runs), fragmentation data with <2 ppm accuracy enabled error tolerant and routine multiplexed database searching–all clearly demonstrated in this study. PMID:19053528

  18. Assessing temporal flux of plant hormones in stored processing potatoes using high definition accurate mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Ortiz, José Juan; Foukaraki, Sofia; Terry, Leon Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones are important molecules which at low concentration can regulate various physiological processes. Mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique for the quantification of multiple classes of plant hormones because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed a new ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–full-scan high-definition accurate mass spectrometry method, for simultaneous determination of abscisic acid and four metabolites phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid, 7′-hydroxy-abscisic acid and abscisic acid glucose ester, cytokinins zeatin, zeatin riboside, gibberellins (GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7) and indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid. We measured the amount of plant hormones in the flesh and skin of two processing potato cvs. Sylvana and Russet Burbank stored for up to 30 weeks at 6 °C under ambient air conditions. Herein, we report for the first time that abscisic acid glucose ester seems to accumulate in the skin of potato tubers throughout storage time. The method achieved a lowest limit of detection of 0.22 ng g−1 of dry weight and a limit of quantification of 0.74 ng g−1 dry weight (zeatin riboside), and was able to recover, detect and quantify a total of 12 plant hormones spiked on flesh and skin of potato tubers. In addition, the mass accuracy for all compounds (<5 ppm) was evaluated. PMID:26504563

  19. Quantitation and accurate mass analysis of pesticides in vegetables by LC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative method consisting of solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) analysis was developed for the identification and quantitation of three chloronicotinyl pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid) commonly used on salad vegetables. Accurate mass measurements within 3 ppm error were obtained for all the pesticides studied in various vegetable matrixes (cucumber, tomato, lettuce, pepper), which allowed an unequivocal identification of the target pesticides. Calibration curves covering 2 orders of magnitude were linear over the concentration range studied, thus showing the quantitative ability of TOF-MS as a monitoring tool for pesticides in vegetables. Matrix effects were also evaluated using matrix-matched standards showing no significant interferences between matrixes and clean extracts. Intraday reproducibility was 2-3% relative standard deviation (RSD) and interday values were 5% RSD. The precision (standard deviation) of the mass measurements was evaluated and it was less than 0.23 mDa between days. Detection limits of the chloronicotinyl insecticides in salad vegetables ranged from 0.002 to 0.01 mg/kg. These concentrations are equal to or better than the EU directives for controlled pesticides in vegetables showing that LC/TOF-MS analysis is a powerful tool for identification of pesticides in vegetables. Robustness and applicability of the method was validated for the analysis of market vegetable samples. Concentrations found in these samples were in the range of 0.02-0.17 mg/kg of vegetable. PMID:15859598

  20. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit . PMID:27397138

  1. PROBABILITIES OF PEAK OCCURRENCE AND INFORMATION CONTENT OF THE NBS/EPA/MSDC MASS SPECTRAL DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The probabilities of peak occurrence and binary information contents were calculated for the 43990 mass spectra in the 1987 NBS/EPA/MSDC database. he median molecular weight of compounds in the database was 230. ompounds composed of combinations of C, H, N, and 0 comprised 64% of...

  2. In-Depth Glycoproteomic Characterization of γ-Conglutin by High-Resolution Accurate Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schiarea, Silvia; Arnoldi, Lolita; Fanelli, Roberto; De Combarieu, Eric; Chiabrando, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s), and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation) were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography–multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants), but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit. PMID:24069245

  3. Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry identification of quinoline alkaloids in honey.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, Tamara; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-08-01

    Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), following a previous chromatographic (gas or liquid chromatography) separation step, is applied to the identification and structural elucidation of quinoline-like alkaloids in honey. Both electron ionization (EI) MS and positive electrospray (ESI+) MS spectra afforded the molecular ions (M(.+) and M+H(+), respectively) of target compounds with mass errors below 5 mDa. Scan EI-MS and product ion scan ESI-MS/MS spectra permitted confirmation of the existence of a quinoline ring in the structures of the candidate compounds. Also, the observed fragmentation patterns were useful to discriminate between quinoline derivatives having the same empirical formula but different functionalities, such as aldoximes and amides. In the particular case of phenylquinolines, ESI-MS/MS spectra provided valuable clues regarding the position of the phenyl moiety attached to the quinoline ring. The aforementioned spectral information, combined with retention times matching, led to the identification of quinoline and five quinoline derivatives, substituted at carbon number 4, in honey samples. An isomer of phenyquinoline was also noticed; however, its exact structure could not be established. Liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography (GC) TOF-MS were applied to the screening of the aforementioned compounds in a total of 62 honeys. Species displaying higher occurrence frequencies were 4-quinolinecarbonitrile, 4-quinolinecarboxaldehyde, 4-quinolinealdoxime, and the phenylquinoline isomer. The Pearson test revealed strong correlations among the first three compounds. PMID:26041455

  4. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data. PMID:24420979

  5. Accurate and Efficient Resolution of Overlapping Isotopic Envelopes in Protein Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Tian, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been an analytical challenge to accurately and efficiently resolve extremely dense overlapping isotopic envelopes (OIEs) in protein tandem mass spectra to confidently identify proteins. Here, we report a computationally efficient method, called OIE_CARE, to resolve OIEs by calculating the relative deviation between the ideal and observed experimental abundance. In the OIE_CARE method, the ideal experimental abundance of a particular overlapping isotopic peak (OIP) is first calculated for all the OIEs sharing this OIP. The relative deviation (RD) of the overall observed experimental abundance of this OIP relative to the summed ideal value is then calculated. The final individual abundance of the OIP for each OIE is the individual ideal experimental abundance multiplied by 1 + RD. Initial studies were performed using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectra on myoglobin (with direct infusion) and the intact E. coli proteome (with liquid chromatographic separation). Comprehensive data at the protein and proteome levels, high confidence and good reproducibility were achieved. The resolving method reported here can, in principle, be extended to resolve any envelope-type overlapping data for which the corresponding theoretical reference values are available. PMID:26439836

  6. Analysis and accurate quantification of CpG methylation by MALDI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tost, Jörg; Schatz, Philipp; Schuster, Matthias; Berlin, Kurt; Gut, Ivo Glynne

    2003-01-01

    As the DNA sequence of the human genome is now nearly finished, the main task of genome research is to elucidate gene function and regulation. DNA methylation is of particular importance for gene regulation and is strongly implicated in the development of cancer. Even minor changes in the degree of methylation can have severe consequences. An accurate quantification of the methylation status at any given position of the genome is a powerful diagnostic indicator. Here we present the first assay for the analysis and precise quantification of methylation on CpG positions in simplex and multiplex reactions based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionisation mass spectrometry detection. Calibration curves for CpGs in two genes were established and an algorithm was developed to account for systematic fluctuations. Regression analysis gave R2 ≥ 0.99 and standard deviation around 2% for the different positions. The limit of detection was ∼5% for the minor isomer. Calibrations showed no significant differences when carried out as simplex or multiplex analyses. All variable parameters were thoroughly investigated, several paraffin-embedded tissue biopsies were analysed and results were verified by established methods like analysis of cloned material. Mass spectrometric results were also compared to chip hybridisation. PMID:12711695

  7. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs. PMID:27166662

  8. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling and magnetized neutron stars: Equal-mass binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2011-02-15

    By performing new, long and numerically accurate general-relativistic simulations of magnetized, equal-mass neutron-star binaries, we investigate the role that realistic magnetic fields may have in the evolution of these systems. In particular, we study the evolution of the magnetic fields and show that they can influence the survival of the hypermassive neutron star produced at the merger by accelerating its collapse to a black hole. We also provide evidence that, even if purely poloidal initially, the magnetic fields produced in the tori surrounding the black hole have toroidal and poloidal components of equivalent strength. When estimating the possibility that magnetic fields could have an impact on the gravitational-wave signals emitted by these systems either during the inspiral or after the merger, we conclude that for realistic magnetic-field strengths B < or approx. 10{sup 12} G such effects could be detected, but only marginally, by detectors such as advanced LIGO or advanced Virgo. However, magnetically induced modifications could become detectable in the case of small-mass binaries and with the development of gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope, with much higher sensitivities at frequencies larger than {approx_equal}2 kHz.

  9. Efficiency of database search for identification of mutated and modified proteins via mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pevzner, P A; Mulyukov, Z; Dancik, V; Tang, C L

    2001-02-01

    Although protein identification by matching tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) against protein databases is a widespread tool in mass spectrometry, the question about reliability of such searches remains open. Absence of rigorous significance scores in MS/MS database search makes it difficult to discard random database hits and may lead to erroneous protein identification, particularly in the case of mutated or post-translationally modified peptides. This problem is especially important for high-throughput MS/MS projects when the possibility of expert analysis is limited. Thus, algorithms that sort out reliable database hits from unreliable ones and identify mutated and modified peptides are sought. Most MS/MS database search algorithms rely on variations of the Shared Peaks Count approach that scores pairs of spectra by the peaks (masses) they have in common. Although this approach proved to be useful, it has a high error rate in identification of mutated and modified peptides. We describe new MS/MS database search tools, MS-CONVOLUTION and MS-ALIGNMENT, which implement the spectral convolution and spectral alignment approaches to peptide identification. We further analyze these approaches to identification of modified peptides and demonstrate their advantages over the Shared Peaks Count. We also use the spectral alignment approach as a filter in a new database search algorithm that reliably identifies peptides differing by up to two mutations/modifications from a peptide in a database. PMID:11157792

  10. Performance evaluation of mass storage systems for scientific databases

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, A. |; Seshadri, S.; Rotem, D.

    1994-09-01

    Mass storage systems for computers are the solution to economic storage of vast volumes of data. These systems evolved from the traditional tape libraries manned by operating personnel and the automation of the storage and retrieval function has led to significant improvement in performance. But in contrast to traditional computer systems, little work has been done to characterize performance in terms of the design parameters. The design and performance analysis of mass storage systems is complicated due to several reasons. A major reason for the complexity is the time lags that may occur in retrieving parts of the information meant for the same query. The usual queuing models used for analyzing disk performance are not directly applicable, because there is greater scope for working in parallel in mass storage systems such as robotic libraries, which help mitigate these shortcomings. In this note, robotic libraries are modeled as queueing systems and explicit results related to performance are obtained. The physical model corresponds to a mass storage system, where the information is stored in cassettes, which are retrieved by robots to be read using one or two read heads. The results pertain to the effect of file splitting on cassettes, and optimal configuration and control of robots that perform the retrieval and storage functions.

  11. STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FROM GALAXY SPECTRA: HOW ACCURATE CAN THEY BE?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallazzi, Anna; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2009-12-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light ratios (M {sub *}/L) from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M {sub *}/L values using either absorption-line data or broadband colors. The accuracy of M {sub *}/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M {sub *}/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50 pixel{sup -1} and limiting uncertainties of {approx}0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accurately corrected or absent and that the redshift is known, color-based M {sub *}/L estimates are only slightly more uncertain than spectroscopic estimates (at comparable spectroscopic and photometric quality), but are more easily affected by systematic biases. This is the case in particular for galaxies with bursty SFHs (high H{delta} {sub A} at fixed D4000 {sub n}), the M {sub *}/L of which cannot be constrained any better than {approx}0.15 dex with any indicators explored here. Finally, we explore the effects of the assumed prior distribution in SFHs and metallicity, finding them to be higher for color-based estimates.

  12. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Accurate Panchromatic Photometry from Optical Priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  14. Accurate prediction of higher-level electronic structure energies for large databases using neural networks, Hartree-Fock energies, and small subsets of the database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malshe, M.; Pukrittayakamee, A.; Raff, L. M.; Hagan, M.; Bukkapatnam, S.; Komanduri, R.

    2009-09-01

    A novel method is presented that significantly reduces the computational bottleneck of executing high-level, electronic structure calculations of the energies and their gradients for a large database that adequately samples the configuration space of importance for systems containing more than four atoms that are undergoing multiple, simultaneous reactions in several energetically open channels. The basis of the method is the high-degree of correlation that generally exists between the Hartree-Fock (HF) and higher-level electronic structure energies. It is shown that if the input vector to a neural network (NN) includes both the configuration coordinates and the HF energies of a small subset of the database, MP4(SDQ) energies with the same basis set can be predicted for the entire database using only the HF and MP4(SDQ) energies for the small subset and the HF energies for the remainder of the database. The predictive error is shown to be less than or equal to the NN fitting error if a NN is fitted to the entire database of higher-level electronic structure energies. The general method is applied to the computation of MP4(SDQ) energies of 68 308 configurations that comprise the database for the simultaneous, unimolecular decomposition of vinyl bromide into six different reaction channels. The predictive accuracy of the method is investigated by employing successively smaller subsets of the database to train the NN to predict the MP4(SDQ) energies of the remaining configurations of the database. The results indicate that for this system, the subset can be as small as 8% of the total number of configurations in the database without loss of accuracy beyond that expected if a NN is employed to fit the higher-level energies for the entire database. The utilization of this procedure is shown to save about 78% of the total computational time required for the execution of the MP4(SDQ) calculations. The sampling error involved with selection of the subset is shown to be

  15. Multiple apolipoprotein kinetics measured in human HDL by high-resolution/accurate mass parallel reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sasha A; Andraski, Allison B; Pieper, Brett; Goh, Wilson; Mendivil, Carlos O; Sacks, Frank M; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous labeling with stable isotopes is used to study the metabolism of proteins in vivo. However, traditional detection methods such as GC/MS cannot measure tracer enrichment in multiple proteins simultaneously, and multiple reaction monitoring MS cannot measure precisely the low tracer enrichment in slowly turning-over proteins as in HDL. We exploited the versatility of the high-resolution/accurate mass (HR/AM) quadrupole Orbitrap for proteomic analysis of five HDL sizes. We identified 58 proteins in HDL that were shared among three humans and that were organized into five subproteomes according to HDL size. For seven of these proteins, apoA-I, apoA-II, apoA-IV, apoC-III, apoD, apoE, and apoM, we performed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) to measure trideuterated leucine tracer enrichment between 0.03 to 1.0% in vivo, as required to study their metabolism. The results were suitable for multicompartmental modeling in all except apoD. These apolipoproteins in each HDL size mainly originated directly from the source compartment, presumably the liver and intestine. Flux of apolipoproteins from smaller to larger HDL or the reverse contributed only slightly to apolipoprotein metabolism. These novel findings on HDL apolipoprotein metabolism demonstrate the analytical breadth and scope of the HR/AM-PRM technology to perform metabolic research. PMID:26862155

  16. Toward Sensitive and Accurate Analysis of Antibody Biotherapeutics by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable methodological advances in the past decade have expanded the application of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of biotherapeutics. Currently, LC/MS represents a promising alternative or supplement to the traditional ligand binding assay (LBA) in the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicokinetic studies of protein drugs, owing to the rapid and cost-effective method development, high specificity and reproducibility, low sample consumption, the capacity of analyzing multiple targets in one analysis, and the fact that a validated method can be readily adapted across various matrices and species. While promising, technical challenges associated with sensitivity, sample preparation, method development, and quantitative accuracy need to be addressed to enable full utilization of LC/MS. This article introduces the rationale and technical challenges of LC/MS techniques in biotherapeutics analysis and summarizes recently developed strategies to alleviate these challenges. Applications of LC/MS techniques on quantification and characterization of antibody biotherapeutics are also discussed. We speculate that despite the highly attractive features of LC/MS, it will not fully replace traditional assays such as LBA in the foreseeable future; instead, the forthcoming trend is likely the conjunction of biochemical techniques with versatile LC/MS approaches to achieve accurate, sensitive, and unbiased characterization of biotherapeutics in highly complex pharmaceutical/biologic matrices. Such combinations will constitute powerful tools to tackle the challenges posed by the rapidly growing needs for biotherapeutics development. PMID:25185260

  17. Toward an Accurate Prediction of the Arrival Time of Geomagnetic-Effective Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, T.; Wang, Y.; Wan, L.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance for the study of space weather. Here we make a statistical study of 21 Earth-directed CMEs, specifically exploring the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with a least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hr. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than their half-angular widths arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be reliably applied to such events. If we exclude these events in the sample, the prediction accuracy can be improved, i.e., the estimation error reduces to 6.8 hr. This work suggests that it is viable to predict the arrival time of CMEs to the Earth based on the initial parameters with fairly good accuracy. Thus, it provides a method of forecasting space weather 1-5 days following the occurrence of CMEs.

  18. PSI/TM-Coffee: a web server for fast and accurate multiple sequence alignments of regular and transmembrane proteins using homology extension on reduced databases.

    PubMed

    Floden, Evan W; Tommaso, Paolo D; Chatzou, Maria; Magis, Cedrik; Notredame, Cedric; Chang, Jia-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The PSI/TM-Coffee web server performs multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of proteins by combining homology extension with a consistency based alignment approach. Homology extension is performed with Position Specific Iterative (PSI) BLAST searches against a choice of redundant and non-redundant databases. The main novelty of this server is to allow databases of reduced complexity to rapidly perform homology extension. This server also gives the possibility to use transmembrane proteins (TMPs) reference databases to allow even faster homology extension on this important category of proteins. Aside from an MSA, the server also outputs topological prediction of TMPs using the HMMTOP algorithm. Previous benchmarking of the method has shown this approach outperforms the most accurate alignment methods such as MSAProbs, Kalign, PROMALS, MAFFT, ProbCons and PRALINE™. The web server is available at http://tcoffee.crg.cat/tmcoffee. PMID:27106060

  19. Accurate Identification of Common Pathogenic Nocardia Species: Evaluation of a Multilocus Sequence Analysis Platform and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Pang, Lu; Chen, Sharon C-A; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Xia; Hou, Xin; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Species identification of Nocardia is not straightforward due to rapidly evolving taxonomy, insufficient discriminatory power of conventional phenotypic methods and also of single gene locus analysis including 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here we evaluated the ability of a 5-locus (16S rRNA, gyrB, secA1, hsp65 and rpoB) multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach as well as that of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison with sequencing of the 5'-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene to provide identification of 25 clinical isolates of Nocardia. The 5'-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing successfully assigned 24 of 25 (96%) clinical isolates to species level, namely Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n = 12, 48%), N. farcinica (n = 9, 36%), N. abscessus (n = 2, 8%) and N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 1, 4%). MLSA showed concordance with 16S rRNA gene sequencing results for the same 24 isolates. However, MLSA was able to identify the remaining isolate as N. wallacei, and clustered N. cyriacigeorgica into three subgroups. None of the clinical isolates were correctly identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS analysis using the manufacturer-provided database. A small "in-house" spectral database was established incorporating spectra of five clinical isolates representing the five species identified in this study. After complementation with the "in-house" database, of the remaining 20 isolates, 19 (95%) were correctly identified to species level (score ≥ 2.00) and one (an N. abscessus strain) to genus level (score ≥ 1.70 and < 2.00). In summary, MLSA showed superior discriminatory power compared with the 5'-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identification of Nocardia. MALDI-TOF MS can provide rapid and accurate identification but is reliant on a robust mass spectra database. PMID:26808813

  20. Metabolomic database annotations via query of elemental compositions: Mass accuracy is insufficient even at less than 1 ppm

    PubMed Central

    Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Background Metabolomic studies are targeted at identifying and quantifying all metabolites in a given biological context. Among the tools used for metabolomic research, mass spectrometry is one of the most powerful tools. However, metabolomics by mass spectrometry always reveals a high number of unknown compounds which complicate in depth mechanistic or biochemical understanding. In principle, mass spectrometry can be utilized within strategies of de novo structure elucidation of small molecules, starting with the computation of the elemental composition of an unknown metabolite using accurate masses with errors <5 ppm (parts per million). However even with very high mass accuracy (<1 ppm) many chemically possible formulae are obtained in higher mass regions. In automatic routines an additional orthogonal filter therefore needs to be applied in order to reduce the number of potential elemental compositions. This report demonstrates the necessity of isotope abundance information by mathematical confirmation of the concept. Results High mass accuracy (<1 ppm) alone is not enough to exclude enough candidates with complex elemental compositions (C, H, N, S, O, P, and potentially F, Cl, Br and Si). Use of isotopic abundance patterns as a single further constraint removes >95% of false candidates. This orthogonal filter can condense several thousand candidates down to only a small number of molecular formulas. Example calculations for 10, 5, 3, 1 and 0.1 ppm mass accuracy are given. Corresponding software scripts can be downloaded from . A comparison of eight chemical databases revealed that PubChem and the Dictionary of Natural Products can be recommended for automatic queries using molecular formulae. Conclusion More than 1.6 million molecular formulae in the range 0–500 Da were generated in an exhaustive manner under strict observation of mathematical and chemical rules. Assuming that ion species are fully resolved (either by chromatography or by high resolution

  1. Degradation of reactive dyes in wastewater from the textile industry by ozone: analysis of the products by accurate masses.

    PubMed

    Constapel, Marc; Schellenträger, Marc; Marzinkowski, Joachim Michael; Gäb, Siegmar

    2009-02-01

    The present work describes the use of ozone to degrade selected reactive dyes from the textile industry and the analysis of the resulting complex mixture by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). To allow certain identification of the substances detected in the wastewater, the original dyes were also investigated either separately or in a synthetic mixture of three dyes (trichromie). Since the reactive dyes are hydrolyzed during the dyeing process, procedures for the hydrolysis were worked out first for the individual dyes. The ozonated solutions were concentrated by solid-phase extraction, which separated very polar or ionic substances from moderately polar degradation products. The latter, which are the primary degradation products, were investigated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with a tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer. Accurate masses, which in most cases could be determined with a deviation of mass analyzer to provide UV-vis spectra of the products in the same run. With retention times, mass spectra, accurate masses, UV-vis spectra and, of course, knowledge of the structures of the original dyes, plausible structures could be proposed for most of the components of the moderately polar fraction. These structures were confirmed by 1H NMR in cases where it was practical to isolate the degradation products by preparative HPLC. PMID:19110293

  2. Accurate stellar masses for SB2 components: Interferometric observations for Gaia validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Famaey, B.; Salomon, J.-B.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Anthonioz, F.; Grellmann, R.; Guieu, S.; Guillout, P.; Jorissen, A.; Kiefer, F.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazeh, T.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Sana, H.; Tal-Or, L.

    2015-12-01

    A sample of about 70 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2) is followed with radial velocity (RV) measurements, in order to derive the masses of their components when the astrometric measurements of Gaia will be available. A subset of 6 SB2 was observed in interferometry with VLTI/PIONIER, and the components were separated for each binary. The RV measurements already obtained were combined with the interferometric observations and the masses of the components were derived. The accuracies of the 12 masses are presently between 0.4 and 7 %, but they will still be improved in the future. These masses will be used to validate the masses which will be obtained from Gaia. In addition, the parallaxes derived from the combined visual+spectroscopic orbits are compared to that of Hipparcos, and a mass-luminosity relation is derived in the infrared H band.

  3. YPED: An Integrated Bioinformatics Suite and Database for Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Christopher M.; Shifman, Mark; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Stone, Kathryn L.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Gulcicek, Erol E.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Wu, Terence; Bjornson, Robert D.; Bruce, Can; Nairn, Angus C.; Rinehart, Jesse; Miller, Perry L.; Williams, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a significantly-enhanced bioinformatics suite and database for proteomics research called Yale Protein Expression Database (YPED) that is used by investigators at more than 300 institutions worldwide. YPED meets the data management, archival, and analysis needs of a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics research ranging from a single laboratory, group of laboratories within and beyond an institution, to the entire proteomics community. The current version is a significant improvement over the first version in that it contains new modules for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) database search results, label and label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, and several scoring outputs for phosphopeptide site localization. In addition, we have added both peptide and protein comparative analysis tools to enable pairwise analysis of distinct peptides/proteins in each sample and of overlapping peptides/proteins between all samples in multiple datasets. We have also implemented a targeted proteomics module for automated multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)/selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assay development. We have linked YPED’s database search results and both label-based and label-free fold-change analysis to the Skyline Panorama repository for online spectra visualization. In addition, we have built enhanced functionality to curate peptide identifications into an MS/MS peptide spectral library for all of our protein database search identification results. PMID:25712262

  4. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator: A Mitochondrial Genome Database of Fish with an Accurate and Automatic Annotation Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Isagozawa, Ryota; Yamada, Koichiro; Maeda, Yasunobu; Satoh, Takashi P.; Sado, Tetsuya; Mabuchi, Kohji; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-01-01

    Mitofish is a database of fish mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) that includes powerful and precise de novo annotations for mitogenome sequences. Fish occupy an important position in the evolution of vertebrates and the ecology of the hydrosphere, and mitogenomic sequence data have served as a rich source of information for resolving fish phylogenies and identifying new fish species. The importance of a mitogenomic database continues to grow at a rapid pace as massive amounts of mitogenomic data are generated with the advent of new sequencing technologies. A severe bottleneck seems likely to occur with regard to mitogenome annotation because of the overwhelming pace of data accumulation and the intrinsic difficulties in annotating sequences with degenerating transfer RNA structures, divergent start/stop codons of the coding elements, and the overlapping of adjacent elements. To ease this data backlog, we developed an annotation pipeline named MitoAnnotator. MitoAnnotator automatically annotates a fish mitogenome with a high degree of accuracy in approximately 5 min; thus, it is readily applicable to data sets of dozens of sequences. MitoFish also contains re-annotations of previously sequenced fish mitogenomes, enabling researchers to refer to them when they find annotations that are likely to be erroneous or while conducting comparative mitogenomic analyses. For users who need more information on the taxonomy, habitats, phenotypes, or life cycles of fish, MitoFish provides links to related databases. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator are freely available at http://mitofish.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ (last accessed August 28, 2013); all of the data can be batch downloaded, and the annotation pipeline can be used via a web interface. PMID:23955518

  5. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator: a mitochondrial genome database of fish with an accurate and automatic annotation pipeline.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Isagozawa, Ryota; Yamada, Koichiro; Maeda, Yasunobu; Satoh, Takashi P; Sado, Tetsuya; Mabuchi, Kohji; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-11-01

    Mitofish is a database of fish mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) that includes powerful and precise de novo annotations for mitogenome sequences. Fish occupy an important position in the evolution of vertebrates and the ecology of the hydrosphere, and mitogenomic sequence data have served as a rich source of information for resolving fish phylogenies and identifying new fish species. The importance of a mitogenomic database continues to grow at a rapid pace as massive amounts of mitogenomic data are generated with the advent of new sequencing technologies. A severe bottleneck seems likely to occur with regard to mitogenome annotation because of the overwhelming pace of data accumulation and the intrinsic difficulties in annotating sequences with degenerating transfer RNA structures, divergent start/stop codons of the coding elements, and the overlapping of adjacent elements. To ease this data backlog, we developed an annotation pipeline named MitoAnnotator. MitoAnnotator automatically annotates a fish mitogenome with a high degree of accuracy in approximately 5 min; thus, it is readily applicable to data sets of dozens of sequences. MitoFish also contains re-annotations of previously sequenced fish mitogenomes, enabling researchers to refer to them when they find annotations that are likely to be erroneous or while conducting comparative mitogenomic analyses. For users who need more information on the taxonomy, habitats, phenotypes, or life cycles of fish, MitoFish provides links to related databases. MitoFish and MitoAnnotator are freely available at http://mitofish.aori.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ (last accessed August 28, 2013); all of the data can be batch downloaded, and the annotation pipeline can be used via a web interface. PMID:23955518

  6. Web and database software for identification of intact proteins using "top down" mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gregory K; Kim, Yong-Bin; Forbes, Andrew J; Meng, Fanyu; McCarthy, Ryan; Kelleher, Neil L

    2003-08-15

    For the identification and characterization of proteins harboring posttranslational modifications (PTMs), a "top down" strategy using mass spectrometry has been forwarded recently but languishes without tailored software widely available. We describe a Web-based software and database suite called ProSight PTM constructed for large-scale proteome projects involving direct fragmentation of intact protein ions. Four main components of ProSight PTM are a database retrieval algorithm (Retriever), MySQL protein databases, a file/data manager, and a project tracker. Retriever performs probability-based identifications from absolute fragment ion masses, automatically compiled sequence tags, or a combination of the two, with graphical rendering and browsing of the results. The database structure allows known and putative protein forms to be searched, with prior or predicted PTM knowledge used during each search. Initial functionality is illustrated with a 36-kDa yeast protein identified from a processed cell extract after automated data acquisition using a quadrupole-FT hybrid mass spectrometer. A +142-Da delta(m) on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was automatically localized between Asp90 and Asp192, consistent with its two cystine residues (149 and 153) alkylated by acrylamide (+71 Da each) during the gel-based sample preparation. ProSight PTM is the first search engine and Web environment for identification of intact proteins (https://prosightptm.scs.uiuc.edu/). PMID:14632120

  7. Assigning in vivo carbamylation and acetylation in human lens proteins using tandem mass spectrometry and database searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Zee-Yong; Sadygov, Rovshan; Clark, Judy M.; Clark, John I.; Yates, John R., III

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we show that ion trap mass spectrometers can differentiate acetylation and carbamylation modifications based on database search results for a lens protein sample. These types of modifications are difficult to distinguish on ion trap instruments because of their lower resolution and mass accuracy. The results were corroborated by using accurate mass information derived from MALDI TOF MS analysis of eluted peptides from a duplicate capillary RPLC separation. Tandem mass spectra of lysine carbamylated peptides were further verified by manual assignments of fragment ions and by the presence of characteristic fragment ions of carbamylated peptides. It was also observed that carbamylated peptides show a strong neutral loss of the carbamyl group in collision induced dissociation (CID), a feature that can be prognostic for carbamylation. In a lens tissue sample of a 67-year-old patient, 12 in vivo carbamylation sites were detected on 7 different lens proteins and 4 lysine acetylation sites were detected on 3 different lens proteins. Among the 12 in vivo carbamylation sites, 9 are novel in vivo carbamylation modification sites. Notably, in vivo carbamylation of [gamma]S crystallin, [beta]A4 crystallin, [beta]B1 crystallin, and [beta]B2 crystallin observed in this study have never been reported before.

  8. Improved classification of mass spectrometry database search results using newer machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Ulintz, Peter J; Zhu, Ji; Qin, Zhaohui S; Andrews, Philip C

    2006-03-01

    Manual analysis of mass spectrometry data is a current bottleneck in high throughput proteomics. In particular, the need to manually validate the results of mass spectrometry database searching algorithms can be prohibitively time-consuming. Development of software tools that attempt to quantify the confidence in the assignment of a protein or peptide identity to a mass spectrum is an area of active interest. We sought to extend work in this area by investigating the potential of recent machine learning algorithms to improve the accuracy of these approaches and as a flexible framework for accommodating new data features. Specifically we demonstrated the ability of boosting and random forest approaches to improve the discrimination of true hits from false positive identifications in the results of mass spectrometry database search engines compared with thresholding and other machine learning approaches. We accommodated additional attributes obtainable from database search results, including a factor addressing proton mobility. Performance was evaluated using publically available electrospray data and a new collection of MALDI data generated from purified human reference proteins. PMID:16321970

  9. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger; Granby, Kit; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Driffield, Malcolm; Højslev Petersen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries in a commercial mass spectral library for GC-MS (GC-EI-QTOF MS) analysis and an in-house built library of accurate masses for substances known to be used in P&B packaging for UHPLC-QTOF analysis. Of 75 tentatively identified substances, 15 were initially selected for further testing in vitro; however, only seven were commercially available and subsequently tested in vitro and quantified. Of these seven, the identities of three pigments found in printing inks were confirmed by UHPLC tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ MS/MS). Two pigments had entries in the database, meaning that a material relevant accurate mass database can provide a fast tentative identification. Pure standards of the seven tentatively identified substances were tested in vitro but could not explain a significant proportion of the AhR-response in the extract. Targeted analyses of dioxins and PCBs, both well-known AhR agonists, was performed. However, the dioxins could explain approximately 3% of the activity observed in the pizza box extract indicating that some very AhR active substance(s) still remain to be

  10. Gapped Spectral Dictionaries and Their Applications for Database Searches of Tandem Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kyowon; Kim, Sangtae; Bandeira, Nuno; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Generating all plausible de novo interpretations of a peptide tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrum (Spectral Dictionary) and quickly matching them against the database represent a recently emerged alternative approach to peptide identification. However, the sizes of the Spectral Dictionaries quickly grow with the peptide length making their generation impractical for long peptides. We introduce Gapped Spectral Dictionaries (all plausible de novo interpretations with gaps) that can be easily generated for any peptide length thus addressing the shortcoming of the Spectral Dictionary approach. We show that Gapped Spectral Dictionaries are small thus opening a possibility of using them to speed-up MS/MS database searches. Our MS-GappedDictionary algorithm (based on Gapped Spectral Dictionaries) enables proteogenomics applications that are prohibitively time consuming with existing approaches. We further introduce gapped tags that have advantages over the conventional peptide sequence tags in filtration-based MS/MS database searches.

  11. An experimental correction proposed for an accurate determination of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohoun, Sylvain; Agoua, Eusèbe; Degan, Gérard; Perre, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the mass diffusion in the hygroscopic region of four temperate species and three tropical ones. In order to simplify the interpretation of the phenomena, a dimensionless parameter called reduced diffusivity is defined. This parameter varies from 0 to 1. The method used is firstly based on the determination of that parameter from results of the measurement of the mass flux which takes into account the conditions of operating standard device (tightness, dimensional variations and easy installation of samples of wood, good stability of temperature and humidity). Secondly the reasons why that parameter has to be corrected are presented. An abacus for this correction of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime has been plotted. This work constitutes an advanced deal nowadays for characterising forest species.

  12. GlycoMob: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry collision cross section database for glycomics.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Benesch, Justin L P; Harvey, David J; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a promising analytical technique for glycomics that separates glycan ions based on their collision cross section (CCS) and provides glycan precursor and fragment masses. It has been shown that isomeric oligosaccharide species can be separated by IM and identified on basis of their CCS and fragmentation. These results indicate that adding CCSs information for glycans and glycan fragments to searchable databases and analysis pipelines will increase identification confidence and accuracy. We have developed a freely accessible database, GlycoMob ( http://www.glycomob.org ), containing over 900 CCSs values of glycans, oligosaccharide standards and their fragments that will be continually updated. We have measured the absolute CCSs of calibration standards, biologically derived and synthetic N-glycans ionized with various adducts in positive and negative mode or as protonated (positive ion) and deprotonated (negative ion) ions. PMID:26314736

  13. Alternative Filament Loading Solution for Accurate Analysis of Boron Isotopes by Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Vengosh, A.

    2008-12-01

    The negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique has become the major tool for investigating boron isotopes in the environment. The high sensitivity of BO2- ionization enables measurements of ng levels of boron. However, B isotope measurement by this technique suffers from two fundamental problems (1) fractionation induced by selective ionization of B isotopes in the mass spectrometer; and (2) CNO- interference on mass 42 that is often present in some load solutions (such as B-free seawater processed through ion-exchange resin). Here we report a potentially improved methodology using an alternative filament loading solution with a recently-installed Thermo Scientific TRITON thermal ionization mass spectrometer. Our initial results suggest that this solution -- prepared by combining high-purity single- element standard solutions of Ca, Mg, Na, and K in proportions similar to those in seawater in a 5% HCl matrix -- may offer significant improvement over some other commonly used load solutions. Total loading blank is around 15pg as determined by isotope dilution (NIST952). Replicate analyses of NIST SRM951 and modern seawater thus far have yielded 11B/10B ratios of 4.0057 (±0.0008, n=14) and 4.1645 (±0.0017, n=7; δ11B=39.6 permil), respectively. Replicate analyses of samples and SRM951 yield an average standard deviation (1 σ) of approximately 0.001 (0.25 permil). Fractionation during analysis (60-90 minutes) has thus far typically been less than 0.002 (0.5 permil). The load solution delivers ionization efficiency similar to directly-loaded seawater and has negligible signal at mass 26 (CN-), a proxy for the common interfering molecular ion (CNO-) on mass 42. Standards and samples loaded with the solution behave fairly predictably during filament heating and analysis, thus allowing for the possibility of fully automated data collection.

