Science.gov

Sample records for accurate mass information

  1. The utility of accurate mass and LC elution time information in the analysis of complex proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Daly, Don S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical tryptic digests of all predicted proteins from the genomes of three organisms of varying complexity were evaluated for specificity and possible utility of combined peptide accurate mass and predicted LC normalized elution time (NET) information. The uniqueness of each peptide was evaluated using its combined mass (+/- 5 ppm and 1 ppm) and NET value (no constraint, +/- 0.05 and 0.01 on a 0-1 NET scale). The set of peptides both underestimates actual biological complexity due to the lack of specific modifications, and overestimates the expected complexity since many proteins will not be present in the sample or observable on the mass spectrometer because of dynamic range limitations. Once a peptide is identified from an LCMS/MS experiment, its mass and elution time is representative of a unique fingerprint for that peptide. The uniqueness of that fingerprint in comparison to that for the other peptides present is indicative of the ability to confidently identify that peptide based on accurate mass and NET measurements. These measurements can be made using HPLC coupled with high resolution MS in a high-throughput manner. Results show that for organisms with comparatively small proteomes, such as Deinococcus radiodurans, modest mass and elution time accuracies are generally adequate for peptide identifications. For more complex proteomes, increasingly accurate easurements are required. However, the majority of proteins should be uniquely identifiable by using LC-MS with mass accuracies within +/- 1 ppm and elution time easurements within +/- 0.01 NET.

  2. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    proteins can also be extensively modified by PTMs26-31 or by their interactions with other biomolecules or small molecules.32,33 Thus, it is highly desirable that proteins, the primary functional macromolecules involved in almost all biological activities, can be studied directly and systematically to determine their diverse properties and interplay. Such proteome-wide analysis is expected to provide a wealth of biological information, such as sequence, quantity, PTMs, interactions, activities, subcellular distribution and structure of proteins, which is critical to the comprehensive understanding of the biological systems. However, the de novo analysis of proteins isolated from cells, tissues or bodily fluids poses significant challenges due to the tremendous complexity and depth of the proteome, which necessitates high-throughput and highly sensitive analytical techniques. It is therefore not surprising that mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable technology for proteome analysis.

  3. Accurate masses for dispersion-supported galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joe; Martinez, Gregory D.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Geha, Marla; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Simon, Joshua D.; Avedo, Frank F.

    2010-08-01

    We derive an accurate mass estimator for dispersion-supported stellar systems and demonstrate its validity by analysing resolved line-of-sight velocity data for globular clusters, dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies. Specifically, by manipulating the spherical Jeans equation we show that the mass enclosed within the 3D deprojected half-light radius r1/2 can be determined with only mild assumptions about the spatial variation of the stellar velocity dispersion anisotropy as long as the projected velocity dispersion profile is fairly flat near the half-light radius, as is typically observed. We find M1/2 = 3 G-1< σ2los > r1/2 ~= 4 G-1< σ2los > Re, where < σ2los > is the luminosity-weighted square of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion and Re is the 2D projected half-light radius. While deceptively familiar in form, this formula is not the virial theorem, which cannot be used to determine accurate masses unless the radial profile of the total mass is known a priori. We utilize this finding to show that all of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies (MW dSphs) are consistent with having formed within a halo of a mass of approximately 3 × 109 Msolar, assuming a Λ cold dark matter cosmology. The faintest MW dSphs seem to have formed in dark matter haloes that are at least as massive as those of the brightest MW dSphs, despite the almost five orders of magnitude spread in luminosity between them. We expand our analysis to the full range of observed dispersion-supported stellar systems and examine their dynamical I-band mass-to-light ratios ΥI1/2. The ΥI1/2 versus M1/2 relation for dispersion-supported galaxies follows a U shape, with a broad minimum near ΥI1/2 ~= 3 that spans dwarf elliptical galaxies to normal ellipticals, a steep rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 3200 for ultra-faint dSphs and a more shallow rise to ΥI1/2 ~= 800 for galaxy cluster spheroids.

  4. Non-targeted analysis of electronics waste by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry: Using accurate mass information and mass defect analysis to explore the data.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Masaaki; Jobst, Karl J; Reiner, Eric J; Reichenbach, Stephen E; Tao, Qingping; Hang, Jiliang; Wu, Zhanpin; Dane, A John; Cody, Robert B

    2015-05-22

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) offer the best possible separation of their respective techniques. Recent commercialization of combined GC×GC-HRMS systems offers new possibilities for the analysis of complex mixtures. However, such experiments yield enormous data sets that require new informatics tools to facilitate the interpretation of the rich information content. This study reports on the analysis of dust obtained from an electronics recycling facility by using GC×GC in combination with a new high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. New software tools for (non-traditional) Kendrick mass defect analysis were developed in this research and greatly aided in the identification of compounds containing chlorine and bromine, elements that feature in most persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In essence, the mass defect plot serves as a visual aid from which halogenated compounds are recognizable on the basis of their mass defect and isotope patterns. Mass chromatograms were generated based on specific ions identified in the plots as well as region of the plot predominantly occupied by halogenated contaminants. Tentative identification was aided by database searches, complementary electron-capture negative ionization experiments and elemental composition determinations from the exact mass data. These included known and emerging flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromobenzene, tetrabromo bisphenol A and tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), as well as other legacy contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs).

  5. Accurate mass tag retention time database for urine proteome analysis by chromatography--mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Agron, I A; Avtonomov, D M; Kononikhin, A S; Popov, I A; Moshkovskii, S A; Nikolaev, E N

    2010-05-01

    Information about peptides and proteins in urine can be used to search for biomarkers of early stages of various diseases. The main technology currently used for identification of peptides and proteins is tandem mass spectrometry, in which peptides are identified by mass spectra of their fragmentation products. However, the presence of the fragmentation stage decreases sensitivity of analysis and increases its duration. We have developed a method for identification of human urinary proteins and peptides. This method based on the accurate mass and time tag (AMT) method does not use tandem mass spectrometry. The database of AMT tags containing more than 1381 AMT tags of peptides has been constructed. The software for database filling with AMT tags, normalizing the chromatograms, database application for identification of proteins and peptides, and their quantitative estimation has been developed. The new procedures for peptide identification by tandem mass spectra and the AMT tag database are proposed. The paper also lists novel proteins that have been identified in human urine for the first time. PMID:20632944

  6. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  7. 78 FR 34604 - Submitting Complete and Accurate Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 Submitting Complete and Accurate Information AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... accurate information as would a licensee or an applicant for a license.'' DATES: Submit comments by August... may submit comments by any of the following methods (unless this document describes a different...

  8. Accurate and reproducible determination of lignin molar mass by acetobromination.

    PubMed

    Asikkala, Janne; Tamminen, Tarja; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2012-09-12

    The accurate and reproducible determination of lignin molar mass by using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) is challenging. The lignin association effects, known to dominate underivatized lignins, have been thoroughly addressed by reaction with acetyl bromide in an excess of glacial acetic acid. The combination of a concerted acetylation with the introduction of bromine within the lignin alkyl side chains is thought to be responsible for the observed excellent solubilization characteristics acetobromination imparts to a variety of lignin samples. The proposed methodology was compared and contrasted to traditional lignin derivatization methods. In addition, side reactions that could possibly be induced under the acetobromination conditions were explored with native softwood (milled wood lignin, MWL) and technical (kraft) lignin. These efforts lend support toward the use of room temperature acetobromination being a facile, effective, and universal lignin derivatization medium proposed to be employed prior to SEC measurements. PMID:22870925

  9. Maximum Mass of Strange Stars and Pulsars with the Most Accurately Measured Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, Yu. L.; Grigoryan, A. K.; Shahinyan, H. A.

    2015-06-01

    Strange quark matter (SQM) is studied using a bag model in which the transition to the SQM state takes place at energy densities of no more than twice the density in atomic nuclei. Thus, low mass neutron stars with a configuration consisting of SQM form a single family on a plot of the mass M of equilibrium superdense configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c (the M(ρ c ) curve). The bag model considered here depends on three constants: the vacuum pressure B, the quark-gluon interaction constant α c , and the strange quark mass m s . Sets of values of these constants are determined, which if used in the equation of state for SQM yield a maximal mass M max of the equilibrium quark configurations which exceeds the recently accurately determined mass of 2.01 M ⊙ for the binary radio pulsar PSR J0348+0432. The mass, radius, total baryon number, and red shift from the surface of the strange star are calculated for these configurations as a function of central energy density ρ c . The values of these integrated parameters are also calculated for each series with M max > 2.01 M ⊙ for superdense configurations with masses of 2.01, 1.97, and 1.44 solar masses, which have been determined with great accuracy from observations. It turns out that, according to the resulting equations of state, all of the three pulsars with the most accurately measured masses, may be possible candidate strange stars.