  14. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  15. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  16. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  17. Mass Spectrometry Provides Accurate and Sensitive Quantitation of A2E

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Blakeley, Lorie; Goletz, Patrice W.; Schey, Kevin L.; Hanneken, Anne; Koutalos, Yiannis; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Summary Orange autofluorescence from lipofuscin in the lysosomes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a hallmark of aging in the eye. One of the major components of lipofuscin is A2E, the levels of which increase with age and in pathologic conditions, such as Stargardt disease or age-related macular degeneration. In vitro studies have suggested that A2E is highly phototoxic and, more specifically, that A2E and its oxidized derivatives contribute to RPE damage and subsequent photoreceptor cell death. To date, absorption spectroscopy has been the primary method to identify and quantitate A2E. Here, a new mass spectrometric method was developed for the specific detection of low levels of A2E and compared to a traditional method of analysis. The new mass spectrometry method allows the detection and quantitation of approximately 10,000-fold less A2E than absorption spectroscopy and the detection and quantitation of low levels of oxidized A2E, with localization of the oxidation sites. This study suggests that identification and quantitation of A2E from tissue extracts by chromatographic absorption spectroscopyoverestimates the amount of A2E. This mass spectrometry approach makes it possible to detect low levels of A2E and its oxidized metabolites with greater accuracy than traditional methods, thereby facilitating a more exact analysis of bis-retinoids in animal models of inherited retinal degeneration as well as in normal and diseased human eyes. PMID:20931136

  18. ACCURATE MASSES FOR THE PRIMARY AND SECONDARY IN THE ECLIPSING WHITE DWARF BINARY NLTT 11748

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Agueeros, M. A.; Camilo, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We measure the radial velocity curve of the eclipsing detached white dwarf binary NLTT 11748. The primary exhibits velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of 273 km s{sup -1} and an orbital period of 5.641 hr. We do not detect any spectral features from the secondary star or any spectral changes during the secondary eclipse. We use our composite spectrum to constrain the temperature and surface gravity of the primary to be T {sub eff} = 8690 {+-} 140 K and log g = 6.54 {+-} 0.05, which correspond to a mass of 0.18 M {sub sun}. For an inclination angle of 89.{sup 0}9 derived from the eclipse modeling, the mass function requires a 0.76 M {sub sun} companion. The merger time for the system is 7.2 Gyr. However, due to the extreme mass ratio of 0.24, the binary will most likely create an AM CVn system instead of a merger.

  19. Crucial test for covariant density functional theory with new and accurate mass measurements from Sn to Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. W.; Song, L. S.; Sun, B.; Geissel, H.; Meng, J.

    2012-12-01

    The covariant density functional theory with the point-coupling interaction PC-PK1 is compared with new and accurate experimental masses in the element range from 50 to 91. The experimental data are from a mass measurement performed with the storage ring mass spectrometry at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) [Chen , Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/j.nuclphysa.2012.03.002 882, 71 (2012)]. Although the microscopic theory contains only 11 parameters, it agrees well with the experimental data. The comparison is characterized by a rms deviation of 0.859 MeV. For even-even nuclei, the theory agrees within about 600 keV. Larger deviations are observed in this comparison for the odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. Improvements and possible reasons for the deviations are discussed in this contribution as well.

  20. Radionuclide mass balance for the TMI-2 accident: data-base system and preliminary mass balance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M I; Davis, R J; Strahl, J F; Arcieri, W C; Tonkay, D W

    1983-04-01

    After the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2), on March 28, 1979, GEND stated its intention to support an effort to determine, as accurately as possible, the current mass balances of significant radiological toxic species. GEND gave two primary reasons for support this effort: (1) such exercises guarantee completeness of the studies, and (2) mass balance determinations ensure that all important sinks and attentuation mechanisms have been identified. The primary objective of the studies conducted by NUS Corporation was to support the goals of the GEND planners and to continue the mass balance effort by generating a preliminary accounting of key radioactive species following the TMI-2 accident. As a result of these studies, secondary objectives, namely a computerized data base and recommendations, have been achieved to support future work in this area.

  1. Accurate mass analysis of ethanesulfonic acid degradates of acetochlor and alachlor using high-performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Parry, R.

    2002-01-01

    Degradates of acetochlor and alachlor (ethanesulfonic acids, ESAs) were analyzed in both standards and in a groundwater sample using high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The negative pseudomolecular ion of the secondary amide of acetochlor ESA and alachlor ESA gave average masses of 256.0750??0.0049 amu and 270.0786??0.0064 amu respectively. Acetochlor and alachlor ESA gave similar masses of 314.1098??0.0061 amu and 314.1153??0.0048 amu; however, they could not be distinguished by accurate mass because they have the same empirical formula. On the other hand, they may be distinguished using positive-ion electrospray because of different fragmentation spectra, which did not occur using negative-ion electrospray.

  2. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL* rf spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D.; Monsanglant, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Lebee, G.

    1999-01-15

    The MISTRAL* experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  3. Accurate Identification of Common Pathogenic Nocardia Species: Evaluation of a Multilocus Sequence Analysis Platform and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C-A.; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Li; Li, Hai-Xia; Hou, Xin; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Species identification of Nocardia is not straightforward due to rapidly evolving taxonomy, insufficient discriminatory power of conventional phenotypic methods and also of single gene locus analysis including 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here we evaluated the ability of a 5-locus (16S rRNA, gyrB, secA1, hsp65 and rpoB) multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach as well as that of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison with sequencing of the 5’-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene to provide identification of 25 clinical isolates of Nocardia. The 5’-end 606 bp 16S rRNA gene sequencing successfully assigned 24 of 25 (96%) clinical isolates to species level, namely Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (n = 12, 48%), N. farcinica (n = 9, 36%), N. abscessus (n = 2, 8%) and N. otitidiscaviarum (n = 1, 4%). MLSA showed concordance with 16S rRNA gene sequencing results for the same 24 isolates. However, MLSA was able to identify the remaining isolate as N. wallacei, and clustered N. cyriacigeorgica into three subgroups. None of the clinical isolates were correctly identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF MS analysis using the manufacturer-provided database. A small “in-house” spectral database was established incorporating spectra of five clinical isolates representing the five species identified in this study. After complementation with the “in-house” database, of the remaining 20 isolates, 19 (95%) were correctly identified to species level (score ≥ 2.00) and one (an N. abscessus strain) to genus level (score ≥ 1.70 and < 2.00). In summary, MLSA showed superior discriminatory power compared with the 5’-end 606 bp partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing for species identification of Nocardia. MALDI-TOF MS can provide rapid and accurate identification but is reliant on a robust mass spectra database. PMID:26808813

  4. Identification of Tryptic Peptides from Large Databases using Multiplexed Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Simulations and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Masselon, Christophe D. ); Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana ); Lee, Sang-Won ); Li, Lingjun; Anderson, Gordon A. ); Harkewicz, Richard ); Smith, Richard D. )

    2003-07-01

    Multiplexed MS/MS was recently demonstrated as a means to increase the throughput of peptides identification in LC-MS/MS experiments. In this approach, a set of parent species is dissociated simultaneously and measured in a single spectrum (in the same manner that a single parent ion is conventionally studied), providing a gain in sensitivity and throughput proportional to the number of species that can be simultaneously addressed. In the present work, simulations performed using the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted proteome database show that multiplexed MS/MS data allow the identification of tryptic peptides from mixtures of up to 10 peptides from a single dataset with only 3 y or b fragments per peptide and a mass accuracy of 2.5 to 5 ppm. At this level of database and data complexity, 98% of the 500 peptides considered in the simulation were correctly identified. This compares favorably with the rates obtained for classical MS/MS at more modest mass measurement accuracy. LC-multiplexed FTICR MS/MS data obtained from a 66 kDa protein (bovine serum albumin) tryptic digest sample are presented to illustrate the approach, and confirm that peptides can be effectively identified from the C. elegans database to which the protein sequence had been appended.

  5. ‘Isotopo’ a database application for facile analysis and management of mass isotopomer data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Huber, Claudia; Hensel, Michael; Schomburg, Dietmar; Münch, Richard; Eylert, Eva; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The composition of stable-isotope labelled isotopologues/isotopomers in metabolic products can be measured by mass spectrometry and supports the analysis of pathways and fluxes. As a prerequisite, the original mass spectra have to be processed, managed and stored to rapidly calculate, analyse and compare isotopomer enrichments to study, for instance, bacterial metabolism in infection. For such applications, we provide here the database application ‘Isotopo’. This software package includes (i) a database to store and process isotopomer data, (ii) a parser to upload and translate different data formats for such data and (iii) an improved application to process and convert signal intensities from mass spectra of 13C-labelled metabolites such as tertbutyldimethylsilyl-derivatives of amino acids. Relative mass intensities and isotopomer distributions are calculated applying a partial least square method with iterative refinement for high precision data. The data output includes formats such as graphs for overall enrichments in amino acids. The package is user-friendly for easy and robust data management of multiple experiments. Availability: The ‘Isotopo’ software is available at the following web link (section Download): http://spp1316.uni-wuerzburg.de/bioinformatics/isotopo/. The package contains three additional files: software executable setup (installer), one data set file (discussed in this article) and one excel file (which can be used to convert data from excel to ‘.iso’ format). The ‘Isotopo’ software is compatible only with the Microsoft Windows operating system. Database URL: http://spp1316.uni-wuerzburg.de/bioinformatics/isotopo/. PMID:25204646

  6. Screening of the polyphenol content of tomato-based products through accurate-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF).

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Jáuregui, Olga; Di Lecce, Giuseppe; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    Tomatoes, the second most important vegetable crop worldwide, are a key component in the so-called "Mediterranean diet" and its consumption has greatly increased worldwide over the past 2 decades, mostly due to a growing demand for tomato-based products such as ketchups, gazpachos and tomato juices. In this work, tomato-based products were analysed after a suitable work-up extraction procedure using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF) with negative ion detection using information-dependent acquisition (IDA) to determine their phenolic composition. The compounds were confirmed by accurate mass measurements in MS and MS(2) modes. The elemental composition was selected according to the accurate masses and isotopic pattern. In this way, 47 compounds (simple phenolic and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids and flavone, flavonol, flavanone and dihydrochalcone derivatives) were identified in tomato-based products, five of them, as far as was known, were previously unreported in tomatoes. The phenolic fingerprint showed that tomato-based products differ in phenolic composition, principally in protocatechuic acid-O-hexoside, apigenin and its glycosylated forms, quercetin-O-dihexoside, kaempferol-C-hexoside and eriodictyol-O-dihexoside. Gazpacho showed the highest number of phenolic compounds due to the vegetables added for its production. PMID:25212313

  7. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverková, Lenka; Hradilová, Šárka; Milde, David; Panáček, Aleš; Skopalová, Jana; Kvítek, Libor; Petrželová, Kamila; Zbořil, Radek

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2- and AgCl32 - for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results.

  8. Fast and Accurate Fourier Series Solutions to Gravitational Lensing by a General Family of Two-Power-Law Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun

    2002-04-01

    Fourier series solutions to the deflection and magnification by a family of three-dimensional cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are presented. The cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are characterized by inner and outer power-law radial indices and a break (or transition) radius. The model family includes mass models mimicking Jaffe, Hernquist, and η models and dark matter halo profiles from numerical simulations. The Fourier series solutions for the cusped two-power-law mass distributions are relatively simple and allow a very fast calculation, even for a chosen small fractional calculational error (e.g., 10-5). These results will be particularly useful for studying lensed systems that provide a number of accurate lensing constraints and for systematic analyses of large numbers of lenses. Subroutines employing these results for the two-power-law model and the results by Chae, Khersonsky, & Turnshek for the generalized single-power-law mass model are made publicly available.

  9. The INFN-CNAF Tier-1 GEMSS Mass Storage System and database facility activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Pier Paolo; Cavalli, Alessandro; Dell'Agnello, Luca; Favaro, Matteo; Gregori, Daniele; Prosperini, Andrea; Pezzi, Michele; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Zizzi, Giovanni; Vagnoni, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    The consolidation of Mass Storage services at the INFN-CNAF Tier1 Storage department that has occurred during the last 5 years, resulted in a reliable, high performance and moderately easy-to-manage facility that provides data access, archive, backup and database services to several different use cases. At present, the GEMSS Mass Storage System, developed and installed at CNAF and based upon an integration between the IBM GPFS parallel filesystem and the Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) tape management software, is one of the largest hierarchical storage sites in Europe. It provides storage resources for about 12% of LHC data, as well as for data of other non-LHC experiments. Files are accessed using standard SRM Grid services provided by the Storage Resource Manager (StoRM), also developed at CNAF. Data access is also provided by XRootD and HTTP/WebDaV endpoints. Besides these services, an Oracle database facility is in production characterized by an effective level of parallelism, redundancy and availability. This facility is running databases for storing and accessing relational data objects and for providing database services to the currently active use cases. It takes advantage of several Oracle technologies, like Real Application Cluster (RAC), Automatic Storage Manager (ASM) and Enterprise Manager centralized management tools, together with other technologies for performance optimization, ease of management and downtime reduction. The aim of the present paper is to illustrate the state-of-the-art of the INFN-CNAF Tier1 Storage department infrastructures and software services, and to give a brief outlook to forthcoming projects. A description of the administrative, monitoring and problem-tracking tools that play a primary role in managing the whole storage framework is also given.

  10. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags based upon High-Throughput Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry for Global Proteomic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-30

    In this review, we describe the technological basis and progress towards a new global proteomics strategy that uses peptide accurate mass measurements augmented by information from separations (e.g. LC retention times) to provide large improvements in sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness and throughput. The use of ?accurate mass and time? (AMT) tags serves to eliminate the need for routine MS/MS measurements [#4109]. As the case study, we use our own research efforts to illustrate the role of AMTs within the broader context of a state-of-the-art proteomics effort. Our strategy exploits high-resolution capillary LC separations combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR). AMTs represent peptide biomarkers and can be used to confidently identify proteins based on the high mass measurement accuracy provided by FTICR combined with LC elution times. Once identified using MS/MS, these biomarkers provide the foundation for subsequent high throughput studies using only AMT tags to identify and quantify the proteins expressed within a cell system. Key attractions of this approach include the feasibility of completely automated high confidence protein identifications, extensive proteome coverage, and the capability for exploiting stable-isotope labeling methods for high precision abundance measurements [#4019]. Additional developments described in this review include methods for more effective coverage of membrane proteins [#4184], for dynamic range expansion of proteome measurements [#4012], and for multi-stage separations that promise to enable more focused analyses, further extend the quality of measurements, and also extend measurements to more complex proteomes.

  11. Accurate mass and nuclear magnetic resonance identification of bisphenolic can coating migrants and their interference with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric analysis of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Luke K; Noonan, Gregory O; Begley, Timothy H; Mazzola, Eugene P

    2011-05-15

    Two unknown compounds were previously determined to be potential interferences in liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of bisphenol A (BPA) in canned infant formula. Both yielded two identical MS/MS transitions to BPA. The identities of the unknowns were investigated using accurate mass LC/MS, LC/MS/MS, and elemental formula and structures proposed. Exact identities were confirmed through purification or synthesis followed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments, as well as comparisons of one unknown with commercial standards. Comparisons of negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) MS/MS and accurate mass spectra suggested both unknowns to be structurally identical (to BPA and each other). Positive ion ESI spectra confirmed both were larger molecules, suggesting that in the negative mode they likely fragmented to the deprotonated BPA ion in the source [corrected]. Elemental composition of positive ion accurate mass spectra and NMR analysis concluded the unknowns were oxidized forms of the known epoxy can coating monomer, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE). One of the unknowns, 2,2-[bis-4-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)phenyl]propane, commonly known as BADGE*2H(2)O, is widely reported as an epoxy-phenolic can coating migrant, but has not been suggested to interfere with the MS/MS analysis of BPA. The other unknown, 2-[4-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)phenyl]-2-[4'-hydroxyphenyl]propane, or the oxidized form of bisphenol A monoglycidyl ether (BAMGE*H(2)O), has not been previously reported in food or packaging. PMID:21488128

  12. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  13. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  14. Phoenix Lander's Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer: Differential Scanning Calorimeter and Mass Spectrometer Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Scout Phoenix lander will land in the north polar region of Mars in May, 2008. One objective of the Phoenix lander is to search for evidence of past life in the form of molecular organics that may be preserved in the subsurface soil. The Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was developed to detect these organics by coupling a simultaneous differential thermal analyzer (SDTA) with a mass spectrometer. Martian soil will be heated to approx.1000 C and potential organic decomposition products such as CO2, CH4 etc. will be examined for with the MS. TEGA s SDTA will also assess the presence of endothermic and exothermic reactions that are characteristic of soil organics and minerals as the soil is heated. The MS in addition to detecting organic decompositon products, will also assess the levels of soil inorganic volatiles such as H2O, SO2, and CO2. Organic detection has a high priority for this mission; however, TEGA has the ability to provide valuable insight into the mineralogical composition of the soil. The overall goal of this work is to develop a TEGA database of minerals that will serve as a reference for the interpretation of Phoenix-TEGA. Previous databases for the ill-fated Mars Polar Lander (MPL)-TEGA instrument only went to 725 C. Furthermore, the MPL-TEGA could only detect CO2 and H2O while the Phoenix-TEGA MS can examine up to 144 atomic mass units. The higher temperature Phoenix-TEGA SDTA coupled with the more capable MS indicates that a higher temperature database is required for TEGA interpretation. The overall goal of this work is to develop a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) database of minerals along with corresponding MS data of evolved gases that can used to interpret TEGA data during and after mission operations. While SDTA and DSC measurement techniques are slightly different (SDTA does not use a reference pan), the results are fundamentally similar and thus DSC is a useful technique in providing comparative data for the TEGA

  15. Purification of pharmaceutical preparations using thin-layer chromatography to obtain mass spectra with Direct Analysis in Real Time and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jessica L; Steiner, Robert R

    2011-06-01

    Forensic analysis of pharmaceutical preparations requires a comparative analysis with a standard of the suspected drug in order to identify the active ingredient. Purchasing analytical standards can be expensive or unattainable from the drug manufacturers. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) is a novel, ambient ionization technique, typically coupled with a JEOL AccuTOF™ (accurate mass) mass spectrometer. While a fast and easy technique to perform, a drawback of using DART™ is the lack of component separation of mixtures prior to ionization. Various in-house pharmaceutical preparations were purified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectra were subsequently obtained using the AccuTOF™- DART™ technique. Utilizing TLC prior to sample introduction provides a simple, low-cost solution to acquiring mass spectra of the purified preparation. Each spectrum was compared against an in-house molecular formula list to confirm the accurate mass elemental compositions. Spectra of purified ingredients of known pharmaceuticals were added to an in-house library for use as comparators for casework samples. Resolving isomers from one another can be accomplished using collision-induced dissociation after ionization. Challenges arose when the pharmaceutical preparation required an optimized TLC solvent to achieve proper separation and purity of the standard. Purified spectra were obtained for 91 preparations and included in an in-house drug standard library. Primary standards would only need to be purchased when pharmaceutical preparations not previously encountered are submitted for comparative analysis. TLC prior to DART™ analysis demonstrates a time efficient and cost saving technique for the forensic drug analysis community. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21548141

  16. Accurate mass screening and identification of emerging contaminants in environmental samples by liquid chromatography-hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hogenboom, A C; van Leerdam, J A; de Voogt, P

    2009-01-16

    The European Reach legislation will possibly drive producers to develop newly designed chemicals that will be less persistent, bioaccumulative or toxic. If this innovation leads to an increased use of more hydrophilic chemicals it may result in higher mobilities of chemicals in the aqueous environment. As a result, the drinking water companies may face stronger demands on removal processes as the hydrophilic compounds inherently are more difficult to remove. Monitoring efforts will also experience a shift in focus to more water-soluble compounds. Screening source waters on the presence of (emerging) contaminants is an essential step in the control of the water cycle from source to tap water. In this article, some of our experiences are presented with the hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ) FT Orbitrap mass spectrometer, in the area of chemical water analysis. A two-pronged strategy in mass spectrometric research was employed: (i) exploring effluent, surface, ground- and drinking-water samples searching for accurate masses corresponding to target compounds (and their product ions) known from, e.g. priority lists or the scientific literature and (ii) full-scan screening of water samples in search of 'unknown' or unexpected masses, followed by MS(n) experiments to elucidate the structure of the unknowns. Applications of both approaches to emerging water contaminants are presented and discussed. Results are presented for target analysis search for pharmaceuticals, benzotriazoles, illicit drugs and for the identification of unknown compounds in a groundwater sample and in a polar extract of a landfill soil sample (a toxicity identification evaluation bioassay sample). The applications of accurate mass screening and identification described in this article demonstrate that the LC-LTQ FT Orbitrap MS is well equipped to meet the challenges posed by newly emerging polar contaminants. PMID:18771771

  17. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis of the S. cerevisiae Metabolome Using Accurate Mass Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: A New Method for Discovery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunping; Moir, Robyn; Willis, Ian; Beecher, Chris; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A; Kurland, Irwin J

    2016-03-01

    Isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA) is a (13)C metabolomics profiling method that eliminates sample to sample variance, discriminates against noise and artifacts, and improves identification of compounds, previously done with accurate mass liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). This is the first report using IROA technology in combination with accurate mass gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), here used to examine the S. cerevisiae metabolome. S. cerevisiae was grown in YNB media, containing randomized 95% (13)C, or 5%(13)C glucose as the single carbon source, in order that the isotopomer pattern of all metabolites would mirror the labeled glucose. When these IROA experiments are combined, the abundance of the heavy isotopologues in the 5%(13)C extracts, or light isotopologues in the 95%(13)C extracts, follows the binomial distribution, showing mirrored peak pairs for the molecular ion. The mass difference between the (12)C monoisotopic and the (13)C monoisotopic equals the number of carbons in the molecules. The IROA-GC/MS protocol developed, using both chemical and electron ionization, extends the information acquired from the isotopic peak patterns for formulas generation. The process that can be formulated as an algorithm, in which the number of carbons, as well as the number of methoximations and silylations are used as search constraints. In electron impact (EI/IROA) spectra, the artifactual peaks are identified and easily removed, which has the potential to generate "clean" EI libraries. The combination of chemical ionization (CI) IROA and EI/IROA affords a metabolite identification procedure that enables the identification of coeluting metabolites, and allowed us to characterize 126 metabolites in the current study. PMID:26820234

  18. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied. PMID:23856232

  19. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  20. Towards the Interoperability of Web, Database, and Mass Storage Technologies for Petabyte Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan; Marciano, Richard; Wan, Michael; Sherwin, Tom; Frost, Richard

    1996-01-01

    At the San Diego Supercomputer Center, a massive data analysis system (MDAS) is being developed to support data-intensive applications that manipulate terabyte sized data sets. The objective is to support scientific application access to data whether it is located at a Web site, stored as an object in a database, and/or storage in an archival storage system. We are developing a suite of demonstration programs which illustrate how Web, database (DBMS), and archival storage (mass storage) technologies can be integrated. An application presentation interface is being designed that integrates data access to all of these sources. We have developed a data movement interface between the Illustra object-relational database and the NSL UniTree archival storage system running in a production mode at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. With this interface, an Illustra client can transparently access data on UniTree under the control of the Illustr DBMS server. The current implementation is based on the creation of a new DBMS storage manager class, and a set of library functions that allow the manipulation and migration of data stored as Illustra 'large objects'. We have extended this interface to allow a Web client application to control data movement between its local disk, the Web server, the DBMS Illustra server, and the UniTree mass storage environment. This paper describes some of the current approaches successfully integrating these technologies. This framework is measured against a representative sample of environmental data extracted from the San Diego Ba Environmental Data Repository. Practical lessons are drawn and critical research areas are highlighted.

  1. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  2. Implications of (Less) Accurate Mass-Radius-Measurements for the Habitability of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets: Why Do We Need PLATO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Wagner, F. W.; Plesa, A.-C.; Höning, D.; Sohl, F.; Breuer, D.; Rauer, H.

    2012-04-01

    Several space missions (CoRoT, Kepler and others) already provided promising candidates for terrestrial exoplanets (i.e. with masses less than about 10 Earth masses) and thereby triggered an exciting new research branch of planetary modelling to investigate the possible habitability of such planets. Earth analogues (low-mass planets with an Earth-like structure and composition) are likely to be found in the near future with new missions such as the proposed M3 mission PLATO. Planets may be more diverse in the universe than they are in the solar system. Our neighbouring planets in the habitable zone are all terrestrial by the means of being differentiated into an iron core, a silicate mantle and a crust. To reliably determine the interior structure of an exoplanet, measurements of mass and radius have to be sufficiently accurate (around +/-2% error allowed for the radius and +/-5% for the mass). An Earth-size planet with an Earth-like mass but an expected error of ~15% in mass for example may have either a Mercury-like, an Earth-like or a Moon-like (i.e. small iron core) structure [1,2]. Even though the atmospheric escape is not strongly influenced by the interior structure, the outgassing of volatiles and the likeliness of plate tectonics and an ongoing carbon-cycle may be very different. Our investigations show, that a planet with a small silicate mantle is less likely to shift into the plate-tectonics regime, cools faster (which may lead to the loss of a magnetic field after a short time) and outgasses less volatiles than a planet with the same mass but a large silicate mantle and small iron core. To be able to address the habitability of exoplanets, space missions such as PLATO, which can lead up to 2% accuracy in radius [3], are extremely important. Moreover, information about the occurrence of different planetary types helps us to better understand the formation of planetary systems and to further constrain the Drake's equation, which gives an estimate of the

  3. Identification of Novel Perfluoroalkyl Ether Carboxylic Acids (PFECAs) and Sulfonic Acids (PFESAs) in Natural Waters Using Accurate Mass Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Strynar, Mark; Dagnino, Sonia; McMahen, Rebecca; Liang, Shuang; Lindstrom, Andrew; Andersen, Erik; McMillan, Larry; Thurman, Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Ball, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific scrutiny and concerns over exposure, toxicity, and risk have led to international regulatory efforts resulting in the reduction or elimination of certain perfluorinated compounds from various products and waste streams. Some manufacturers have started producing shorter chain per- and polyfluorinated compounds to try to reduce the potential for bioaccumulation in humans and wildlife. Some of these new compounds contain central ether oxygens or other minor modifications of traditional perfluorinated structures. At present, there has been very limited information published on these "replacement chemistries" in the peer-reviewed literature. In this study we used a time-of-flight mass spectrometry detector (LC-ESI-TOFMS) to identify fluorinated compounds in natural waters collected from locations with historical perfluorinated compound contamination. Our workflow for discovery of chemicals included sequential sampling of surface water for identification of potential sources, nontargeted TOFMS analysis, molecular feature extraction (MFE) of samples, and evaluation of features unique to the sample with source inputs. Specifically, compounds were tentatively identified by (1) accurate mass determination of parent and/or related adducts and fragments from in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID), (2) in-depth evaluation of in-source adducts formed during analysis, and (3) confirmation with authentic standards when available. We observed groups of compounds in homologous series that differed by multiples of CF2 (m/z 49.9968) or CF2O (m/z 65.9917). Compounds in each series were chromatographically separated and had comparable fragments and adducts produced during analysis. We detected 12 novel perfluoroalkyl ether carboxylic and sulfonic acids in surface water in North Carolina, USA using this approach. A key piece of evidence was the discovery of accurate mass in-source n-mer formation (H(+) and Na(+)) differing by m/z 21.9819, corresponding to the

  4. High resolution/accurate mass (HRMS) detection of anatoxin-a in lake water using LDTD-APCI coupled to a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A new innovative analytical method combining ultra-fast analysis time with high resolution/accurate mass detection was developed to eliminate the misidentification of anatoxin-a (ANA-a), a cyanobacterial toxin, from the natural amino acid phenylalanine (PHE). This was achieved by using the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to the Q-Exactive, a high resolution/accurate mass spectrometer (HRMS). This novel combination, the LDTD-APCI-HRMS, allowed for an ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s/sample). A comparison of two different acquisition modes (full scan and targeted ion fragmentation) was made to determine the most rigorous analytical method using the LDTD-APCI interface. Method development focused toward selectivity and sensitivity improvement to reduce the possibility of false positives and to lower detection limits. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer operates with resolving powers between 17500 and 140000 FWHM (m/z 200). Nevertheless, a resolution of 17500FWHM is enough to dissociate ANA-a and PHE signals. Mass accuracy was satisfactory with values below 1 ppm reaching precision to the fourth decimal. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the isotopically-labeled (D5) phenylalanine with good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Enhancement of signal to noise ratios relative to a standard triple-quadrupole method was demonstrated with lower detection and quantification limit values of 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L using the Q-Exactive. Accuracy and interday/intraday relative standard deviations were below 15%. The new method was applied to 8 different lake water samples with signs of cyanobacterial blooms. This work demonstrates the possibility of using an ultra-fast LDTD-APCI sample introduction system with an HRMS hybrid instrument for quantitative purposes with high selectivity in complex environmental matrices. PMID:25476385

  5. Identifying Gel-Separated Proteins Using In-Gel Digestion, Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching: Consider the Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Jessica C.; Dassenko, David J.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is an important bioanalytical technique in drug discovery, proteomics, and research at the biology-chemistry interface. This is an especially powerful tool when combined with gel separation of proteins and database mining using the mass spectral data. Currently, few hands-on…

  6. Multiclass semi-volatile compounds determination in wine by gas chromatography accurate time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Silva, A; Cela, R

    2016-04-15

    The performance of gas chromatography (GC) with accurate, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) for the determination of a group of 39 semi-volatile compounds related to wine quality (pesticide residues, phenolic off-flavours, phenolic pollutants and bioactive stilbenes) is investigated. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used as extraction technique, previously to acetylation (phenolic compounds) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) concentration. Compounds were determined by GC coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) MS system through an electron ionization (EI) source. The final method attained limits of quantification (LOQs) at the very low ng mL(-1) level, covering the range of expected concentrations for target compounds in red and white wines. For 38 out of 39 compounds, performance of sample preparation and determination steps were hardly affected by the wine matrix; thus, accurate recoveries were achieved by using pseudo-external calibration. Levels of target compounds in a set of 25 wine samples are reported. The capabilities of the described approach for the post-run identification of species not considered during method development, without retention time information, are illustrated and discussed with selected examples of compounds from different classes. PMID:26971021

  7. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  8. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    PubMed

    Minyoo, Abel B; Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul; Lankester, Felix

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  9. Generalized method for probability-based peptide and protein identification from tandem mass spectrometry data and sequence database searching.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Fernández, Antonio; Paradela, Alberto; Navajas, Rosana; Albar, Juan Pablo

    2008-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics is currently in great demand of computational methods that facilitate the elimination of likely false positives in peptide and protein identification. In the last few years, a number of new peptide identification programs have been described, but scores or other significance measures reported by these programs cannot always be directly translated into an easy to interpret error rate measurement such as the false discovery rate. In this work we used generalized lambda distributions to model frequency distributions of database search scores computed by MASCOT, X!TANDEM with k-score plug-in, OMSSA, and InsPecT. From these distributions, we could successfully estimate p values and false discovery rates with high accuracy. From the set of peptide assignments reported by any of these engines, we also defined a generic protein scoring scheme that enabled accurate estimation of protein-level p values by simulation of random score distributions that was also found to yield good estimates of protein-level false discovery rate. The performance of these methods was evaluated by searching four freely available data sets ranging from 40,000 to 285,000 MS/MS spectra. PMID:18515861

  10. Development and evaluation of a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for rapid, accurate quantitation of malondialdehyde in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, Constance A; Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Swardfager, Walter; Levitt, Anthony; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    Malondialdhyde (MDA) is a commonly used marker of lipid peroxidation in oxidative stress. To provide a sensitive analytical method that is compatible with high throughput, we developed a multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) approach using 3-nitrophenylhydrazine chemical derivatization, isotope-labeling, and liquid chromatography (LC) with electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry assay to accurately quantify MDA in human plasma. A stable isotope-labeled internal standard was used to compensate for ESI matrix effects. The assay is linear (R(2)=0.9999) over a 20,000-fold concentration range with a lower limit of quantitation of 30fmol (on-column). Intra- and inter-run coefficients of variation (CVs) were <2% and ∼10% respectively. The derivative was stable for >36h at 5°C. Standards spiked into plasma had recoveries of 92-98%. When compared to a common LC-UV method, the LC-MS method found near-identical MDA concentrations. A pilot project to quantify MDA in patient plasma samples (n=26) in a study of major depressive disorder with winter-type seasonal pattern (MDD-s) confirmed known associations between MDA concentrations and obesity (p<0.02). The LC-MS method provides high sensitivity and high reproducibility for quantifying MDA in human plasma. The simple sample preparation and rapid analysis time (5x faster than LC-UV) offers high throughput for large-scale clinical applications. PMID:27437618

  11. LipidHome: a database of theoretical lipids optimized for high throughput mass spectrometry lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joseph M; Moreno, Pablo; Fabregat, Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Steinbeck, Christoph; Apweiler, Rolf; Wakelam, Michael J O; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Protein sequence databases are the pillar upon which modern proteomics is supported, representing a stable reference space of predicted and validated proteins. One example of such resources is UniProt, enriched with both expertly curated and automatic annotations. Taken largely for granted, similar mature resources such as UniProt are not available yet in some other "omics" fields, lipidomics being one of them. While having a seasoned community of wet lab scientists, lipidomics lies significantly behind proteomics in the adoption of data standards and other core bioinformatics concepts. This work aims to reduce the gap by developing an equivalent resource to UniProt called 'LipidHome', providing theoretically generated lipid molecules and useful metadata. Using the 'FASTLipid' Java library, a database was populated with theoretical lipids, generated from a set of community agreed upon chemical bounds. In parallel, a web application was developed to present the information and provide computational access via a web service. Designed specifically to accommodate high throughput mass spectrometry based approaches, lipids are organised into a hierarchy that reflects the variety in the structural resolution of lipid identifications. Additionally, cross-references to other lipid related resources and papers that cite specific lipids were used to annotate lipid records. The web application encompasses a browser for viewing lipid records and a 'tools' section where an MS1 search engine is currently implemented. LipidHome can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/apweiler-srv/lipidhome. PMID:23667450

  12. Propellant Mass Gauging: Database of Vehicle Applications and Research and Development Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.

    2008-01-01

    Gauging the mass of propellants in a tank in low gravity is not a straightforward task because of the uncertainty of the liquid configuration in the tank and the possibility of there being more than one ullage bubble. Several concepts for such a low-gravity gauging system have been proposed, and breadboard or flight-like versions have been tested in normal gravity or even in low gravity, but at present, a flight-proven reliable gauging system is not available. NASA desired a database of the gauging techniques used in current and past vehicles during ascent or under settled conditions, and during short coasting (unpowered) periods, for both cryogenic and storable propellants. Past and current research and development efforts on gauging systems that are believed to be applicable in low-gravity conditions were also desired. This report documents the results of that survey.

  13. Accurate determination of selected pesticides in soya beans by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huertas Pérez, J F; Sejerøe-Olsen, B; Fernández Alba, A R; Schimmel, H; Dabrio, M

    2015-05-01

    A sensitive, accurate and simple liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry method for the determination of 10 selected pesticides in soya beans has been developed and validated. The method is intended for use during the characterization of selected pesticides in a reference material. In this process, high accuracy and appropriate uncertainty levels associated to the analytical measurements are of utmost importance. The analytical procedure is based on sample extraction by the use of a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe) extraction and subsequent clean-up of the extract with C18, PSA and Florisil. Analytes were separated on a C18 column using gradient elution with water-methanol/2.5 mM ammonium acetate mobile phase, and finally identified and quantified by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Reliable and accurate quantification of the analytes was achieved by means of stable isotope-labelled analogues employed as internal standards (IS) and calibration with pure substance solutions containing both, the isotopically labelled and native compounds. Exceptions were made for thiodicarb and malaoxon where the isotopically labelled congeners were not commercially available at the time of analysis. For the quantification of those compounds methomyl-(13)C2(15)N and malathion-D10 were used respectively. The method was validated according to the general principles covered by DG SANCO guidelines. However, validation criteria were set more stringently. Mean recoveries were in the range of 86-103% with RSDs lower than 8.1%. Repeatability and intermediate precision were in the range of 3.9-7.6% and 1.9-8.7% respectively. LODs were theoretically estimated and experimentally confirmed to be in the range 0.001-0.005 mg kg(-1) in the matrix, while LOQs established as the lowest spiking mass fractionation level were in the range 0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1). The method reliably identifies and quantifies the

  14. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet β-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K12 position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4×12-VT750) had a high binding affinity (∼3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4×12-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  15. A Proteomic Study of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project's Pilot Samples using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Vitzthum, Frank; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2005-08-01

    Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome is critical to the discovery of routinely useful clinical biomarkers. We used an Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag strategy with high-resolution mass accuracy capillary liquid chromatography Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (cLC-FTICR MS) to perform a global proteomic analysis of pilot study samples as part of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project. HUPO reference serum and citrated plasma samples from African Americans, Asian Americans, and Caucasian Americans were analyzed, in addition to a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory reference serum and plasma. The AMT tag strategy allowed us to leverage two previously published “shotgun” proteomics experiments to perform global analyses on these samples in triplicate in less than 4 days total analysis time. A total of 722 (22% with multiple peptide identifications) International Protein Index (IPI) redundant proteins, or 377 protein families by ProteinProphet, were identified over the 6 individual HUPO serum and plasma samples. The samples yielded a similar number of identified redundant proteins in the plasma samples (average 446 +/-23) as found in the serum samples (average 440+/-20). These proteins were identified by an average of 956+/-35 unique peptides in plasma and 930+/-11 unique peptides in serum. In addition to this high-throughput analysis, the AMT tag approach was used with a Z-score normalization to compare relative protein abundances. This analysis highlighted both known differences in serum and citrated plasma such as fibrinogens, and reproducible differences in peptide abundances from proteins such as soluble activin receptor-like kinase 7b and glycoprotein m6b. The AMT tag strategy not only improved our sample throughput, and provided a basis for estimated quantitation.