  10. Application of the accurate mass and time tag approach in studies of the human blood lipidome

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jie; Sorensen, Christina M.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Jiang, Hongliang; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-08-15

    We report a preliminary demonstration of the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach for lipidomics. Initial data-dependent LC-MS/MS analyses of human plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte lipids were performed in order to identify lipid molecular species in conjunction with complementary accurate mass and isotopic distribution information. Identified lipids were used to populate initial lipid AMT tag databases containing 250 and 45 entries for those species detected in positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) modes, respectively. The positive ESI database was then utilized to identify human plasma, erythrocyte, and lymphocyte lipids in high-throughput quantitative LC-MS analyses based on the AMT tag approach. We were able to define the lipid profiles of human plasma, erythrocytes, and lymphocytes based on qualitative and quantitative differences in lipid abundance. In addition, we also report on the optimization of a reversed-phase LC method for the separation of lipids in these sample types.

  11. Accurate Low-mass Stellar Models of KOI-126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian; Dotter, Aaron

    2011-10-01

    The recent discovery of an eclipsing hierarchical triple system with two low-mass stars in a close orbit (KOI-126) by Carter et al. appeared to reinforce the evidence that theoretical stellar evolution models are not able to reproduce the observational mass-radius relation for low-mass stars. We present a set of stellar models for the three stars in the KOI-126 system that show excellent agreement with the observed radii. This agreement appears to be due to the equation of state implemented by our code. A significant dispersion in the observed mass-radius relation for fully convective stars is demonstrated; indicative of the influence of physics currently not incorporated in standard stellar evolution models. We also predict apsidal motion constants for the two M dwarf companions. These values should be observationally determined to within 1% by the end of the Kepler mission.

  12. iPE-MMR: An integrated approach to accurately assign monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric data

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Jung; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Hokeun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Hyung, Seok-Won; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Kyong-Chul; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Su-Jin; Tolic, Nikola; Slysz, Gordon W.; Moore, Ronald J.; Zhao, Rui; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lee, Hookeun; Camp, David G.; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won

    2010-01-01

    Accurate assignment of monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) data is a fundamental and critically important step for successful peptide identifications in mass spectrometry based proteomics. Here we describe an integrated approach that combines three previously reported methods of treating MS/MS data for precursor mass refinement. This combined method, “integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement” (iPE-MMR), integrates steps: 1) generation of refined MS/MS data by DeconMSn; 2) additional refinement of the resultant MS/MS data by a modified version of PE-MMR; 3) elimination of systematic errors of precursor masses using DtaRefinery. iPE-MMR is the first method that utilizes all MS information from multiple MS scans of a precursor ion including multiple charge states, in an MS scan, to determine precursor mass. By combining these methods, iPE-MMR increases sensitivity in peptide identification and provides increased accuracy when applied to complex high-throughput proteomics data. PMID:20863060

  13. Quantitative proteomics using the high resolution accurate mass capabilities of the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Domon, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    High resolution/accurate mass hybrid mass spectrometers have considerably advanced shotgun proteomics and the recent introduction of fast sequencing capabilities has expanded its use for targeted approaches. More specifically, the quadrupole-orbitrap instrument has a unique configuration and its new features enable a wide range of experiments. An overview of the analytical capabilities of this instrument is presented, with a focus on its application to quantitative analyses. The high resolution, the trapping capability and the versatility of the instrument have allowed quantitative proteomic workflows to be redefined and new data acquisition schemes to be developed. The initial proteomic applications have shown an improvement of the analytical performance. However, as quantification relies on ion trapping, instead of ion beam, further refinement of the technique can be expected.

  14. A highly accurate method for the determination of mass and center of mass of a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Trubert, M. R.; Egwuatu, A.

    1978-01-01

    An extremely accurate method for the measurement of mass and the lateral center of mass of a spacecraft has been developed. The method was needed for the Voyager spacecraft mission requirement which limited the uncertainty in the knowledge of lateral center of mass of the spacecraft system weighing 750 kg to be less than 1.0 mm (0.04 in.). The method consists of using three load cells symmetrically located at 120 deg apart on a turntable with respect to the vertical axis of the spacecraft and making six measurements for each load cell. These six measurements are taken by cyclic rotations of the load cell turntable and of the spacecraft, about the vertical axis of the measurement fixture. This method eliminates all alignment, leveling, and load cell calibration errors for the lateral center of mass determination, and permits a statistical best fit of the measurement data. An associated data reduction computer program called MASCM has been written to implement this method and has been used for the Voyager spacecraft.

  15. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ions against every fragmentation spectrum across the entire acquisition. A dot product score is calculated against each spectrum in order to generate a score chromatogram used for both identification and quantification. Chromatographic elution profile characteristics are not used to cluster precursor peptide signals to their respective fragment ions. FT-ARM identifications are demonstrated to be complementary to conventional data-dependent shotgun analysis, especially in cases where the data-dependent method fails due to fragmenting multiple overlapping precursors. The sensitivity, robustness and specificity of FT-ARM quantification are shown to be analogous to selected reaction monitoring-based peptide quantification with the added benefit of minimal assay development. Thus, FT-ARM is demonstrated to be a novel and complementary data acquisition, identification, and quantification method for the large scale analysis of peptides. PMID:22288382

  16. Accurate, reliable control of process gases by mass flow controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.; McKnight, T.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal mass flow controller, or MFC, has become an instrument of choice for the monitoring and controlling of process gas flow throughout the materials processing industry. These MFCs are used on CVD processes, etching tools, and furnaces and, within the semiconductor industry, are used on 70% of the processing tools. Reliability and accuracy are major concerns for the users of the MFCs. Calibration and characterization technologies for the development and implementation of mass flow devices are described. A test facility is available to industry and universities to test and develop gas floe sensors and controllers and evaluate their performance related to environmental effects, reliability, reproducibility, and accuracy. Additional work has been conducted in the area of accuracy. A gravimetric calibrator was invented that allows flow sensors to be calibrated in corrosive, reactive gases to an accuracy of 0.3% of reading, at least an order of magnitude better than previously possible. Although MFCs are typically specified with accuracies of 1% of full scale, MFCs may often be implemented with unwarranted confidence due to the conventional use of surrogate gas factors. Surrogate gas factors are corrections applied to process flow indications when an MFC has been calibrated on a laboratory-safe surrogate gas, but is actually used on a toxic, or corrosive process gas. Previous studies have indicated that the use of these factors may cause process flow errors of typically 10%, but possibly as great as 40% of full scale. This paper will present possible sources of error in MFC process gas flow monitoring and control, and will present an overview of corrective measures which may be implemented with MFC use to significantly reduce these sources of error.

  17. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  18. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    DOEpatents

    Hylton, J.O.; Remenyik, C.J.

    1994-08-09

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure is disclosed. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel. 5 figs.

  19. Ultra-accurate collaborative information filtering via directed user similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Song, W.-J.; Liu, J.-G.

    2014-07-01

    A key challenge of the collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering is how to obtain the reliable and accurate results with the help of peers' recommendation. Since the similarities from small-degree users to large-degree users would be larger than the ones in opposite direction, the large-degree users' selections are recommended extensively by the traditional second-order CF algorithms. By considering the users' similarity direction and the second-order correlations to depress the influence of mainstream preferences, we present the directed second-order CF (HDCF) algorithm specifically to address the challenge of accuracy and diversity of the CF algorithm. The numerical results for two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, show that the accuracy of the new algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art CF algorithms. Comparing with the CF algorithm based on random walks proposed by Liu et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 20 (2009) 285) the average ranking score could reach 0.0767 and 0.0402, which is enhanced by 27.3% and 19.1% for MovieLens and Netflix, respectively. In addition, the diversity, precision and recall are also enhanced greatly. Without relying on any context-specific information, tuning the similarity direction of CF algorithms could obtain accurate and diverse recommendations. This work suggests that the user similarity direction is an important factor to improve the personalized recommendation performance.

  20. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  1. DeconMSn: A Software Tool for accurate parent ion monoisotopic mass determination for tandem mass spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-04-01

    We present a new software tool for tandem MS analyses that: • accurately calculates the monoisotopic mass and charge of high–resolution parent ions • accurately operates regardless of the mass selected for fragmentation • performs independent of instrument settings • enables optimal selection of search mass tolerance for high mass accuracy experiments • is open source and thus can be tailored to individual needs • incorporates a SVM-based charge detection algorithm for analyzing low resolution tandem MS spectra • creates multiple output data formats (.dta, .MGF) • handles .RAW files and .mzXML formats • compatible with SEQUEST, MASCOT, X!Tandem

  2. Integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement: An Integrated Approach to Accurately Assign Monoisotopic Precursor Masses to Tandem Mass Spectrometric Data

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hee-Jung; Purvine, Samuel O.; Kim, Hokeun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Hyung, Seok-Won; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Kyong-Chul; Park, Jong-Moon; Kim, Su-Jin; Tolic, Nikola; Slysz, Gordon W.; Moore, Ronald J.; Zhao, Rui; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Lee, Hookeun; Camp, David G.; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won

    2010-10-15

    Accurate assignment of monoisotopic precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) data is a fundamental and critically important step for successful peptide identifications in mass spectrometry based proteomics. Here we describe an integrated approach that combines three previously reported methods of treating MS/MS data for precursor mass refinement. This combined method, “integrated Post-Experiment Monoisotopic Mass Refinement” (iPE MMR), integrates steps: 1) generation of refined MS/MS data by DeconMSn, 2) additional refinement of the resultant MS/MS data by a modified version of PE-MMR, and 3) elimination of systematic errors of precursor masses using DtaRefinery. iPE-MMR is the first method that utilizes all MS information from multiple MS scans of a precursor ion and multiple charge states of it in an MS scan to determine precursor mass. By combining the synergistic features of each of method, iPE MMR increases sensitivity in peptide identification and provides increased accuracy when applied to complex high-throughput proteomics data. iPE MMR also allows incorporating additional data processing step(s) or skipping step(s), if necessary, to enable new developments or applications of the tools, as each step of iPE MMR produces output data in a common and conventional format used in proteomics data processing.

  3. MASS MEASUREMENTS BY AN ACCURATE AND SENSITIVE SELECTED ION RECORDING TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace-level components of mixtures were successfully identified or confirmed by mass spectrometric accurate mass measurements, made at high resolution with selected ion recording, using GC and LC sample introduction. Measurements were made at 20 000 or 10 000 resolution, respecti...

  4. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  5. Accurate screening for synthetic preservatives in beverage using high performance liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu Qin; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Yan Yan; Yong, Wei; Chu, Xiao Gang; Fang, Yan Yan; Zweigenbaum, Jerry

    2008-02-11

    In this study, liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/TOF-MS) is applied to qualitation and quantitation of 18 synthetic preservatives in beverage. The identification by HPLC/TOF-MS is accomplished with the accurate mass (the subsequent generated empirical formula) of the protonated molecules [M+H]+ or the deprotonated molecules [M-H]-, along with the accurate mass of their main fragment ions. In order to obtain sufficient sensitivity for quantitation purposes (using the protonated or deprotonated molecule) and additional qualitative mass spectrum information provided by the fragments ions, segment program of fragmentor voltages is designed in positive and negative ion mode, respectively. Accurate mass measurements are highly useful in the complex sample analyses since they allow us to achieve a high degree of specificity, often needed when other interferents are present in the matrix. The mass accuracy typically obtained is routinely better than 3 ppm. The 18 compounds behave linearly in the 0.005-5.0mg.kg(-1) concentration range, with correlation coefficient >0.996. The recoveries at the tested concentrations of 1.0mg.kg(-1)-100mg.kg(-1) are 81-106%, with coefficients of variation <7.5%. Limits of detection (LODs) range from 0.0005 to 0.05 mg.kg(-1), which are far below the required maximum residue level (MRL) for these preservatives in foodstuff. The method is suitable for routine quantitative and qualitative analyses of synthetic preservatives in foodstuff.

  6. Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry identification of quinoline alkaloids in honey.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, Tamara; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Cela, Rafael; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-08-01

    Time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), following a previous chromatographic (gas or liquid chromatography) separation step, is applied to the identification and structural elucidation of quinoline-like alkaloids in honey. Both electron ionization (EI) MS and positive electrospray (ESI+) MS spectra afforded the molecular ions (M(.+) and M+H(+), respectively) of target compounds with mass errors below 5 mDa. Scan EI-MS and product ion scan ESI-MS/MS spectra permitted confirmation of the existence of a quinoline ring in the structures of the candidate compounds. Also, the observed fragmentation patterns were useful to discriminate between quinoline derivatives having the same empirical formula but different functionalities, such as aldoximes and amides. In the particular case of phenylquinolines, ESI-MS/MS spectra provided valuable clues regarding the position of the phenyl moiety attached to the quinoline ring. The aforementioned spectral information, combined with retention times matching, led to the identification of quinoline and five quinoline derivatives, substituted at carbon number 4, in honey samples. An isomer of phenyquinoline was also noticed; however, its exact structure could not be established. Liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography (GC) TOF-MS were applied to the screening of the aforementioned compounds in a total of 62 honeys. Species displaying higher occurrence frequencies were 4-quinolinecarbonitrile, 4-quinolinecarboxaldehyde, 4-quinolinealdoxime, and the phenylquinoline isomer. The Pearson test revealed strong correlations among the first three compounds. PMID:26041455

  7. Invited article: Time accurate mass flow measurements of solid-fueled systems.

    PubMed

    Olliges, Jordan D; Lilly, Taylor C; Joslyn, Thomas B; Ketsdever, Andrew D

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic method is described that utilizes a thrust stand mass balance (TSMB) to directly measure time-accurate mass flow from a solid-fuel thruster. The accuracy of the TSMB mass flow measurement technique was demonstrated in three ways including the use of an idealized numerical simulation, verifying a fluid mass calibration with high-speed digital photography, and by measuring mass loss in more than 30 hybrid rocket motor firings. Dynamic response of the mass balance was assessed through weight calibration and used to derive spring, damping, and mass moment of inertia coefficients for the TSMB. These dynamic coefficients were used to determine the mass flow rate and total mass loss within an acrylic and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor firing. Intentional variations in the oxygen flow rate resulted in corresponding variations in the total propellant mass flow as expected. The TSMB was optimized to determine mass losses of up to 2.5 g and measured total mass loss to within 2.5% of that calculated by a NIST-calibrated digital scale. Using this method, a mass flow resolution of 0.0011 g/s or 2% of the average mass flow in this study has been achieved.

  8. Main-Sequence Effective Temperatures from a Revised Mass-Luminosity Relation Based on Accurate Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eker, Z.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Yaz Gökçe, E.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Şenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-04-01

    The mass-luminosity (M-L), mass-radius (M-R), and mass-effective temperature (M-{{T}eff}) diagrams for a subset of galactic nearby main-sequence stars with masses and radii accurate to ≤slant 3% and luminosities accurate to ≤slant 30% (268 stars) has led to a putative discovery. Four distinct mass domains have been identified, which we have tentatively associated with low, intermediate, high, and very high mass main-sequence stars, but which nevertheless are clearly separated by three distinct break points at 1.05, 2.4, and 7 {{M}⊙ } within the studied mass range of 0.38-32 {{M}⊙ }. Further, a revised mass-luminosity relation (MLR) is found based on linear fits for each of the mass domains identified. The revised, mass-domain based MLRs, which are classical (L\\propto {{M}α }), are shown to be preferable to a single linear, quadratic, or cubic equation representing an alternative MLR. Stellar radius evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly evident on the M-R diagram, but it is not clear on the M-{{T}eff} diagram based on published temperatures. Effective temperatures can be calculated directly using the well known Stephan-Boltzmann law by employing the accurately known values of M and R with the newly defined MLRs. With the calculated temperatures, stellar temperature evolution within the main sequence for stars with M\\gt 1 {{M}⊙ } is clearly visible on the M-{{T}eff} diagram. Our study asserts that it is now possible to compute the effective temperature of a main-sequence star with an accuracy of ˜6%, as long as its observed radius error is adequately small (\\lt 1%) and its observed mass error is reasonably small (\\lt 6%).

  9. Accurate mass determination of short-lived isotopes by a tandem Penning-trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, H.; Becker, S.; Bollen, G.; Kern, F.; Kluge, H.; Otto, T.; Savard, G.; Schweikhard, L. ); Audi, G. ); Moore, R.B. ); The ISOLDE Collaboration

    1990-12-17

    A mass spectrometer consisting of two Penning traps has been set up for short-lived isotopes at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. The ion beam is collected and cooled in the first trap. After delivery to the second trap, high-accuracy direct mass measurements are made by determining the cyclotron frequency of the stored ions. Measurements have been performed for {sup 118}Cs--{sup 137}Cs. A resolving power of over 10{sup 6} and an accuracy of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}7} have been achieved, corresponding to about 20 keV.

  10. Automatic and Accurate Shadow Detection Using Near-Infrared Information.

    PubMed

    Rüfenacht, Dominic; Fredembach, Clément; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to automatically detect shadows in a fast and accurate manner by taking advantage of the inherent sensitivity of digital camera sensors to the near-infrared (NIR) part of the spectrum. Dark objects, which confound many shadow detection algorithms, often have much higher reflectance in the NIR. We can thus build an accurate shadow candidate map based on image pixels that are dark both in the visible and NIR representations. We further refine the shadow map by incorporating ratios of the visible to the NIR image, based on the observation that commonly encountered light sources have very distinct spectra in the NIR band. The results are validated on a new database, which contains visible/NIR images for a large variety of real-world shadow creating illuminant conditions, as well as manually labeled shadow ground truth. Both quantitative and qualitative evaluations show that our method outperforms current state-of-the-art shadow detection algorithms in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  11. A new accurate pill recognition system using imprint information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Kamata, Sei-ichiro

    2013-12-01

    Great achievements in modern medicine benefit human beings. Also, it has brought about an explosive growth of pharmaceuticals that current in the market. In daily life, pharmaceuticals sometimes confuse people when they are found unlabeled. In this paper, we propose an automatic pill recognition technique to solve this problem. It functions mainly based on the imprint feature of the pills, which is extracted by proposed MSWT (modified stroke width transform) and described by WSC (weighted shape context). Experiments show that our proposed pill recognition method can reach an accurate rate up to 92.03% within top 5 ranks when trying to classify more than 10 thousand query pill images into around 2000 categories.