  16. Improvement of identification of Capnocytophaga canimorsus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry using enriched database.

    PubMed

    Magnette, Amandine; Huang, Te-Din; Renzi, Francesco; Bogaerts, Pierre; Cornelis, Guy R; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Capnocytophaga cynodegmi can be transmitted from dogs or cats and cause serious human infections. We aimed to evaluate the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify these two Capnocytophaga species. Ninety-four C. canimorsus and 10 C. cynodegmi isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed. Using the MALDI BioTyper database, correct identification was achieved for only 16 of 94 (17%) C. canimorsus and all 10 C. cynodegmi strains, according to the manufacturer's log score specifications. Following the establishment of a complementary homemade reference database by addition of 51 C. canimorsus and 8 C. cynodegmi mass spectra, MALDI-TOF MS provided reliable identification to the species level for 100% of the 45 blind-coded Capnocytophaga isolates tested. MALDI-TOF MS can accurately identify C. canimorsus and C. cynodegmi using an enriched database and thus constitutes a valuable diagnostic tool in the clinical laboratory. PMID:26508105

  17. A completely automated CAD system for mass detection in a large mammographic database

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Tangaro, S.

    2006-08-15

    Mass localization plays a crucial role in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for the classification of suspicious regions in mammograms. In this article we present a completely automated classification system for the detection of masses in digitized mammographic images. The tool system we discuss consists in three processing levels: (a) Image segmentation for the localization of regions of interest (ROIs). This step relies on an iterative dynamical threshold algorithm able to select iso-intensity closed contours around gray level maxima of the mammogram. (b) ROI characterization by means of textural features computed from the gray tone spatial dependence matrix (GTSDM), containing second-order spatial statistics information on the pixel gray level intensity. As the images under study were recorded in different centers and with different machine settings, eight GTSDM features were selected so as to be invariant under monotonic transformation. In this way, the images do not need to be normalized, as the adopted features depend on the texture only, rather than on the gray tone levels, too. (c) ROI classification by means of a neural network, with supervision provided by the radiologist's diagnosis. The CAD system was evaluated on a large database of 3369 mammographic images [2307 negative, 1062 pathological (or positive), containing at least one confirmed mass, as diagnosed by an expert radiologist]. To assess the performance of the system, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and free-response ROC analysis were employed. The area under the ROC curve was found to be A{sub z}=0.783{+-}0.008 for the ROI-based classification. When evaluating the accuracy of the CAD against the radiologist-drawn boundaries, 4.23 false positives per image are found at 80% of mass sensitivity.

  18. Critical evaluation of screening techniques for emerging environmental contaminants based on accurate mass measurements with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Joonas; Pellinen, Jukka; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea

    2012-03-01

    Emerging contaminants from wastewater effluent samples were analysed, using posttarget and nontarget analysis techniques. The samples were analysed with an ultra performance liquid chromatograph-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UPLC-TOF-MS), and the resulting data were processed with commercial deconvolution software. The method works well for posttarget analysis with prior information about the retention times of the compounds of interest. With positive polarity, 63 of 66 compounds and with negative polarity, 18 of 20 compounds were correctly identified in a spiked sample, while two compounds of a total of 88 fell out of the mass range. Furthermore, a four-stage process for identification was developed for the posttarget analysis lacking the retention time data. In the process, the number of candidate compounds was reduced by using the accurate mass of selected compounds in two steps (stages 1 and 2), structure-property relationships (stage 3) and isotope patterns of the analytes (stage 4). The process developed was validated by analysing wastewater samples spiked with 88 compounds. This procedure can be used to gain a preliminary indication of the presence of certain analytes in the samples. Nontarget analysis was tested by applying a theoretical mass spectra library for a wastewater sample spiked with six pharmaceuticals. The results showed a high number of false identifications. In addition, manual processing of the data was considered laborious and ineffective. Finally, the posttarget analysis was applied to a real wastewater sample. The analysis revealed the presence of six compounds that were afterwards confirmed with standard compounds as being correct. Three psycholeptics (nordiazepam, oxazepam and temazepam) could be tentatively identified, using the identification process developed. Posttarget analysis with UPLC-TOF-MS proved to be a promising method for analysing wastewater samples, while we concluded that the software for nontarget analysis will need

  19. Innovations in Mass Spectrometry for Precise and Accurate Isotope Ratio Determination from Very Small Analyte Quantities (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, N. S.; Bouman, C.; Horstwood, M. S.; Parrish, R. R.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation describes progress in mass spectrometry for analysing very small analyte quantities, illustrated by example applications from nuclear forensics. In this challenging application, precise and accurate (‰) uranium isotope ratios are required from 1 - 2 µm diameter uranium oxide particles, which comprise less than 40 pg of uranium. Traditionally these are analysed using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS), and more recently using secondary ionisation mass spectrometry (SIMS). Multicollector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) can offer higher productivity compared to these techniques, but is traditionally limited by low efficiency of analyte utilisation (sample through to ion detection). Samples can either be introduced as a solution, or sampled directly from solid using laser ablation. Large multi-isotope ratio datasets can help identify provenance and intended use of anthropogenic uranium and other nuclear materials [1]. The Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus (Bremen, Germany) with ‘Jet Interface’ option offers unparalleled MC-ICP-MS sensitivity. An analyte utilisation of c. 4% has previously been reported for uranium [2]. This high-sensitivity configuration utilises a dry high-capacity (100 m3/h) interface pump, special skimmer and sampler cones and a desolvating nebuliser system. Coupled with new acquisition methodologies, this sensitivity enhancement makes possible the analysis of micro-particles and small sample volumes at higher precision levels than previously achieved. New, high-performance, full-size and compact discrete dynode secondary electron multipliers (SEM) exhibit excellent stability and linearity over a large dynamic range and can be configured to simultaneously measure all of the uranium isotopes. Options for high abundance-sensitivity filters on two ion beams are also available, e.g. for 236U and 234U. Additionally, amplifiers with high ohm (1012 - 1013) feedback resistors have been developed to

  20. CASMI 2013: Identification of Small Molecules by Tandem Mass Spectrometry Combined with Database and Literature Mining

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Andrew G.; Nikolic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    The Critical Assessment of Small Molecule Identification (CASMI) contest was initiated in 2012 to evaluate manual and automated strategies for the identification of small molecules from raw mass spectrometric data. The authors participated in both category 1 (molecular formula determination) and category 2 (molecular structure determination) of the second annual CASMI contest (CASMI 2013) using slow but effective manual methods. The provided high resolution mass spectrometric data were interpreted manually using a combination of molecular formula calculators, fragment and neutral loss analysis, literature consultation, manual database searches, deductive logic, and experience. The authors submitted correct formulas as lead candidates for 16 of 16 challenges and submitted correct structure solutions as lead candidates for 14 of 16 challenges. One structure submission (Challenge 3) was very close but not exact (N2-acetylglutaminylisoleucinamide instead of the correct N2-acetylglutaminylleucinamide). A solution for one (Challenge 13) was not submitted due to an inability to reconcile the provided fragmentation pattern with any known structures with the provided molecular composition. PMID:26819877

  1. Profiling monoterpenol glycoconjugation in Vitis vinifera L. cv. Muscat of Alexandria using a novel putative compound database approach, high resolution mass spectrometry and collision induced dissociation fragmentation analysis.

    PubMed

    Hjelmeland, Anna K; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Ebeler, Susan E

    2015-08-01

    In this work we present a novel approach for the identification of plant metabolites using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The workflow involves developing an in-house compound database consisting of exact masses of previously identified as well as putative compounds. The database is used to screen accurate mass spectrometry (MS) data to identify possible compound matches. Subsequent tandem MS data is acquired for possible matches and used for structural elucidation. The methodology is applied to profile monoterpene glycosides in Vitis vinifera cv. Muscat of Alexandria grape berries over three developmental stages. Monoterpenes are a subclass of terpenes, the largest class of plant secondary metabolites, and are found in two major forms in the plant, "bound" to one or more sugar moieties or "free" of said sugar moieties. In the free form, monoterpenes are noted for their fragrance and play important roles in plant defense and as attractants for pollinators. However, glycoconjugation renders these compounds odorless, and it is this form that the plant uses for monoterpene storage. In order to gain insight into monoterpene biochemistry and their fate in the plant an analysis of intact glycosides is essential. Eighteen monoterpene glycosides were identified including a monoterpene trisaccharide glycoside, which is tentatively identified here for this first time in any plant. Additionally, while previous studies have identified monoterpene malonylated glucosides in other grapevine tissue, we tentatively identify them for the first time in grape berries. This analytical approach can be readily applied to other plants and the workflow approach can also be used for other classes of compounds. This approach, in general, provides researchers with data to support the identification of putative compounds, which is especially useful when no standard is available. PMID:26320795

  2. Using semantic data modeling techniques to organize an object-oriented database for extending the mass storage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.; Short, Nicholas M., Jr.; Roelofs, Larry H.; Dorfman, Erik

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for optimizing organization of data obtained by NASA earth and space missions is discussed. The methodology uses a concept based on semantic data modeling techniques implemented in a hierarchical storage model. The modeling is used to organize objects in mass storage devices, relational database systems, and object-oriented databases. The semantic data modeling at the metadata record level is examined, including the simulation of a knowledge base and semantic metadata storage issues. The semantic data model hierarchy and its application for efficient data storage is addressed, as is the mapping of the application structure to the mass storage.

  3. Rapid and Accurate U-Th Dating of Ancient Carbonates using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Eric; Sallé, Eline; Frank, Norbert; Eisele, Markus; Pons-Branchu, Edwige; Ayrault, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Here, the potential for rapid and accurate U-Th dating technique of marine aragonite skeletons (deep-sea corals, Lophelia pertusa) and secondary calcite deposits (speleothems and stalagmites) has been explored using inductively-coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The analytical procedure includes a largely simplified chemical separation technique for uranium (U) and thorium (Th) using UTEVA resin. The developed technique permits simultaneous quantification of uranium [238U] and thorium [232Th] concentrations and their respective isotopic composition, required for U-series disequilibrium dating. Up to 50 U-Th dates per day can be achieved through ICP-QMS with 234U and 230Th reproducibility (2sigma) of 3-4 permil and 1 percent, respectively. The high sensitivity (> 300 000 cps/ppb) together with low background (<0.5 cps) on each mass between 228-236 amu allowed U-Th dating of ancient deep water corals (15-260 kyrs) and stalagmites (30-85 kyrs) at precision levels of less than 2%. Consequently, the combination of simplified chemistry using UTEVA with state-of-the-art ICP-QMS isotopic measurements that do not require a U-Th separation step now provides an extremely rapid and low-cost U-series dating technology. The level of precision is most convenient for numerous geochronological applications, such as the determination of climatic influences on ecosystem development and carbonate precipitation. As a first-example application we present ICP-QMS U-Th dates of North Atlantic deep-water coral fragments retrieved in the southeastern Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G, Mound Thérèse), indicating a purely interglacial growth of deep-water corals on so-called carbonate mounds over several climate cycles.

  4. Accurate Mass MS/MS/MS Analysis of Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and E1 by Collision-Induced Dissociation Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, Ashley M.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2015-11-01

    Siderophores are bacterially secreted, small molecule iron chelators that facilitate the binding of insoluble iron (III) for reuptake and use in various biological processes. These compounds are classified by their iron (III) binding geometry, as dictated by subunit composition and include groups such as the trihydroxamates (hexadentate ligand) and catecholates (bidentate). Small modifications to the core structure such as acetylation, lipid tail addition, or cyclization, make facile characterization of new siderophores difficult by molecular ion detection alone (MS1). We have expanded upon previous fragmentation-directed studies using electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS/MS) and identified diagnostic MS3 features from the trihydroxamate siderophore class for ferrioxamine B and E1 by accurate mass. Diagnostic features for MS3 include C-C, C-N, amide, and oxime cleavage events with proposed losses of water and -CO from the iron (III) coordination sites. These insights will facilitate the discovery of novel trihydroxamate siderophores from complex sample matrices.

  5. Accurate quantification of creatinine in serum by coupling a measurement standard to extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Keke; Li, Ming; Li, Hongmei; Li, Mengwan; Jiang, You; Fang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization (AI) techniques have been widely used in chemistry, medicine, material science, environmental science, forensic science. AI takes advantage of direct desorption/ionization of chemicals in raw samples under ambient environmental conditions with minimal or no sample preparation. However, its quantitative accuracy is restricted by matrix effects during the ionization process. To improve the quantitative accuracy of AI, a matrix reference material, which is a particular form of measurement standard, was coupled to an AI technique in this study. Consequently the analyte concentration in a complex matrix can be easily quantified with high accuracy. As a demonstration, this novel method was applied for the accurate quantification of creatinine in serum by using extractive electrospray ionization (EESI) mass spectrometry. Over the concentration range investigated (0.166 ~ 1.617 μg/mL), a calibration curve was obtained with a satisfactory linearity (R2 = 0.994), and acceptable relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.6 ~ 8.0% (n = 6). Finally, the creatinine concentration value of a serum sample was determined to be 36.18 ± 1.08 μg/mL, which is in excellent agreement with the certified value of 35.16 ± 0.39 μg/mL. PMID:26759071

  6. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF₃) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  7. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  8. Effect of cleavage enzyme, search algorithm and decoy database on mass spectrometric identification of wheat gluten proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is routinely used to identify proteins by comparing peptide spectra to those generated in silico from protein sequence databases. Wheat storage proteins (gliadins and glutenins) are difficult to distinguish by MS/MS as they have few cleavable tryptic sites, often res...

  9. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections at Mercury: Database and effects on the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Reka; Anderson, Brian J.; Schwadron, Nathan; Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol

    2016-07-01

    We use observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER is the first spacecraft since Helios 1 and 2 in the 1980s to make in situ measurements of the interplanetary medium at heliocentric distances < 0.5 AU. Because extensive observations, both remote sensing and in-situ, are available throughout the MESSENGER mission, these data present a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere and the development of the solar wind and interplanetary transients. We catalog ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2015 and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing data sets of ICMEs at 1 AU, we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. Using our database of nearly 70 ICMEs, we also statistically characterize Mercury's magnetosphere during times of ICMEs, when Mercury's magnetosphere becomes significantly altered. We conduct a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during extreme solar wind conditions, by studying the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, erosion of the dayside magnetosphere, the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the cusp region, and the plasma precipitation to the surface.

  10. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  11. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  12. Leptospira species and serovars identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after database implementation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis, a spirochaetal zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution, endemic in Europe, has been recognized as an important emerging infectious disease, though yet it is mostly a neglected disease which imparts its greatest burden on impoverished populations from developing countries. Leptospirosis is caused by the infection with any of the more than 230 serovars of pathogenic Leptospira sp. In this study we aimed to implement the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) database currently available in our laboratory with Leptospira reference pathogenic (L. interrogans, L. borgpetersenii, L. kirschneri, L. noguchii), intermediate (L. fainei) and saprophytic (L. biflexa) strains of our collection in order to evaluate its possible application to the diagnosis of leptospirosis and to the typing of strains. This was done with the goal of understanding whether this methodology could be used as a tool for the identification of Leptospira strains, not only at species level for diagnostic purposes, but also at serovar level for epidemiological purposes, overcoming the limits of serological and molecular conventional methods. Twenty Leptospira reference strains were analysed by MALDI-TOF MS. Statistical analysis of the protein spectra was performed by ClinProTools software. Results The spectra obtained by the analysis of the reference strains tested were grouped into 6 main classes corresponding to the species analysed, highlighting species-specific protein profiles. Moreover, the statistical analysis of the spectra identified discriminatory peaks to recognize Leptospira strains also at serovar level extending previously published data. Conclusions In conclusion, we confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS could be a powerful tool for research and diagnostic in the field of leptospirosis with broad applications ranging from the detection and identification of pathogenic leptospires for diagnostic purposes to the typing of pathogenic and non-pathogenic leptospires for

  13. Structure elucidation of degradation products of the antibiotic amoxicillin with ion trap MS(n) and accurate mass determination by ESI TOF.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Edgar; Moritz, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Today, it is necessary to identify relevant compounds appearing in discovery and development of new drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. For that purpose, the measurement of accurate molecular mass and empirical formula calculation is very important for structure elucidation in addition to other available analytical methods. In this work, the identification and confirmation of degradation products in a finished dosage form of the antibiotic drug amoxicillin obtained under stress conditions will be demonstrated. Structure elucidation is performed utilizing liquid chromatography (LC) ion trap MS/MS and MS3 together with accurate mass measurement of the molecular ions and of the collision induced dissociation (CID) fragments by liquid chromatography electro spray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-TOF). PMID:16099170

  14. Development of a Clinically Comprehensive Database and a Simple Procedure for Identification of Molds from Solid Media by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Steven K.; Calhoun, Leslie B.; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a powerful tool for the rapid and highly accurate identification of clinical pathogens but has not been utilized extensively in clinical mycology due to challenges in developing an effective protein extraction method and the limited databases available. Here, we developed an alternate extraction procedure and constructed a highly stringent database comprising 294 individual isolates representing 76 genera and 152 species. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive clinically relevant mold database developed to date. When challenged with 421 blinded clinical isolates from our institution, by use of the BioTyper software, accurate species-level (score of ≥2.0) and genus-level (score of ≥1.7) identifications were obtained for 370 (88.9%) and 18 (4.3%) isolates, respectively. No isolates were misidentified. Of the 33 isolates (7.8%) for which there was no identification (score of <1.7), 25 were basidiomycetes not associated with clinical disease and 8 were Penicillium species that were not represented in the database. Our library clearly outperformed the manufacturer's database that was obtained with the instrument, which identified only 3 (0.7%) and 26 (6.2%) isolates at species and genus levels, respectively. Identification was not affected by different culture conditions. Implementation into our routine workflow has revolutionized our mycology laboratory efficiency, with improved accuracy and decreased time for mold identification, eliminating reliance on traditional phenotypic features. PMID:23269728

  15. High-performance hardware implementation of a parallel database search engine for real-time peptide mass fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Bogdán, István A.; Rivers, Jenny; Beynon, Robert J.; Coca, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) is a method for protein identification in which a protein is fragmented by a defined cleavage protocol (usually proteolysis with trypsin), and the masses of these products constitute a ‘fingerprint’ that can be searched against theoretical fingerprints of all known proteins. In the first stage of PMF, the raw mass spectrometric data are processed to generate a peptide mass list. In the second stage this protein fingerprint is used to search a database of known proteins for the best protein match. Although current software solutions can typically deliver a match in a relatively short time, a system that can find a match in real time could change the way in which PMF is deployed and presented. In a paper published earlier we presented a hardware design of a raw mass spectra processor that, when implemented in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) hardware, achieves almost 170-fold speed gain relative to a conventional software implementation running on a dual processor server. In this article we present a complementary hardware realization of a parallel database search engine that, when running on a Xilinx Virtex 2 FPGA at 100 MHz, delivers 1800-fold speed-up compared with an equivalent C software routine, running on a 3.06 GHz Xeon workstation. The inherent scalability of the design means that processing speed can be multiplied by deploying the design on multiple FPGAs. The database search processor and the mass spectra processor, running on a reconfigurable computing platform, provide a complete real-time PMF protein identification solution. Contact: d.coca@sheffield.ac.uk PMID:18453553

  16. A database application for pre-processing, storage and comparison of mass spectra derived from patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Mark K; Siccama, Ivar; Dekker, Lennard J; van Rijswijk, Angelique LCT; Heeren, Ron MA; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A; Luider, Theo M

    2006-01-01

    Background Statistical comparison of peptide profiles in biomarker discovery requires fast, user-friendly software for high throughput data analysis. Important features are flexibility in changing input variables and statistical analysis of peptides that are differentially expressed between patient and control groups. In addition, integration the mass spectrometry data with the results of other experiments, such as microarray analysis, and information from other databases requires a central storage of the profile matrix, where protein id's can be added to peptide masses of interest. Results A new database application is presented, to detect and identify significantly differentially expressed peptides in peptide profiles obtained from body fluids of patient and control groups. The presented modular software is capable of central storage of mass spectra and results in fast analysis. The software architecture consists of 4 pillars, 1) a Graphical User Interface written in Java, 2) a MySQL database, which contains all metadata, such as experiment numbers and sample codes, 3) a FTP (File Transport Protocol) server to store all raw mass spectrometry files and processed data, and 4) the software package R, which is used for modular statistical calculations, such as the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank sum test. Statistic analysis by the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in R demonstrates that peptide-profiles of two patient groups 1) breast cancer patients with leptomeningeal metastases and 2) prostate cancer patients in end stage disease can be distinguished from those of control groups. Conclusion The database application is capable to distinguish patient Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI-TOF) peptide profiles from control groups using large size datasets. The modular architecture of the application makes it possible to adapt the application to handle also large sized data from MS/MS- and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry

  17. Automated storage of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data in a relational database to facilitate compound screening and identification.

    PubMed

    Staeb, J A; Epema, O J; van Duijn, P; Steevens, J; Klap, V A; Freriks, I L

    2002-10-18

    This paper describes a database containing massspectra from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS) measurements as a tool for easy screening for multiple compounds. In this way additional compounds can be reported from the same run together with routine pesticide monitoring with little effort. The relevant analytical data from the GC-MS measurements are transferred automatically to a database. Search algorithms in the database, containing the US EPA and Dutch NEN GC-MS identification criteria as standard settings, are used to identify compounds in the data. Screening of samples analysed in our laboratory show the ubiquitous presence of--up until now in monitoring largely overlooked--compounds in surface waters in The Netherlands. Most frequently found compounds include TAED (complexing agent), 2-methyl quinoline (industrial solvent), atrazin and desethylatrazin (pesticide and degradation product), caffeine (human consumption), surfinol-104 (anti foaming agent), HHCB (Galaxolide) and AHTN (Tonalide; fragrances). The database can also be used to quickly search a large number of datafiles for rare contaminants. This way, some interesting compounds such as pentoxifilin (a pharmaceutical) and Irgarol 1051 (an antifouling compound) were found. PMID:12458939

  18. Pivotal role of computers and software in mass spectrometry - SEQUEST and 20 years of tandem MS database searching.

    PubMed

    Yates, John R

    2015-11-01

    Advances in computer technology and software have driven developments in mass spectrometry over the last 50 years. Computers and software have been impactful in three areas: the automation of difficult calculations to aid interpretation, the collection of data and control of instruments, and data interpretation. As the power of computers has grown, so too has the utility and impact on mass spectrometers and their capabilities. This has been particularly evident in the use of tandem mass spectrometry data to search protein and nucleotide sequence databases to identify peptide and protein sequences. This capability has driven the development of many new approaches to study biological systems, including the use of "bottom-up shotgun proteomics" to directly analyze protein mixtures. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26286455

  19. Pivotal Role of Computers and Software in Mass Spectrometry - SEQUEST and 20 Years of Tandem MS Database Searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, John R.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in computer technology and software have driven developments in mass spectrometry over the last 50 years. Computers and software have been impactful in three areas: the automation of difficult calculations to aid interpretation, the collection of data and control of instruments, and data interpretation. As the power of computers has grown, so too has the utility and impact on mass spectrometers and their capabilities. This has been particularly evident in the use of tandem mass spectrometry data to search protein and nucleotide sequence databases to identify peptide and protein sequences. This capability has driven the development of many new approaches to study biological systems, including the use of "bottom-up shotgun proteomics" to directly analyze protein mixtures.

  20. Identification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System Is Improved by a Database Extension.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Valentijn A; van Dam, Alje P; Hananta, I Putu Yuda; Schuurman, Rob; Kusters, Johannes G; Rentenaar, Rob J

    2016-04-01

    Identification ofNeisseria gonorrhoeaeby the Bruker matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system may be affected by "B consistency categorization." A supplementary database of 17N. gonorrhoeaemain spectra was constructed. Twelve of 64N. gonorrhoeaeidentifications were categorized with B consistency, which disappeared using the supplementary database. Database extension did not result in misidentification ofNeisseria meningitidis. PMID:26763972

  1. Assessment of gas chromatography time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry for identification of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, M; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R; Sulaiman, S A; Gan, S H

    2014-11-01

    The performance of gas chromatography (GC) combined with a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system for the determination of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in honey samples is evaluated. After headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of samples, the accurate mass capabilities of the above system were evaluated for compounds identification. Accurate scan electron impact (EI) MS spectra allowed discriminating compounds displaying the same nominal masses, but having different empirical formulae. Moreover, the use of a mass window with a width of 0.005 Da provided highly specific chromatograms for selected ions, avoiding the contribution of interferences to their peak areas. Additional information derived from positive chemical ionization (PCI) MS spectra and ion product scan MS/MS spectra permitted confirming the identity of novel compounds. The above possibilities are illustrated with examples of honey aroma compounds, belonging to different chemical classes and containing different elements in their molecules. Examples of compounds whose structures could not be described are also provided. Overall, 84 compounds, from a total of 89 species, could be identified in 19 honey samples from 3 different geographic areas in the world. The suitability of responses measured for selected ions, corresponding to above species, for authentication purposes is assessed through principal components analysis. PMID:25127626

  2. Searching molecular structure databases with tandem mass spectra using CSI:FingerID

    PubMed Central

    Dührkop, Kai; Shen, Huibin; Meusel, Marvin; Rousu, Juho; Böcker, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites provide a direct functional signature of cellular state. Untargeted metabolomics experiments usually rely on tandem MS to identify the thousands of compounds in a biological sample. Today, the vast majority of metabolites remain unknown. We present a method for searching molecular structure databases using tandem MS data of small molecules. Our method computes a fragmentation tree that best explains the fragmentation spectrum of an unknown molecule. We use the fragmentation tree to predict the molecular structure fingerprint of the unknown compound using machine learning. This fingerprint is then used to search a molecular structure database such as PubChem. Our method is shown to improve on the competing methods for computational metabolite identification by a considerable margin. PMID:26392543

  3. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  4. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  5. CLASH-VLT: Constraints on the Dark Matter Equation of State from Accurate Measurements of Galaxy Cluster Mass Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara; Biviano, Andrea; Rosati, Piero; Borgani, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Bartelmann, Matthias; Girardi, Marisa; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Zitrin, Adi; Balestra, Italo; Mercurio, Amata; Nonino, Mario; Postman, Marc; Czakon, Nicole; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Annunziatella, Marianna; Benitez, Narciso; Czoske, Oliver; Donahue, Megan; Ettori, Stefano; Ford, Holland; Fritz, Alexander; Kelson, Dan; Koekemoer, Anton; Kuchner, Ulrike; Lombardi, Marco; Maier, Christian; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Munari, Emiliano; Presotto, Valentina; Scodeggio, Marco; Seitz, Stella; Tozzi, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Bodo

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being Ltc, depend solely on the gravitational potential, whereas photon trajectories reflect the contributions from the gravitational potential plus a relativistic-pressure term that depends on the cluster mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (pr + 2 pt )/(3 c 2ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc <= r <= r 200, where pr and pt are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  6. CLASH-VLT: CONSTRAINTS ON THE DARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FROM ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF GALAXY CLUSTER MASS PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Girardi, Marisa; Biviano, Andrea; Balestra, Italo; Nonino, Mario; Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole; Bartelmann, Matthias; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Medezinski, Elinor; Zitrin, Adi; Mercurio, Amata; Broadhurst, Tom; Melchior, Peter; and others

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being <mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2–0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (p{sub r} + 2 p{sub t} )/(3 c {sup 2}ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc ≤ r ≤ r {sub 200}, where p{sub r} and p{sub t} are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  7. Rapid screening for 67 drugs and metabolites in serum or plasma by accurate-mass LC-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Hughes, John M; Lawlor, Bryan G; Clark, Chantry J; McMillin, Gwendolyn A

    2012-09-01

    Sixty-seven drugs and metabolites were detected in serum or plasma using a fast (7.5 min) liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) method. This method was developed as a blood drug screen, with emphasis on the detection of common drugs of abuse and drugs used to manage chronic pain. Qualitative drug detection may identify a drug exposure, assure patient adherence with prescribed therapy and document abstinence from non-prescribed medications. Compound identification is based on chromatographic retention time, mass, isotope spacing and isotope abundance. Data analysis software (Agilent) generates a compound score based on how well these observed criteria matched theoretical and empirical values. The method was validated using fortified samples and 299 residual patient specimens (920 positive results). All results were confirmed by gas chromatography-MS or LC-tandem MS. The accuracy of positive results (samples meeting all qualitative criteria for retention time, mass and compound score) was >90% for drugs and/or metabolites, except for two benzodiazepines. There were 35 false positive results (seven compounds, 3.8%) that could be distinguished by retention time and/or absence of metabolites. The most frequent was 6-acetylmorphine in the absence of morphine. The LC-TOF-MS targeted screening method presented represents a sensitive and specific technology for drug screening of serum or plasma. PMID:22802572

  8. Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry Measurements and Protocols for Database and Library Development Relating to Organic Species in Support of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, P.; Garcia, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2010-04-01

    An organic contaminant database and library has been developed for use with the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrumentation utilizing laboratory-based Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry measurements of pyrolyzed and baked material samples.

  9. Chi(1) rotamer populations and angles of mobile surface side chains are accurately predicted by a torsion angle database potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Clore, G Marius; Kuszewski, John

    2002-03-27

    The equilibrium angles and distributions of chi(1) rotamers for mobile surface side chains of the small, 63-residue, B1 domain of protein L have been calculated from the static crystal structure by rigid body/torsion angle simulated annealing using a torsion angle database potential of mean force and compared to those deduced by Monte Carlo analysis of side chain residual dipolar couplings measured in solution. Good agreement between theory and experiment is observed, indicating that for side chains undergoing rotamer averaging that is fast on the chemical shift time scale, the equilibrium angles and distribution of chi(1) rotamers are largely determined by the backbone phi/psi torsion angles. PMID:11902865

  10. Accurate mass determination for double-lined spectroscopic binaries by digital cross-correlation spectroscopy: DM Virginis revisited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Nordstroem, B.; Andersen, J.; Torres, G.; Stefanik, R. P.; Thaller, M.; Bester, M. J.

    1996-10-01

    Fundamental mass determinations in eclipsing binaries rely on radial velocities derived from double-lined spectra. We evaluate the performance of the CfA Digital Speedometers for deriving radial velocities of double-lined systems, using simulated observations of composite spectra. When XCSAO (Kurtz et al. 1992) is used to calculate a one-dimensional cross-correlation, simple fits to the double peaks in the correlation function can lead to systematic errors as large as 3km/s due to the effects of line blending. The two-dimensional correlation scheme TODCOR (Zucker & Mazeh 1994ApJ...420..806Z) can reduce the systematic errors by an order of magnitude. We apply TODCOR to a new mass determination for the F-type eclipsing binary DM Vir, achieving an accuracy of 0.6%. The improved physical properties of DM Vir agree very well with stellar evolution models incorporating the most recent opacity data, both with and without convective core overshooting, and for reasonable assumptions about the chemical composition. The age of DM Vir is found to be 1.75+/-0.20x10^9^yr, metallicity being the dominant source of uncertainty.

  11. Body mass index and in-hospital mortality in anorexia nervosa: data from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Yasunaga, Hideo; Shimada, Takafumi; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2013-12-01

    One of the main purposes of admission for anorexia nervosa is to manage acute medical conditions related to this condition. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality in anorexia nervosa remain unclear. This study describes the clinical features of anorexia nervosa patients requiring hospitalization in Japan. We analyzed the association between in-hospital mortality and body mass index upon admission using a currently available, nationwide hospital-based database. We identified 669 eligible patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI ≤ 16.5) from 229 hospitals between July and December, 2010. More than 90 % of the patients were female and 100 patients were admitted involuntarily. The average body mass index was 13.1, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 0.7 %. Five patients who died had a BMI under 11, indicating that patients with an extremely low BMI may be likely to die, despite admission. PMID:23929026

  12. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem diode array detector (DAD) and accurate mass QTOF-MS for the analysis of flavonoids and iridoid glycosides in Hedyotis diffusa.

    PubMed

    Li, Duxin; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of chemical constituents in Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) is a challenge because of numerous compounds with various polarities and functional groups. Liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is of particular interest in the analysis of herbal components. One of the main attributes of QTOF that makes it an attractive analytical technique is its accurate mass measurement for both precursor and product ions. For the separation of CHMs, comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography (LCxLC) provides much higher resolving power than traditional one-dimensional separation. Therefore, a LCxLC-QTOF-MS system was developed and applied to the analysis of flavonoids and iridoid glycosides in aqueous extracts of Hedyotis diffusa (Rubiaceae). Shift gradient was applied in the two-dimensional separation in the LCxLC system to increase the orthogonality and effective peak distribution area of the analysis. Tentative identification of compounds was done by accurate mass interpretation and validation by UV spectrum. A clear classification of flavonol glycosides (FGs), acylated FGs, and iridoid glycosides (IGs) was shown in different regions of the LCxLC contour plot. In total, five FGs, four acylated FGs, and three IGs were tentatively identified. In addition, several novel flavonoids were found, which demonstrates that LCxLC-QTOF-MS detection also has great potential in herbal medicine analysis. PMID:25171829

  13. Accurate determination of ⁴¹Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-12-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long-Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (41)Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). (41)Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF2 precipitations. Measured (41)Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The (41)Ca/(60)Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. PMID:24144617

  14. Self-aliquoting microarray plates for accurate quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Martin; Fagerer, Stephan R; Köhling, Rudolf; Küster, Simon K; Steinhoff, Robert; Badertscher, Martin; Wahl, Fabian; Dittrich, Petra S; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-10-15

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a fast analysis tool employed for the detection of a broad range of analytes. However, MALDI-MS has a reputation of not being suitable for quantitative analysis. Inhomogeneous analyte/matrix co-crystallization, spot-to-spot inhomogeneity, as well as a typically low number of replicates are the main contributing factors. Here, we present a novel MALDI sample target for quantitative MALDI-MS applications, which addresses the limitations mentioned above. The platform is based on the recently developed microarray for mass spectrometry (MAMS) technology and contains parallel lanes of hydrophilic reservoirs. Samples are not pipetted manually but deposited by dragging one or several sample droplets with a metal sliding device along these lanes. Sample is rapidly and automatically aliquoted into the sample spots due to the interplay of hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. With a few microliters of sample, it is possible to aliquot up to 40 replicates within seconds, each aliquot containing just 10 nL. The analyte droplet dries immediately and homogeneously, and consumption of the whole spot during MALDI-MS analysis is typically accomplished within few seconds. We evaluated these sample targets with respect to their suitability for use with different samples and matrices. Furthermore, we tested their application for generating calibration curves of standard peptides with α-cyano-4-hdydroxycinnamic acid as a matrix. For angiotensin II and [Glu(1)]-fibrinopeptide B we achieved coefficients of determination (r(2)) greater than 0.99 without the use of internal standards. PMID:24003910

  15. A data-based model to locate mass movements triggered by seismic events in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fabio Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes affect the entire world and have catastrophic consequences. On May 12, 2008, an earthquake of magnitude 7.9 on the Richter scale occurred in the Wenchuan area of Sichuan province in China. This event, together with subsequent aftershocks, caused many avalanches, landslides, debris flows, collapses, and quake lakes and induced numerous unstable slopes. This work proposes a methodology that uses a data mining approach and geographic information systems to predict these mass movements based on their association with the main and aftershock epicenters, geologic faults, riverbeds, and topography. A dataset comprising 3,883 mass movements is analyzed, and some models to predict the location of these mass movements are developed. These predictive models could be used by the Chinese authorities as an important tool for identifying risk areas and rescuing survivors during similar events in the future. PMID:24085622

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2MASS database (IPAC/UMass, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Schneider, S. E.; Stiening, R.; Strom, S. E.; Weinberg, M. D.; Beichman, C.; Chester, T.; Cutri, R.; Lonsdale, C.; Elias, J.; Elston, R.; Capps, R.; Carpenter, J.; Huchra, J.; Liebert, J.; Monet, D.; Price, S.; Seitzer, P.