  12. Analysis of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced waters using accurate mass: identification of ethoxylated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Two series of ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants, polyethylene glycols (PEGs from EO3 to EO33) and linear alkyl ethoxylates (LAEs C-9 to C-15 with EO3-EO28), were identified in hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a new application of the Kendrick mass defect and liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The Kendrick mass defect differentiates the proton, ammonium, and sodium adducts in both singly and doubly charged forms. A structural model of adduct formation is presented, and binding constants are calculated, which is based on a spherical cagelike conformation, where the central cation (NH4(+) or Na(+)) is coordinated with ether oxygens. A major purpose of the study was the identification of the ethylene oxide (EO) surfactants and the construction of a database with accurate masses and retention times in order to unravel the mass spectral complexity of surfactant mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing fluids. For example, over 500 accurate mass assignments are made in a few seconds of computer time, which then is used as a fingerprint chromatogram of the water samples. This technique is applied to a series of flowback and produced water samples to illustrate the usefulness of ethoxylate "fingerprinting", in a first application to monitor water quality that results from fluids used in hydraulic fracturing. PMID:25164376

  13. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reasonable steps to assure information is... Reasonable Steps Commission Will Take To Assure Information It Discloses Is Accurate, and That Disclosure Is... Administers § 1101.32 Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate. (a) The Commission considers...

  14. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reasonable steps to assure information is... Reasonable Steps Commission Will Take To Assure Information It Discloses Is Accurate, and That Disclosure Is... Administers § 1101.32 Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate. (a) The Commission considers...

  15. Simultaneous measurement in mass and mass/mass mode for accurate qualitative and quantitative screening analysis of pharmaceuticals in river water.

    PubMed

    Martínez Bueno, M J; Ulaszewska, Maria M; Gomez, M J; Hernando, M D; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2012-09-21

    A new approach for the analysis of pharmaceuticals (target and non-target) in water by LC-QTOF-MS is described in this work. The study has been designed to assess the performance of the simultaneous quantitative screening of target compounds, and the qualitative analysis of non-target analytes, in just one run. The features of accurate mass full scan mass spectrometry together with high MS/MS spectral acquisition rates - by means of information dependent acquisition (IDA) - have demonstrated their potential application in this work. Applying this analytical strategy, an identification procedure is presented based on library searching for compounds which were not included a priori in the analytical method as target compounds, thus allowing their characterization by data processing of accurate mass measurements in MS and MS/MS mode. The non-target compounds identified in river water samples were ketorolac, trazodone, fluconazole, metformin and venlafaxine. Simultaneously, this strategy allowed for the identification of other compounds which were not included in the library by screening the highest intensity peaks detected in the samples and by analysis of the full scan TOF-MS, isotope pattern and MS/MS spectra - the example of loratadine (histaminergic) is described. The group of drugs of abuse selected as target compounds for evaluation included analgesics, opioids and psychostimulants. Satisfactory results regarding sensitivity and linearity of the developed method were obtained. Limits of detection for the selected target compounds were from 0.003 to 0.01 μg/L and 0.01 to 0.5 μg/L, in MS and MS/MS mode, respectively - by direct sample injection of 100 μL.

  16. The Use of Accurate Mass Tags for High-Throughput Microbial Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard D. ); Anderson, Gordon A. ); Lipton, Mary S. ); Masselon, Christophe D. ); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana ); Shen, Yufeng ); Udseth, Harold R. )

    2002-08-01

    We describe and demonstrate a global strategy that extends the sensitivity, dynamic range, comprehensiveness, and throughput of proteomic measurements based upon the use of peptide accurate mass tags (AMTs) produced by global protein enzymatic digestion. The two-stage strategy exploits Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry to validate peptide AMTs for a specific organism, tissue or cell type from potential mass tags identified using conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods, providing greater confidence in identifications as well as the basis for subsequent measurements without the need for MS/MS, and thus with greater sensitivity and increased throughput. A single high resolution capillary liquid chromatography separation combined with high sensitivity, high resolution and ac-curate FT-ICR measurements has been shown capable of characterizing peptide mixtures of significantly more than 10 5 components with mass accuracies of -1 ppm, sufficient for broad protein identification using AMTs. Other attractions of the approach include the broad and relatively unbiased proteome coverage, the capability for exploiting stable isotope labeling methods to realize high precision for relative protein abundance measurements, and the projected potential for study of mammalian proteomes when combined with additional sample fractionation. Using this strategy, in our first application we have been able to identify AMTs for 60% of the potentially expressed proteins in the organism Deinococcus radiodurans.

  17. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass haloes, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realizations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate-mass galaxies in 1012 M⊙ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k ≤ 0.15 h Mpc-1, and with only 3-per cent error for k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at github.com/junkoda/cola_halo.

  18. A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Trojanowicz, Marek; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of accurate-mass multi-residue screening methods using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been evaluated, including over 625 multiclass food contaminants as case study. Aspects such as the selectivity and confirmation capability provided by HRMS with different acquisition modes (full-scan or full-scan combined with collision induced dissociation (CID) with no precursor ion isolation), and chromatographic separation along with main limitations such as sensitivity or automated data processing have been examined. Compound identification was accomplished with retention time matching and accurate mass measurements of the targeted ions for each analyte (mainly (de)protonated molecules). Compounds with the same nominal mass (isobaric species) were very frequent due to the large number of compounds included. Although 76% of database compounds were involved in isobaric groups, they were resolved in most cases (99% of these isobaric species were distinguished by retention time, resolving power, isotopic profile or fragment ions). Only three pairs could not be resolved with these tools. In-source CID fragmentation was evaluated in depth, although the results obtained in terms of information provided were not as thorough as those obtained using fragmentation experiments without precursor ion isolation (all ion mode). The latter acquisition mode was found to be the best suited for this type of large-scale screening method instead of classic product ion scan, as provided excellent fragmentation information for confirmatory purposes for an unlimited number of compounds. Leaving aside the sample treatment limitations, the main weaknesses noticed are basically the relatively low sensitivity for compounds which does not map well against electrospray ionization and also quantitation issues such as those produced by signal suppression due to either matrix effects from coeluting matrix or from

  19. A feasibility study of UHPLC-HRMS accurate-mass screening methods for multiclass testing of organic contaminants in food.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Lara-Ortega, Felipe J; García-Reyes, Juan F; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Trojanowicz, Marek; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The feasibility of accurate-mass multi-residue screening methods using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been evaluated, including over 625 multiclass food contaminants as case study. Aspects such as the selectivity and confirmation capability provided by HRMS with different acquisition modes (full-scan or full-scan combined with collision induced dissociation (CID) with no precursor ion isolation), and chromatographic separation along with main limitations such as sensitivity or automated data processing have been examined. Compound identification was accomplished with retention time matching and accurate mass measurements of the targeted ions for each analyte (mainly (de)protonated molecules). Compounds with the same nominal mass (isobaric species) were very frequent due to the large number of compounds included. Although 76% of database compounds were involved in isobaric groups, they were resolved in most cases (99% of these isobaric species were distinguished by retention time, resolving power, isotopic profile or fragment ions). Only three pairs could not be resolved with these tools. In-source CID fragmentation was evaluated in depth, although the results obtained in terms of information provided were not as thorough as those obtained using fragmentation experiments without precursor ion isolation (all ion mode). The latter acquisition mode was found to be the best suited for this type of large-scale screening method instead of classic product ion scan, as provided excellent fragmentation information for confirmatory purposes for an unlimited number of compounds. Leaving aside the sample treatment limitations, the main weaknesses noticed are basically the relatively low sensitivity for compounds which does not map well against electrospray ionization and also quantitation issues such as those produced by signal suppression due to either matrix effects from coeluting matrix or from

  20. A statistical method for assessing peptide identification confidence in accurate mass and time tag proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jeffrey R; Adkins, Joshua N; Slysz, Gordon W; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Karpievitch, Yuliya V; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Dabney, Alan R

    2011-08-15

    Current algorithms for quantifying peptide identification confidence in the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach assume that the AMT tags themselves have been correctly identified. However, there is uncertainty in the identification of AMT tags, because this is based on matching LC-MS/MS fragmentation spectra to peptide sequences. In this paper, we incorporate confidence measures for the AMT tag identifications into the calculation of probabilities for correct matches to an AMT tag database, resulting in a more accurate overall measure of identification confidence for the AMT tag approach. The method is referenced as Statistical Tools for AMT Tag Confidence (STAC). STAC additionally provides a uniqueness probability (UP) to help distinguish between multiple matches to an AMT tag and a method to calculate an overall false discovery rate (FDR). STAC is freely available for download, as both a command line and a Windows graphical application.