    2000-09-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project is designed to close the gap between our current technical capability and our knowledge of the near-infrared sky. In addition to providing a context for the interpretation of results obtained at infrared and other wavelengths, 2MASS will provide direct answers to immediate questions on the large-scale structure of the Milky Way and the Local Universe. To achieve these goals, 2MASS is uniformly scanning the entire sky in three near-infrared bands to detect and characterize point sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band, with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 10, using a pixel size of 2.0". This will achieve an 80,000-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to earlier surveys. 2MASS uses two new, highly-automated 1.3-m telescopes, one at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and one at CTIO, Chile. Each telescope is equipped with a three-channel camera, each channel consisting of a 256x256 array of HgCdTe detectors, capable of observing the sky simultaneously at J (1.25 μm), H (1.65 μm), and Ks (2.17 μm), to a 3σ limiting sensivity of 17.1, 16.4 and 1.3mag in thge three bands. The 2MASS arrays image the sky while the telescopes scan smoothly in declination at a rate of ~1' per second. The 2MASS data "tiles" are 6° long in the declination direction and one camera frame (8.5') wide. The camera field-of-view shifts by ~1/6 of a frame in declination from frame-to-frame. The camera images each point on the sky six times for a total integration time of 7.8 s, with sub-pixel "dithering", which improves the ultimate spatial resolution of the final Atlas Images. The University of Massachusetts (UMass) is responsible for the overall management of the project, and for developing the infrared cameras and on-site computing systems at both facilities. The Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) is responsible for all data processing through the Production Pipeline, and construction and distribution of the data products. The 2MASS

  17. Accurate determination of ochratoxin A in Korean fermented soybean paste by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seonghee; Lee, Suyoung; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, has been frequently detected in doenjang, a traditional fermented soybean paste, when it is fermented under improper conditions. Reliable screening of OTA in traditional fermented soybean paste (doenjang) is a special food-safety issue in Korea. Our laboratory, the National Metrology Institute of Korea, established an isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) method as a higher-order reference method to be used for SI-traceable value-assignment of OTA in certified reference materials (CRMs). (13)C20-OTA was used as an internal standard. Sample preparation conditions and LC/MS measurement parameters were optimised for this purpose. The analytical method was validated by measuring samples fortified with OTA at various levels. Repeatability and reproducibility studies showed that the ID-LC/MS/MS method is reliable and reproducible within 2% relative standard deviation. The analytical method was applied to determine OTA in various commercial doenjang products and home-made doenjang products. PMID:26212984

  18. CLASH-VLT: Insights on the Mass Substructures in the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 through Accurate Strong Lens Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, C.; Suyu, S. H.; Rosati, P.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Munari, E.; Nonino, M.; Caminha, G. B.; Lombardi, M.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Gobat, R.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Umetsu, K.; Coe, D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Postman, M.; Zitrin, A.; Halkola, A.; Broadhurst, T.; Sartoris, B.; Presotto, V.; Annunziatella, M.; Maier, C.; Fritz, A.; Vanzella, E.; Frye, B.

    2015-02-01

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log (M */M ⊙) ~= 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of a set of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.''3 by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of two cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components, parameterized with dual pseudo-isothermal total mass profiles. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ~5%, including the systematic uncertainties estimated from six distinct mass models. We emphasize that the use of multiple-image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and knowledge of cluster membership based on extensive spectroscopic information is key to constructing robust high-resolution mass maps. We also produce magnification maps over the central area that is covered with HST observations. We investigate the galaxy contribution, both in terms of total and stellar mass, to the total mass budget of the cluster. When compared with the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations, our results point to a lack of massive subhalos in the inner regions of simulated clusters with total masses similar to that of MACS J0416.1-2403. Our findings of the location and shape of the cluster dark-matter halo density profiles and on the cluster substructures provide intriguing tests of the

  19. CLASH-VLT: INSIGHTS ON THE MASS SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACS J0416.1–2403 THROUGH ACCURATE STRONG LENS MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, C.; Suyu, S. H.; Umetsu, K.; Rosati, P.; Caminha, G. B.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Munari, E.; Nonino, M.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Lombardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Zitrin, A.; Halkola, A. and others

    2015-02-10

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≅ 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of a set of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.''3 by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of two cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components, parameterized with dual pseudo-isothermal total mass profiles. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ∼5%, including the systematic uncertainties estimated from six distinct mass models. We emphasize that the use of multiple-image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and knowledge of cluster membership based on extensive spectroscopic information is key to constructing robust high-resolution mass maps. We also produce magnification maps over the central area that is covered with HST observations. We investigate the galaxy contribution, both in terms of total and stellar mass, to the total mass budget of the cluster. When compared with the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations, our results point to a lack of massive subhalos in the inner regions of simulated clusters with total masses similar to that of MACS J0416.1–2403. Our findings of the location and shape of the cluster dark-matter halo density profiles and on the cluster substructures provide intriguing

  20. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia - III. Accurate SB2 orbits for 10 binaries and masses of HIP 87895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, F.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Famaey, B.; Guillout, P.; Lebreton, Y.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Mazeh, T.; Salomon, J.-B.; Soubiran, C.; Tal-Or, L.

    2016-05-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries has been observed since 2010 with the Spectrographe pour l'Observation des PHénomènes des Intérieurs Stellaires et des Exoplanètes spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 per cent when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. In this paper, we present the results from five years of observations of 10 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 37 to 881 d. Using the TODMOR algorithm, we computed radial velocities from the spectra, and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the components are then obtained with an accuracy better than 1.2 per cent for the 10 binaries. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 87895 with an accuracy of 0.98 and 1.2 per cent, respectively.

  1. Accurate analysis of trace earthy-musty odorants in water by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kang; Zhang, Jin Na; Zhao, Min; He, Ya Juan

    2012-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous separation and determination of trace earthy-musty compounds including geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2,3,4-trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, and 2,3,6-trichloroanisole in water samples. This method combined headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and used naphthalene-d(8) as internal standard. A divinylbenzene/carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber exposing at 90°C for 30 min provided effective sample enrichment in HS-SPME. These compounds were separated by a DB-1701MS capillary column and detected in selected ion monitoring mode within 12 min. The method showed a good linearity from 1 to 100 ng L(-1) and detection limits within (0.25-0.61 ng L(-1)) for all compounds. Using naphthalene-d(8) as the internal standard, the intra-day relative standard deviation (RSD) was within (2.6-3.4%), while the inter-day RSD was (3.5-4.9%). Good recoveries were obtained for tap water (80.5-90.6%), river water (81.5-92.4%), and lake water (83.5-95.2%) spiked at 10 ng L(-1). Compared with other methods using HS-SPME for determination of odor compounds in water samples, this present method had more analytes, better precision, and recovery. This method was successfully applied for analysis of earthy-musty odors in water samples from different sources. PMID:22740259

  2. The Generating Function of CID, ETD, and CID/ETD Pairs of Tandem Mass Spectra: Applications to Database Search*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtae; Mischerikow, Nikolai; Bandeira, Nuno; Navarro, J. Daniel; Wich, Louis; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent emergence of new mass spectrometry techniques (e.g. electron transfer dissociation, ETD) and improved availability of additional proteases (e.g. Lys-N) for protein digestion in high-throughput experiments raised the challenge of designing new algorithms for interpreting the resulting new types of tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra. Traditional MS/MS database search algorithms such as SEQUEST and Mascot were originally designed for collision induced dissociation (CID) of tryptic peptides and are largely based on expert knowledge about fragmentation of tryptic peptides (rather than machine learning techniques) to design CID-specific scoring functions. As a result, the performance of these algorithms is suboptimal for new mass spectrometry technologies or nontryptic peptides. We recently proposed the generating function approach (MS-GF) for CID spectra of tryptic peptides. In this study, we extend MS-GF to automatically derive scoring parameters from a set of annotated MS/MS spectra of any type (e.g. CID, ETD, etc.), and present a new database search tool MS-GFDB based on MS-GF. We show that MS-GFDB outperforms Mascot for ETD spectra or peptides digested with Lys-N. For example, in the case of ETD spectra, the number of tryptic and Lys-N peptides identified by MS-GFDB increased by a factor of 2.7 and 2.6 as compared with Mascot. Moreover, even following a decade of Mascot developments for analyzing CID spectra of tryptic peptides, MS-GFDB (that is not particularly tailored for CID spectra or tryptic peptides) resulted in 28% increase over Mascot in the number of peptide identifications. Finally, we propose a statistical framework for analyzing multiple spectra from the same precursor (e.g. CID/ETD spectral pairs) and assigning p values to peptide-spectrum-spectrum matches. PMID:20829449

  3. Combined use of medium mass resolution and desolvation introduction system for accurate plutonium determination in the femtogram range by inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointurier, Fabien; Pottin, Anne-Claire; Hémet, Philippe; Hubert, Amélie

    2011-03-01

    Formation of a polyatomic species made of an atom of a heavy element like lead, mercury or iridium, and atoms abundant in plasma (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen) when using an inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS) may lead to false detection of femtograms (fg) of plutonium or bias in the measured concentrations. Mathematical corrections, based on the measurement of heavy element concentrations in the sample solutions and determination of the extents of formation of the polyatomic interferences, are efficient but time-consuming and degrade detection limits. We describe and discuss a new method based on the combination of, on the one hand, medium mass resolution (MR) of the ICP-SFMS to separate plutonium isotopes physically from interfering polyatomic species, and, on the other, use of a desolvation introduction system (DIS) to enhance sensitivity, thus partly compensating for the loss of transmission due to use of a higher resolution. Plutonium peaks are perfectly separated from the major interfering species (PbO 2, HgAr, and IrO 3) with a mass resolution of ~ 4000. The resulting nine-fold transmission loss is partly compensated by a five-fold increase in sensitivity obtained with the DIS and a lower background. The instrumental detection limits for plutonium isotopes, calculated for measurements of pure synthetic solutions, of the new method (known as MR-DIS method) and of the one currently used in the laboratory (LR method), based on a low mass resolution equal to 360, a microconcentric nebulizer and two in-line cooled spray chambers, are roughly equivalent, at around 0.2 fg ml - 1 . Regarding the measurement of real-life samples, the results obtained with both methods agree and the corresponding analytical detection limits for plutonium isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu are of a few fg·ml - 1 of sample solution, slightly lower with the MR-DIS method than with the current LR method. Although less sensitive than other plutonium

  4. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  5. A database of chromatographic properties and mass spectra of fatty acid methyl esters from omega-3 products.

    PubMed

    Wasta, Ziar; Mjøs, Svein A

    2013-07-19

    Fatty acids in products claimed to contain oils with the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were analyzed as fatty acid methyl esters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using electron impact ionization. To cover the variation in products on the market, the 20 products that were studied in detail were selected from a larger sample set by statistical methodology. The samples were analyzed on two different stationary phases (polyethylene glycol and cyanopropyl) and the fatty acid methyl esters were identified by methodology that combines the mass spectra and retention indices into a single score value. More that 100 fatty acids had a chromatographic area above 0.1% of the total, in at least one product. Retention indices are reported as equivalent chain lengths, and overlap patterns on the two columns are discussed. Both columns were found suitable for analysis of major and nutritionally important fatty acids, but the large number of minor compounds that may act as interferents will be problematic if low limits of quantification are required in analyses of similar sample types. A database of mass spectral libraries and equivalent chain lengths of the detected compounds has been compiled and is available online. PMID:23773584

  6. Accurate and Sensitive Peptide Identification with Mascot Percolator

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Markus; Yu, Lu; Hubbard, Tim; Choudhary, Jyoti

    2009-01-01

    Sound scoring methods for sequence database search algorithms such as Mascot and Sequest are essential for sensitive and accurate peptide and protein identifications from proteomic tandem mass spectrometry data. In this paper, we present a software package that interfaces Mascot with Percolator, a well performing machine learning method for rescoring database search results, and demonstrate it to be amenable for both low and high accuracy mass spectrometry data, outperforming all available Mascot scoring schemes as well as providing reliable significance measures. Mascot Percolator can be readily used as a stand alone tool or integrated into existing data analysis pipelines. PMID:19338334

  7. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for fast and accurate identification of Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species.

    PubMed

    Sitterlé, E; Giraud, S; Leto, J; Bouchara, J P; Rougeron, A; Morio, F; Dauphin, B; Angebault, C; Quesne, G; Beretti, J L; Hassouni, N; Nassif, X; Bougnoux, M E

    2014-09-01

    An increasing number of infections due to Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species has been reported during the past decades, both in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Additionally, these fungi are now recognized worldwide as common agents of fungal colonization of the airways in cystic fibrosis patients, which represents a risk factor for disseminated infections after lung transplantation. Currently six species are described within the Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium genus, including Scedosporium prolificans and species of the Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium apiospermum complex (i.e. S. apiospermum sensu stricto, Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium aurantiacum, Pseudallescheria minutispora and Scedosporium dehoogii). Precise identification of clinical isolates at the species level is required because these species differ in their antifungal drug susceptibility patterns. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)/mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool to rapidly identify moulds at the species level. We investigated the potential of this technology to discriminate Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species. Forty-seven reference strains were used to build a reference database library. Profiles from 3-, 5- and 7-day-old cultures of each reference strain were analysed to identify species-specific discriminating profiles. The database was tested for accuracy using a set of 64 clinical or environmental isolates previously identified by multilocus sequencing. All isolates were unequivocally identified at the species level by MALDI-TOF/MS. Our results, obtained using a simple protocol, without prior protein extraction or standardization of the culture, demonstrate that MALDI-TOF/MS is a powerful tool for rapid identification of Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium species that cannot be currently identified by morphological examination in the clinical setting. PMID:24476388

  8. EVOLUTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND YIELDS OF LOW-MASS ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES. II. THE FRUITY DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Cristallo, S.; Dominguez, I.; Abia, C.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Di Rico, G.; Quintini, M.; Bisterzo, S.

    2011-12-01

    By using updated stellar low-mass stars models, we systematically investigate the nucleosynthesis processes occurring in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In this paper, we present a database dedicated to the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars: FRANEC Repository of Updated Isotopic Tables and Yields (FRUITY). An interactive Web-based interface allows users to freely download the full (from H to Bi) isotopic composition, as it changes after each third dredge-up (TDU) episode and the stellar yields the models produce. A first set of AGB models, having masses in the range 1.5 {<=}M/M{sub Sun} {<=} 3.0 and metallicities 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {<=} Z {<=} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}, is discussed. For each model, a detailed description of the physical and the chemical evolution is provided. In particular, we illustrate the details of the s-process and we evaluate the theoretical uncertainties due to the parameterization adopted to model convection and mass loss. The resulting nucleosynthesis scenario is checked by comparing the theoretical [hs/ls] and [Pb/hs] ratios to those obtained from the available abundance analysis of s-enhanced stars. On the average, the variation with the metallicity of these spectroscopic indexes is well reproduced by theoretical models, although the predicted spread at a given metallicity is substantially smaller than the observed one. Possible explanations for such a difference are briefly discussed. An independent check of the TDU efficiency is provided by the C-stars luminosity function. Consequently, theoretical C-stars luminosity functions for the Galactic disk and the Magellanic Clouds have been derived. We generally find good agreement with observations.

  9. Molecular speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometric methods for accurate, reproducible and direct quantification of reduced, oxidized and total glutathione in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fahrenholz, Timothy; Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Kingston, H M Skip; Faber, Scott; Kern, John C; Pamuku, Matt; Miller, Logan; Chatragadda, Hemasudha; Kogelnik, Andreas

    2015-01-20

    Novel protocols were developed to accurately quantify reduced (GSH), oxidized (GSSG) and total (tGSH) glutathione in biological samples using molecular speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS). For GSH and GSSG measurement, the sample was spiked with isotopically enriched analogues of the analytes ((310)GSH and (616)GSSG), along with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and treated with acetonitrile to solubilize the endogenous analytes via protein precipitation and equilibrate them with the spikes. The supernatant was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the analytes were quantified with simultaneous tracking and correction for auto-oxidation of GSH to GSSG. For tGSH assay, a (310)GSH-spiked sample was treated with dithiothreitol (DTT) to convert disulfide-bonded glutathione to GSH. After removing the protein, the supernatant was analyzed by LC-MS/MS and the analyte was quantified by single-spiking isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The mathematical relationships in IDMS and SIDMS quantifications are based on isotopic ratios and do not involve calibration curves. The protocols were validated using spike recovery tests and by analyzing synthetic standard solutions. Red blood cell (RBC) and saliva samples obtained from healthy subjects, and whole blood samples collected and shipped from a remote location were analyzed. The concentrations of tGSH in the RBC and whole blood samples were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those found in saliva. The fractions of GSSG were 0.2-2.2% (RBC and blood) and 15-47% (saliva) of the free glutathione (GSH + 2xGSSG) in the corresponding samples. Up to 3% GSH was auto-oxidized to GSSG during sample workup; the highest oxidations (>1%) were in the saliva samples. PMID:25519489

  10. Exploring Site-Specific N-Glycosylation Microheterogeneity of Haptoglobin using Glycopeptide CID Tandem Mass Spectra and Glycan Database Search

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Pompach, Petr; Goldman, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is a common protein modification with a significant role in many vital cellular processes and human diseases, making the characterization of protein-attached glycan structures important for understanding cell biology and disease processes. Direct analysis of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry of glycopeptides promises site-specific elucidation of N-glycan microheterogeneity, something which detached N-glycan and de-glycosylated peptide analyses cannot provide. However, successful implementation of direct N-glycopeptide analysis by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenge. In this work, we consider algorithmic techniques for the analysis of LC-MS/MS data acquired from glycopeptide-enriched fractions of enzymatic digests of purified proteins. We implement a computational strategy which takes advantage of the properties of CID fragmentation spectra of N-glycopeptides, matching the MS/MS spectra to peptide-glycan pairs from protein sequences and glycan structure databases. Significantly, we also propose a novel false-discovery-rate estimation technique to estimate and manage the number of false identifications. We use a human glycoprotein standard, haptoglobin, digested with trypsin and GluC, enriched for glycopeptides using HILIC chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to demonstrate our algorithmic strategy and evaluate its performance. Our software, GlycoPeptideSearch (GPS), assigned glycopeptide identifications to 246 of the spectra at false-discovery-rate 5.58%, identifying 42 distinct haptoglobin peptide-glycan pairs at each of the four haptoglobin N-linked glycosylation sites. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by analyzing plasma-derived haptoglobin, identifying 136 N-linked glycopeptide spectra at false-discovery-rate 0.4%, representing 15 distinct glycopeptides on at least three of the four N-linked glycosylation sites. The software, GlycoPeptideSearch, is available for download from http

  11. Distance Restraints from Crosslinking Mass Spectrometry: Mining a Molecular Dynamics Simulation Database to Evaluate Lysine-Lysine Distances

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Rysavy, Steven; Kahraman, Abdullah; Hafen, Ryan P.; Daggett, Valerie; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2014-03-18

    Integrative structural biology models the structures of protein complexes that are intractable by classical structural methods (because of extreme size, dynamics, or heterogeneity) by combining computational structural modeling with data from experimental methods. One such method is chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS), in which cross-linked peptides, derived from a covalently cross-linked protein complex and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, pinpoint protein residues close in three-dimensional space. The commonly used lysine-reactive N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents disuccinimidylsuberate (DSS) and bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate (BS3) have a linker arm that is 11.4 Å long when fully extended. However, XL-MS studies on proteins of known structure frequently report cross-links that exceed this distance. Typically, a tolerance of ~3 Å is added to the theoretical maximum to account for this observation, with little justification for the value chosen. We used the Dynameomics database, a repository of high-quality molecular dynamics simulations of 807 proteins representative of all protein folds, to investigate the change in lysine-lysine distances resulting from native-state dynamics on the time-scale of tens of nanoseconds. We conclude that observed cross-links are consistent with a protein structure if the distance between cross-linked lysine Nζ atoms is less than the cross-linker length plus 11.3 Å. For DSS or BS3, this corresponds to a Cα to Cα distance of 30.4 Å. This analysis provides a theoretical basis for the widespread practice of adding a tolerance to the crosslinker length when comparing XL-MS results to structures, and indicates the appropriate values of an XLMS derived distance constraint to use in structural modeling.

  12. Exploring site-specific N-glycosylation microheterogeneity of haptoglobin using glycopeptide CID tandem mass spectra and glycan database search.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Pompach, Petr; Goldman, Radoslav; Edwards, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation is a common protein modification with a significant role in many vital cellular processes and human diseases, making the characterization of protein-attached glycan structures important for understanding cell biology and disease processes. Direct analysis of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry of glycopeptides promises site-specific elucidation of N-glycan microheterogeneity, something that detached N-glycan and deglycosylated peptide analyses cannot provide. However, successful implementation of direct N-glycopeptide analysis by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenge. In this work, we consider algorithmic techniques for the analysis of LC-MS/MS data acquired from glycopeptide-enriched fractions of enzymatic digests of purified proteins. We implement a computational strategy that takes advantage of the properties of CID fragmentation spectra of N-glycopeptides, matching the MS/MS spectra to peptide-glycan pairs from protein sequences and glycan structure databases. Significantly, we also propose a novel false discovery rate estimation technique to estimate and manage the number of false identifications. We use a human glycoprotein standard, haptoglobin, digested with trypsin and GluC, enriched for glycopeptides using HILIC chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS to demonstrate our algorithmic strategy and evaluate its performance. Our software, GlycoPeptideSearch (GPS), assigned glycopeptide identifications to 246 of the spectra at a false discovery rate of 5.58%, identifying 42 distinct haptoglobin peptide-glycan pairs at each of the four haptoglobin N-linked glycosylation sites. We further demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by analyzing plasma-derived haptoglobin, identifying 136 N-linked glycopeptide spectra at a false discovery rate of 0.4%, representing 15 distinct glycopeptides on at least three of the four N-linked glycosylation sites. The software, GlycoPeptideSearch, is available for download from http

  13. An optimized method for the accurate determination of patulin in apple products by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Miyeong; Kim, Byungjoo; Baek, Song-Yee

    2015-07-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several molds in fruits, has been frequently detected in apple products. Therefore, regulatory bodies have established recommended maximum permitted patulin concentrations for each type of apple product. Although several analytical methods have been adopted to determine patulin in food, quality control of patulin analysis is not easy, as reliable certified reference materials (CRMs) are not available. In this study, as a part of a project for developing CRMs for patulin analysis, we developed isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) as a higher-order reference method for the accurate value-assignment of CRMs. (13)C7-patulin was used as internal standard. Samples were extracted with ethyl acetate to improve recovery. For further sample cleanup with solid-phase extraction (SPE), the HLB SPE cartridge was chosen after comparing with several other types of SPE cartridges. High-performance liquid chromatography was performed on a multimode column for proper retention and separation of highly polar and water-soluble patulin from sample interferences. Sample extracts were analyzed by LC/MS/MS with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode with selected reaction monitoring of patulin and (13)C7-patulin at m/z 153→m/z 109 and m/z 160→m/z 115, respectively. The validity of the method was tested by measuring gravimetrically fortified samples of various apple products. In addition, the repeatability and the reproducibility of the method were tested to evaluate the performance of the method. The method was shown to provide accurate measurements in the 3-40 μg/kg range with a relative expanded uncertainty of around 1%. PMID:25925860

  14. Tandem Mass Spectrometry Measurement of the Collision Products of Carbamate Anions Derived from CO2 Capture Sorbents: Paving the Way for Accurate Quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Phil; Fisher, Keith J.; Attalla, Moetaz Ibrahim

    2011-08-01

    The reaction between CO2 and aqueous amines to produce a charged carbamate product plays a crucial role in post-combustion capture chemistry when primary and secondary amines are used. In this paper, we report the low energy negative-ion CID results for several anionic carbamates derived from primary and secondary amines commonly used as post-combustion capture solvents. The study was performed using the modern equivalent of a triple quadrupole instrument equipped with a T-wave collision cell. Deuterium labeling of 2-aminoethanol (1,1,2,2,-d4-2-aminoethanol) and computations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level were used to confirm the identity of the fragmentation products for 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate (derived from 2-aminoethanol), in particular the ions CN-, NCO- and facile neutral losses of CO2 and water; there is precedent for the latter in condensed phase isocyanate chemistry. The fragmentations of 2-hydroxyethylcarbamate were generalized for carbamate anions derived from other capture amines, including ethylenediamine, diethanolamine, and piperazine. We also report unequivocal evidence for the existence of carbamate anions derived from sterically hindered amines ( Tris(2-hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and 2-methyl-2-aminopropanol). For the suite of carbamates investigated, diagnostic losses include the decarboxylation product (-CO2, 44 mass units), loss of 46 mass units and the fragments NCO- ( m/z 42) and CN- ( m/z 26). We also report low energy CID results for the dicarbamate dianion (-O2CNHC2H4NHCO{2/-}) commonly encountered in CO2 capture solution utilizing ethylenediamine. Finally, we demonstrate a promising ion chromatography-MS based procedure for the separation and quantitation of aqueous anionic carbamates, which is based on the reported CID findings. The availability of accurate quantitation methods for ionic CO2 capture products could lead to dynamic operational tuning of CO2 capture-plants and, thus, cost-savings via real-time manipulation of solvent

  15. CYP450 phenotyping and metabolite identification of quinine by accurate mass UPLC-MS analysis: a possible metabolic link to blackwater fever

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The naturally occurring alkaloid drug, quinine is commonly used for the treatment of severe malaria. Despite centuries of use, its metabolism is still not fully understood, and may play a role in the haemolytic disorders associated with the drug. Methods Incubations of quinine with CYPs 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were conducted, and the metabolites were characterized by accurate mass UPLC-MSE analysis. Reactive oxygen species generation was also measured in human erythrocytes incubated in the presence of quinine with and without microsomes. Results The metabolites 3-hydroxyquinine, 2’-oxoquininone, and O-desmethylquinine were observed after incubation with CYPs 3A4 (3-hydroxyquinine and 2’-oxoquininone) and 2D6 (O-desmethylquinine). In addition, multiple hydroxylations were observed both on the quinoline core and the quinuclidine ring system. Of the five primary abundance CYPs tested, 3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 2C19 all demonstrated activity toward quinine, while 1A2 did not. Further, quinine produced robust dose-dependent oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in the presence of microsomes. Conclusions Taken in context, these data suggest a CYP-mediated link between quinine metabolism and the poorly understood haemolytic condition known as blackwater fever, often associated with quinine ingestion. PMID:23800033

  16. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  17. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  18. Development of a sensitive, accurate and robust liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric method for profiling of angiotensin peptides in plasma and its application for atherosclerotic mice.

    PubMed

    Olkowicz, Mariola; Radulska, Adrianna; Suraj, Joanna; Kij, Agnieszka; Walczak, Maria; Chlopicki, Stefan; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2015-05-01

    Quantification of angiotensin (Ang) peptides in biological matrices is a challenge due to their low picomolar (pM) concentration and poor analytical performance of current methods. This work aimed to select an optimal strategy for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) quantification of major angiotensins in plasma of wild type and atherosclerotic mice. Optimal LC/MS set-up for Ang quantification was chosen, based on analytical performance, from: nanoflow/orbitrap, nanoflow/triple quadrupole and preconcentration nanoflow/triple quadrupole. The best LC/MS configuration (preconcentration nanoflow/triple quadrupole) was validated and used for measurement of angiotensins (Ang I, II, III, IV and (1-7)) in plasma of 6-month-old atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E/LDL receptor double knock-outs (ApoE/LDLR (--/--)) and wild type C57BL/6J (WT) mice. The method established for Ang quantification was selective, accurate and highly sensitive with LLOQ of 5pgmL(-1). The peak area intra-day precisions for Ang II and Ang-(1-7) were in the range 3.0-5.1 and 3.5-5.8, respectively, with corresponding accuracy of 95.4-103.5% and 95.6-106.3%. Plasma angiotensin profile was substantially modified in ApoE/LDLR knock-out mice with increase in concentration of Ang II from 37.6±21.3pgmL(-1) in WT to 200.2±47.6pgmL(-1). Concentrations of Ang I, III and IV were also increased 3-10 fold in ApoE/LDLR (--/--) mice while that of Ang-(1-7) was unchanged. We conclude that the method developed could be effectively used for accurate, comprehensive profiling of angiotensin peptides in mouse plasma. We identified substantial changes in renin-angiotensin system in a genetic mouse model of atherosclerosis consistent with the overactivation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and the impairment of ACE2. PMID:25817477

  19. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  20. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Fungi and the Effects of Database Composition on Protein Inferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry has shown potential for identifying and detecting plant pathogens. Unlike antibody-based assays like ELISA, mass spectrometry does not require the use of pathogen-specific reagents for the detection of pathogen-specific proteins and peptides. However, the mass spectrometry appro...

  1. Evaluation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the metabolic profiling of plant-fungus interaction in Aquilaria malaccensis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; Chin, Sung-Tong; Perlmutter, Patrick; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-03-27

    To explore the possible obligate interactions between the phytopathogenic fungus and Aquilaria malaccensis which result in generation of a complex array of secondary metabolites, we describe a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) method, coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the untargeted and comprehensive metabolic profiling of essential oils from naturally infected A. malaccensis trees. A polar/non-polar column configuration was employed, offering an improved separation pattern of components when compared to other column sets. Four different grades of the oils displayed quite different metabolic patterns, suggesting the evolution of a signalling relationship between the host tree (emergence of various phytoalexins) and fungi (activation of biotransformation). In total, ca. 550 peaks/metabolites were detected, of which tentative identification of 155 of these compounds was reported, representing between 20.1% and 53.0% of the total ion count. These are distributed over the chemical families of monoterpenic and sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes (comprised of ketone, aldehyde, oxide, alcohol, lactone, keto-alcohol and diol), norterpenoids, diterpenoids, short chain glycols, carboxylic acids and others. The large number of metabolites detected, combined with the ease with which they are located in the 2D separation space, emphasises the importance of a comprehensive analytical approach for the phytochemical analysis of plant metabolomes. Furthermore, the potential of this methodology in grading agarwood oils by comparing the obtained metabolic profiles (pattern recognition for unique metabolite chemical families) is discussed. The phytocomplexity of the agarwood oils signified the production of a multitude of plant-fungus mediated secondary metabolites as chemical signals for natural ecological communication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most complete

  2. Accurate and reliable quantification of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D species by liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry[S

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, Gerhard; Matysik, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In general, mass spectrometric quantification of small molecules in routine laboratory testing utilizes liquid chromatography coupled to low mass resolution triple-quadrupole mass spectrometers (QQQs). Here we introduce high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (quadrupole-Orbitrap) for the quantification of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D], a marker of the vitamin D status, because the specificity of 25(OH)D immunoassays is still questionable and mass spectrometric quantification is becoming increasingly important. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/HR-MS) was used to quantify 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol [25(OH)D2], and their C3-epimers 3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 3-epi-25(OH)D2. The method has a run time of 5 min and was validated according to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency guidelines. High mass resolution was advantageously applied to separate a quasi-isobaric interference of the internal standard D6-25(OH)D2 with 3-epi-25(OH)D3. All analytes showed an imprecision of below 10% coefficient of variation (CV), trueness between 90% and 110%, and limits of quantification below 10 nM. Concentrations measured by LC-MS/HR-MS are in good agreement with those of the National Institute of Standards and Technology reference methods using LC-MS/MS (QQQ). In conclusion, quantification of 25(OH)D by LC-MS/HR-MS is applicable for routine testing and also holds promise for highly specific quantification of other small molecules. PMID:25833687

  3. ProXL (Protein Cross-Linking Database): A Platform for Analysis, Visualization, and Sharing of Protein Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ProXL is a Web application and accompanying database designed for sharing, visualizing, and analyzing bottom-up protein cross-linking mass spectrometry data with an emphasis on structural analysis and quality control. ProXL is designed to be independent of any particular software pipeline. The import process is simplified by the use of the ProXL XML data format, which shields developers of data importers from the relative complexity of the relational database schema. The database and Web interfaces function equally well for any software pipeline and allow data from disparate pipelines to be merged and contrasted. ProXL includes robust public and private data sharing capabilities, including a project-based interface designed to ensure security and facilitate collaboration among multiple researchers. ProXL provides multiple interactive and highly dynamic data visualizations that facilitate structural-based analysis of the observed cross-links as well as quality control. ProXL is open-source, well-documented, and freely available at https://github.com/yeastrc/proxl-web-app. PMID:27302480

  4. ProXL (Protein Cross-Linking Database): A Platform for Analysis, Visualization, and Sharing of Protein Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Riffle, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Zelter, Alex; Davis, Trisha N

    2016-08-01

    ProXL is a Web application and accompanying database designed for sharing, visualizing, and analyzing bottom-up protein cross-linking mass spectrometry data with an emphasis on structural analysis and quality control. ProXL is designed to be independent of any particular software pipeline. The import process is simplified by the use of the ProXL XML data format, which shields developers of data importers from the relative complexity of the relational database schema. The database and Web interfaces function equally well for any software pipeline and allow data from disparate pipelines to be merged and contrasted. ProXL includes robust public and private data sharing capabilities, including a project-based interface designed to ensure security and facilitate collaboration among multiple researchers. ProXL provides multiple interactive and highly dynamic data visualizations that facilitate structural-based analysis of the observed cross-links as well as quality control. ProXL is open-source, well-documented, and freely available at https://github.com/yeastrc/proxl-web-app . PMID:27302480

  5. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  6. A Comprehensive Review of School-Based Body Mass Index Screening Programs and Their Implications for School Health: Do the Controversies Accurately Reflect the Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Dominique G.; Bass, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whereas legislation for body mass index (BMI) surveillance and screening programs has passed in 25 states, the programs are often subject to ethical debates about confidentiality and privacy, school-to-parent communication, and safety and self-esteem issues for students. Despite this debate, no comprehensive analysis has been completed…

  7. The H-Index of `An Approach to Correlate Tandem Mass Spectral Data of Peptides with Amino Acid Sequences in a Protein Database'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Over 20 years ago a remarkable paper was published in the Journal of American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This paper from Jimmy Eng, Ashley McCormack, and John Yates described the use of protein databases to drive the interpretation of tandem mass spectra of peptides. This paper now has over 3660 citations and continues to average more than 260 per year over the last decade. This is an amazing scientific achievement. The reason for this is the paper was a cutting edge development at the moment in time when genomes of organisms were being sequenced, protein and peptide mass spectrometry was growing into the field of proteomics, and the power of computing was growing quickly in accordance with Moore's law. This work by the Yates lab grew in importance as genomics, proteomics, and computation all advanced and eventually resulted in the widely used SEQUEST algorithm and platform for the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry data. This commentary provides an analysis of the impact of this paper by analyzing the citations it has generated and the impact of these citing papers.

  8. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  9. Accurate prediction of H3O+ and D3O+ sensitivity coefficients to probe a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Polyansky, O. L.; Ovsyannikov, R. I.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of H316O+, H318O+, and D316O+ is investigated variationally using the nuclear motion program TROVE (Yurchenko, Thiel & Jensen). The calculations utilize new high-level ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Along with the mass dependence, frequency data and Einstein A coefficients are computed for all transitions probed. Particular attention is paid to the Δ|k| = 3 and Δ|k - l| = 3 transitions comprising the accidentally coinciding |J, K = 0, v2 = 0+> and |J, K = 3, v2 = 0-> rotation-inversion energy levels. The newly computed probes exhibit sensitivities comparable to their ammonia and methanol counterparts, thus demonstrating their potential for testing the cosmological stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. The theoretical TROVE results are in close agreement with sensitivities obtained using the non-rigid and rigid inverter approximate models, confirming that the ab initio theory used in the present study is adequate.

  10. High-throughput database search and large-scale negative polarity liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with ultraviolet photodissociation for complex proteomic samples.