  1. Dereplication of Streptomyces sp. AMC 23 polyether ionophore antibiotics by accurate-mass electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Crevelin, Eduardo J; Crotti, Antônio E M; Zucchi, Tiago D; Melo, Itamar S; Moraes, Luiz A B

    2014-11-01

    Actinomycetes, especially those belonging to the genus Streptomyces, are economically important from a biotechnological standpoint: they produce antibiotics, anticancer compounds and a variety of bioactive substances that are potentially applicable in the agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries. This paper combined accurate-mass electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in the full scan and product ion scan modes with compounds library data to identify the major compounds in the crude extract produced by Streptomyces sp. AMC 23; it also investigated how sodiated nonactin ([M + Na](+)) fragmented. Most product ions resulted from elimination of 184 mass units due to consecutive McLafferty-type rearrangements. The data allowed identification of four macrotetrolides homologous to nonactin (monactin, isodinactin, isotrinactin/trinactin and tetranactin) as well as three related linear dimer compounds (nonactyl nonactoate, nonactyl homononactoate and homononactyl homononactoate). The major product ions of the sodiated molecules of these compounds also originated from elimination of 184 and 198 mass units. UPLC-MS/MS in the neutral loss scan mode helped to identify these compounds on the basis of the elimination of 184 and 198 mass units. This method aided monitoring of the relative production of these compounds for 32 days and revealed that the biosynthetic process began with increased production of linear dimers as compared with macrotetrolides. These data could facilitate dereplication and identification of these compounds in other microbial crude extracts.

  2. An accurate mass and radius measurement for an ultracool white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Bergeron, P.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Bento, J.; Littlefair, S. P.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2012-11-01

    Studies of cool white dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood have placed a limit on the age of the Galactic disc of 8-9 billion years. However, determining their cooling ages requires the knowledge of their effective temperatures, masses, radii and atmospheric composition. So far, these parameters could only be inferred for a small number of ultracool white dwarfs for which an accurate distance is known, by fitting their spectral energy distributions in conjunction with a theoretical mass-radius relation. However, the mass-radius relation remains largely untested, and the derived cooling ages are hence model dependent. Here we report direct measurements of the mass and radius of an ultracool white dwarf in the double-lined eclipsing binary SDSS J013851.54-001621.6. We find MWD = 0.529 ± 0.010 M⊙ and RWD = 0.0131 ± 0.0003 R⊙. Our measurements are consistent with the mass-radius relation and we determine a robust cooling age of 9.5 billion years for the 3570 K white dwarf. We find that the mass and radius of the low-mass companion star, Msec = 0.132 ± 0.003 M⊙ and Rsec = 0.165 ± 0.001 R⊙, are in agreement with evolutionary models. We also find evidence that this >9.5 Gyr old M5 star is still active, far beyond the activity lifetime for a star of its spectral type. This is likely caused by the high tidally enforced rotation rate of the star. The companion star is close to filling its Roche lobe and the system will evolve into a cataclysmic variable in only 70 Myr. Our direct measurements demonstrate that this system can be used to calibrate ultracool white dwarf atmospheric models.

  3. Accurate mass - time tag library for LC/MS-based metabolite profiling of medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Johnson, Sean R.; Piljac-Žegarac, Jasenka; Kappel, Julia; Schäfer, Sarah; Wüst, Matthias; Ketchum, Raymond E. B.; Croteau, Rodney B.; Marques, Joaquim V.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni M.; Soejarto, D. Doel; Lange, B. Markus

    2013-01-01

    We report the development and testing of an accurate mass – time (AMT) tag approach for the LC/MS-based identification of plant natural products (PNPs) in complex extracts. An AMT tag library was developed for approximately 500 PNPs with diverse chemical structures, detected in electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes (both positive and negative polarities). In addition, to enable peak annotations with high confidence, MS/MS spectra were acquired with three different fragmentation energies. The LC/MS and MS/MS data sets were integrated into online spectral search tools and repositories (Spektraris and MassBank), thus allowing users to interrogate their own data sets for the potential presence of PNPs. The utility of the AMT tag library approach is demonstrated by the detection and annotation of active principles in 27 different medicinal plant species with diverse chemical constituents. PMID:23597491

  4. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  5. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  6. Identification of "Known Unknowns" Utilizing Accurate Mass Data and ChemSpider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Williams, Antony J.; Pshenichnov, Alexey; Tkachenko, Valery

    2012-01-01

    In many cases, an unknown to an investigator is actually known in the chemical literature, a reference database, or an internet resource. We refer to these types of compounds as "known unknowns." ChemSpider is a very valuable internet database of known compounds useful in the identification of these types of compounds in commercial, environmental, forensic, and natural product samples. The database contains over 26 million entries from hundreds of data sources and is provided as a free resource to the community. Accurate mass mass spectrometry data is used to query the database by either elemental composition or a monoisotopic mass. Searching by elemental composition is the preferred approach. However, it is often difficult to determine a unique elemental composition for compounds with molecular weights greater than 600 Da. In these cases, searching by the monoisotopic mass is advantageous. In either case, the search results are refined by sorting the number of references associated with each compound in descending order. This raises the most useful candidates to the top of the list for further evaluation. These approaches were shown to be successful in identifying "known unknowns" noted in our laboratory and for compounds of interest to others.

  7. A Statistical Method for Assessing Peptide Identification Confidence in Accurate Mass and Time Tag Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2011-07-15

    High-throughput proteomics is rapidly evolving to require high mass measurement accuracy for a variety of different applications. Increased mass measurement accuracy in bottom-up proteomics specifically allows for an improved ability to distinguish and characterize detected MS features, which may in turn be identified by, e.g., matching to entries in a database for both precursor and fragmentation mass identification methods. Many tools exist with which to score the identification of peptides from LC-MS/MS measurements or to assess matches to an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database, but these two calculations remain distinctly unrelated. Here we present a statistical method, Statistical Tools for AMT tag Confidence (STAC), which extends our previous work incorporating prior probabilities of correct sequence identification from LC-MS/MS, as well as the quality with which LC-MS features match AMT tags, to evaluate peptide identification confidence. Compared to existing tools, we are able to obtain significantly more high-confidence peptide identifications at a given false discovery rate and additionally assign confidence estimates to individual peptide identifications. Freely available software implementations of STAC are available in both command line and as a Windows graphical application.

  8. Accurate Universal Models for the Mass Accretion Histories and Concentrations of Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Börner, G.

    2009-12-01

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance ΛCDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and ΛCDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the ΛCDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass, when

  9. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass

  10. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Drake, Steven K; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F; Sacks, David B; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple 'fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html . Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Identification of Microorganisms by High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Accurate Statistical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Wang, Guanghui; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Drake, Steven K.; Gucek, Marjan; Suffredini, Anthony F.; Sacks, David B.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Correct and rapid identification of microorganisms is the key to the success of many important applications in health and safety, including, but not limited to, infection treatment, food safety, and biodefense. With the advance of mass spectrometry (MS) technology, the speed of identification can be greatly improved. However, the increasing number of microbes sequenced is challenging correct microbial identification because of the large number of choices present. To properly disentangle candidate microbes, one needs to go beyond apparent morphology or simple `fingerprinting'; to correctly prioritize the candidate microbes, one needs to have accurate statistical significance in microbial identification. We meet these challenges by using peptidome profiles of microbes to better separate them and by designing an analysis method that yields accurate statistical significance. Here, we present an analysis pipeline that uses tandem MS (MS/MS) spectra for microbial identification or classification. We have demonstrated, using MS/MS data of 81 samples, each composed of a single known microorganism, that the proposed pipeline can correctly identify microorganisms at least at the genus and species levels. We have also shown that the proposed pipeline computes accurate statistical significances, i.e., E-values for identified peptides and unified E-values for identified microorganisms. The proposed analysis pipeline has been implemented in MiCId, a freely available software for Microorganism Classification and Identification. MiCId is available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads.html.