    PubMed

    Madsen, James A; Xu, Hua; Robinson, Michelle R; Horton, Andrew P; Shaw, Jared B; Giles, David K; Kaoud, Tamer S; Dalby, Kevin N; Trent, M Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2013-09-01

    The use of ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) for the activation and dissociation of peptide anions is evaluated for broader coverage of the proteome. To facilitate interpretation and assignment of the resulting UVPD mass spectra of peptide anions, the MassMatrix database search algorithm was modified to allow automated analysis of negative polarity MS/MS spectra. The new UVPD algorithms were developed based on the MassMatrix database search engine by adding specific fragmentation pathways for UVPD. The new UVPD fragmentation pathways in MassMatrix were rigorously and statistically optimized using two large data sets with high mass accuracy and high mass resolution for both MS(1) and MS(2) data acquired on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer for complex Halobacterium and HeLa proteome samples. Negative mode UVPD led to the identification of 3663 and 2350 peptides for the Halo and HeLa tryptic digests, respectively, corresponding to 655 and 645 peptides that were unique when compared with electron transfer dissociation (ETD), higher energy collision-induced dissociation, and collision-induced dissociation results for the same digests analyzed in the positive mode. In sum, 805 and 619 proteins were identified via UVPD for the Halobacterium and HeLa samples, respectively, with 49 and 50 unique proteins identified in contrast to the more conventional MS/MS methods. The algorithm also features automated charge determination for low mass accuracy data, precursor filtering (including intact charge-reduced peaks), and the ability to combine both positive and negative MS/MS spectra into a single search, and it is freely open to the public. The accuracy and specificity of the MassMatrix UVPD search algorithm was also assessed for low resolution, low mass accuracy data on a linear ion trap. Analysis of a known mixture of three mitogen-activated kinases yielded similar sequence coverage percentages for UVPD of peptide anions versus conventional collision-induced dissociation of

  11. High-throughput Database Search and Large-scale Negative Polarity Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Ultraviolet Photodissociation for Complex Proteomic Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, James A.; Xu, Hua; Robinson, Michelle R.; Horton, Andrew P.; Shaw, Jared B.; Giles, David K.; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Dalby, Kevin N.; Trent, M. Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) for the activation and dissociation of peptide anions is evaluated for broader coverage of the proteome. To facilitate interpretation and assignment of the resulting UVPD mass spectra of peptide anions, the MassMatrix database search algorithm was modified to allow automated analysis of negative polarity MS/MS spectra. The new UVPD algorithms were developed based on the MassMatrix database search engine by adding specific fragmentation pathways for UVPD. The new UVPD fragmentation pathways in MassMatrix were rigorously and statistically optimized using two large data sets with high mass accuracy and high mass resolution for both MS1 and MS2 data acquired on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer for complex Halobacterium and HeLa proteome samples. Negative mode UVPD led to the identification of 3663 and 2350 peptides for the Halo and HeLa tryptic digests, respectively, corresponding to 655 and 645 peptides that were unique when compared with electron transfer dissociation (ETD), higher energy collision-induced dissociation, and collision-induced dissociation results for the same digests analyzed in the positive mode. In sum, 805 and 619 proteins were identified via UVPD for the Halobacterium and HeLa samples, respectively, with 49 and 50 unique proteins identified in contrast to the more conventional MS/MS methods. The algorithm also features automated charge determination for low mass accuracy data, precursor filtering (including intact charge-reduced peaks), and the ability to combine both positive and negative MS/MS spectra into a single search, and it is freely open to the public. The accuracy and specificity of the MassMatrix UVPD search algorithm was also assessed for low resolution, low mass accuracy data on a linear ion trap. Analysis of a known mixture of three mitogen-activated kinases yielded similar sequence coverage percentages for UVPD of peptide anions versus conventional collision-induced dissociation of

  12. Evaluation of triple stage mass spectrometry as a robust and accurate diagnostic tool for determination of free cordycepin in designer egg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi Hsin; Lim, Chee Wei; Chan, Sheot Harn

    2014-05-01

    Direct determination of free cordycepin in designer egg using a highly selective mass spectrometric (MS) technique aided by a rapid and efficient dilute-and-shoot workflow would enhance their application as diagnostic tools in food fraud control. Here, triple stage mass spectrometry (MS(3)) demonstrated excellent analyte selectivity capability even when incomplete chromatographic separation was performed. Method validation was performed at six concentration levels of 100, 200, 400, 800, 1200 and 1600ngg(-1). Spiking experiments were examined at three concentration levels of 200, 400, and 1200ngg(-1) in individual egg white and egg yolk, measured over 2days. MS(3) enabled ion chromatograms with zero-background interference to be made in egg extracts. MS(3) eliminated severe over recovery (p<0.05) observed in all fortified samples, a challenge that MRM-transition could not address in a single step. Matrix-matched calibrants were needed to compensate for over recovery observed under MRM-transition mode. PMID:24360442

  13. Accurate determination of ¹²⁹I concentrations and ¹²⁹I/¹³⁷Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-04-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (129)I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO3/HClO4, (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured (129)I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of (129)I/(137)Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. PMID:24525301

  14. Detection and Identification of Heme c-Modified Peptides by Histidine Affinity Chromatography, High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, and Database Searching

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Park, Jea H.; Belchik, Sara M.; Shi, Liang; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2012-12-07

    Multiheme c-type cytochromes (proteins with covalently attached heme c moieties) play important roles in extracellular metal respiration in dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-(LC-MS/MS) characterization of c-type cytochromes is hindered by the presence of multiple heme groups, since the heme c modified peptides are typically not observed, or if observed, not identified. Using a recently reported histidine affinity chromatography (HAC) procedure, we enriched heme c tryptic peptides from purified bovine heart cytochrome c, a bacterial decaheme cytochrome, and subjected these samples to LC-MS/MS analysis. Enriched bovine cytochrome c samples yielded three- to six-fold more confident peptide-spectrum matches to heme-c containing peptides than unenriched digests. In unenriched digests of the decaheme cytochrome MtoA from Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1, heme c peptides for four of the ten expected sites were observed by LC-MS/MS; following HAC fractionation, peptides covering nine out of ten sites were obtained. Heme c peptide spiked into E. coli lysates at mass ratios as low as 10-4 was detected with good signal-to-noise after HAC and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to HAC, we have developed a proteomics database search strategy that takes into account the unique physicochemical properties of heme c peptides. The results suggest that accounting for the double thioether link between heme c and peptide, and the use of the labile heme fragment as a reporter ion, can improve database searching results. The combination of affinity chromatography and heme-specific informatics yielded increases in the number of peptide-spectrum matches of 20-100-fold for bovine cytochrome c.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Indole and Oxindole Alkaloids from Leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth Using Liquid Chromatography-Accurate QToF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Sagi, Satyanarayanaraju; Wang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Mei; Ali, Zulfiqar; Smillie, Troy J; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    Alkaloids have been reported to be the major physiologically active constituents in Mitragyna. An analytical method was developed to provide an alternative, fast method for characterization of alkaloids from various M. speciosa samples. The separation was achieved using an RP octylsilyl (C8) column, MS detection, and a water-acetonitrile with formic acid gradient as the mobile phase. Ultra-HPLC/quadrupole time-of-flight MS analysis and characterization were performed on 12 corynanthe-type indole/oxindole alkaloids obtained from the leaves of M. speciosa Korth. The indoles and oxindoles had an open E ring with or without substitution occurring at the C9 position. The full single mass spectrum of alkaloids showed a strong signal for the protonated molecule [M+H]+. The product ion spectrum of mitragynine type of alkaloids showed strong response at m/z=174.0901 suggestive of an ion containing an odd number of nitrogen atoms corresponding to formula C11H12NO, which is characteristic of indole alkaloids. A multivariate statistical analysis technique, principal component analysis, was used to show discrimination between the M. speciosa samples. The results indicated that the analytical method is suitable for QC testing of various Mitragyna commercial samples and can be used to evaluate market products purported to contain M. speciosa. PMID:25857873

  16. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  17. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). PMID:24704185

  18. Feasibility of ultra-high performance liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for accurate determination of primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Calvarro, Sagrario; Fernández, Mario A; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates (PAEs) are ubiquitous toxic chemical compounds. During the last few years, some phthalate metabolites (MPAEs) have been proposed as appropriate biomarkers in human urine samples to determine PAE human intake and exposure. So, it is necessary to have fast, easy, robust and validated analytical methods to determine selected MPAEs in urine human samples. Two different instrumental methods based on gas (GC) and ultra-high performance liquid (UHPLC) chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) have been optimized, characterized and validated for the simultaneous determination of nine primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples. Both instrumental methods have similar sensitivity (detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 8.89 pg μL(-1) and from 0.06 to 0.49 pg μL(-1) in GC-MS and UHPLC-MS(2), respectively), precision (repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, which was lower than 8.4% in both systems, except for 5OH-MEHP in the case of GC-MS) and accuracy. But some advantages of the UHPLC-MS(2) method, such as more selectivity and lower time in the chromatographic runs (6.8 min vs. 28.5 min), have caused the UHPLC-MS(2) method to be chosen to analyze the twenty one human urine samples from the general Spanish population. Regarding these samples, MEP showed the highest median concentration (68.6 μg L(-1)), followed by MiBP (23.3 μg L(-1)), 5cx-MEPP (22.5 μg L(-1)) and MBP (19.3μgL(-1)). MMP (6.99 μg L(-1)), 5oxo-MEHP (6.15 μg L(-1)), 5OH-MEHP (5.30 μg L(-1)) and MEHP (4.40 μg L(-1)) showed intermediate levels. Finally, the lowest levels were found for MBzP (2.55 μg L(-1)). These data are within the same order of magnitude as those found in other similar populations. PMID:25467512

  19. Database Cross-Correlation at Scale: A Complete Census of Cool and Peculiar Brown Dwarfs in the 2MASS/SDSS Overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metchev, Stanimir

    Cross-correlation of surveys at different wavelengths is an effective way to leverage existing data for the generation of new science. We propose to perform a cross-match of the complete 2MASS and SDSS surveys as a demonstration of database cross-correlation at scale. The specific science case focuses on identifying cool brown dwarfs. Hundreds of L and T dwarfs have been discovered in the solar neighborhood, ~90% of which from 2MASS or SDSS. These have offered an unprecedented empirical context for the creation of sophisticated substellar phenomenology. A few dozen peculiar L and T dwarfs have also emerged from the larger sample. Their unusual spectral energy distributions have been particularly informative about the ranges of temperature, surface gravity, and dust content in ultra-cool atmospheres. Nevertheless, fundamental aspects of our knowledge of substellar astrophysics remain fragmented. The local space density of T dwarfs is hardly known to better than a factor of several. In fact, some of the nearest cool brown dwarfs may have escaped detection. Dust and cloud dynamics in ultra-cool atmospheres, and their dependence on temperature, gravity, and metallicity remain poorly understood. And in all likelihood, the few known examples of peculiar L and T dwarfs represent merely the extremes of a broad range of existing atmospheric conditions that have yet to be revealed. A combined search on 2MASS and SDSS is an effective way to generate a large, complete sample of L and T dwarfs to address these shortcomings. Cross-correlation of the two surveys can probe deeper, to cooler effective temperatures, and to a higher completeness level than searches on either survey alone. We validated this approach through a test cross-match of the 2099 sq.deg overlap area between 2MASS and SDSS Data Release 1. The demonstration project resulted not only in the first unbiased estimate of the space density and luminosity function of T0-T8 dwarfs, but also in doubling of the then known

  20. The Pisa pre-main sequence tracks and isochrones. A database covering a wide range of Z, Y, mass, and age values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognelli, E.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2011-09-01

    Context. In recent years new observations of pre-main sequence stars (pre-MS) with Z ≤ Z⊙ have been made available. To take full advantage of the continuously growing amount of data of pre-MS stars in different environments, we need to develop updated pre-MS models for a wide range of metallicity to assign reliable ages and masses to the observed stars. Aims: We present updated evolutionary pre-MS models and isochrones for a fine grid of mass, age, metallicity, and helium values. Methods: We use a standard and well-tested stellar evolutionary code (i.e. FRANEC), that adopts outer boundary conditions from detailed and realistic atmosphere models. In this code, we incorporate additional improvements to the physical inputs related to the equation of state and the low temperature radiative opacities essential to computing low-mass stellar models. Results: We make available via internet a large database of pre-MS tracks and isochrones for a wide range of chemical compositions (Z = 0.0002-0.03), masses (M = 0.2-7.0 M⊙), and ages (1-100 Myr) for a solar-calibrated mixing length parameter α (i.e. 1.68). For each chemical composition, additional models were computed with two different mixing length values, namely α = 1.2 and 1.9. Moreover, for Z ≥ 0.008, we also provided models with two different initial deuterium abundances. The characteristics of the models have been discussed in detail and compared with other work in the literature. The main uncertainties affecting theoretical predictions have been critically discussed. Comparisons with selected data indicate that there is close agreement between theory and observation. Tracks and isochrones are available on the web at the http://astro.df.unipi.it/stellar-models/Tracks and isochrones are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/533/A109

  1. Analysis of advanced glycation endproducts in selected food items by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry: Presentation of a dietary AGE database.

    PubMed

    Scheijen, Jean L J M; Clevers, Egbert; Engelen, Lian; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Brouns, Fred; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate an ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the determination of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in food items and to analyze AGEs in a selection of food items commonly consumed in a Western diet. N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N(ε)-(1-carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and N(δ)-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) were quantified in the protein fractions of 190 food items using UPLC-MS/MS. Intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision were 2-29%. The calibration curves showed perfect linearity in water and food matrices. We found the highest AGE levels in high-heat processed nut or grain products, and canned meats. Fruits, vegetables, butter and coffee had the lowest AGE content. The described method proved to be suitable for the quantification of three major AGEs in food items. The presented dietary AGE database opens the possibility to further quantify actual dietary exposure to AGEs and to explore its physiological impact on human health. PMID:26213088

  2. An evaluation for cross-species proteomics research by publicly available expressed sequence tag database search using tandem mass spectral data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei; Chen, Tong; Chan, ZhuLong

    2006-01-01

    With 1383 tandem mass spectra derived from 120 individual protein spots separated by the two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis of protein samples from three different species, comparative analyses were performed by searching the Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database (DB) and the NCBI non-redundant (nr) DB of green plants, respectively, which uses the Mascot search engine to establish a statistical basis. It was confirmed that the former could identify more peptides manually validated by de novo sequencing (DNS) from fewer species in more closely phylogenetic relationships than the latter in a statistically significant manner. Our data demonstrated that correct peptide identifications were given low Mascot scores (e.g. 6-14) and incorrect peptide identifications were given high Mascot scores (e.g. 68-83). Our data also showed that the current evaluation approaches to protein assignments are unsatisfactory because a few 'false-positive' proteins are recognized and several 'false-negative' proteins are rescued by manual validation. PMID:16941525

  3. Biofuel Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    Biofuel Database (Web, free access)   This database brings together structural, biological, and thermodynamic data for enzymes that are either in current use or are being considered for use in the production of biofuels.

  4. Electronic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Martha E.

    1985-01-01

    Presents examples of bibliographic, full-text, and numeric databases. Also discusses how to access these databases online, aids to online retrieval, and several issues and trends (including copyright and downloading, transborder data flow, use of optical disc/videodisc technology, and changing roles in database generation and processing). (JN)

  5. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  6. Evaluation and validation of an accurate mass screening method for the analysis of pesticides in fruits and vegetables using liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry with automated detection.

    PubMed

    López, Mónica García; Fussell, Richard J; Stead, Sara L; Roberts, Dominic; McCullagh, Mike; Rao, Ramesh

    2014-12-19

    This study reports the development and validation of a screening method for the detection of pesticides in 11 different fruit and vegetable commodities. The method was based on ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). The objective was to validate the method in accordance with the SANCO guidance document (12571/2013) on analytical quality control and validation procedures for pesticide residues analysis in food and feed. Samples were spiked with 199 pesticides, each at two different concentrations (0.01 and 0.05 mg kg(-1)) and extracted using the QuEChERS approach. Extracts were analysed by UPLC-QTOF-MS using generic acquisition parameters. Automated detection and data filtering were performed using the UNIFI™ software and the peaks detected evaluated against a proprietary scientific library containing information for 504 pesticides. The results obtained using different data processing parameters were evaluated for 4378 pesticide/commodities combinations at 0.01 and 0.05 mg kg(-1). Using mass accuracy (± 5 ppm) with retention time (± 0.2 min) and a low response threshold (100 counts) the validated Screening Detection Limits (SDLs) were 0.01 mg kg(-1) and 0.05 mg kg(-1) for 57% and 79% of the compounds tested, respectively, with an average of 10 false detects per sample analysis. Excluding the most complex matrices (onion and leek) the detection rates increased to 69% and 87%, respectively. The use of additional parameters such as isotopic pattern and fragmentation information further reduced the number of false detects but compromised the detection rates, particularly at lower residue concentrations. The challenges associated with the validation and subsequent implementation of a pesticide multi-residue screening method are also discussed. PMID:25465001

  7. Characterization of the phosphorylation sites of human high molecular weight neurofilament protein by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and database searching.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H; Veeranna; Shetty, K T; Pant, H C

    1998-03-17

    Hyperphosphorylated high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NF-H) exhibits extensive phosphorylation on lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeats in the C-terminal domain of the molecule. Specific phosphorylation sites in human NF-H were identified by proteolytic digestion and analysis of the resulting digests by a combination of microbore liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization tandem (MS/MS) ion trap mass spectrometry, and database searching. The computer programs utilized (PEPSEARCH and SEQUEST) are capable of identifying peptides and phosphorylation sites from uninterpreted MS/MS spectra, and by use of these methods, 27 phosphopeptides and their phosphorylated residues were identified. On the basis of these phosphopeptides, 38 phosphorylation sites in human NF-H were characterized. These include 33 KSP, lysine-threonine-proline (KTP) or arginine-serine-proline (RSP) sites and four unphosphorylated sites, all of which occur in the KSP repeat domain (residues 502-823); and one threonine phosphorylation site observed in a KVPTPEK motif. Six KSP sites were not characterized because of the failure to isolate and identify corresponding phosphopeptides. Heterogeneity in serine and threonine phosphorylation was observed at three sites or deduced to occur at three sites on the basis of enzyme specificity. As a result of the phosphorylated motifs identified (KSPAKEE, KSPVKEE, KS/TPEKAK, KSPEKEE, KSPVKAE, KSPAEAK, KSPPEAK, KSPEAKT, KSPAEVK, and KVPTPEK), human NF-H tail domain is postulated to be a substrate of proline-directed kinases. The threonine-phosphorylated KVPTPEK motif suggested the existence of a novel proline-directed kinase. PMID:9521714

  8. Statistical databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kogalovskii, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a review of problems related to statistical database systems, which are wide-spread in various fields of activity. Statistical databases (SDB) are referred to as databases that consist of data and are used for statistical analysis. Topics under consideration are: SDB peculiarities, properties of data models adequate for SDB requirements, metadata functions, null-value problems, SDB compromise protection problems, stored data compression techniques, and statistical data representation means. Also examined is whether the present Database Management Systems (DBMS) satisfy the SDB requirements. Some actual research directions in SDB systems are considered.

  9. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Using the Vitek MS System for Rapid and Accurate Identification of Dermatophytes on Solid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Monnin, Valérie; Girard, Victoria; Welker, Martin; Arsac, Maud; Cellière, Béatrice; Durand, Géraldine; Bosshard, Philipp P.; Farina, Claudio; Passera, Marco; Van Belkum, Alex; Petrini, Orlando; Tonolla, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to extend the Vitek MS fungal knowledge base version 2.0.0 to allow the robust identification of clinically relevant dermatophytes, using a variety of strains, incubation times, and growth conditions. First, we established a quick and reliable method for sample preparation to obtain a reliable and reproducible identification independently of the growth conditions. The Vitek MS V2.0.0 fungal knowledge base was then expanded using 134 well-characterized strains belonging to 17 species in the genera Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. Cluster analysis based on mass spectrum similarity indicated good species discrimination independently of the culture conditions. We achieved a good separation of the subpopulations of the Trichophyton anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae and of anthropophilic and zoophilic strains of Trichophyton interdigitale. Overall, the 1,130 mass spectra obtained for dermatophytes gave an estimated identification performance of 98.4%. The expanded fungal knowledge base was then validated using 131 clinical isolates of dermatophytes belonging to 13 taxa. For 8 taxa all strains were correctly identified, and for 3 the rate of successful identification was >90%; 75% (6/8) of the M. gypseum strains were correctly identified, whereas only 47% (18/38) of the African T. rubrum population (also called T. soudanense) were recognized accurately, with a large quantity of strains misidentified as T. violaceum, demonstrating the close relationship of these two taxa. The method of sample preparation was fast and efficient and the expanded Vitek MS fungal knowledge base reliable and robust, allowing reproducible dermatophyte identifications in the routine laboratory. PMID:25297329

  10. Database Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  11. Maize databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is a succinct overview of maize data held in the species-specific database MaizeGDB (the Maize Genomics and Genetics Database), and selected multi-species data repositories, such as Gramene/Ensembl Plants, Phytozome, UniProt and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), ...

  12. An optimized method for neurotransmitters and their metabolites analysis in mouse hypothalamus by high performance liquid chromatography-Q Exactive hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Lin; Li, Hui; Wang, Bing; Liu, Shu-Ying

    2016-02-15

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) and their metabolites are known to play an essential role in maintaining various physiological functions in nervous system. However, there are many difficulties in the detection of NTs together with their metabolites in biological samples. A new method for NTs and their metabolites detection by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q Exactive hybrid quadruple-orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) was established in this paper. This method was a great development of the applying of Q Exactive MS in the quantitative analysis. This method enabled a rapid quantification of ten compounds within 18min. Good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient above 0.99. The concentration range of the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) level were 0.0008-0.05nmol/mL and 0.002-25.0nmol/mL respectively. Precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD) of this method were at 0.36-12.70%. Recovery ranges were between 81.83% and 118.04%. Concentrations of these compounds in mouse hypothalamus were detected by Q Exactive LC-MS technology with this method. PMID:26812177

  13. Application of the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach to the Proteome Analysis of Sub-cellular Fractions Obtained from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 Aerobic and Photosynthetic Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Dominguez, Migual; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Tavano, Christine; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-08-04

    Abstract The high-throughput accurate mass and time tag (AMT) proteomic approach was utilized to characterize the proteomes for cytoplasm, cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane fractions from aerobic and photosynthetic cultures of the gram-nagtive bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. In addition, we analyzed the proteins within purified chromatophore fractions that house the photosynthetic apparatus from photosynthetically grown cells. In total, 8300 peptides were identified with high confidence from at least one sub-cellular fraction from either cell culture. These peptides were derived from 1514 genes or 35% percent of proteins predicted to be encoded by the genome. A significant number of these proteins were detected within a single sub-cellular fraction and their localization was compared to in-silico predictions. However, the majority of proteins were observed in multiple sub-cellular fractions, and the most likely sub-cellular localization for these proteins was investigated using a Z-score analysis of peptide abundance along with clustering techniques. Good (81%) agreement was observed between the experimental results and in-silico predictions. The AMT tag approach provides localization evidence for those proteins that have no predicted localization information, those annotated as putative proteins, and/or for those proteins annotated as hypothetical and conserved hypothetical.

  14. Body mass index and survival after diagnosis of invasive breast cancer: a study based on the Japanese National Clinical Database-Breast Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Masaaki; Tomotaki, Ai; Miyata, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Niikura, Naoki; Anan, Keisei; Hayashi, Naoki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Ishida, Takanori; Masuoka, Hideji; Iijima, Kotaro; Masuda, Shinobu; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Seigo; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have reported the association between body mass index (BMI) and outcome among Asian breast cancer patients. We analyzed data for 20,090 female invasive breast cancer patients who had been followed-up for a median period of 6.7 years entered in the National Clinical Database-Breast Cancer Registry between 2004 and 2006. We used mainly the WHO criteria for BMI (kg/m(2) ) categories; <18.5 (underweight), ≥18.5-<21.8 (reference), ≥21.8-<25, ≥25-<30 (overweight), and ≥30 (obese). We divided normal weight patients into two subgroups because this category includes many patients compared to others. The timing of BMI measurement was not specified. The Cox proportional hazards model and cubic spline regression were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Smoking, alcohol, and physical activity were not controlled. A total of 1418 all-cause, 937 breast cancer-specific deaths, and 2433 recurrences were observed. Obesity was associated with an increased risk of all-cause (HR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.16-1.83) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.11-1.93) for all patients, and with all-cause (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.13-1.92) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.13-2.20) for postmenopausal patients. Being underweight was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death for all (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.16-1.71) and for postmenopausal patients (HR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.15-1.84). With regard to subtype and menopausal status, obesity was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer-specific death for all cases of luminal B tumor (HR: 2.59; 95% CI: 1.51-4.43; Pheterogeneity of Luminal B vs. Triple negative = 0.016) and for postmenopausal patients with luminal B tumor (HR: 3.24; 95% CI: 1.71-6.17). Being obese or underweight is associated with a higher risk of death among female breast cancer patients in Japan. PMID:26923549

  15. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  16. BIOMARKERS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This database was developed by assembling and evaluating the literature relevant to human biomarkers. It catalogues and evaluates the usefulness of biomarkers of exposure, susceptibility and effect which may be relevant for a longitudinal cohort study. In addition to describing ...

  17. Use of Ga for mass bias correction for the accurate determination of copper isotope ratio in the NIST SRM 3114 Cu standard and geological samples by MC-ICP MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Zhou, L.; Tong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The absolute determination of the Cu isotope ratio in NIST SRM 3114 based on a regression mass bias correction model is performed for the first time with NIST SRM 944 Ga as the calibrant. A value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for the 65Cu/63Cu ratio was obtained with a value of +0.18±0.04 ‰ (2SD, n=5) for δ65Cu relative to NIST 976.The availability of the NIST SRM 3114 material, now with the absolute value of the 65Cu/63Cu ratio and a δ65Cu value relative to NIST 976 makes it suitable as a new candidate reference material for Cu isotope studies. In addition, a protocol is described for the accurate and precise determination of δ65Cu values of geological reference materials. Purification of Cu from the sample matrix was performed using the AG MP-1M Bio-Rad resin. The column recovery for geological samples was found to be 100±2% (2SD, n=15).A modified method of standard-sample bracketing with internal normalization for mass bias correction was employed by adding natural Ga to both the sample and the solution of NIST SRM 3114, which was used as the bracketing standard. An absolute value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for 65Cu/63Cu quantified in this study was used to calibrate the 69Ga/71Ga ratio in the two adjacent bracketing standards of SRM 3114,their average value of 69Ga/71Ga was then used to correct the 65Cu/63Cu ratio in the sample. Measured δ65Cu values of 0.18±0.04‰ (2SD, n=20),0.13±0.04‰ (2SD, n=9),0.08±0.03‰ (2SD, n=6),0.01±0.06‰(2SD, n=4) and 0.26±0.04‰ (2SD, n=7) were obtained for five geological reference materials of BCR-2,BHVO-2,AGV-2,BIR-1a,and GSP-2,respectively,in agreement with values obtained in previous studies.

  18. An integrated strategy for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins and related peptides in natural blooms by liquid chromatography-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cintia; Caixach, Josep

    2015-08-14

    An integrated high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) strategy has been developed for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins (MCs) and related peptides in water blooms. The natural samples (water and algae) were filtered for independent analysis of aqueous and sestonic fractions. These fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-Orbitrap-HCD-MS. MALDI, ESI and the study of fragmentation sequences have been provided crucial structural information. The potential of combined positive and negative ionization modes, full scan and fragmentation acquisition modes (TOF/TOF and HCD) by HRMS and high resolution and accurate mass was investigated in order to allow unequivocal determination of MCs. Besides, a reliable quantitation has been possible by HRMS. This composition helped to decrease the probability of false positives and negatives, as alternative to commonly used LC-ESI-MS/MS methods. The analysis was non-target, therefore covered the possibility to analyze all MC analogs concurrently without any pre-selection of target MC. Furthermore, archived data was subjected to retrospective "post-targeted" analysis and a screening of other potential toxins and related peptides as anabaenopeptins in the samples was done. Finally, the MS protocol and identification tools suggested were applied to the analysis of characteristic water blooms from Spanish reservoirs. PMID:26141269

  19. Creation of an In-House Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Corynebacterineae Database Overcomes Difficulties in Identification of Nocardia farcinica Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Dacko, Władysław; Sikora, Joanna; Gurlaga, Danuta; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Miękisiak, Grzegorz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare disease that is caused by Gram-positive actinobacteria of the Nocardia genus and affects predominantly immunocompromised patients. In its disseminated form, it has a predilection for the central nervous system and is associated with high mortality rates. Therefore, prompt identification of the pathogen is critical. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a relatively novel technique used for identification of microorganisms. In this work, an upgraded MALDI-TOF Biotyper database containing Corynebacterineae representatives of strains deposited in the Polish Collection of Microorganisms was created and used for identification of the strain isolated from a nocardial brain abscess, mimicking a brain tumor, in an immunocompetent patient. Testing with the API Coryne system initially incorrectly identified Rhodococcus sp., while chemotaxonomic tests, especially mycolic acid analysis, enabled correct Nocardia identification only at the genus level. Subsequent sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and secA1 genes confirmed the identification. To improve the accuracy of the results, an in-house database was constructed using optimized parameters; with the use of the database, the strain was eventually identified as Nocardia farcinica. Clinical laboratories processing various clinical strains can upgrade a commercial database to improve and to accelerate the results obtained. This is especially important in the case of Nocardia, for which valid microbial diagnosis remains challenging; reference laboratories are often required to identify and to survey these rare actinobacteria. PMID:26041903

  20. Creation of an In-House Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Corynebacterineae Database Overcomes Difficulties in Identification of Nocardia farcinica Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Paściak, Mariola; Dacko, Władysław; Sikora, Joanna; Gurlaga, Danuta; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Miękisiak, Grzegorz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare disease that is caused by Gram-positive actinobacteria of the Nocardia genus and affects predominantly immunocompromised patients. In its disseminated form, it has a predilection for the central nervous system and is associated with high mortality rates. Therefore, prompt identification of the pathogen is critical. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry is a relatively novel technique used for identification of microorganisms. In this work, an upgraded MALDI-TOF Biotyper database containing Corynebacterineae representatives of strains deposited in the Polish Collection of Microorganisms was created and used for identification of the strain isolated from a nocardial brain abscess, mimicking a brain tumor, in an immunocompetent patient. Testing with the API Coryne system initially incorrectly identified Rhodococcus sp., while chemotaxonomic tests, especially mycolic acid analysis, enabled correct Nocardia identification only at the genus level. Subsequent sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and secA1 genes confirmed the identification. To improve the accuracy of the results, an in-house database was constructed using optimized parameters; with the use of the database, the strain was eventually identified as Nocardia farcinica. Clinical laboratories processing various clinical strains can upgrade a commercial database to improve and to accelerate the results obtained. This is especially important in the case of Nocardia, for which valid microbial diagnosis remains challenging; reference laboratories are often required to identify and to survey these rare actinobacteria. PMID:26041903

  1. The comprehensive peptaibiotics database.

    PubMed

    Stoppacher, Norbert; Neumann, Nora K N; Burgstaller, Lukas; Zeilinger, Susanne; Degenkolb, Thomas; Brückner, Hans; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    Peptaibiotics are nonribosomally biosynthesized peptides, which - according to definition - contain the marker amino acid α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and possess antibiotic properties. Being known since 1958, a constantly increasing number of peptaibiotics have been described and investigated with a particular emphasis on hypocrealean fungi. Starting from the existing online 'Peptaibol Database', first published in 1997, an exhaustive literature survey of all known peptaibiotics was carried out and resulted in a list of 1043 peptaibiotics. The gathered information was compiled and used to create the new 'The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database', which is presented here. The database was devised as a software tool based on Microsoft (MS) Access. It is freely available from the internet at http://peptaibiotics-database.boku.ac.at and can easily be installed and operated on any computer offering a Windows XP/7 environment. It provides useful information on characteristic properties of the peptaibiotics included such as peptide category, group name of the microheterogeneous mixture to which the peptide belongs, amino acid sequence, sequence length, producing fungus, peptide subfamily, molecular formula, and monoisotopic mass. All these characteristics can be used and combined for automated search within the database, which makes The Comprehensive Peptaibiotics Database a versatile tool for the retrieval of valuable information about peptaibiotics. Sequence data have been considered as to December 14, 2012. PMID:23681723

  2. View generated database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downward, James G.

    1992-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the View Generated Database (VGD) project, NAS7-1066. It documents the work done on the project up to the point at which all project work was terminated due to lack of project funds. The VGD was to provide the capability to accurately represent any real-world object or scene as a computer model. Such models include both an accurate spatial/geometric representation of surfaces of the object or scene, as well as any surface detail present on the object. Applications of such models are numerous, including acquisition and maintenance of work models for tele-autonomous systems, generation of accurate 3-D geometric/photometric models for various 3-D vision systems, and graphical models for realistic rendering of 3-D scenes via computer graphics.

  3. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  4. Global distribution of soil organic carbon, based on the Harmonized World Soil Database - Part 1: Masses and frequency distribution of SOC stocks for the tropics, permafrost regions, wetlands, and the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köchy, M.; Hiederer, R.; Freibauer, A.

    2014-09-01

    The global soil organic carbon (SOC) mass is relevant for the carbon cycle budget. We review current estimates of soil organic carbon stocks (mass/area) and mass (stock × area) in wetlands, permafrost and tropical regions and the world in the upper 1 m of soil. The Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v.1.2 provides one of the most recent and coherent global data sets of SOC, giving a total mass of 2476 Pg. Correcting the HWSD's bulk density of organic soils, especially Histosols, results in a mass of 1062 Pg. The uncertainty of bulk density of Histosols alone introduces a range of -56 to +180 Pg for the estimate of global SOC in the top 1 m, larger than estimates of global soil respiration. We report the spatial distribution of SOC stocks per 0.5 arc minutes, the areal masses of SOC and the quantiles of SOC stocks by continents, wetland types, and permafrost types. Depending on the definition of "wetland", wetland soils contain between 82 and 158 Pg SOC. Incorporating more detailed estimates for permafrost from the Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Data Base (496 Pg SOC) and tropical peatland carbon, global soils contain 1324 Pg SOC in the upper 1 m including 421 Pg in tropical soils, whereof 40 Pg occur in tropical wetlands. Global SOC amounts to just under 3000 Pg when estimates for deeper soil layers are included. Variability in estimates is due to variation in definitions of soil units, differences in soil property databases, scarcity of information about soil carbon at depths > 1 m in peatlands, and variation in definitions of "peatland".

  5. Experiment Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik

    Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central databases, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment databases: databases designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive database. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment database to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.

  6. Solubility Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility Database (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The database includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.

  7. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  8. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  9. How accurate are parental responses concerning their fourth-grade children's school-meal participation, and what is the relationship between children's body mass index and school-meal participation based on parental responses?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This article investigated (1) parental response accuracy of fourth-grade children's school-meal participation and whether accuracy differed by children's body mass index (BMI), sex, and race, and (2) the relationship between BMI and school-meal participation (based on parental responses). Methods Data were from four cross-sectional studies conducted from fall 1999 to spring 2003 with fourth-grade children from 13 schools total. Consent forms asked parents to report children's usual school-meal participation. As two studies' consent forms did not ask about lunch participation, complete data were available for breakfast on 1,496 children (51% Black; 49% boys) and for lunch on 785 children (46% Black; 48% boys). Researchers compiled nametag records (during meal observations) of meal participation on randomly selected days during children's fourth-grade school year for breakfast (average nametag days across studies: 7-35) and for lunch (average nametag days across studies: 4-10) and categorized participation as "usually" (≥ 50% of days) or "not usually" (< 50% of days). Weight and height were measured. Concerning parental response accuracy, marginal regression was used with agreement between parental responses and nametag records as the dependent variable; independent variables were BMI, age, sex, race, and study. Concerning a relationship between BMI and school-meal participation, marginal regression was used with BMI as the dependent variable; independent variables were breakfast participation, lunch participation, age, sex, race, and study. Results Concerning breakfast participation and lunch participation, 74% and 92% of parents provided accurate responses, respectively. Parental response accuracy was better for older children for breakfast and lunch participation, and for Black than White children for lunch participation. Usual school-meal participation was significantly related to children's BMI but in opposite directions -- positively for breakfast

  10. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed collection; comment... recommendations made in the report was that the USPTO create and maintain an accurate and comprehensive database... database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys in their...

  11. 78 FR 60861 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed... maintain an accurate and comprehensive database containing the official insignia of all federally and state... Appropriations directed the USPTO to create this database. The USPTO database of official tribal...

  12. Drinking Water Treatability Database (Database)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) will provide data taken from the literature on the control of contaminants in drinking water, and will be housed on an interactive, publicly-available USEPA web site. It can be used for identifying effective treatment processes, rec...

  13. IRIS: Towards an Accurate and Fast Stage Weight Prediction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taponier, V.; Balu, A.

    2002-01-01

    , validated on several technical and econometrical cases, has been used for this purpose. A database of several conventional stages, operated with either solid or liquid propellants, has been made up, in conjunction with an evolutionary set of geometrical, physical and functional parameters likely to contribute to the description of the mass fraction and presumably known at the early steps of the preliminary design. After several iterations aiming at selecting the most influential parameters, polynomial expressions of the mass fraction have been made up, associated to a confidence level. The outcome highlights the real possibility of a parametric formulation of the mass fraction for conventional stages on the basis of a limited number of descriptive parameters and with a high degree of accuracy, lower than 10%. The formulas have been later on tested on existing or preliminary stages not included in the initial database, for validation purposes. Their mass faction is assessed with a comparable accuracy. The polynomial generation method in use allows also for a search of the influence of each parameter. The devised method, suitable for the preliminary design phase, represents, compared to the classical empirical approach, a significant way of improvement of the mass fraction prediction. It enables a rapid dissemination of more accurate and consistent weight data estimates to support system studies. It makes also possible the upstream processing of the preliminary design tasks through a global system approach. This method, currently in the experimental phase, is already in use as a complementary means at the technical underdirectorate of CNES-DLA. * IRIS :Instrument de Recherche des Indices Structuraux

  14. Accurate measurement of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.; Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-07-01

    The paper discusses current methods for accurate measurements of time by conventional atomic clocks, with particular attention given to the principles of operation of atomic-beam frequency standards, atomic hydrogen masers, and atomic fountain and to the potential use of strings of trapped mercury ions as a time device more stable than conventional atomic clocks. The areas of application of the ultraprecise and ultrastable time-measuring devices that tax the capacity of modern atomic clocks include radio astronomy and tests of relativity. The paper also discusses practical applications of ultraprecise clocks, such as navigation of space vehicles and pinpointing the exact position of ships and other objects on earth using the GPS.