  12. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  13. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  14. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  15. Assessing temporal flux of plant hormones in stored processing potatoes using high definition accurate mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Ortiz, José Juan; Foukaraki, Sofia; Terry, Leon Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones are important molecules which at low concentration can regulate various physiological processes. Mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique for the quantification of multiple classes of plant hormones because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed a new ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–full-scan high-definition accurate mass spectrometry method, for simultaneous determination of abscisic acid and four metabolites phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid, 7′-hydroxy-abscisic acid and abscisic acid glucose ester, cytokinins zeatin, zeatin riboside, gibberellins (GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7) and indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid. We measured the amount of plant hormones in the flesh and skin of two processing potato cvs. Sylvana and Russet Burbank stored for up to 30 weeks at 6 °C under ambient air conditions. Herein, we report for the first time that abscisic acid glucose ester seems to accumulate in the skin of potato tubers throughout storage time. The method achieved a lowest limit of detection of 0.22 ng g−1 of dry weight and a limit of quantification of 0.74 ng g−1 dry weight (zeatin riboside), and was able to recover, detect and quantify a total of 12 plant hormones spiked on flesh and skin of potato tubers. In addition, the mass accuracy for all compounds (<5 ppm) was evaluated. PMID:26504563

  16. Quantitation and accurate mass analysis of pesticides in vegetables by LC/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative method consisting of solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) analysis was developed for the identification and quantitation of three chloronicotinyl pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, thiacloprid) commonly used on salad vegetables. Accurate mass measurements within 3 ppm error were obtained for all the pesticides studied in various vegetable matrixes (cucumber, tomato, lettuce, pepper), which allowed an unequivocal identification of the target pesticides. Calibration curves covering 2 orders of magnitude were linear over the concentration range studied, thus showing the quantitative ability of TOF-MS as a monitoring tool for pesticides in vegetables. Matrix effects were also evaluated using matrix-matched standards showing no significant interferences between matrixes and clean extracts. Intraday reproducibility was 2-3% relative standard deviation (RSD) and interday values were 5% RSD. The precision (standard deviation) of the mass measurements was evaluated and it was less than 0.23 mDa between days. Detection limits of the chloronicotinyl insecticides in salad vegetables ranged from 0.002 to 0.01 mg/kg. These concentrations are equal to or better than the EU directives for controlled pesticides in vegetables showing that LC/TOF-MS analysis is a powerful tool for identification of pesticides in vegetables. Robustness and applicability of the method was validated for the analysis of market vegetable samples. Concentrations found in these samples were in the range of 0.02-0.17 mg/kg of vegetable. PMID:15859598

  17. Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis of the S. cerevisiae Metabolome Using Accurate Mass Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: A New Method for Discovery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunping; Moir, Robyn; Willis, Ian; Beecher, Chris; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A; Kurland, Irwin J

    2016-03-01

    Isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA) is a (13)C metabolomics profiling method that eliminates sample to sample variance, discriminates against noise and artifacts, and improves identification of compounds, previously done with accurate mass liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). This is the first report using IROA technology in combination with accurate mass gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), here used to examine the S. cerevisiae metabolome. S. cerevisiae was grown in YNB media, containing randomized 95% (13)C, or 5%(13)C glucose as the single carbon source, in order that the isotopomer pattern of all metabolites would mirror the labeled glucose. When these IROA experiments are combined, the abundance of the heavy isotopologues in the 5%(13)C extracts, or light isotopologues in the 95%(13)C extracts, follows the binomial distribution, showing mirrored peak pairs for the molecular ion. The mass difference between the (12)C monoisotopic and the (13)C monoisotopic equals the number of carbons in the molecules. The IROA-GC/MS protocol developed, using both chemical and electron ionization, extends the information acquired from the isotopic peak patterns for formulas generation. The process that can be formulated as an algorithm, in which the number of carbons, as well as the number of methoximations and silylations are used as search constraints. In electron impact (EI/IROA) spectra, the artifactual peaks are identified and easily removed, which has the potential to generate "clean" EI libraries. The combination of chemical ionization (CI) IROA and EI/IROA affords a metabolite identification procedure that enables the identification of coeluting metabolites, and allowed us to characterize 126 metabolites in the current study. PMID:26820234

  18. In-Depth Glycoproteomic Characterization of γ-Conglutin by High-Resolution Accurate Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Schiarea, Silvia; Arnoldi, Lolita; Fanelli, Roberto; De Combarieu, Eric; Chiabrando, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    The molecular characterization of bioactive food components is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of their beneficial or detrimental effects on human health. This study focused on γ-conglutin, a well-known lupin seed N-glycoprotein with health-promoting properties and controversial allergenic potential. Given the importance of N-glycosylation for the functional and structural characteristics of proteins, we studied the purified protein by a mass spectrometry-based glycoproteomic approach able to identify the structure, micro-heterogeneity and attachment site of the bound N-glycan(s), and to provide extensive coverage of the protein sequence. The peptide/N-glycopeptide mixtures generated by enzymatic digestion (with or without N-deglycosylation) were analyzed by high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography–multi-stage mass spectrometry. The four main micro-heterogeneous variants of the single N-glycan bound to γ-conglutin were identified as Man2(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2, GlcNAcMan3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc 2Man3(Xyl) (Fuc) GlcNAc2. These carry both core β1,2-xylose and core α1-3-fucose (well known Cross-Reactive Carbohydrate Determinants), but corresponding fucose-free variants were also identified as minor components. The N-glycan was proven to reside on Asn131, one of the two potential N-glycosylation sites. The extensive coverage of the γ-conglutin amino acid sequence suggested three alternative N-termini of the small subunit, that were later confirmed by direct-infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis of the intact subunit. PMID:24069245

  19. Change in body mass accurately and reliably predicts change in body water after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Lang, James A; Kenney, W Larry

    2009-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the change in body mass (DeltaBM) accurately reflects the change in total body water (DeltaTBW) after prolonged exercise. Subjects (4 men, 4 women; 22-36 year; 66 +/- 10 kg) completed 2 h of interval running (70% VO(2max)) in the heat (30 degrees C), followed by a run to exhaustion (85% VO(2max)), and then sat for a 1 h recovery period. During exercise and recovery, subjects drank fluid or no fluid to maintain their BM, increase BM by 2%, or decrease BM by 2 or 4% in separate trials. Pre- and post-experiment TBW were determined using the deuterium oxide (D(2)O) dilution technique and corrected for D(2)O lost in urine, sweat, breath vapor, and nonaqueous hydrogen exchange. The average difference between DeltaBM and DeltaTBW was 0.07 +/- 1.07 kg (paired t test, P = 0.29). The slope and intercept of the relation between DeltaBM and DeltaTBW were not significantly different from 1 and 0, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient between DeltaBM and DeltaTBW was 0.76, which is indicative of excellent reliability between methods. Measuring pre- to post-exercise DeltaBM is an accurate and reliable method to assess the DeltaTBW.

  20. Storage and retrieval of mass spectral information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohn, M. E.; Humberston, M. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1977-01-01

    Computer handling of mass spectra serves two main purposes: the interpretation of the occasional, problematic mass spectrum, and the identification of the large number of spectra generated in the gas-chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of complex natural and synthetic mixtures. Methods available fall into the three categories of library search, artificial intelligence, and learning machine. Optional procedures for coding, abbreviating and filtering a library of spectra minimize time and storage requirements. Newer techniques make increasing use of probability and information theory in accessing files of mass spectral information.

  1. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs.

  2. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, Kevin A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a wide range of biological and medical applications. Their identification by tandem mass spectrometry remains a challenging task. A new open-source de novo peptide identification engine CycloBranch was developed and successfully applied in identification or detailed characterization of 11 linear, cyclic, branched, and branch-cyclic peptides. CycloBranch is based on annotated building block databases the size of which is defined by the user according to ribosomal or nonribosomal peptide origin. The current number of involved nonisobaric and isobaric building blocks is 287 and 521, respectively. Contrary to all other peptide sequencing tools utilizing either peptide libraries or peptide fragment libraries, CycloBranch represents a true de novo sequencing engine developed for accurate mass spectrometric data. It is a stand-alone and cross-platform application with a graphical and user-friendly interface; it supports mzML, mzXML, mgf, txt, and baf file formats and can be run in parallel on multiple threads. It can be downloaded for free from http://ms.biomed.cas.cz/cyclobranch/, where the User's manual and video tutorials can be found.

  3. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data. PMID:24420979

  4. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling and magnetized neutron stars: Equal-mass binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2011-02-15

    By performing new, long and numerically accurate general-relativistic simulations of magnetized, equal-mass neutron-star binaries, we investigate the role that realistic magnetic fields may have in the evolution of these systems. In particular, we study the evolution of the magnetic fields and show that they can influence the survival of the hypermassive neutron star produced at the merger by accelerating its collapse to a black hole. We also provide evidence that, even if purely poloidal initially, the magnetic fields produced in the tori surrounding the black hole have toroidal and poloidal components of equivalent strength. When estimating the possibility that magnetic fields could have an impact on the gravitational-wave signals emitted by these systems either during the inspiral or after the merger, we conclude that for realistic magnetic-field strengths B < or approx. 10{sup 12} G such effects could be detected, but only marginally, by detectors such as advanced LIGO or advanced Virgo. However, magnetically induced modifications could become detectable in the case of small-mass binaries and with the development of gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope, with much higher sensitivities at frequencies larger than {approx_equal}2 kHz.