  15. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  16. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.; Fakhouri, O.; Marcy, G. W.; Han, E.; Feng, Y.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, A. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Valenti, J. A.; Anderson, J.; Piskunov, N.

    2011-04-01

    We present a database of well-determined orbital parameters of exoplanets, and their host stars' properties. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 427 planets orbiting 363 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form online through the Exoplanets Data Explorer table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanet Data Explorer plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots, giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the different selection biases between radial velocity and transit surveys, and that the multiplanet systems show a distinct semimajor-axis distribution from apparently singleton systems.

  17. The Indra Simulation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, Bridget; Budavari, T.; Cole, S.; Crankshaw, D.; Dobos, L.; Lemson, G.; Neyrinck, M.; Szalay, A.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present the Indra suite of cosmological N-body simulations and the design of its companion database. Indra consists of 512 different instances of a 1 Gpc/h-sided box, each with 100 million dark matter particles and the same input cosmology, enabling a characterization of very large-scale modes of the matter power spectrum with galaxy-scale mass resolution and an excellent handle on cosmic variance. Each simulation outputs 64 snapshots, giving over 100 TB of data for the full set of simulations, all of which will be loaded into a SQL database. We discuss the database design for the particle data, consisting of the positions and velocities of each particle; the FOF halos, with links to the particle data so that halo properties can be calculated within the database; and the density field on a power-of-two grid, which can be easily linked to each particle's Peano-Hilbert index. Initial performance tests and example queries will be given. The authors are grateful for support from the Gordon and Betty Moore and the W.M. Keck Foundations.

  18. Analysis of soluble lignin in sugarcane by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with a do-it-yourself oligomer database.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Mazzafera, Paulo; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F

    2012-08-21

    Lignin is a polymer found in the cell wall of plants and is one of the main obstacles to the implementation of second-generation ethanol production because it confers the recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic material. The recalcitrance of biomass is affected by the amount of lignin, by its monomer composition, and the way the monomers are arranged in the plant cell wall. Analysis of lignin structure demands mass spectrometry analysis, and identification of oligomers is usually based on libraries produced by laborious protocols. A robust method to build a do-it-yourself lignin oligomer library was tested. This library can be built using commercially available enzymes, standards, and reagents and is relatively easy to accomplish. An ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the separation and characterization of monomers and oligomers was developed and was equally applicable to the synthetic lignin and to soluble lignin extracted from a sample of sugar cane. PMID:22830944

  19. Stackfile Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deVarvalho, Robert; Desai, Shailen D.; Haines, Bruce J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gilmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This software provides storage retrieval and analysis functionality for managing satellite altimetry data. It improves the efficiency and analysis capabilities of existing database software with improved flexibility and documentation. It offers flexibility in the type of data that can be stored. There is efficient retrieval either across the spatial domain or the time domain. Built-in analysis tools are provided for frequently performed altimetry tasks. This software package is used for storing and manipulating satellite measurement data. It was developed with a focus on handling the requirements of repeat-track altimetry missions such as Topex and Jason. It was, however, designed to work with a wide variety of satellite measurement data [e.g., Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment -- GRACE). The software consists of several command-line tools for importing, retrieving, and analyzing satellite measurement data.

  20. Database Marketplace 2002: The Database Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol; Baker, Gayle; Robinson, William

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the database industry over the past year, including new companies and services, company closures, popular database formats, popular access methods, and changes in existing products and services. Lists 33 firms and their database services; 33 firms and their database products; and 61 company profiles. (LRW)

  1. Identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds in chemical ionization GC-MS using a mass-to-structure (MTS) Search Engine with integral isotope pattern ranking.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenta; Draper, William M

    2013-02-21

    The mass-to-structure or MTS Search Engine is an Access 2010 database containing theoretical molecular mass information for 19,438 compounds assembled from common sources such as the Merck Index, pesticide and pharmaceutical compilations, and chemical catalogues. This database, which contains no experimental mass spectral data, was developed as an aid to identification of compounds in atmospheric pressure ionization (API)-LC-MS. This paper describes a powerful upgrade to this database, a fully integrated utility for filtering or ranking candidates based on isotope ratios and patterns. The new MTS Search Engine is applied here to the identification of volatile and semivolatile compounds including pesticides, nitrosoamines and other pollutants. Methane and isobutane chemical ionization (CI) GC-MS spectra were obtained from unit mass resolution mass spectrometers to determine MH(+) masses and isotope ratios. Isotopes were measured accurately with errors of <4% and <6%, respectively, for A + 1 and A + 2 peaks. Deconvolution of interfering isotope clusters (e.g., M(+) and [M - H](+)) was required for accurate determination of the A + 1 isotope in halogenated compounds. Integrating the isotope data greatly improved the speed and accuracy of the database identifications. The database accurately identified unknowns from isobutane CI spectra in 100% of cases where as many as 40 candidates satisfied the mass tolerance. The paper describes the development and basic operation of the new MTS Search Engine and details performance testing with over 50 model compounds. PMID:23248816

  2. Creating databases for biological information: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lincoln

    2013-06-01

    The essence of bioinformatics is dealing with large quantities of information. Whether it be sequencing data, microarray data files, mass spectrometric data (e.g., fingerprints), the catalog of strains arising from an insertional mutagenesis project, or even large numbers of PDF files, there inevitably comes a time when the information can simply no longer be managed with files and directories. This is where databases come into play. This unit briefly reviews the characteristics of several database management systems, including flat file, indexed file, relational databases, and NoSQL databases. It compares their strengths and weaknesses and offers some general guidelines for selecting an appropriate database management system. PMID:23749755

  3. Markarian Galaxies. I. The Optical Database and Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Artashes; McLean, Brian; Allen, Ronald J.; MacKenty, John W.

    2007-05-01

    A database for the entire Markarian catalog is presented that combines extensive new measurements of their optical parameters with a literature and database search. The measurements were made using images extracted from the STScI Digitized Sky Survey (DSS) of Fpg(red) and Jpg(blue) band photographic sky survey plates obtained by the Palomar and UK Schmidt telescopes. We provide accurate coordinates, morphological type, spectral and activity classes, red and blue apparent magnitudes, apparent diameters, axial ratios, and position angles, as well as number counts of neighboring objects in a circle of radius 50 kpc. Special attention was paid to the individual descriptions of the galaxies in the original Markarian lists, which clarified many cases of misidentifications of the objects, particularly among interacting systems, larger galaxies with knots of star formation, possible stars, and cases of stars projected on galaxies. The total number of individual Markarian objects in the database is now 1544. We also include redshifts that are now available for 1524 objects with UV-excess radiation, as well as galactic color excess E(B-V) values and their 2MASS or DENIS infrared magnitudes. The database also includes extensive notes that summarize information about the membership of Markarian galaxies in different systems of galaxies and about new and revised activity classes and redshifts. An atlas of several interesting subclasses of Markarian galaxies is also presented.

  4. High-Precision Tungsten Isotopic Analysis by Multicollection Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Based on Simultaneous Measurement of W and (18)O/(16)O Isotope Ratios for Accurate Fractionation Correction.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne; Touboul, Mathieu; Walker, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Determination of the (182)W/(184)W ratio to a precision of ± 5 ppm (2σ) is desirable for constraining the timing of core formation and other early planetary differentiation processes. However, WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry normally results in a residual correlation between the instrumental-mass-fractionation-corrected (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W ratios that is attributed to mass-dependent variability of O isotopes over the course of an analysis and between different analyses. A second-order correction using the (183)W/(184)W ratio relies on the assumption that this ratio is constant in nature. This may prove invalid, as has already been realized for other isotope systems. The present study utilizes simultaneous monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O and W isotope ratios to correct oxide interferences on a per-integration basis and thus avoid the need for a double normalization of W isotopes. After normalization of W isotope ratios to a pair of W isotopes, following the exponential law, no residual W-O isotope correlation is observed. However, there is a nonideal mass bias residual correlation between (182)W/(i)W and (183)W/(i)W with time. Without double normalization of W isotopes and on the basis of three or four duplicate analyses, the external reproducibility per session of (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W normalized to (186)W/(183)W is 5-6 ppm (2σ, 1-3 μg loads). The combined uncertainty per session is less than 4 ppm for (183)W/(184)W and less than 6 ppm for (182)W/(184)W (2σm) for loads between 3000 and 50 ng. PMID:26751903

  5. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  6. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  7. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data. PMID:23710630

  8. The EXOSAT database system. Available databases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, C.

    1991-02-01

    This User's Guide describes the databases that are currently available by remote login to the EXOSAT/ESTEC site of the EXOSAT database system. This includes where ever possible the following: brief descriptions of each observatory, telescope and instrument references to more complete observatory descriptions a list of the contents of each database and how it was generated, parameter descriptions.

  9. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-01

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  10. Fast and accurate determination of sites along the FUT2 in vitro transcript that are accessible to antisense oligonucleotides by application of secondary structure predictions and RNase H in combination with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Angelika; Krebs, Stefan; Seichter, Doris; Förster, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Alteration of gene expression by use of antisense oligonucleotides has considerable potential for therapeutic purposes and scientific studies. Although applied for almost 25 years, this technique is still associated with difficulties in finding antisense-effective regions along the target mRNA. This is mainly due to strong secondary structures preventing binding of antisense oligonucleotides and RNase H, playing a major role in antisense-mediated degradation of the mRNA. These difficulties make empirical testing of a large number of sequences complementary to various sites in the target mRNA a very lengthy and troublesome procedure. To overcome this problem, more recent strategies to find efficient antisense sites are based on secondary structure prediction and RNase H-dependent mechanisms. We were the first who directly combined these two strategies; antisense oligonucleotides complementary to predicted unpaired target mRNA regions were designed and hybridized to the corresponding RNAs. Incubation with RNase H led to cleavage of the RNA at the respective hybridization sites. Analysis of the RNA fragments by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, which has not been used in this context before, allowed exact determination of the cleavage site. Thus the technique described here is very promising when searching for effective antisense sites. PMID:12888531

  11. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-28

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  12. Curation accuracy of model organism databases.

    PubMed

    Keseler, Ingrid M; Skrzypek, Marek; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Chen, Albert Y; Fulcher, Carol; Li, Gene-Wei; Lemmer, Kimberly C; Mladinich, Katherine M; Chow, Edmond D; Sherlock, Gavin; Karp, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Manual extraction of information from the biomedical literature-or biocuration-is the central methodology used to construct many biological databases. For example, the UniProt protein database, the EcoCyc Escherichia coli database and the Candida Genome Database (CGD) are all based on biocuration. Biological databases are used extensively by life science researchers, as online encyclopedias, as aids in the interpretation of new experimental data and as golden standards for the development of new bioinformatics algorithms. Although manual curation has been assumed to be highly accurate, we are aware of only one previous study of biocuration accuracy. We assessed the accuracy of EcoCyc and CGD by manually selecting curated assertions within randomly chosen EcoCyc and CGD gene pages and by then validating that the data found in the referenced publications supported those assertions. A database assertion is considered to be in error if that assertion could not be found in the publication cited for that assertion. We identified 10 errors in the 633 facts that we validated across the two databases, for an overall error rate of 1.58%, and individual error rates of 1.82% for CGD and 1.40% for EcoCyc. These data suggest that manual curation of the experimental literature by Ph.D-level scientists is highly accurate. Database URL: http://ecocyc.org/, http://www.candidagenome.org// PMID:24923819

  13. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  14. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  15. Accurate Evaluation of Quantum Integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.; Goorvitch, D.

    1994-01-01

    Combining an appropriate finite difference method with Richardson's extrapolation results in a simple, highly accurate numerical method for solving a Schr\\"{o}dinger's equation. Important results are that error estimates are provided, and that one can extrapolate expectation values rather than the wavefunctions to obtain highly accurate expectation values. We discuss the eigenvalues, the error growth in repeated Richardson's extrapolation, and show that the expectation values calculated on a crude mesh can be extrapolated to obtain expectation values of high accuracy.

  16. Databases: Beyond the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Robert

    This presented paper offers an elementary description of database characteristics and then provides a survey of databases that may be useful to the teacher and researcher in Slavic and East European languages and literatures. The survey focuses on commercial databases that are available, usable, and needed. Individual databases discussed include:…

  17. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  18. Using SEQUEST with Theoretically Complete Sequence Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadygov, Rovshan G.

    2015-11-01

    SEQUEST has long been used to identify peptides/proteins from their tandem mass spectra and protein sequence databases. The algorithm has proven to be hugely successful for its sensitivity and specificity in identifying peptides/proteins, the sequences of which are present in the protein sequence databases. In this work, we report on work that attempts a new use for the algorithm by applying it to search a complete list of theoretically possible peptides, a de novo-like sequencing. We used freely available mass spectral data and determined a number of unique peptides as identified by SEQUEST. Using masses of these peptides and the mass accuracy of 0.001 Da, we have created a database of all theoretically possible peptide sequences corresponding to the precursor masses. We used our recently developed algorithm for determining all amino acid compositions corresponding to a mass interval, and used a lexicographic ordering to generate theoretical sequences from the compositions. The newly generated theoretical database was many-fold more complex than the original protein sequence database. We used SEQUEST to search and identify the best matches to the spectra from all theoretically possible peptide sequences. We found that SEQUEST cross-correlation score ranked the correct peptide match among the top sequence matches. The results testify to the high specificity of SEQUEST when combined with the high mass accuracy for intact peptides.

  19. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  20. Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-07-01

    This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

  1. MINEs: Open access databases of computationally predicted enzyme promiscuity products for untargeted metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffryes, James G.; Colastani, Ricardo L.; Elbadawi-Sidhu, Mona; Kind, Tobias; Niehaus, Thomas D.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Fiehn, Oliver; Tyo, Keith E. J.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-08-28

    Metabolomics have proven difficult to execute in an untargeted and generalizable manner. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) has made it possible to gather data on thousands of cellular metabolites. However, matching metabolites to their spectral features continues to be a bottleneck, meaning that much of the collected information remains uninterpreted and that new metabolites are seldom discovered in untargeted studies. These challenges require new approaches that consider compounds beyond those available in curated biochemistry databases. Here we present Metabolic In silico Network Expansions (MINEs), an extension of known metabolite databases to include molecules that have not been observed, but are likely to occur based on known metabolites and common biochemical reactions. We utilize an algorithm called the Biochemical Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) and expert-curated reaction rules based on the Enzyme Commission classification system to propose the novel chemical structures and reactions that comprise MINE databases. Starting from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) COMPOUND database, the MINE contains over 571,000 compounds, of which 93% are not present in the PubChem database. However, these MINE compounds have on average higher structural similarity to natural products than compounds from KEGG or PubChem. MINE databases were able to propose annotations for 98.6% of a set of 667 MassBank spectra, 14% more than KEGG alone and equivalent to PubChem while returning far fewer candidates per spectra than PubChem (46 vs. 1715 median candidates). Application of MINEs to LC–MS accurate mass data enabled the identity of an unknown peak to be confidently predicted. MINE databases are freely accessible for non-commercial use via user-friendly web-tools at http://minedatabase.mcs.anl.gov and developer-friendly APIs. MINEs improve metabolomics peak identification as compared to general chemical databases whose results

  2. MINEs: Open access databases of computationally predicted enzyme promiscuity products for untargeted metabolomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeffryes, James G.; Colastani, Ricardo L.; Elbadawi-Sidhu, Mona; Kind, Tobias; Niehaus, Thomas D.; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Fiehn, Oliver; Tyo, Keith E. J.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-08-28

    Metabolomics have proven difficult to execute in an untargeted and generalizable manner. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) has made it possible to gather data on thousands of cellular metabolites. However, matching metabolites to their spectral features continues to be a bottleneck, meaning that much of the collected information remains uninterpreted and that new metabolites are seldom discovered in untargeted studies. These challenges require new approaches that consider compounds beyond those available in curated biochemistry databases. Here we present Metabolic In silico Network Expansions (MINEs), an extension of known metabolite databases to include molecules that have not been observed, but are likelymore » to occur based on known metabolites and common biochemical reactions. We utilize an algorithm called the Biochemical Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) and expert-curated reaction rules based on the Enzyme Commission classification system to propose the novel chemical structures and reactions that comprise MINE databases. Starting from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) COMPOUND database, the MINE contains over 571,000 compounds, of which 93% are not present in the PubChem database. However, these MINE compounds have on average higher structural similarity to natural products than compounds from KEGG or PubChem. MINE databases were able to propose annotations for 98.6% of a set of 667 MassBank spectra, 14% more than KEGG alone and equivalent to PubChem while returning far fewer candidates per spectra than PubChem (46 vs. 1715 median candidates). Application of MINEs to LC–MS accurate mass data enabled the identity of an unknown peak to be confidently predicted. MINE databases are freely accessible for non-commercial use via user-friendly web-tools at http://minedatabase.mcs.anl.gov and developer-friendly APIs. MINEs improve metabolomics peak identification as compared to general chemical databases whose

  3. NATIONAL URBAN DATABASE AND ACCESS PROTAL TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current mesoscale weather prediction and microscale dispersion models are limited in their ability to perform accurate assessments in urban areas. A project called the National Urban Database with Access Portal Tool (NUDAPT) is beginning to provide urban data and improve the para...

  4. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  5. THE ECOTOX DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database provides chemical-specific toxicity information for aquatic life, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial wildlife. ECOTOX is a comprehensive ecotoxicology database and is therefore essential for providing and suppoirting high quality models needed to estimate population...

  6. Network II Database

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  7. Household Products Database: Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Types of Products Manufacturers Ingredients About the Database FAQ Product Recalls Help Glossary Contact Us More ... holders. Information is extracted from Consumer Product Information Database ©2001-2015 by DeLima Associates. All rights reserved. ...

  8. Implementation and performance evaluation of a database of chemical formulas for the screening of pharmaco/toxicologically relevant compounds in biological samples using electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Polettini, Aldo; Gottardo, Rossella; Pascali, Jennifer Paola; Tagliaro, Franco

    2008-04-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI)-time-of-flight (TOF) MS enables searching a wide number of pharmaco/toxicologically relevant compounds (PTRC) in biosamples. However, the number of identifiable PTRC depends on extension of reference database of chemical formulas/compound names. Previous approaches proposed in-house or commercial databases with limitations either in PTRC number or content (e.g., few metabolites, presence of non-PTRC). In the frame of development of a ESI-TOF PTRC screening procedure, a subset of PubChem Compound as reference database is proposed. Features of this database (approximately 50,500 compounds) are illustrated, and its performance evaluated through analysis by capillary electrophoresis (CE)-ESI-TOF of hair/blood/urine collected from subjects under treatment with known drugs or by comparison with reference standards. The database is rich in parent compounds of pharmaceutical and illicit drugs, pesticides, and poisons and contains many metabolites (including about 6000 phase I metabolites and 180 glucuronides) and related substances (e.g., impurities, esters). The average number of hits with identical chemical formula is 1.82 +/- 2.27 (median = 1, range 1-39). Minor deficiencies, redundancies, and errors have been detected that do not limit the potential of the database in identifying unknown PTRC. The database allows a much broader search for PTRC than other commercial/in-house databases of chemical formulas/compound names previously proposed. However, the probability that a search retrieves different PTRC having identical chemical formula is higher than with smaller databases, and additional information (anamnestic/circumstantial data, concomitant presence of parent drug and metabolite, selective sample preparation, liquid chromatographic retention, and CE migration behavior) must be used in order to focus the search more tightly. PMID:18336013

  9. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant. PMID:22088068

  10. MPlus Database system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-20

    The MPlus Database program was developed to keep track of mail received. This system was developed by TRESP for the Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Operations. The MPlus Database program is a PC application, written in dBase III+'' and compiled with Clipper'' into an executable file. The files you need to run the MPLus Database program can be installed on a Bernoulli, or a hard drive. This paper discusses the use of this database.

  11. Aviation Safety Issues Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.

    2009-01-01

    The aviation safety issues database was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues database is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the database. This broader interest was the genesis to making the database publically accessible and writing this report.

  12. The new IAGOS Database Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Gautron, Benoit; Thouret, Valérie; Fontaine, Alain

    2016-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data. The IAGOS Database Portal (http://www.iagos.fr, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). The new IAGOS Database Portal has been released in December 2015. The main improvement is the interoperability implementation with international portals or other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse; the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de); and the CAMS data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The CAMS (Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service) project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. The new portal provides improved and new services such as the download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats, plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles, etc.) and user management. Added value products are available on the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data, etc. The link with the CAMS data center, through JOIN (Jülich OWS Interface), allows to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for inter-comparison. Finally IAGOS metadata has been standardized (ISO 19115) and now provides complete information about data traceability and quality.

  13. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database.

    PubMed

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated 'metabolomic' database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  14. Mission and Assets Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, John; Zendejas, Silvino; Gutheinz, Sandy; Borden, Chester; Wang, Yeou-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Mission and Assets Database (MADB) Version 1.0 is an SQL database system with a Web user interface to centralize information. The database stores flight project support resource requirements, view periods, antenna information, schedule, and forecast results for use in mid-range and long-term planning of Deep Space Network (DSN) assets.

  15. Plant and Crop Databases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Databases have become an integral part of all aspects of biological research, including basic and applied plant biology. The importance of databases continues to increase as the volume of data from direct and indirect genomics approaches expands. What is not always obvious to users of databases is t...

  16. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  17. A database for thick target PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, David D.; Clayton, E.

    1987-03-01

    In order to convert peak areas from PIXE spectra into sample concentrations, a large database is needed. This database must be reliable and cover the widest possible range of targets, ions and energies. It need not be unique: several different databases may produce similar end results. Our database includes ionisation cross sections, ion stopping powers, X-ray mass attenuation coefficients, fluorescence yields, Coster-Kronig transition rates, X-ray line intensities and transition rates, together with a good knowledge of the detection efficiency. It covers both proton (PIXE) and helium ion (HIXE) bombardment from 100 keV to 10 MeV for all targets composed of elements from hydrogen to uranium for both K and L shell X-rays. We have tested it successfully on a wide variety of samples. We present this database together with polynomial fits to some of the key parameters so others may use it.

  18. Phytophthora Database 2.0: update and future direction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The online community resource Phytophthora Database (PD) was developed to support accurate and rapid identification of Phytophthora and to help characterize and catalog the diversity and evolutionary relationships within the genus. Since its release in 2008, its sequence database has grown to cover ...

  19. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  20. Organizing a breast cancer database: data management.

    PubMed

    Yi, Min; Hunt, Kelly K

    2016-06-01

    Developing and organizing a breast cancer database can provide data and serve as valuable research tools for those interested in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Depending on the research setting, the quality of the data can be a major issue. Assuring that the data collection process does not contribute inaccuracies can help to assure the overall quality of subsequent analyses. Data management is work that involves the planning, development, implementation, and administration of systems for the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of data while protecting it by implementing high security levels. A properly designed database provides you with access to up-to-date, accurate information. Database design is an important component of application design. If you take the time to design your databases properly, you'll be rewarded with a solid application foundation on which you can build the rest of your application. PMID:27197511

  1. Visualization of multidimensional database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung

    2008-01-01

    The concept of multidimensional databases has been extensively researched and wildly used in actual database application. It plays an important role in contemporary information technology, but due to the complexity of its inner structure, the database design is a complicated process and users are having a hard time fully understanding and using the database. An effective visualization tool for higher dimensional information system helps database designers and users alike. Most visualization techniques focus on displaying dimensional data using spreadsheets and charts. This may be sufficient for the databases having three or fewer dimensions but for higher dimensions, various combinations of projection operations are needed and a full grasp of total database architecture is very difficult. This study reviews existing visualization techniques for multidimensional database and then proposes an alternate approach to visualize a database of any dimension by adopting the tool proposed by Kiviat for software engineering processes. In this diagramming method, each dimension is represented by one branch of concentric spikes. This paper documents a C++ based visualization tool with extensive use of OpenGL graphics library and GUI functions. Detailed examples of actual databases demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness in visualizing multidimensional databases.

  2. An Introduction to Database Structure and Database Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detweiler, Karen

    1984-01-01

    Enumerates principal management objectives of database management systems (data independence, quality, security, multiuser access, central control) and criteria for comparison (response time, size, flexibility, other features). Conventional database management systems, relational databases, and database machines used for backend processing are…

  3. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  4. Food Composition Database Format and Structure: A User Focused Approach

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Annabel K.; Woods, Kaitlyn; McMahon, Anne; Probst, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the needs of Australian food composition database user’s regarding database format and relate this to the format of databases available globally. Three semi structured synchronous online focus groups (M = 3, F = 11) and n = 6 female key informant interviews were recorded. Beliefs surrounding the use, training, understanding, benefits and limitations of food composition data and databases were explored. Verbatim transcriptions underwent preliminary coding followed by thematic analysis with NVivo qualitative analysis software to extract the final themes. Schematic analysis was applied to the final themes related to database format. Desktop analysis also examined the format of six key globally available databases. 24 dominant themes were established, of which five related to format; database use, food classification, framework, accessibility and availability, and data derivation. Desktop analysis revealed that food classification systems varied considerably between databases. Microsoft Excel was a common file format used in all databases, and available software varied between countries. User’s also recognised that food composition databases format should ideally be designed specifically for the intended use, have a user-friendly food classification system, incorporate accurate data with clear explanation of data derivation and feature user input. However, such databases are limited by data availability and resources. Further exploration of data sharing options should be considered. Furthermore, user’s understanding of food composition data and databases limitations is inherent to the correct application of non-specific databases. Therefore, further exploration of user FCDB training should also be considered. PMID:26554836

  5. The RECONS 25 Parsec Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Pewett, Tiffany; Riedel, Adric R.; Silverstein, Michele L.; Slatten, Kenneth J.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Recons Team

    2015-01-01

    The REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS, www.recons.org) Team has been mapping the solar neighborhood since 1994. Nearby stars provide the fundamental framework upon which all of stellar astronomy is based, both for individual stars and stellar populations. The nearest stars are also the primary targets for extrasolar planet searches, and will undoubtedly play key roles in understanding the prevalence and structure of solar systems, and ultimately, in our search for life elsewhere.We have built the RECONS 25 Parsec Database to encourage and enable exploration of the Sun's nearest neighbors. The Database, slated for public release in 2015, contains 3088 stars, brown dwarfs, andexoplanets in 2184 systems as of October 1, 2014. All of these systems have accurate trigonometric parallaxes in the refereed literature placing them closer than 25.0 parsecs, i.e., parallaxes greater than 40 mas with errors less than 10 mas. Carefully vetted astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic data are incorporated intothe Database from reliable sources, including significant original data collected by members of the RECONS Team.Current exploration of the solar neighborhood by RECONS, enabled by the Database, focuses on the ubiquitous red dwarfs, including: assessing the stellar companion population of ~1200 red dwarfs (Winters), investigating the astrophysical causes that spread red dwarfs of similar temperatures by a factor of 16 in luminosity (Pewett), and canvassing ~3000 red dwarfs for excess emission due to unseen companions and dust (Silverstein). In addition, a decade long astrometric survey of ~500 red dwarfs in the southern sky has begun, in an effort to understand the stellar, brown dwarf, and planetary companion populations for the stars that make up at least 75% of all stars in the Universe.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402, AST-1109445, and AST-1412026, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  6. 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

  7. ITS-90 Thermocouple Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 60 NIST ITS-90 Thermocouple Database (Web, free access)   Web version of Standard Reference Database 60 and NIST Monograph 175. The database gives temperature -- electromotive force (emf) reference functions and tables for the letter-designated thermocouple types B, E, J, K, N, R, S and T. These reference functions have been adopted as standards by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

  8. Predict amine solution properties accurately

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.; Meisen, A.; Chakma, A.

    1996-02-01

    Improved process design begins with using accurate physical property data. Especially in the preliminary design stage, physical property data such as density viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat can affect the overall performance of absorbers, heat exchangers, reboilers and pump. These properties can also influence temperature profiles in heat transfer equipment and thus control or affect the rate of amine breakdown. Aqueous-amine solution physical property data are available in graphical form. However, it is not convenient to use with computer-based calculations. Developed equations allow improved correlations of derived physical property estimates with published data. Expressions are given which can be used to estimate physical properties of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diglycolamine (DGA) solutions.

  9. Kinetics of the Reaction of the Heaviest Hydrogen Atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 -> 4HeμΗ + H Reaction: Experiments, Accurate Quantal Calculations, and Variational Transition State Theory, including Kinetic Isotope Effects for a Factor of 36.1 in Isotopic Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Donald G.; Arseneau, Donald J.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H.; Mielke, Steven L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schatz, George C.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom {sup 4}He{mu}, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of {sup 4}He{mu} with molecular hydrogen, {sup 4}He{mu} + H{sub 2} {yields} {sup 4}He{mu}H + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a {mu}SR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k{sub He{mu}}, are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k{sub He{mu}} are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k{sub He{mu}} on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H{sub 2} and Mu + H{sub 2} reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H{sub 2} reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

  10. Opening CEM vendor databases

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A.; Patel, D.

    1995-12-31

    CEM database performance requirements (i.e., voluminous data storage, rapid response times) often conflict with the concept of an open, accessible database. Utilities would like to use their CEM data for more purposes than simply submitting environmental reports. But in most cases, other uses are inhibited because today`s sophisticated CEM systems incorporate databases that have forsaken openness and accessibility in favor of performance. Several options are available for CEM vendors wishing to move in the direction of open, accessible CEM databases.

  11. Databases for Microbiologists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Databases play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own databases that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological databases are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current databases that are of interest to microbiologists. PMID:26013493

  12. Veterans Administration Databases

    Cancer.gov

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  13. Backing up DMF Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardo, Nicholas P.; Woodrow, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A complete backup of the Cray Data Migration Facility (DMF) databases should include the data migration databases, all media specific process' (MSP's) databases, and the journal file. The backup should be able to accomplished without impacting users or stopping DMF. The High Speed Processors group at the Numerical Aerodynamics Simulation (NAS) Facility at NASA Ames Research Center undertook the task of finding an effective and efficient way to backup all DMF databases. This has been accomplished by taking advantage of new features introduced in DMF 2.0 and adding a minor modification to the dmdaemon. This paper discusses the investigation and the changes necessary to implement these enhancements.

  14. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  15. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  16. CDS - Database Administrator's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. P.

    This guide aims to instruct the CDS database administrator in: o The CDS file system. o The CDS index files. o The procedure for assimilating a new CDS tape into the database. It is assumed that the administrator has read SUN/79.

  17. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  18. Database Searching by Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Stephen E.

    Managers and executives need the easy and quick access to business and management information that online databases can provide, but many have difficulty articulating their search needs to an intermediary. One possible solution would be to encourage managers and their immediate support staff members to search textual databases directly as they now…

  19. Morchella MLST database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Welcome to the Morchella MLST database. This dedicated database was set up at the CBS-KNAW Biodiversity Center by Vincent Robert in February 2012, using BioloMICS software (Robert et al., 2011), to facilitate DNA sequence-based identifications of Morchella species via the Internet. The current datab...

  20. First Look: TRADEMARKSCAN Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Anne Conway; Davidson, Alan B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes database produced by Thomson and Thomson and available on Dialog which contains over 700,000 records representing all active federal trademark registrations and applications for registrations filed in United States Patent and Trademark Office. A typical record, special features, database applications, learning to use TRADEMARKSCAN, and…

  1. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  2. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  3. Assignment to database industy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kohichiroh

    Various kinds of databases are considered to be essential part in future large sized systems. Information provision only by databases is also considered to be growing as the market becomes mature. This paper discusses how such circumstances have been built and will be developed from now on.

  4. Dictionary as Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Derrick

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of dictionaries as databases focuses on the digitizing of The Oxford English dictionary (OED) and the use of Standard Generalized Mark-Up Language (SGML). Topics include the creation of a consortium to digitize the OED, document structure, relational databases, text forms, sequence, and discourse. (LRW)

  5. A Quality System Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, William H.; Turner, Anne M.; Gifford, Luther; Stites, William

    2010-01-01

    A quality system database (QSD), and software to administer the database, were developed to support recording of administrative nonconformance activities that involve requirements for documentation of corrective and/or preventive actions, which can include ISO 9000 internal quality audits and customer complaints.

  6. BioImaging Database

    2006-10-25

    The Biolmaging Database (BID) is a relational database developed to store the data and meta-data for the 3D gene expression in early Drosophila embryo development on a cellular level. The schema was written to be used with the MySQL DBMS but with minor modifications can be used on any SQL compliant relational DBMS.

  7. The intelligent database machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    The IDM data base was compared with the data base crack to determine whether IDM 500 would better serve the needs of the MSFC data base management system than Oracle. The two were compared and the performance of the IDM was studied. Implementations that work best on which database are implicated. The choice is left to the database administrator.

  8. Build Your Own Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacso, Peter; Lancaster, F. W.

    This book is intended to help librarians and others to produce databases of better value and quality, especially if they have had little previous experience in database construction. Drawing upon almost 40 years of experience in the field of information retrieval, this book emphasizes basic principles and approaches rather than in-depth and…

  9. Database Reviews: Legal Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiser, Virginia

    Detailed reviews of two legal information databases--"Laborlaw I" and "Legal Resource Index"--are presented in this paper. Each database review begins with a bibliographic entry listing the title; producer; vendor; cost per hour contact time; offline print cost per citation; time period covered; frequency of updates; and size of file. A detailed…

  10. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  11. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  12. National Vulnerability Database (NVD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    National Vulnerability Database (NVD) (Web, free access)   NVD is a comprehensive cyber security vulnerability database that integrates all publicly available U.S. Government vulnerability resources and provides references to industry resources. It is based on and synchronized with the CVE vulnerability naming standard.