  5. Enantiomeric separation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Chin, Sung-Tong; Nolvachai, Yada; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Chiral comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (eGC×GC) coupled to quadrupole-accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS) was evaluated for its capability to report the chiral composition of several monoterpenes, namely, α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene in cardamom oil. Enantiomers in a standard mixture were fully resolved by direct enantiomeric-GC analysis with a 2,3-di-O-methyl-6-t-butylsilyl derivatized β-cyclodextrin phase; however, the (+)-(R)-limonene enantiomer in cardamom oil was overlapped with other background components including cymene and cineole. Verification of (+)-(R)-limonene components based on characteristic ions at m/z 136, 121, and 107 acquired by chiral single-dimension GC-QTOFMS in the alternate MS/MSMS mode of operation was unsuccessful due to similar parent/daughter ions generated by interfering or co-eluting cymene and cineole. Column phases SUPELCOWAX, SLB-IL111, HP-88, and SLB-IL59, were incorporated as the second dimension column ((2)D) in chiral GC×GC analysis; the SLB-IL59 offered the best resolution for the tested monoterpene enantiomers from the matrix background. Enantiomeric ratios for α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene were determined to be 1.325, 2.703, and 1.040, respectively, in the cardamom oil sample based on relative peak area data.

  6. Accurate and Efficient Resolution of Overlapping Isotopic Envelopes in Protein Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Tian, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been an analytical challenge to accurately and efficiently resolve extremely dense overlapping isotopic envelopes (OIEs) in protein tandem mass spectra to confidently identify proteins. Here, we report a computationally efficient method, called OIE_CARE, to resolve OIEs by calculating the relative deviation between the ideal and observed experimental abundance. In the OIE_CARE method, the ideal experimental abundance of a particular overlapping isotopic peak (OIP) is first calculated for all the OIEs sharing this OIP. The relative deviation (RD) of the overall observed experimental abundance of this OIP relative to the summed ideal value is then calculated. The final individual abundance of the OIP for each OIE is the individual ideal experimental abundance multiplied by 1 + RD. Initial studies were performed using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectra on myoglobin (with direct infusion) and the intact E. coli proteome (with liquid chromatographic separation). Comprehensive data at the protein and proteome levels, high confidence and good reproducibility were achieved. The resolving method reported here can, in principle, be extended to resolve any envelope-type overlapping data for which the corresponding theoretical reference values are available. PMID:26439836

  7. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs. PMID:27166662

  8. Accurate assessment of mass, models and resolution by small-angle scattering

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Robert P.; Tainer, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Modern small angle scattering (SAS) experiments with X-rays or neutrons provide a comprehensive, resolution-limited observation of the thermodynamic state. However, methods for evaluating mass and validating SAS based models and resolution have been inadequate. Here, we define the volume-of-correlation, Vc: a SAS invariant derived from the scattered intensities that is specific to the structural state of the particle, yet independent of concentration and the requirements of a compact, folded particle. We show Vc defines a ratio, Qr, that determines the molecular mass of proteins or RNA ranging from 10 to 1,000 kDa. Furthermore, we propose a statistically robust method for assessing model-data agreements (X2free) akin to cross-validation. Our approach prevents over-fitting of the SAS data and can be used with a newly defined metric, Rsas, for quantitative evaluation of resolution. Together, these metrics (Vc, Qr, X2free, and Rsas) provide analytical tools for unbiased and accurate macromolecular structural characterizations in solution. PMID:23619693

  9. Mass Storage Performance Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

  10. Identification of Novel Perfluoroalkyl Ether Carboxylic Acids (PFECAs) and Sulfonic Acids (PFESAs) in Natural Waters Using Accurate Mass Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS).

    PubMed

    Strynar, Mark; Dagnino, Sonia; McMahen, Rebecca; Liang, Shuang; Lindstrom, Andrew; Andersen, Erik; McMillan, Larry; Thurman, Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Ball, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific scrutiny and concerns over exposure, toxicity, and risk have led to international regulatory efforts resulting in the reduction or elimination of certain perfluorinated compounds from various products and waste streams. Some manufacturers have started producing shorter chain per- and polyfluorinated compounds to try to reduce the potential for bioaccumulation in humans and wildlife. Some of these new compounds contain central ether oxygens or other minor modifications of traditional perfluorinated structures. At present, there has been very limited information published on these "replacement chemistries" in the peer-reviewed literature. In this study we used a time-of-flight mass spectrometry detector (LC-ESI-TOFMS) to identify fluorinated compounds in natural waters collected from locations with historical perfluorinated compound contamination. Our workflow for discovery of chemicals included sequential sampling of surface water for identification of potential sources, nontargeted TOFMS analysis, molecular feature extraction (MFE) of samples, and evaluation of features unique to the sample with source inputs. Specifically, compounds were tentatively identified by (1) accurate mass determination of parent and/or related adducts and fragments from in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID), (2) in-depth evaluation of in-source adducts formed during analysis, and (3) confirmation with authentic standards when available. We observed groups of compounds in homologous series that differed by multiples of CF2 (m/z 49.9968) or CF2O (m/z 65.9917). Compounds in each series were chromatographically separated and had comparable fragments and adducts produced during analysis. We detected 12 novel perfluoroalkyl ether carboxylic and sulfonic acids in surface water in North Carolina, USA using this approach. A key piece of evidence was the discovery of accurate mass in-source n-mer formation (H(+) and Na(+)) differing by m/z 21.9819, corresponding to the

  11. Implications of (Less) Accurate Mass-Radius-Measurements for the Habitability of Extrasolar Terrestrial Planets: Why Do We Need PLATO?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, L.; Wagner, F. W.; Plesa, A.-C.; Höning, D.; Sohl, F.; Breuer, D.; Rauer, H.

    2012-04-01

    Several space missions (CoRoT, Kepler and others) already provided promising candidates for terrestrial exoplanets (i.e. with masses less than about 10 Earth masses) and thereby triggered an exciting new research branch of planetary modelling to investigate the possible habitability of such planets. Earth analogues (low-mass planets with an Earth-like structure and composition) are likely to be found in the near future with new missions such as the proposed M3 mission PLATO. Planets may be more diverse in the universe than they are in the solar system. Our neighbouring planets in the habitable zone are all terrestrial by the means of being differentiated into an iron core, a silicate mantle and a crust. To reliably determine the interior structure of an exoplanet, measurements of mass and radius have to be sufficiently accurate (around +/-2% error allowed for the radius and +/-5% for the mass). An Earth-size planet with an Earth-like mass but an expected error of ~15% in mass for example may have either a Mercury-like, an Earth-like or a Moon-like (i.e. small iron core) structure [1,2]. Even though the atmospheric escape is not strongly influenced by the interior structure, the outgassing of volatiles and the likeliness of plate tectonics and an ongoing carbon-cycle may be very different. Our investigations show, that a planet with a small silicate mantle is less likely to shift into the plate-tectonics regime, cools faster (which may lead to the loss of a magnetic field after a short time) and outgasses less volatiles than a planet with the same mass but a large silicate mantle and small iron core. To be able to address the habitability of exoplanets, space missions such as PLATO, which can lead up to 2% accuracy in radius [3], are extremely important. Moreover, information about the occurrence of different planetary types helps us to better understand the formation of planetary systems and to further constrain the Drake's equation, which gives an estimate of the

  12. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  13. STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FROM GALAXY SPECTRA: HOW ACCURATE CAN THEY BE?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallazzi, Anna; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2009-12-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light ratios (M {sub *}/L) from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M {sub *}/L values using either absorption-line data or broadband colors. The accuracy of M {sub *}/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M {sub *}/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50 pixel{sup -1} and limiting uncertainties of {approx}0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accurately corrected or absent and that the redshift is known, color-based M {sub *}/L estimates are only slightly more uncertain than spectroscopic estimates (at comparable spectroscopic and photometric quality), but are more easily affected by systematic biases. This is the case in particular for galaxies with bursty SFHs (high H{delta} {sub A} at fixed D4000 {sub n}), the M {sub *}/L of which cannot be constrained any better than {approx}0.15 dex with any indicators explored here. Finally, we explore the effects of the assumed prior distribution in SFHs and metallicity, finding them to be higher for color-based estimates.

  14. Multiclass semi-volatile compounds determination in wine by gas chromatography accurate time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Silva, A; Cela, R

    2016-04-15

    The performance of gas chromatography (GC) with accurate, high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) for the determination of a group of 39 semi-volatile compounds related to wine quality (pesticide residues, phenolic off-flavours, phenolic pollutants and bioactive stilbenes) is investigated. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was used as extraction technique, previously to acetylation (phenolic compounds) and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) concentration. Compounds were determined by GC coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) MS system through an electron ionization (EI) source. The final method attained limits of quantification (LOQs) at the very low ng mL(-1) level, covering the range of expected concentrations for target compounds in red and white wines. For 38 out of 39 compounds, performance of sample preparation and determination steps were hardly affected by the wine matrix; thus, accurate recoveries were achieved by using pseudo-external calibration. Levels of target compounds in a set of 25 wine samples are reported. The capabilities of the described approach for the post-run identification of species not considered during method development, without retention time information, are illustrated and discussed with selected examples of compounds from different classes.

  15. Toward an Accurate Prediction of the Arrival Time of Geomagnetic-Effective Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, T.; Wang, Y.; Wan, L.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance for the study of space weather. Here we make a statistical study of 21 Earth-directed CMEs, specifically exploring the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with a least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hr. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than their half-angular widths arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be reliably applied to such events. If we exclude these events in the sample, the prediction accuracy can be improved, i.e., the estimation error reduces to 6.8 hr. This work suggests that it is viable to predict the arrival time of CMEs to the Earth based on the initial parameters with fairly good accuracy. Thus, it provides a method of forecasting space weather 1-5 days following the occurrence of CMEs.