  13. Knowledge Discovery in Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Jay

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to database design…

  14. Online Database Searching Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlejohn, Alice C.; Parker, Joan M.

    Designed primarily for use by first-time searchers, this workbook provides an overview of online searching. Following a brief introduction which defines online searching, databases, and database producers, five steps in carrying out a successful search are described: (1) identifying the main concepts of the search statement; (2) selecting a…

  15. CPDB: Carcinogenic Potency Database.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2008-01-01

    The Carcinogenic Potency Database reports analyses of animal cancer tests on 1,547 chemicals. These tests are used in support of cancer risk assessments for humans. Results are searchable and are made available via the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) TOXNET system. This column will provide background information on the database, as well as present search basics. PMID:19042710

  16. HMDB: the Human Metabolome Database

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.; Tzur, Dan; Knox, Craig; Eisner, Roman; Guo, An Chi; Young, Nelson; Cheng, Dean; Jewell, Kevin; Arndt, David; Sawhney, Summit; Fung, Chris; Nikolai, Lisa; Lewis, Mike; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Forsythe, Ian; Tang, Peter; Shrivastava, Savita; Jeroncic, Kevin; Stothard, Paul; Amegbey, Godwin; Block, David; Hau, David. D.; Wagner, James; Miniaci, Jessica; Clements, Melisa; Gebremedhin, Mulu; Guo, Natalie; Zhang, Ying; Duggan, Gavin E.; MacInnis, Glen D.; Weljie, Alim M.; Dowlatabadi, Reza; Bamforth, Fiona; Clive, Derrick; Greiner, Russ; Li, Liang; Marrie, Tom; Sykes, Brian D.; Vogel, Hans J.; Querengesser, Lori

    2007-01-01

    The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) is currently the most complete and comprehensive curated collection of human metabolite and human metabolism data in the world. It contains records for more than 2180 endogenous metabolites with information gathered from thousands of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the HMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental metabolite concentration data compiled from hundreds of mass spectra (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed on urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on purified, reference metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the HMDB contains an average of 90 separate data fields including a comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, biofluid concentrations, disease associations, pathway information, enzyme data, gene sequence data, SNP and mutation data as well as extensive links to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided. The HMDB is designed to address the broad needs of biochemists, clinical chemists, physicians, medical geneticists, nutritionists and members of the metabolomics community. The HMDB is available at: PMID:17202168

  17. HMDB: the Human Metabolome Database.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S; Tzur, Dan; Knox, Craig; Eisner, Roman; Guo, An Chi; Young, Nelson; Cheng, Dean; Jewell, Kevin; Arndt, David; Sawhney, Summit; Fung, Chris; Nikolai, Lisa; Lewis, Mike; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Forsythe, Ian; Tang, Peter; Shrivastava, Savita; Jeroncic, Kevin; Stothard, Paul; Amegbey, Godwin; Block, David; Hau, David D; Wagner, James; Miniaci, Jessica; Clements, Melisa; Gebremedhin, Mulu; Guo, Natalie; Zhang, Ying; Duggan, Gavin E; Macinnis, Glen D; Weljie, Alim M; Dowlatabadi, Reza; Bamforth, Fiona; Clive, Derrick; Greiner, Russ; Li, Liang; Marrie, Tom; Sykes, Brian D; Vogel, Hans J; Querengesser, Lori

    2007-01-01

    The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) is currently the most complete and comprehensive curated collection of human metabolite and human metabolism data in the world. It contains records for more than 2180 endogenous metabolites with information gathered from thousands of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the HMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental metabolite concentration data compiled from hundreds of mass spectra (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed on urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on purified, reference metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the HMDB contains an average of 90 separate data fields including a comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, biofluid concentrations, disease associations, pathway information, enzyme data, gene sequence data, SNP and mutation data as well as extensive links to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided. The HMDB is designed to address the broad needs of biochemists, clinical chemists, physicians, medical geneticists, nutritionists and members of the metabolomics community. The HMDB is available at: www.hmdb.ca. PMID:17202168

  18. GOTTCHA Database, Version 1

    2015-08-03

    One major challenge in the field of shotgun metagenomics is the accurate identification of the organisms present within the community, based on classification of short sequence reads. Though microbial community profiling methods have emerged to attempt to rapidly classify the millions of reads output from contemporary sequencers, the combination of incomplete databases, similarity among otherwise divergent genomes, and the large volumes of sequencing data required for metagenome sequencing has led to unacceptably high false discoverymore » rates (FDR). Here we present the application of a novel, gene-independent and signature-based metagenomic taxonomic profiling tool with significantly smaller FDR, which is also capable of classifying never-before seen genomes into the appropriate parent taxa.The algorithm is based upon three primary computational phases: (I) genomic decomposition into bit vectors, (II) bit vector intersections to identify shared regions, and (III) bit vector subtractions to remove shared regions and reveal unique, signature regions.In the Decomposition phase, genomic data is first masked to highlight only the valid (non-ambiguous) regions and then decomposed into overlapping 24-mers. The k-mers are sorted along with their start positions, de-replicated, and then prefixed, to minimize data duplication. The prefixes are indexed and an identical data structure is created for the start positions to mimic that of the k-mer data structure.During the Intersection phase -- which is the most computationally intensive phase -- as an all-vs-all comparison is made, the number of comparisons is first reduced by four methods: (a) Prefix restriction, (b) Overlap detection, (c) Overlap restriction, and (d) Result recording. In Prefix restriction, only k-mers of the same prefix are compared. Within that group, potential overlap of k-mer suffixes that would result in a non-empty set intersection are screened for. If such an overlap exists, the region which

  19. GOTTCHA Database, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, Tracey; Chain, Patrick; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Po-E

    2015-08-03

    One major challenge in the field of shotgun metagenomics is the accurate identification of the organisms present within the community, based on classification of short sequence reads. Though microbial community profiling methods have emerged to attempt to rapidly classify the millions of reads output from contemporary sequencers, the combination of incomplete databases, similarity among otherwise divergent genomes, and the large volumes of sequencing data required for metagenome sequencing has led to unacceptably high false discovery rates (FDR). Here we present the application of a novel, gene-independent and signature-based metagenomic taxonomic profiling tool with significantly smaller FDR, which is also capable of classifying never-before seen genomes into the appropriate parent taxa.The algorithm is based upon three primary computational phases: (I) genomic decomposition into bit vectors, (II) bit vector intersections to identify shared regions, and (III) bit vector subtractions to remove shared regions and reveal unique, signature regions.In the Decomposition phase, genomic data is first masked to highlight only the valid (non-ambiguous) regions and then decomposed into overlapping 24-mers. The k-mers are sorted along with their start positions, de-replicated, and then prefixed, to minimize data duplication. The prefixes are indexed and an identical data structure is created for the start positions to mimic that of the k-mer data structure.During the Intersection phase -- which is the most computationally intensive phase -- as an all-vs-all comparison is made, the number of comparisons is first reduced by four methods: (a) Prefix restriction, (b) Overlap detection, (c) Overlap restriction, and (d) Result recording. In Prefix restriction, only k-mers of the same prefix are compared. Within that group, potential overlap of k-mer suffixes that would result in a non-empty set intersection are screened for. If such an overlap exists, the region which intersects is

  20. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  1. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  2. Protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  3. AMASS: a database for investigating protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Clinton J.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Dinu, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Modern techniques have produced many sequence annotation databases and protein structure portals, but these Web resources are rarely integrated in ways that permit straightforward exploration of protein functional residues and their co-localization. Results: We have created the AMASS database, which maps 1D sequence annotation databases to 3D protein structures with an intuitive visualization interface. Our platform also provides an analysis service that screens mass spectrometry sequence data for post-translational modifications that reside in functionally relevant locations within protein structures. The system is built on the premise that functional residues such as active sites, cancer mutations and post-translational modifications within proteins may co-localize and share common functions. Availability and implementation: AMASS database is implemented with Biopython and Apache as a freely available Web server at amass-db.org. Contact: clinton.mielke@gmail.com PMID:24497503

  4. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  5. Database Tools for Evaluating Thermophysical Property Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, Richard L.; Wilding, W. Vincent; Oscarson, John L.; Yang, Yan

    2007-06-01

    Most thermophysical-property databases (TPD) provide low-level quality control checks. This manuscript focuses on additional, higher-level data evaluations made possible by the breadth of data stored in the database. For example, thermodynamic equations relate the critical point, vapor-pressure curve, enthalpy of vaporization, liquid density, and liquid and vapor heat capacities to each other. Thermodynamic consistency among these properties can be used to guide selection of the best data sets. Even more broadly, molecular structure-based trends in properties can be identified within the database, and the properties of structurally related compounds can be effectively used to discriminate among available datasets. Automated property predictions can be used in conjunction with the TPD to guide the selection of the most accurate data. These and other high-level consistency tools will be illustrated based on evaluation and quality control work associated with the DIPPR® 801 TPD project for pure chemicals.

  6. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-12-28

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  7. PADB : Published Association Database

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hwanseok; Lee, Jin-Sung

    2007-01-01

    Background Although molecular pathway information and the International HapMap Project data can help biomedical researchers to investigate the aetiology of complex diseases more effectively, such information is missing or insufficient in current genetic association databases. In addition, only a few of the environmental risk factors are included as gene-environment interactions, and the risk measures of associations are not indexed in any association databases. Description We have developed a published association database (PADB; ) that includes both the genetic associations and the environmental risk factors available in PubMed database. Each genetic risk factor is linked to a molecular pathway database and the HapMap database through human gene symbols identified in the abstracts. And the risk measures such as odds ratios or hazard ratios are extracted automatically from the abstracts when available. Thus, users can review the association data sorted by the risk measures, and genetic associations can be grouped by human genes or molecular pathways. The search results can also be saved to tab-delimited text files for further sorting or analysis. Currently, PADB indexes more than 1,500,000 PubMed abstracts that include 3442 human genes, 461 molecular pathways and about 190,000 risk measures ranging from 0.00001 to 4878.9. Conclusion PADB is a unique online database of published associations that will serve as a novel and powerful resource for reviewing and interpreting huge association data of complex human diseases. PMID:17877839

  8. ResPlan Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellers, Michael L.

    2003-01-01

    The main project I was involved in was new application development for the existing CIS0 Database (ResPlan). This database application was developed in Microsoft Access. Initial meetings with Greg Follen, Linda McMillen, Griselle LaFontaine and others identified a few key weaknesses with the existing database. The weaknesses centered around that while the database correctly modeled the structure of Programs, Projects and Tasks, once the data was entered, the database did not capture any dynamic status information, and as such was of limited usefulness. After the initial meetings my goals were identified as follows: Enhance the ResPlan Database to include qualitative and quantitative status information about the Programs, Projects and Tasks Train staff members about the ResPlan database from both the user perspective and the developer perspective Give consideration to a Web Interface for reporting. Initially, the thought was that there would not be adequate time to actually develop the Web Interface, Greg wanted it understood that this was an eventual goal and as such should be a consideration throughout the development process.

  9. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect

    GAULT, G.W.

    1999-10-13

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  10. Database for propagation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-01-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  11. The Gaia Parameter Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Lammers, U.; Perryman, M. A. C.

    2005-01-01

    The parallel development of many aspects of a complex mission like Gaia, which includes numerous participants in ESA, industrial companies, and a large and active scientific collaboration throughout Europe, makes keeping track of the many design changes, instrument and operational complexities, and numerical values for the data analysis a very challenging problem. A comprehensive, easily-accessible, up-to-date, and definitive compilation of a large range of numerical quantities is required, and the Gaia parameter database has been established to satisfy these needs. The database is a centralised repository containing, besides mathematical, physical, and astronomical constants, many satellite and subsystem design parameters. At the end of 2004, more than 1600 parameters had been included. Version control has been implemented, providing, next to a `live' version with the most recent parameters, well-defined reference versions of the full database contents. The database can be queried or browsed using a regular Web browser (http://www.rssd.esa.int/Gaia/paramdb). Query results are formated by default in HTML. Data can also be retrieved as Fortran-77, Fortran-90, Java, ANSIC, C++, or XML structures for direct inclusion into software codes in these languages. The idea is that all collaborating scientists can use the database parameters and values, once retrieved, directly linked to computational routines. An off-line access mode is also available, enabling users to automatically download the contents of the database. The database will be maintained actively, and significant extensions of the contents are planned. Consistent use in the future of the database by the Gaia community at large, including all industrial teams, will ensure correct numerical values throughout the complex software systems being built up as details of the Gaia design develop. The database is already being used for the telemetry simulation chain in ESTEC, and in the data simulations for GDAAS2.

  12. Human variation databases

    PubMed Central

    Küntzer, Jan; Eggle, Daniela; Klostermann, Stefan; Burtscher, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 000 human genetic variations have been described in various genes that are associated with a wide variety of diseases. Such data provides invaluable information for both clinical medicine and basic science. A number of locus-specific databases have been developed to exploit this huge amount of data. However, the scope, format and content of these databases differ strongly and as no standard for variation databases has yet been adopted, the way data is presented varies enormously. This review aims to give an overview of current resources for human variation data in public and commercial resources. PMID:20639550

  13. International Comparisions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    International Comparisions Database (Web, free access)   The International Comparisons Database (ICDB) serves the U.S. and the Inter-American System of Metrology (SIM) with information based on Appendices B (International Comparisons), C (Calibration and Measurement Capabilities) and D (List of Participating Countries) of the Comit� International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA). The official source of the data is The BIPM key comparison database. The ICDB provides access to results of comparisons of measurements and standards organized by the consultative committees of the CIPM and the Regional Metrology Organizations.

  14. Hybrid Terrain Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Trey

    2006-01-01

    A prototype hybrid terrain database is being developed in conjunction with other databases and with hardware and software that constitute subsystems of aerospace cockpit display systems (known in the art as synthetic vision systems) that generate images to increase pilots' situation awareness and eliminate poor visibility as a cause of aviation accidents. The basic idea is to provide a clear view of the world around an aircraft by displaying computer-generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle, and airport information.

  15. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  16. JICST Factual Database(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Keisuke

    The computer programme, which builds atom-bond connection tables from nomenclatures, is developed. Chemical substances with their nomenclature and varieties of trivial names or experimental code numbers are inputted. The chemical structures of the database are stereospecifically stored and are able to be searched and displayed according to stereochemistry. Source data are from laws and regulations of Japan, RTECS of US and so on. The database plays a central role within the integrated fact database service of JICST and makes interrelational retrieval possible.

  17. Databases for materials selection

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Cambridge Materials Selector (CMS2.0) materials database was developed by the Engineering Dept. at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. This database makes it possible to select a material for a specific application from essentially all classes of materials. Genera, Predict, and Socrates software programs from CLI International, Houston, Texas, automate materials selection and corrosion problem-solving tasks. They are said to significantly reduce the time necessary to select a suitable material and/or to assess a corrosion problem and reach cost-effective solutions. This article describes both databases and tells how to use them.

  18. Detecting Cancer Quickly and Accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul; McDonald, Anthony; Hendricks, Judy; Copeland, Guild; Hunter, John; Akhil, Ohmar; Capps, Heather; Curry, Marc; Skirboll, Steve

    2000-03-01

    We present a new technique for high throughput screening of tumor cells in a sensitive nanodevice that has the potential to quickly identify a cell population that has begun the rapid protein synthesis and mitosis characteristic of cancer cell proliferation. Currently, pathologists rely on microscopic examination of cell morphology using century-old staining methods that are labor-intensive, time-consuming and frequently in error. New micro-analytical methods for automated, real time screening without chemical modification are critically needed to advance pathology and improve diagnoses. We have teamed scientists with physicians to create a microlaser biochip (based upon our R&D award winning bio-laser concept)1 which evaluates tumor cells by quantifying their growth kinetics. The key new discovery was demonstrating that the lasing spectra are sensitive to the biomolecular mass in the cell, which changes the speed of light in the laser microcavity. Initial results with normal and cancerous human brain cells show that only a few hundred cells -- the equivalent of a billionth of a liter -- are required to detect abnormal growth. The ability to detect cancer in such a minute tissue sample is crucial for resecting a tumor margin or grading highly localized tumor malignancy. 1. P. L. Gourley, NanoLasers, Scientific American, March 1998, pp. 56-61. This work supported under DOE contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. Detecting cancer quickly and accurately

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Hendricks, Judy K.; Copeland, G. C.; Hunter, John A.; Akhil, O.; Cheung, D.; Cox, Jimmy D.; Capps, H.; Curry, Mark S.; Skirboll, Steven K.

    2000-03-01

    We present a new technique for high throughput screening of tumor cells in a sensitive nanodevice that has the potential to quickly identify a cell population that has begun the rapid protein synthesis and mitosis characteristic of cancer cell proliferation. Currently, pathologists rely on microscopic examination of cell morphology using century-old staining methods that are labor-intensive, time-consuming and frequently in error. New micro-analytical methods for automated, real time screening without chemical modification are critically needed to advance pathology and improve diagnoses. We have teamed scientists with physicians to create a microlaser biochip (based upon our R&D award winning bio- laser concept) which evaluates tumor cells by quantifying their growth kinetics. The key new discovery was demonstrating that the lasing spectra are sensitive to the biomolecular mass in the cell, which changes the speed of light in the laser microcavity. Initial results with normal and cancerous human brain cells show that only a few hundred cells -- the equivalent of a billionth of a liter -- are required to detect abnormal growth. The ability to detect cancer in such a minute tissue sample is crucial for resecting a tumor margin or grading highly localized tumor malignancy.

  20. Primary mass standard based on atomic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter; Gläser, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The paper summarises the activities of several national and international Metrology Institutes in replacing the kilogram artefact, the unit of mass, by the mass of a certain number of atoms, in particular the atomic masses of silicon or bismuth. This task is based on two different experiments: a very accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, measuring the density and lattice parameter of an enriched silicon-28 crystal, and the accumulation of decelerated bismuth-209 ions by using a mass separator. The relative measurement uncertainties reached so far are in the first case 2 parts in 107, and in the latter several part in 104. The bismuth experiment is still in an early state of the work. The ratios between the masses of 28Si or 209Bi, respectively, and the present atomic mass standard, the mass of 12C, can be determined with an accuracy now approaching 10-10 using high precision Penning traps mass spectrometers.

  1. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  2. NCCDPHP PUBLICATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts of publications produced by the CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) including journal articles, monographs, book chapters, reports, policy documents, and fact sheets. Full...

  3. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1994-05-27

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  4. THE CTEPP DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CTEPP (Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants) database contains a wealth of data on children's aggregate exposures to pollutants in their everyday surroundings. Chemical analysis data for the environmental media and ques...

  5. Hawaii bibliographic database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Takahashi, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Hawaii bibliographic database has been created to contain all of the literature, from 1779 to the present, pertinent to the volcanological history of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain. References are entered in a PC- and Macintosh-compatible EndNote Plus bibliographic database with keywords and abstracts or (if no abstract) with annotations as to content. Keywords emphasize location, discipline, process, identification of new chemical data or age determinations, and type of publication. The database is updated approximately three times a year and is available to upload from an ftp site. The bibliography contained 8460 references at the time this paper was submitted for publication. Use of the database greatly enhances the power and completeness of library searches for anyone interested in Hawaiian volcanism.

  6. Chemical Kinetics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  7. Requirements Management Database

    2009-08-13

    This application is a simplified and customized version of the RBA and CTS databases to capture federal, site, and facility requirements, link to actions that must be performed to maintain compliance with their contractual and other requirements.

  8. Navigating Public Microarray Databases

    PubMed Central

    Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  9. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  10. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  11. Household Products Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... Commercial / Institutional Product Names Types of Products Manufacturers Ingredients About the Database FAQ Product Recalls Help Glossary Contact Us More Resources What's under your kitchen sink, in your garage, in your bathroom, and ...

  12. TREATABILITY DATABASE DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Drinking Water Treatability Database (TDB) presents referenced information on the control of contaminants in drinking water. It allows drinking water utilities, first responders to spills or emergencies, treatment process designers, research organizations, academics, regulato...

  13. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  14. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase-out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  15. Querying genomic databases

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

    1991-09-01

    A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

  16. Steam Properties Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 10 NIST/ASME Steam Properties Database (PC database for purchase)   Based upon the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) 1995 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of water and the most recent IAPWS formulations for transport and other properties, this updated version provides water properties over a wide range of conditions according to the accepted international standards.

  17. The ribosomal database project.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, N; Olsen, G J; Maidak, B L; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Macke, T J; Marsh, T L; Woese, C R

    1993-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome data along with related programs and services. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via ftp and electronic mail. Certain analytic services are also provided by the electronic mail server. PMID:8332524

  18. Database computing in HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.T.; Loken, S.; MacFarlane, J.F. ); May, E.; Lifka, D.; Lusk, E.; Price, L.E. ); Baden, A. . Dept. of Physics); Grossman, R.; Qin, X. . Dept. of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science); Cormell, L.; Leibold, P.; Liu, D

    1992-01-01

    The major SSC experiments are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year each. Once the primary reconstruction is completed by farms of inexpensive processors. I/O becomes a major factor in further analysis of the data. We believe that the application of database techniques can significantly reduce the I/O performed in these analyses. We present examples of such I/O reductions in prototype based on relational and object-oriented databases of CDF data samples.

  19. Database computing in HEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, C. T.; Loken, S.; Macfarlane, J. F.; May, E.; Lifka, D.; Lusk, E.; Price, L. E.; Baden, A.; Grossman, R.; Qin, X.

    1992-01-01

    The major SSC experiments are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year each. Once the primary reconstruction is completed by farms of inexpensive processors, I/O becomes a major factor in further analysis of the data. We believe that the application of database techniques can significantly reduce the I/O performed in these analyses. We present examples of such I/O reductions in prototypes based on relational and object-oriented databases of CDF data samples.

  20. Validation of a nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and the accurate quantification by isotopic dilution of glutathionylated and cysteinylated precursors of 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol and 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one in white grape juices.

    PubMed

    Roland, Aurélie; Vialaret, Jérôme; Moniatte, Marc; Rigou, Peggy; Razungles, Alain; Schneider, Rémi

    2010-03-01

    A rapid nanoLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of glutathionylated and cysteinylated precursors of 3-mercapto-hexan-1-ol (3MH) and 4-methyl-4-mercaptopentan-2-one in grape juice using stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA). The analytes were extracted from must using a cation exchange resin and purified on C18 cartridges. They were chromatographically separated on a reverse phase column and finally analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) using deuterated analogues as standards except for glutathionylated conjugate of 4MMP which was analyzed by external calibration. The method was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization recommendations by determining linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effect, repeatability, intermediate reproducibility, LODs and LOQs. Calibration for each precursor was determined by performing Lack-of-Fit test and the best fitting for 3MH precursors was a quadratic model whereas a linear model was better adapted for 4MMP precursors. All calibration curves showed quite satisfactory correlation coefficients (R(2)>0.995 for SIDA quantification and R(2)>0.985 for external calibration). Quantification by SIDA and external calibration allowed a high level of accuracy since the averaged value ranged from 80 to 108%. Quantification of aroma precursors was accurate and reproducible over five days since intermediate precision (same analyst, same sample and same apparatus), which was evaluated by the calculation of RSD was inferior to 16%. Limits of quantification for G3MH and G4MMP were closed to 0.50 and 0.07 nmol/L and as 4.75 and 1.90 nmol/L for Cys3MH and Cys4MMP respectively. This method was applied to the quantification of precursors into several types of grape juices: Melon B., Sauvignon, Riesling and Gewurztraminer. PMID:20122692

  1. Databases: Peter's Picks and Pans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacso, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the best and worst in databases on disk, CD-ROM, and online, and offers judgments and observations on database characteristics. Two databases are praised and three are criticized. (Author/JMV)

  2. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  3. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  4. Drinking Water Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, ShaTerea R.

    2004-01-01

    This summer I had the opportunity to work in the Environmental Management Office (EMO) under the Chemical Sampling and Analysis Team or CS&AT. This team s mission is to support Glenn Research Center (GRC) and EM0 by providing chemical sampling and analysis services and expert consulting. Services include sampling and chemical analysis of water, soil, fbels, oils, paint, insulation materials, etc. One of this team s major projects is the Drinking Water Project. This is a project that is done on Glenn s water coolers and ten percent of its sink every two years. For the past two summers an intern had been putting together a database for this team to record the test they had perform. She had successfully created a database but hadn't worked out all the quirks. So this summer William Wilder (an intern from Cleveland State University) and I worked together to perfect her database. We began be finding out exactly what every member of the team thought about the database and what they would change if any. After collecting this data we both had to take some courses in Microsoft Access in order to fix the problems. Next we began looking at what exactly how the database worked from the outside inward. Then we began trying to change the database but we quickly found out that this would be virtually impossible.

  5. The Transporter Classification Database

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Tamang, Dorjee G.; Västermark, Åke

    2014-01-01

    The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; http://www.tcdb.org) serves as a common reference point for transport protein research. The database contains more than 10 000 non-redundant proteins that represent all currently recognized families of transmembrane molecular transport systems. Proteins in TCDB are organized in a five level hierarchical system, where the first two levels are the class and subclass, the second two are the family and subfamily, and the last one is the transport system. Superfamilies that contain multiple families are included as hyperlinks to the five tier TC hierarchy. TCDB includes proteins from all types of living organisms and is the only transporter classification system that is both universal and recognized by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It has been expanded by manual curation, contains extensive text descriptions providing structural, functional, mechanistic and evolutionary information, is supported by unique software and is interconnected to many other relevant databases. TCDB is of increasing usefulness to the international scientific community and can serve as a model for the expansion of database technologies. This manuscript describes an update of the database descriptions previously featured in NAR database issues. PMID:24225317

  6. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  7. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  8. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  9. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  10. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  11. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  12. ECMDB: the E. coli Metabolome Database.

    PubMed

    Guo, An Chi; Jewison, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Liu, Yifeng; Knox, Craig; Djoumbou, Yannick; Lo, Patrick; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Wishart, David S

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Metabolome Database (ECMDB, http://www.ecmdb.ca) is a comprehensively annotated metabolomic database containing detailed information about the metabolome of E. coli (K-12). Modelled closely on the Human and Yeast Metabolome Databases, the ECMDB contains >2600 metabolites with links to ∼1500 different genes and proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in the ECMDB has been collected from dozens of textbooks, journal articles and electronic databases. Each metabolite entry in the ECMDB contains an average of 75 separate data fields, including comprehensive compound descriptions, names and synonyms, chemical taxonomy, compound structural and physicochemical data, bacterial growth conditions and substrates, reactions, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data and numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. The ECMDB also includes an extensive collection of intracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from our own work as well as other published metabolomic studies. This information is further supplemented with thousands of fully assigned reference nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry spectra obtained from pure E. coli metabolites that we (and others) have collected. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of E. coli's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers but also to molecular biologists, systems biologists and individuals in the biotechnology industry. PMID:23109553

  13. Great Basin paleontological database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, N.; Blodgett, R.B.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has constructed a paleontological database for the Great Basin physiographic province that can be served over the World Wide Web for data entry, queries, displays, and retrievals. It is similar to the web-database solution that we constructed for Alaskan paleontological data (www.alaskafossil.org). The first phase of this effort was to compile a paleontological bibliography for Nevada and portions of adjacent states in the Great Basin that has recently been completed. In addition, we are also compiling paleontological reports (Known as E&R reports) of the U.S. Geological Survey, which are another extensive source of l,egacy data for this region. Initial population of the database benefited from a recently published conodont data set and is otherwise focused on Devonian and Mississippian localities because strata of this age host important sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Au, Zn, and barite resources and enormons Carlin-type An deposits. In addition, these strata are the most important petroleum source rocks in the region, and record the transition from extension to contraction associated with the Antler orogeny, the Alamo meteorite impact, and biotic crises associated with global oceanic anoxic events. The finished product will provide an invaluable tool for future geologic mapping, paleontological research, and mineral resource investigations in the Great Basin, making paleontological data acquired over nearly the past 150 yr readily available over the World Wide Web. A description of the structure of the database and the web interface developed for this effort are provided herein. This database is being used ws a model for a National Paleontological Database (which we am currently developing for the U.S. Geological Survey) as well as for other paleontological databases now being developed in other parts of the globe. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  14. Chemical Explosion Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Peder; Brachet, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    A database containing information on chemical explosions, recorded and located by the International Data Center (IDC) of the CTBTO, should be established in the IDC prior to entry into force of the CTBT. Nearly all of the large chemical explosions occur in connection with mining activity. As a first step towards the establishment of this database, a survey of presumed mining areas where sufficiently large explosions are conducted has been done. This is dominated by the large coal mining areas like the Powder River (U.S.), Kuznetsk (Russia), Bowen (Australia) and Ekibastuz (Kazakhstan) basins. There are also several other smaller mining areas, in e.g. Scandinavia, Poland, Kazakhstan and Australia, with large enough explosions for detection. Events in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) of the IDC that are located in or close to these mining areas, and which therefore are candidates for inclusion in the database, have been investigated. Comparison with a database of infrasound events has been done as many mining blasts generate strong infrasound signals and therefore also are included in the infrasound database. Currently there are 66 such REB events in 18 mining areas in the infrasound database. On a yearly basis several hundreds of events in mining areas have been recorded and included in the REB. Establishment of the database of chemical explosions requires confirmation and ground truth information from the States Parties regarding these events. For an explosion reported in the REB, the appropriate authority in whose country the explosion occurred is encouraged, on a voluntary basis, to seek out information on the explosion and communicate this information to the IDC.

  15. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa.

    PubMed

    Coddington, Jonathan A; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios "barcodes" (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families-taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75-100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of the

  16. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Jonathan A.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios “barcodes” (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families—taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75–100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of

  17. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  18. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; et al

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  19. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; Rose, Kristie L.; Tabb, David L.

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.

  20. Extensive and Highly Accurate Line Lists for Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Richard, C.; Le Roy, R. J.; Coxon, J. A.; Hajigeorgiou, P.

    2011-06-01

    New dipole moment functions (DMF) for the ground X 1Σ+ electronic states of the hydrogen halides (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) have been obtained using a direct fit approach that fits the best available and appropriately weighted experimental line intensity data for individual ro-vibrational transitions. Combining the newly developed (taking into account the most recent experiments) empirical potential energy functions and the DMFs, line positions and line intensities of the hydrogen halides and their isotopologues have been calculated numerically using program LEVEL. In addition, new semi-empirical algorithms for assigning line-shape parameters for these species have been developed. Using these improvements, new line lists for hydrogen halides were created to update the HITRAN spectroscopic database. These new lists are more accurate and significantly more extensive than those included in the current version of the database (HITRAN2008). R.J. Le Roy, ``LEVEL 8.0, 2007'', University of Waterloo Chemical Physics Research Report CP-663 (2007); see http://leroy.uwaterloo.ca/programs/. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.C. Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al., ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  1. ADANS database specification

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    The purpose of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Deployment Analysis System (ADANS) Database Specification (DS) is to describe the database organization and storage allocation and to provide the detailed data model of the physical design and information necessary for the construction of the parts of the database (e.g., tables, indexes, rules, defaults). The DS includes entity relationship diagrams, table and field definitions, reports on other database objects, and a description of the ADANS data dictionary. ADANS is the automated system used by Headquarters AMC and the Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) for airlift planning and scheduling of peacetime and contingency operations as well as for deliberate planning. ADANS also supports planning and scheduling of Air Refueling Events by the TACC and the unit-level tanker schedulers. ADANS receives input in the form of movement requirements and air refueling requests. It provides a suite of tools for planners to manipulate these requirements/requests against mobility assets and to develop, analyze, and distribute schedules. Analysis tools are provided for assessing the products of the scheduling subsystems, and editing capabilities support the refinement of schedules. A reporting capability provides formatted screen, print, and/or file outputs of various standard reports. An interface subsystem handles message traffic to and from external systems. The database is an integral part of the functionality summarized above.

  2. The Chandra Bibliography Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rots, A. H.; Winkelman, S. L.; Paltani, S.; Blecksmith, S. E.; Bright, J. D.

    2004-07-01

    Early in the mission, the Chandra Data Archive started the development of a bibliography database, tracking publications in refereed journals and on-line conference proceedings that are based on Chandra observations, allowing our users to link directly to articles in the ADS from our archive, and to link to the relevant data in the archive from the ADS entries. Subsequently, we have been working closely with the ADS and other data centers, in the context of the ADEC-ITWG, on standardizing the literature-data linking. We have also extended our bibliography database to include all Chandra-related articles and we are also keeping track of the number of citations of each paper. Obviously, in addition to providing valuable services to our users, this database allows us to extract a wide variety of statistical information. The project comprises five components: the bibliography database-proper, a maintenance database, an interactive maintenance tool, a user browsing interface, and a web services component for exchanging information with the ADS. All of these elements are nearly mission-independent and we intend make the package as a whole available for use by other data centers. The capabilities thus provided represent support for an essential component of the Virtual Observatory.

  3. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three missions outstanding, the Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database has nearly 3000 entries. The data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. Details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics will be provided. Post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will also be discussed. Potential enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers will be addressed in the Future Work section. A related database of returned surfaces from the International Space Station will also be introduced.

  4. Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James I.; Christiansen, Eric I.; Lear, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    With three flights remaining on the manifest, the shuttle impact hypervelocity database has over 2800 entries. The data is currently divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the database provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. The paper will provide details and insights on the contents of the database including examples of descriptive statistics using the impact data. A discussion of post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will be presented. Future work to be discussed will be possible enhancements to the database structure and availability of the data for other researchers. A related database of ISS returned surfaces that are under development will also be introduced.

  5. Using the Reactome Database

    PubMed Central

    Haw, Robin

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the bioinformatics community in creating pathway databases. The Reactome project (a collaboration between the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York University Medical Center and the European Bioinformatics Institute) is one such pathway database and collects structured information on all the biological pathways and processes in the human. It is an expert-authored and peer-reviewed, curated collection of well-documented molecular reactions that span the gamut from simple intermediate metabolism to signaling pathways and complex cellular events. This information is supplemented with likely orthologous molecular reactions in mouse, rat, zebrafish, worm and other model organisms. This unit describes how to use the Reactome database to learn the steps of a biological pathway; navigate and browse through the Reactome database; identify the pathways in which a molecule of interest is involved; use the Pathway and Expression analysis tools to search the database for and visualize possible connections within user-supplied experimental data set and Reactome pathways; and the Species Comparison tool to compare human and model organism pathways. PMID:22700314

  6. FishTraits Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angermeier, Paul L.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2009-01-01

    The need for integrated and widely accessible sources of species traits data to facilitate studies of ecology, conservation, and management has motivated development of traits databases for various taxa. In spite of the increasing number of traits-based analyses of freshwater fishes in the United States, no consolidated database of traits of this group exists publicly, and much useful information on these species is documented only in obscure sources. The largely inaccessible and unconsolidated traits information makes large-scale analysis involving many fishes and/or traits particularly challenging. FishTraits is a database of >100 traits for 809 (731 native and 78 exotic) fish species found in freshwaters of the conterminous United States, including 37 native families and 145 native genera. The database contains information on four major categories of traits: (1) trophic ecology, (2) body size and reproductive ecology (life history), (3) habitat associations, and (4) salinity and temperature tolerances. Information on geographic distribution and conservation status is also included. Together, we refer to the traits, distribution, and conservation status information as attributes. Descriptions of attributes are available here. Many sources were consulted to compile attributes, including state and regional species accounts and other databases.

  7. NASA Records Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Lunsford, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Records Database, comprising a Web-based application program and a database, is used to administer an archive of paper records at Stennis Space Center. The system begins with an electronic form, into which a user enters information about records that the user is sending to the archive. The form is smart : it provides instructions for entering information correctly and prompts the user to enter all required information. Once complete, the form is digitally signed and submitted to the database. The system determines which storage locations are not in use, assigns the user s boxes of records to some of them, and enters these assignments in the database. Thereafter, the software tracks the boxes and can be used to locate them. By use of search capabilities of the software, specific records can be sought by box storage locations, accession numbers, record dates, submitting organizations, or details of the records themselves. Boxes can be marked with such statuses as checked out, lost, transferred, and destroyed. The system can generate reports showing boxes awaiting destruction or transfer. When boxes are transferred to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the system can automatically fill out NARA records-transfer forms. Currently, several other NASA Centers are considering deploying the NASA Records Database to help automate their records archives.

  8. Integrating Paleoecological Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blois, Jessica; Goring, Simon; Smith, Alison

    2011-02-01

    Neotoma Consortium Workshop; Madison, Wisconsin, 23-26 September 2010 ; Paleoecology can contribute much to global change science, as paleontological records provide rich information about species range shifts, changes in vegetation composition and productivity, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem responses to abrupt climate change, and paleoclimate reconstruction, for example. However, while paleoecology is increasingly a multidisciplinary, multiproxy field focused on biotic responses to global change, most paleo databases focus on single-proxy groups. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (http://www.neotomadb.org) aims to remedy this limitation by integrating discipline-specific databases to facilitate cross-community queries and analyses. In September, Neotoma consortium members and representatives from other databases and data communities met at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to launch the second development phase of Neotoma. The workshop brought together 54 international specialists, including Neotoma data stewards, users, and developers. Goals for the meeting were fourfold: (1) develop working plans for existing data communities; (2) identify new data types and sources; (3) enhance data access, visualization, and analysis on the Neotoma Web site; and (4) coordinate with other databases and cooperate in tool development and sharing.

  9. VIEWCACHE: An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timoleon

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to illustrate the concept of incremental access to distributed databases. An experimental database management system, ADMS, which has been developed at the University of Maryland, in College Park, uses VIEWCACHE, a database access method based on incremental search. VIEWCACHE is a pointer-based access method that provides a uniform interface for accessing distributed databases and catalogues. The compactness of the pointer structures formed during database browsing and the incremental access method allow the user to search and do inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are dereferenced.

  10. Open Geoscience Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashev, A.

    2012-04-01

    Currently there is an enormous amount of various geoscience databases. Unfortunately the only users of the majority of the databases are their elaborators. There are several reasons for that: incompaitability, specificity of tasks and objects and so on. However the main obstacles for wide usage of geoscience databases are complexity for elaborators and complication for users. The complexity of architecture leads to high costs that block the public access. The complication prevents users from understanding when and how to use the database. Only databases, associated with GoogleMaps don't have these drawbacks, but they could be hardly named "geoscience" Nevertheless, open and simple geoscience database is necessary at least for educational purposes (see our abstract for ESSI20/EOS12). We developed a database and web interface to work with them and now it is accessible at maps.sch192.ru. In this database a result is a value of a parameter (no matter which) in a station with a certain position, associated with metadata: the date when the result was obtained; the type of a station (lake, soil etc); the contributor that sent the result. Each contributor has its own profile, that allows to estimate the reliability of the data. The results can be represented on GoogleMaps space image as a point in a certain position, coloured according to the value of the parameter. There are default colour scales and each registered user can create the own scale. The results can be also extracted in *.csv file. For both types of representation one could select the data by date, object type, parameter type, area and contributor. The data are uploaded in *.csv format: Name of the station; Lattitude(dd.dddddd); Longitude(ddd.dddddd); Station type; Parameter type; Parameter value; Date(yyyy-mm-dd). The contributor is recognised while entering. This is the minimal set of features that is required to connect a value of a parameter with a position and see the results. All the complicated data

  11. CD-ROM-aided Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yuzuru

    CD-ROM is remarked as an epoch-making medium because of its advantages such as large capacity, compact size, mass reproducibility, read only memory and cost performance ratio. Some of big dictionaries and online databases have been converted to CD-ROM versions so far, however, information of publication or machine parts are converted recently. Moreover various CD-ROM-aided products such as support system for R&D, decision making and so on are being turned out. Still there remain many problems on sophisticated utilization of CD-ROM and distributive machinery of information. Author reviews this mini-series and describes the prospects of development of CD-ROM.

  12. Protein Structure Databases.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-01-01

    Web-based protein structure databases come in a wide variety of types and levels of information content. Those having the most general interest are the various atlases that describe each experimentally determined protein structure and provide useful links, analyses, and schematic diagrams relating to its 3D structure and biological function. Also of great interest are the databases that classify 3D structures by their folds as these can reveal evolutionary relationships which may be hard to detect from sequence comparison alone. Related to these are the numerous servers that compare folds-particularly useful for newly solved structures, and especially those of unknown function. Beyond these are a vast number of databases for the more specialized user, dealing with specific families, diseases, structural features, and so on. PMID:27115626

  13. Cytochrome P450 database.

    PubMed

    Lisitsa, A V; Gusev, S A; Karuzina, I I; Archakov, A I; Koymans, L

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a specialized database dedicated exclusively to the cytochrome P450 superfamily. The system provides the impression of superfamily's nomenclature and describes structure and function of different P450 enzymes. Information on P450-catalyzed reactions, substrate preferences, peculiarities of induction and inhibition is available through the database management system. Also the source genes and appropriate translated proteins can be retrieved together with corresponding literature references. Developed programming solution provides the flexible interface for browsing, searching, grouping and reporting the information. Local version of database manager and required data files are distributed on a compact disk. Besides, there is a network version of the software available on Internet. The network version implies the original mechanism, which is useful for the permanent online extension of the data scope. PMID:11769119

  14. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  15. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  16. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  17. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R- 125, R-134a, R-141b, R142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses polyalkylene glycol (PAG), ester, and other lubricants. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits.

  18. The PROSITE database.

    PubMed

    Hulo, Nicolas; Bairoch, Amos; Bulliard, Virginie; Cerutti, Lorenzo; De Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Pagni, Marco; Sigrist, Christian J A

    2006-01-01

    The PROSITE database consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful signatures that are described as patterns or profiles. Each signature is linked to a documentation that provides useful biological information on the protein family, domain or functional site identified by the signature. The PROSITE database is now complemented by a series of rules that can give more precise information about specific residues. During the last 2 years, the documentation and the ScanProsite web pages were redesigned to add more functionalities. The latest version of PROSITE (release 19.11 of September 27, 2005) contains 1329 patterns and 552 profile entries. Over the past 2 years more than 200 domains have been added, and now 52% of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries (release 48.1 of September 27, 2005) have a cross-reference to a PROSITE entry. The database is accessible at http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:16381852

  19. The PROSITE database

    PubMed Central

    Hulo, Nicolas; Bairoch, Amos; Bulliard, Virginie; Cerutti, Lorenzo; De Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S.; Pagni, Marco; Sigrist, Christian J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The PROSITE database consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful signatures that are described as patterns or profiles. Each signature is linked to a documentation that provides useful biological information on the protein family, domain or functional site identified by the signature. The PROSITE database is now complemented by a series of rules that can give more precise information about specific residues. During the last 2 years, the documentation and the ScanProsite web pages were redesigned to add more functionalities. The latest version of PROSITE (release 19.11 of September 27, 2005) contains 1329 patterns and 552 profile entries. Over the past 2 years more than 200 domains have been added, and now 52% of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries (release 48.1 of September 27, 2005) have a cross-reference to a PROSITE entry. The database is accessible at . PMID:16381852

  20. Associations of Body Mass Index (Maternal BMI) and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Neonatal and Maternal Pregnancy Outcomes in a Multicentre European Database (Diabetes and Pregnancy Vitamin D and Lifestyle Intervention for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Prevention)

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Akke; Zawiejska, A.; Harreiter, J.; Buckley, B.; Di Cianni, G.; Lapolla, A.; Corcoy, R.; Simmons, D.; Adelantado, J. M.; Damm, P.; Desoye, G.; Devlieger, R.; Hill, D.; Kautzky-Willer, A.; Klemetti, M.; Mathiesen, E.; Rebollo, P.; Snoek, F.; Tikkanen, M.; Timmerman, D.; van Assche, A.; van Poppel, M.; Wender-Oegowska, E.; Dunne, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Assess the impact of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and obesity on neonatal and maternal pregnancy outcomes. Methods. Cross-sectional data (3343 pregnancies) from seven European centres were included in a multilevel analysis of the association between GDM/obesity and caesarean section, macrosomia and neonatal morbidities. Results. Comparison of databases identified reporting differences between countries due to the inclusion of true population based samples or pregnancies from specialised tertiary centres, resulting in higher prevalences of GDM for some countries. The analysis showed that obesity and GDM were independent risk factors of perinatal complications. Only BMI had a dose-dependent effect on the risk of macrosomia and caesarean section. Both obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and GDM were independent risk factors of neonatal morbidities. Conclusions. Obesity and GDM were independent risk factors of perinatal complications. The effect of the worldwide obesity and diabetes epidemic is extending to the next generation. PMID:24527262

  1. Associations of Body Mass Index (Maternal BMI) and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus with Neonatal and Maternal Pregnancy Outcomes in a Multicentre European Database (Diabetes and Pregnancy Vitamin D and Lifestyle Intervention for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Prevention).

    PubMed

    Vellinga, Akke; Zawiejska, A; Harreiter, J; Buckley, B; Di Cianni, G; Lapolla, A; Corcoy, R; Simmons, D; Adelantado, J M; Damm, P; Desoye, G; Devlieger, R; Hill, D; Kautzky-Willer, A; Klemetti, M; Mathiesen, E; Rebollo, P; Snoek, F; Tikkanen, M; Timmerman, D; van Assche, A; van Poppel, M; Wender-Oegowska, E; Dunne, F

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Assess the impact of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and obesity on neonatal and maternal pregnancy outcomes. Methods. Cross-sectional data (3343 pregnancies) from seven European centres were included in a multilevel analysis of the association between GDM/obesity and caesarean section, macrosomia and neonatal morbidities. Results. Comparison of databases identified reporting differences between countries due to the inclusion of true population based samples or pregnancies from specialised tertiary centres, resulting in higher prevalences of GDM for some countries. The analysis showed that obesity and GDM were independent risk factors of perinatal complications. Only BMI had a dose-dependent effect on the risk of macrosomia and caesarean section. Both obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) and GDM were independent risk factors of neonatal morbidities. Conclusions. Obesity and GDM were independent risk factors of perinatal complications. The effect of the worldwide obesity and diabetes epidemic is extending to the next generation. PMID:24527262

  2. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Barnosky, A. D.; Betancourt, J. L.; Bills, B.; Booth, R.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Graham, R. W.; Goring, S. J.; Hausmann, S.; Smith, A. J.; Williams, J. W.; Buckland, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (www.neotomadb.org) is a multiproxy, open-access, relational database that includes fossil data for the past 5 million years (the late Neogene and Quaternary Periods). Modern distributional data for various organisms are also being made available for calibration and paleoecological analyses. The project is a collaborative effort among individuals from more than 20 institutions worldwide, including domain scientists representing a spectrum of Pliocene-Quaternary fossil data types, as well as experts in information technology. Working groups are active for diatoms, insects, ostracodes, pollen and plant macroscopic remains, testate amoebae, rodent middens, vertebrates, age models, geochemistry and taphonomy. Groups are also active in developing online tools for data analyses and for developing modules for teaching at different levels. A key design concept of NeotomaDB is that stewards for various data types are able to remotely upload and manage data. Cooperatives for different kinds of paleo data, or from different regions, can appoint their own stewards. Over the past year, much progress has been made on development of the steward software-interface that will enable this capability. The steward interface uses web services that provide access to the database. More generally, these web services enable remote programmatic access to the database, which both desktop and web applications can use and which provide real-time access to the most current data. Use of these services can alleviate the need to download the entire database, which can be out-of-date as soon as new data are entered. In general, the Neotoma web services deliver data either from an entire table or from the results of a view. Upon request, new web services can be quickly generated. Future developments will likely expand the spatial and temporal dimensions of the database. NeotomaDB is open to receiving new datasets and stewards from the global Quaternary community

  3. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  4. Database Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer database management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software in the world.

  5. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  6. JICST Factual Database(1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Shinji

    The outline of JICST factual database (JOIS-F), which JICST has started from January, 1988, and its online service are described in this paper. First, the author mentions the circumstances from 1973, when its planning was started, to the present, and its relation to "Project by Special Coordination Founds for Promoting Science and Technology". Secondly, databases, which are now under development aiming to start its services from fiscal 1988 or fiscal 1989, of DNA, metallic material intensity, crystal structure, chemical substance regulations, and so forth, are described. Lastly, its online service is briefly explained.

  7. The Ribosomal Database Project.

    PubMed Central

    Maidak, B L; Larsen, N; McCaughey, M J; Overbeek, R; Olsen, G J; Fogel, K; Blandy, J; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) is a curated database that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services, and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server/rdp.life.uiuc.edu) and gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu). The electronic mail server also provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for chimeric nature of newly sequenced rRNAs, and automated alignment. PMID:7524021

  8. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  9. DataBase on Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar Aparicio, R.; Gomez, D.; Coterillo Coz, I.; Wojcik, D.

    2012-12-01

    At CERN a number of key database applications are running on user-managed MySQL database services. The database on demand project was born out of an idea to provide the CERN user community with an environment to develop and run database services outside of the actual centralised Oracle based database services. The Database on Demand (DBoD) empowers the user to perform certain actions that had been traditionally done by database administrators, DBA's, providing an enterprise platform for database applications. It also allows the CERN user community to run different database engines, e.g. presently open community version of MySQL and single instance Oracle database server. This article describes a technology approach to face this challenge, a service level agreement, the SLA that the project provides, and an evolution of possible scenarios.

  10. An Efficient Approach for Automated Mass Segmentation and Classification in Mammograms.

    PubMed

    Dong, Min; Lu, Xiangyu; Ma, Yide; Guo, Yanan; Ma, Yurun; Wang, Keju

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is becoming a leading death of women all over the world; clinical experiments demonstrate that early detection and accurate diagnosis can increase the potential of treatment. In order to improve the breast cancer diagnosis precision, this paper presents a novel automated segmentation and classification method for mammograms. We conduct the experiment on both DDSM database and MIAS database, firstly extract the region of interests (ROIs) with chain codes and using the rough set (RS) method to enhance the ROIs, secondly segment the mass region from the location ROIs with an improved vector field convolution (VFC) snake and following extract features from the mass region and its surroundings, and then establish features database with 32 dimensions; finally, these features are used as input to several classification techniques. In our work, the random forest is used and compared with support vector machine (SVM), genetic algorithm support vector machine (GA-SVM), particle swarm optimization support vector machine (PSO-SVM), and decision tree. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated by a comprehensive and objective evaluation system; also, Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) indicator is used. Among the state-of-the-art classifiers, our method achieves the best performance with best accuracy of 97.73%, and the MCC value reaches 0.8668 and 0.8652 in unique DDSM database and both two databases, respectively. Experimental results prove that the proposed method outperforms the other methods; it could consider applying in CAD systems to assist the physicians for breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:25776767

  11. A Knowledge Database on Thermal Control in Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Shigeki; Satoh, Isao

    A prototype version of a knowledge database on thermal control in manufacturing processes, specifically, molding, semiconductor manufacturing, and micro-scale manufacturing has been developed. The knowledge database has search functions for technical data, evaluated benchmark data, academic papers, and patents. The database also displays trends and future roadmaps for research topics. It has quick-calculation functions for basic design. This paper summarizes present research topics and future research on thermal control in manufacturing engineering to collate the information to the knowledge database. In the molding process, the initial mold and melt temperatures are very important parameters. In addition, thermal control is related to many semiconductor processes, and the main parameter is temperature variation in wafers. Accurate in-situ temperature measurment of wafers is important. And many technologies are being developed to manufacture micro-structures. Accordingly, the knowledge database will help further advance these technologies.

  12. The CEBAF Element Database

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

    2011-03-01

    With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

  13. GENERAL PERMITS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:This database was used to provide permit writers with a library of examples for writing general permits. It has not been maintained and is outdated and will be removed. Water Permits Division is trying to determine whether or not to recreate this databas...

  14. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  15. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  16. Redis database administration tool

    2013-02-13

    MyRedis is a product of the Lorenz subproject under the ASC Scirntific Data Management effort. MyRedis is a web based utility designed to allow easy administration of instances of Redis databases. It can be usedd to view and manipulate data as well as run commands directly against a variety of different Redis hosts.

  17. NATIONAL NUTRIENTS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Nutrient Criteria Program has initiated development of a National relational database application that will be used to store and analyze nutrient data. The ultimate use of these data will be to derive ecoregion- and waterbody-specific numeric nutrient...

  18. NATIONAL ASSESSMENT DATABASE (NAD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The National Assessment Database stores State water quality assessments that are reported under Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act. The data are stored by individual water quality assessments. Threatened, partially and not supporting waters also have da...

  19. Patent Family Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Edlyn S.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on retrieval of patent information online and includes definition of patent family, basic and equivalent patents, "parents and children" applications, designated states, patent family databases--International Patent Documentation Center, World Patents Index, APIPAT (American Petroleum Institute), CLAIMS (IFI/Plenum). A table noting country…

  20. High Performance Buildings Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry, a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses. The database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site.

  1. NATIONAL CONTAMINANT OCCURRENCE DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:Under the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments, EPA is to assemble a National Drinking Water Occurrence Database (NCOD) by August 1999. The NCOD is a collection of data of documented quality on unregulated and regulated chemical, radiological, microbia...

  2. Database Technologies for RDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Souripriya; Srinivasan, Jagannathan

    Efficient and scalable support for RDF/OWL data storage, loading, inferencing and querying, in conjunction with already available support for enterprise level data and operations reliability requirements, can make databases suitable to act as enterprise-level RDF/OWL repository and hence become a viable platform for building semantic applications for the enterprise environments.

  3. Biomedical term mapping databases.

    PubMed

    Wren, Jonathan D; Chang, Jeffrey T; Pustejovsky, James; Adar, Eytan; Garner, Harold R; Altman, Russ B

    2005-01-01

    Longer words and phrases are frequently mapped onto a shorter form such as abbreviations or acronyms for efficiency of communication. These abbreviations are pervasive in all aspects of biology and medicine and as the amount of biomedical literature grows, so does the number of abbreviations and the average number of definitions per abbreviation. Even more confusing, different authors will often abbreviate the same word/phrase differently. This ambiguity impedes our ability to retrieve information, integrate databases and mine textual databases for content. Efforts to standardize nomenclature, especially those doing so retrospectively, need to be aware of different abbreviatory mappings and spelling variations. To address this problem, there have been several efforts to develop computer algorithms to identify the mapping of terms between short and long form within a large body of literature. To date, four such algorithms have been applied to create online databases that comprehensively map biomedical terms and abbreviations within MEDLINE: ARGH (http://lethargy.swmed.edu/ARGH/argh.asp), the Stanford Biomedical Abbreviation Server (http://bionlp.stanford.edu/abbreviation/), AcroMed (http://medstract.med.tufts.edu/acro1.1/index.htm) and SaRAD (http://www.hpl.hp.com/research/idl/projects/abbrev.html). In addition to serving as useful computational tools, these databases serve as valuable references that help biologists keep up with an ever-expanding vocabulary of terms. PMID:15608198

  4. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  5. Databases and data mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the course of the past decade, the breadth of information that is made available through online resources for plant biology has increased astronomically, as have the interconnectedness among databases, online tools, and methods of data acquisition and analysis. For maize researchers, the numbe...

  6. Weathering Database Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Collecting weather data is a traditional part of a meteorology unit at the middle level. However, making connections between the data and weather conditions can be a challenge. One way to make these connections clearer is to enter the data into a database. This allows students to quickly compare different fields of data and recognize which…

  7. The Ribosomal Database Project

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Gary J.; Overbeek, Ross; Larsen, Niels; Marsh, Terry L.; McCaughey, Michael J.; Maciukenas, Michael A.; Kuan, Wen-Min; Macke, Thomas J.; Xing, Yuqing; Woese, Carl R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) compiles ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development. PMID:1598241

  8. LQTS gene LOVD database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Moss, Arthur; Cong, Peikuan; Pan, Min; Chang, Bingxi; Zheng, Liangrong; Fang, Quan; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer; Lin, Changsong; Li, Zhongxiang; Wei, Junfang; Zeng, Qiang; Qi, Ming

    2010-11-01

    The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that predisposes young individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. LQTS is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of cardiac ion channels (KCNQ1, KCNH2,SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2). Many other genes involved in LQTS have been described recently(KCNJ2, AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, SCNA4B, SNTA1, and CAV3). We created an online database(http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/introduction.html) that provides information on variants in LQTS-associated genes. As of February 2010, the database contains 1738 unique variants in 12 genes. A total of 950 variants are considered pathogenic, 265 are possible pathogenic, 131 are unknown/unclassified, and 292 have no known pathogenicity. In addition to these mutations collected from published literature, we also submitted information on gene variants, including one possible novel pathogenic mutation in the KCNH2 splice site found in ten Chinese families with documented arrhythmias. The remote user is able to search the data and is encouraged to submit new mutations into the database. The LQTS database will become a powerful tool for both researchers and clinicians. PMID:20809527

  9. LHCb distributed conditions database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, M.

    2008-07-01

    The LHCb Conditions Database project provides the necessary tools to handle non-event time-varying data. The main users of conditions are reconstruction and analysis processes, which are running on the Grid. To allow efficient access to the data, we need to use a synchronized replica of the content of the database located at the same site as the event data file, i.e. the LHCb Tier1. The replica to be accessed is selected from information stored on LFC (LCG File Catalog) and managed with the interface provided by the LCG developed library CORAL. The plan to limit the submission of jobs to those sites where the required conditions are available will also be presented. LHCb applications are using the Conditions Database framework on a production basis since March 2007. We have been able to collect statistics on the performance and effectiveness of both the LCG library COOL (the library providing conditions handling functionalities) and the distribution framework itself. Stress tests on the CNAF hosted replica of the Conditions Database have been performed and the results will be summarized here.

  10. WETLANDS TREATMENT DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA sponsored a project to collect and catalog information from wastewater treatment wetlands into a computer database. PA has also written a user friendly, stand-alone, menu-driven computer program to allow anyone with DOS 3.3 or higher to access the information in the ...

  11. ECOREGION SPATIAL DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This spatial database contains boundaries and attributes describing Level III ecoregions in EPA Region 8. The ecoregions shown here have been derived from Omernik (1987) and from refinements of Omernik's framework that have been made for other projects. These ongoing or re...

  12. The AMMA database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloche, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Fleury, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim

    2010-05-01

    The AMMA project includes aircraft, ground-based and ocean measurements, an intensive use of satellite data and diverse modelling studies. Therefore, the AMMA database aims at storing a great amount and a large variety of data, and at providing the data as rapidly and safely as possible to the AMMA research community. In order to stimulate the exchange of information and collaboration between researchers from different disciplines or using different tools, the database provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats. The AMMA database contains: - AMMA field campaigns datasets; - historical data in West Africa from 1850 (operational networks and previous scientific programs); - satellite products from past and future satellites, (re-)mapped on a regular latitude/longitude grid and stored in NetCDF format (CF Convention); - model outputs from atmosphere or ocean operational (re-)analysis and forecasts, and from research simulations. The outputs are processed as the satellite products are. Before accessing the data, any user has to sign the AMMA data and publication policy. This chart only covers the use of data in the framework of scientific objectives and categorically excludes the redistribution of data to third parties and the usage for commercial applications. Some collaboration between data producers and users, and the mention of the AMMA project in any publication is also required. The AMMA database and the associated on-line tools have been fully developed and are managed by two teams in France (IPSL Database Centre, Paris and OMP, Toulouse). Users can access data of both data centres using an unique web portal. This website is composed of different modules : - Registration: forms to register, read and sign the data use chart when an user visits for the first time - Data access interface: friendly tool allowing to build a data extraction request by selecting various criteria like location, time, parameters... The request can

  13. JDD, Inc. Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    JDD Inc, is a maintenance and custodial contracting company whose mission is to provide their clients in the private and government sectors "quality construction, construction management and cleaning services in the most efficient and cost effective manners, (JDD, Inc. Mission Statement)." This company provides facilities support for Fort Riley in Fo,rt Riley, Kansas and the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field here in Cleveland, Ohio. JDD, Inc. is owned and operated by James Vaughn, who started as painter at NASA Glenn and has been working here for the past seventeen years. This summer I worked under Devan Anderson, who is the safety manager for JDD Inc. in the Logistics and Technical Information Division at Glenn Research Center The LTID provides all transportation, secretarial, security needs and contract management of these various services for the center. As a safety manager, my mentor provides Occupational Health and Safety Occupation (OSHA) compliance to all JDD, Inc. employees and handles all other issues (Environmental Protection Agency issues, workers compensation, safety and health training) involving to job safety. My summer assignment was not as considered "groundbreaking research" like many other summer interns have done in the past, but it is just as important and beneficial to JDD, Inc. I initially created a database using a Microsoft Excel program to classify and categorize data pertaining to numerous safety training certification courses instructed by our safety manager during the course of the fiscal year. This early portion of the database consisted of only data (training field index, employees who were present at these training courses and who was absent) from the training certification courses. Once I completed this phase of the database, I decided to expand the database and add as many dimensions to it as possible. Throughout the last seven weeks, I have been compiling more data from day to day operations and been adding the

  14. PMAG: Relational Database Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Genevey, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Scripps center for Physical and Chemical Earth References (PACER) was established to help create databases for reference data and make them available to the Earth science community. As part of these efforts PACER supports GERM, REM and PMAG and maintains multiple online databases under the http://earthref.org umbrella website. This website has been built on top of a relational database that allows for the archiving and electronic access to a great variety of data types and formats, permitting data queries using a wide range of metadata. These online databases are designed in Oracle 8.1.5 and they are maintained at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. They are directly available via http://earthref.org/databases/. A prototype of the PMAG relational database is now operational within the existing EarthRef.org framework under http://earthref.org/databases/PMAG/. As will be shown in our presentation, the PMAG design focuses around the general workflow that results in the determination of typical paleo-magnetic analyses. This ensures that individual data points can be traced between the actual analysis and the specimen, sample, site, locality and expedition it belongs to. These relations guarantee traceability of the data by distinguishing between original and derived data, where the actual (raw) measurements are performed on the specimen level, and data on the sample level and higher are then derived products in the database. These relations may also serve to recalculate site means when new data becomes available for that locality. The PMAG data records are extensively described in terms of metadata. These metadata are used when scientists search through this online database in order to view and download their needed data. They minimally include method descriptions for field sampling, laboratory techniques and statistical analyses. They also include selection criteria used during the interpretation of the data and, most importantly, critical information about the

  15. Tautomerism in large databases

    PubMed Central

    Sitzmann, Markus; Ihlenfeldt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    We have used the Chemical Structure DataBase (CSDB) of the NCI CADD Group, an aggregated collection of over 150 small-molecule databases totaling 103.5 million structure records, to conduct tautomerism analyses on one of the largest currently existing sets of real (i.e. not computer-generated) compounds. This analysis was carried out using calculable chemical structure identifiers developed by the NCI CADD Group, based on hash codes available in the chemoinformatics toolkit CACTVS and a newly developed scoring scheme to define a canonical tautomer for any encountered structure. CACTVS’s tautomerism definition, a set of 21 transform rules expressed in SMIRKS line notation, was used, which takes a comprehensive stance as to the possible types of tautomeric interconversion included. Tautomerism was found to be possible for more than 2/3 of the unique structures in the CSDB. A total of 680 million tautomers were calculated from, and including, the original structure records. Tautomerism overlap within the same individual database (i.e. at least one other entry was present that was really only a different tautomeric representation of the same compound) was found at an average rate of 0.3% of the original structure records, with values as high as nearly 2% for some of the databases in CSDB. Projected onto the set of unique structures (by FICuS identifier), this still occurred in about 1.5% of the cases. Tautomeric overlap across all constituent databases in CSDB was found for nearly 10% of the records in the collection. PMID:20512400

  16. Accurate and Precise Zinc Isotope Ratio Measurements in Urban Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, D.; Gioia, S. M. C. L.; Coles, B.; Arnold, T.; Babinski, M.

    2009-04-01

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of δ66Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per mil per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in δ66Zn ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per mil in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per mil in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source.

  17. Compact variant-rich customized sequence database and a fast and sensitive database search for efficient proteogenomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Park, Heejin; Bae, Junwoo; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Sangok; Kim, Hokeun; Mun, Dong-Gi; Joh, Yoonsung; Lee, Wonyeop; Chae, Sehyun; Lee, Sanghyuk; Kim, Hark Kyun; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won; Paek, Eunok

    2014-12-01

    In proteogenomic analysis, construction of a compact, customized database from mRNA-seq data and a sensitive search of both reference and customized databases are essential to accurately determine protein abundances and structural variations at the protein level. However, these tasks have not been systematically explored, but rather performed in an ad-hoc fashion. Here, we present an effective method for constructing a compact database containing comprehensive sequences of sample-specific variants--single nucleotide variants, insertions/deletions, and stop-codon mutations derived from Exome-seq and RNA-seq data. It, however, occupies less space by storing variant peptides, not variant proteins. We also present an efficient search method for both customized and reference databases. The separate searches of the two databases increase the search time, and a unified search is less sensitive to identify variant peptides due to the smaller size of the customized database, compared to the reference database, in the target-decoy setting. Our method searches the unified database once, but performs target-decoy validations separately. Experimental results show that our approach is as fast as the unified search and as sensitive as the separate searches. Our customized database includes mutation information in the headers of variant peptides, thereby facilitating the inspection of peptide-spectrum matches. PMID:25316439

  18. Generative engineering databases - Toward expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasdorf, W. J.; Salley, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Engineering data management, incorporating concepts of optimization with data representation, is receiving increasing attention as the amount and complexity of information necessary for performing engineering operations increases and the need to coordinate its representation and use increases. Research in this area promises advantages for a wide variety of engineering applications, particularly those which seek to use data in innovative ways in the engineering process. This paper presents a framework for a comprehensive, relational database management system that combines a knowledge base of design constraints with a database of engineering data items in order to achieve a 'generative database' - one which automatically generates new engineering design data according to the design constraints stored in the knowledge base. The representation requires a database that is able to store all of the data normally associated with engineering design and to accurately represent the interactions between constraints and the stored data while guaranteeing its integrity. The representation also requires a knowledge base that is able to store all the constraints imposed upon the engineering design process.

  19. Image database for digital hand atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Huang, H. K.; Pietka, Ewa; Gilsanz, Vicente; Dey, Partha S.; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Pospiech-Kurkowska, Sywia

    2003-05-01

    Bone age assessment is a procedure frequently performed in pediatric patients to evaluate their growth disorder. A commonly used method is atlas matching by a visual comparison of a hand radiograph with a small reference set of old Greulich-Pyle atlas. We have developed a new digital hand atlas with a large set of clinically normal hand images of diverse ethnic groups. In this paper, we will present our system design and implementation of the digital atlas database to support the computer-aided atlas matching for bone age assessment. The system consists of a hand atlas image database, a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) software module for image processing and atlas matching, and a Web user interface. Users can use a Web browser to push DICOM images, directly or indirectly from PACS, to the CAD server for a bone age assessment. Quantitative features on the examined image, which reflect the skeletal maturity, are then extracted and compared with patterns from the atlas image database to assess the bone age. The digital atlas method built on a large image database and current Internet technology provides an alternative to supplement or replace the traditional one for a quantitative, accurate and cost-effective assessment of bone age.

  20. Dbsync: A Computer Program for maintaining duplicate database tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, N.; Gaudet, S.

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre(CADC) is one of the centres responsible for the distribution of HST data to the scientifc community outside the United States. One of the requirements for the external data centres is the maintenance of an accurate, up to date subset of the STScI HST archive database. The CADC was given the responsibility to develop a method for automatically maintaining a copy of the HST archive database at each of the external data centres. The HST data archive database is a SYBASE relational database which consists of nearly 200 tables in 2 databases, with a total size of approximately 550 MB. The content of many of the database tables changes on a daily basis, and the structure of the tables are subject to change. A different subset of the database is required at each of the external archive centres, and the makeup of the subsets are subject to change. The computer program "dbsync" was developed by the CADC to maintain both the content and the structure of the tables in the database. Dbsync is run at the external archive sites, accessing the source database over the Internet. Dbsync updates the content of selected tables and rebuilds any tables whose structure has changed. The external archive sites retain control over the transfer, allowing complete flexibility in the selection of data from the database. Dbsync was developed to perform a specific task, but has since evolved into general purpose tool for copying and updating tables between databases. This Paper will describe the following: an overview of the problem of maintaining a copy of the HST archive database. a description of the initial approach to a solution. a description of the dbsync program. the current uses of the dbsync program.

  1. An open access thyroid ultrasound image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Lina; Vargas, Carlos; Narváez, Fabián.; Durán, Oscar; Muñoz, Emma; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems (CAD) have been developed to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of abnormalities and a large number of pattern recognition techniques have been proposed to obtain a second opinion. Most of these strategies have been evaluated using different datasets making their performance incomparable. In this work, an open access database of thyroid ultrasound images is presented. The dataset consists of a set of B-mode Ultrasound images, including a complete annotation and diagnostic description of suspicious thyroid lesions by expert radiologists. Several types of lesions as thyroiditis, cystic nodules, adenomas and thyroid cancers were included while an accurate lesion delineation is provided in XML format. The diagnostic description of malignant lesions was confirmed by biopsy. The proposed new database is expected to be a resource for the community to assess different CAD systems.

  2. XLSearch: a Probabilistic Database Search Algorithm for Identifying Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Li, Sujun; Reilly, James P; Radivojac, Predrag; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometric analysis has become an important technique for probing protein three-dimensional structure and protein-protein interactions. A key step in this process is the accurate identification and validation of cross-linked peptides from tandem mass spectra. The identification of cross-linked peptides, however, presents challenges related to the expanded nature of the search space (all pairs of peptides in a sequence database) and the fact that some peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) contain one correct and one incorrect peptide but often receive scores that are comparable to those in which both peptides are correctly identified. To address these problems and improve detection of cross-linked peptides, we propose a new database search algorithm, XLSearch, for identifying cross-linked peptides. Our approach is based on a data-driven scoring scheme that independently estimates the probability of correctly identifying each individual peptide in the cross-link given knowledge of the correct or incorrect identification of the other peptide. These conditional probabilities are subsequently used to estimate the joint posterior probability that both peptides are correctly identified. Using the data from two previous cross-link studies, we show the effectiveness of this scoring scheme, particularly in distinguishing between true identifications and those containing one incorrect peptide. We also provide evidence that XLSearch achieves more identifications than two alternative methods at the same false discovery rate (availability: https://github.com/COL-IU/XLSearch ). PMID:27068484

  3. Integration of the QMSFRG Database into the HZETRN Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Shavers, M. R.; Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Accurate nuclear interaction data bases are needed for describing the transport of space radiation in matter including space craft structures, atmospheres, and tissues. Transport models support the identification and development of new material concepts for human and electronic part protection. Quantum effects are manifested in nuclear reactions in several ways including interference effects between terms in the multiple scattering series, the many-body nuclear wave functions (for e.g. the roles of shell structure and Fermi momentum) and nuclear clustering. The quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model (QMSFRG) is a comprehensive model for generating nuclear interaction databases for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport. Other nuclear databases including the NUCFRG model and Monte-Carlo simulation codes such as FLUKA, LAHET, HETC, and GEANT ignore quantum effects. These codes fail to describe many important features of nuclear reactions and are thus inaccurate for the evaluation of materials for radiation protection. Previously we have shown that quantum effects are manifested through constructive interference in forward production spectra, the effects of Fermi momentum on production spectra, cluster nuclei knockout, and the nuclear response function. Quantum effects are especially important for heavy ions with mass numbers less than 20 that dominate radiation transport in human tissues and for the materials that are expected to be superior in space radiation protection. We describe the integration of the QMSFRG model into the HZETRN transport code. Integration milestones include proper treatment of odd-even charge-mass effects in nuclear fragmentation and the momentum distribution of nucleon production from GCR primary heavy ions. We have also modified the two-body amplitudes in the model to include nuclear medium effects. In order to include a comprehensive description of the GCR isotopic composition in materials, we have described the isotopic composition

  4. The GLIMS Glacier Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raup, B. H.; Khalsa, S. S.; Armstrong, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project has built a geospatial and temporal database of glacier data, composed of glacier outlines and various scalar attributes. These data are being derived primarily from satellite imagery, such as from ASTER and Landsat. Each "snapshot" of a glacier is from a specific time, and the database is designed to store multiple snapshots representative of different times. We have implemented two web-based interfaces to the database; one enables exploration of the data via interactive maps (web map server), while the other allows searches based on text-field constraints. The web map server is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Server (WMS) and Web Feature Server (WFS). This means that other web sites can display glacier layers from our site over the Internet, or retrieve glacier features in vector format. All components of the system are implemented using Open Source software: Linux, PostgreSQL, PostGIS (geospatial extensions to the database), MapServer (WMS and WFS), and several supporting components such as Proj.4 (a geographic projection library) and PHP. These tools are robust and provide a flexible and powerful framework for web mapping applications. As a service to the GLIMS community, the database contains metadata on all ASTER imagery acquired over glacierized terrain. Reduced-resolution of the images (browse imagery) can be viewed either as a layer in the MapServer application, or overlaid on the virtual globe within Google Earth. The interactive map application allows the user to constrain by time what data appear on the map. For example, ASTER or glacier outlines from 2002 only, or from Autumn in any year, can be displayed. The system allows users to download their selected glacier data in a choice of formats. The results of a query based on spatial selection (using a mouse) or text-field constraints can be downloaded in any of these formats: ESRI shapefiles, KML (Google Earth), Map

  5. NATIVE HEALTH DATABASES: NATIVE HEALTH HISTORY DATABASE (NHHD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Native Health Databases contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The databases provide i...

  6. NATIVE HEALTH DATABASES: NATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH DATABASE (NHRD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Native Health Databases contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The databases provide i...

  7. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-11-09

    The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R- 717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents on compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. A computerized version is available that includes retrieval software.

  8. Protein Model Database

    SciTech Connect

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  9. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  10. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-11-15

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  11. Real Time Baseball Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Yasuhiro

    The author describes the system outline, features and operations of "Nikkan Sports Realtime Basaball Database" which was developed and operated by Nikkan Sports Shimbun, K. K. The system enables to input numerical data of professional baseball games as they proceed simultaneously, and execute data updating at realtime, just-in-time. Other than serving as supporting tool for prepareing newspapers it is also available for broadcasting media, general users through NTT dial Q2 and others.

  12. MEROPS: the peptidase database

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.; Barrett, Alan J.

    2000-01-01

    Important additions have been made to the MEROPS database (http://www.bi.bbsrc.ac.uk/Merops/Merops.htm ). These include sequence alignments and cladograms for many of the families of peptidases, and these have proved very helpful in the difficult task of distinguishing the sequences of peptidases that are simply species variants of already known enzymes from those that represent novel enzymes. PMID:10592261

  13. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilities access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  14. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  15. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-01-15

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. it consolidates and facilitates.access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  16. Two elephants in the room: new hybrid nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry approaches for metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes some of the advances made over the past year in NMR-based metabolomics for the elucidation of known and unknown compounds, including new ways of how to combine this information with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Recent findings A new method allows the back-calculation of mass spectra from NMR spectra that have been queried against databases improving the accuracy of the identified compounds by validation and consistency analysis. For the de-novo characterization of unknown compounds, an algorithm has been introduced that predicts all viable NMR spectra from accurate masses allowing, by comparison with experimental NMR data, the determination of the structures of new metabolites in complex mixtures. Summary Recent advances in NMR and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and their synergistic use promises to significantly improve metabolomics sample characterization both in terms of identification and quantitation, and accelerate metabolite discovery. PMID:26154280

  17. Anomaly detection applied to a materials control and accounting database

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, R.; Spanks, L.; Yarbro, T.

    1995-09-01

    An important component of the national mission of reducing the nuclear danger includes accurate recording of the processing and transportation of nuclear materials. Nuclear material storage facilities, nuclear chemical processing plants, and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities collect and store large amounts of data describing transactions that involve nuclear materials. To maintain confidence in the integrity of these data, it is essential to identify anomalies in the databases. Anomalous data could indicate error, theft, or diversion of material. Yet, because of the complex and diverse nature of the data, analysis and evaluation are extremely tedious. This paper describes the authors work in the development of analysis tools to automate the anomaly detection process for the Material Accountability and Safeguards System (MASS) that tracks and records the activities associated with accountable quantities of nuclear material at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using existing guidelines that describe valid transactions, the authors have created an expert system that identifies transactions that do not conform to the guidelines. Thus, this expert system can be used to focus the attention of the expert or inspector directly on significant phenomena.

  18. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, J.M.

    1993-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  19. The Cambridge Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Groom, Colin R.; Bruno, Ian J.; Lightfoot, Matthew P.; Ward, Suzanna C.

    2016-01-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal–organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface. PMID:27048719

  20. ARTI refrigerant database

    SciTech Connect

    Calm, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alterative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on various refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.