  16. Toward Sensitive and Accurate Analysis of Antibody Biotherapeutics by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable methodological advances in the past decade have expanded the application of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of biotherapeutics. Currently, LC/MS represents a promising alternative or supplement to the traditional ligand binding assay (LBA) in the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicokinetic studies of protein drugs, owing to the rapid and cost-effective method development, high specificity and reproducibility, low sample consumption, the capacity of analyzing multiple targets in one analysis, and the fact that a validated method can be readily adapted across various matrices and species. While promising, technical challenges associated with sensitivity, sample preparation, method development, and quantitative accuracy need to be addressed to enable full utilization of LC/MS. This article introduces the rationale and technical challenges of LC/MS techniques in biotherapeutics analysis and summarizes recently developed strategies to alleviate these challenges. Applications of LC/MS techniques on quantification and characterization of antibody biotherapeutics are also discussed. We speculate that despite the highly attractive features of LC/MS, it will not fully replace traditional assays such as LBA in the foreseeable future; instead, the forthcoming trend is likely the conjunction of biochemical techniques with versatile LC/MS approaches to achieve accurate, sensitive, and unbiased characterization of biotherapeutics in highly complex pharmaceutical/biologic matrices. Such combinations will constitute powerful tools to tackle the challenges posed by the rapidly growing needs for biotherapeutics development. PMID:25185260

  17. The Megamaser Cosmology Project. III. Accurate Masses of Seven Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galaxies with Circumnuclear Megamaser Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. Y.; Braatz, J. A.; Condon, J. J.; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Lo, K. Y.; Zaw, I.; Schenker, M.; Henkel, C.; Reid, M. J.; Greene, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of H2O masers from circumnuclear disks in active galaxies for the Megamaser Cosmology Project (MCP) allow accurate measurement of the mass of supermassive black holes (BH) in these galaxies. We present the Very Long Baseline Interferometry images and kinematics of water maser emission in six active galaxies: NGC 1194, NGC 2273, NGC 2960 (Mrk 1419), NGC 4388, NGC 6264 and NGC 6323. We use the Keplerian rotation curves of these six megamaser galaxies, plus a seventh previously published, to determine accurate enclosed masses within the central ~0.3 pc of these galaxies, smaller than the radius of the sphere of influence of the central mass in all cases. We also set lower limits to the central mass densities of between 0.12 × 1010 and 61 × 1010 M sun pc-3. For six of the seven disks, the high central densities rule out clusters of stars or stellar remnants as the central objects, and this result further supports our assumption that the enclosed mass can be attributed predominantly to a supermassive BH. The seven BHs have masses ranging between 0.75 × 107 and 6.5 × 107 M sun, with the mass errors dominated by the uncertainty of the Hubble constant. We compare the megamaser BH mass determination with BH mass measured from the virial estimation method. The virial estimation BH mass in four galaxies is consistent with the megamaser BH mass, but the virial mass uncertainty is much greater. Circumnuclear megamaser disks allow the best mass determination of the central BH mass in external galaxies and significantly improve the observational basis at the low-mass end of the M-σsstarf relation. The M-σsstarf relation may not be a single, low-scatter power law as originally proposed. MCP observations continue and we expect to obtain more maser BH masses in the future.

  18. Faster and more accurate graphical model identification of tandem mass spectra using trellises

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengjie; Halloran, John T.; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is the dominant high throughput technology for identifying and quantifying proteins in complex biological samples. Analysis of the tens of thousands of fragmentation spectra produced by an MS/MS experiment begins by assigning to each observed spectrum the peptide that is hypothesized to be responsible for generating the spectrum. This assignment is typically done by searching each spectrum against a database of peptides. To our knowledge, all existing MS/MS search engines compute scores individually between a given observed spectrum and each possible candidate peptide from the database. In this work, we use a trellis, a data structure capable of jointly representing a large set of candidate peptides, to avoid redundantly recomputing common sub-computations among different candidates. We show how trellises may be used to significantly speed up existing scoring algorithms, and we theoretically quantify the expected speedup afforded by trellises. Furthermore, we demonstrate that compact trellis representations of whole sets of peptides enables efficient discriminative learning of a dynamic Bayesian network for spectrum identification, leading to greatly improved spectrum identification accuracy. Contact: bilmes@uw.edu or william-noble@uw.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307634

  19. Enhancing accurate data collection in mass fatality kinship identifications: lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Dolan, Siobhan M; Beckwith, Michelle; Northrup, Tammy Pruet; Sozer, Amanda

    2008-09-01

    A mass fatality DNA identification effort is a complex process in which direct matching and kinship analysis is used for identifying human remains. Kinship DNA identification is an important tool in the identification process in which victim's DNA profiles are compared to the profiles of "known" biologically related reference samples. Experience from the 9/11 World Trade Center DNA identification efforts showed that forms used to record biological relationships are important and that inaccurately documented information may hamper the kinship analysis and DNA identification process. In the identification efforts following Hurricane Katrina, a Family and/or Donor Reference Collection (FDRC) form was used as a means to document the reported relationship between the reference DNA donor and the purported missing individual. This FDRC form was developed based upon lessons learned from 9/11 and the Tsunami identification efforts. This paper analyses the effectiveness of the FDRC form used in the Hurricane Katrina kinship DNA identification efforts and proposes an improved sample collection form for kinship and other donor reference samples. The data presented can be used to enhance the accuracy of the data collection process through an improved sample collection form, streamlining the DNA kinship identification process and decreasing the burden on valuable resources.

  20. Accurate stellar masses for SB2 components: Interferometric observations for Gaia validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Famaey, B.; Salomon, J.-B.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Anthonioz, F.; Grellmann, R.; Guieu, S.; Guillout, P.; Jorissen, A.; Kiefer, F.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazeh, T.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Sana, H.; Tal-Or, L.

    2015-12-01

    A sample of about 70 double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2) is followed with radial velocity (RV) measurements, in order to derive the masses of their components when the astrometric measurements of Gaia will be available. A subset of 6 SB2 was observed in interferometry with VLTI/PIONIER, and the components were separated for each binary. The RV measurements already obtained were combined with the interferometric observations and the masses of the components were derived. The accuracies of the 12 masses are presently between 0.4 and 7 %, but they will still be improved in the future. These masses will be used to validate the masses which will be obtained from Gaia. In addition, the parallaxes derived from the combined visual+spectroscopic orbits are compared to that of Hipparcos, and a mass-luminosity relation is derived in the infrared H band.

  1. Differential contribution of visual and auditory information to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of a visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Park, Seoung Hoon; Kim, Seonjin; Kwon, MinHyuk; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-03-01

    Vision and auditory information are critical for perception and to enhance the ability of an individual to respond accurately to a stimulus. However, it is unknown whether visual and auditory information contribute differentially to identify the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction and rotational motion of the stimulus based on visual and auditory information. In this study, we recruited 9 expert table-tennis players and used table-tennis service as our experimental model. Participants watched recorded services with different levels of visual and auditory information. The goal was to anticipate the direction of the service (left or right) and the rotational motion of service (topspin, sidespin, or cut). We recorded their responses and quantified the following outcomes: (i) directional accuracy and (ii) rotational motion accuracy. The response accuracy was the accurate predictions relative to the total number of trials. The ability of the participants to predict the direction of the service accurately increased with additional visual information but not with auditory information. In contrast, the ability of the participants to predict the rotational motion of the service accurately increased with the addition of auditory information to visual information but not with additional visual information alone. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that visual information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the direction of the stimulus, whereas additional auditory information enhances the ability of an individual to accurately predict the rotational motion of stimulus.

  2. An experimental correction proposed for an accurate determination of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohoun, Sylvain; Agoua, Eusèbe; Degan, Gérard; Perre, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the mass diffusion in the hygroscopic region of four temperate species and three tropical ones. In order to simplify the interpretation of the phenomena, a dimensionless parameter called reduced diffusivity is defined. This parameter varies from 0 to 1. The method used is firstly based on the determination of that parameter from results of the measurement of the mass flux which takes into account the conditions of operating standard device (tightness, dimensional variations and easy installation of samples of wood, good stability of temperature and humidity). Secondly the reasons why that parameter has to be corrected are presented. An abacus for this correction of mass diffusivity of wood in steady regime has been plotted. This work constitutes an advanced deal nowadays for characterising forest species.

  3. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  4. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  5. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. However, th...

  6. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize phytochemicals in plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. New methods a...

  7. Collision-induced fragmentation accurate mass spectrometric analysis methods to rapidly characterize plant extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid advances in analytical chromatography equipment have made the reliable and reproducible measurement of a wide range of plant chemical components possible. Full chemical characterization of a given plant material is possible with the new mass spectrometers currently available. For phytochem...

  8. ACCURATE MASSES FOR THE PRIMARY AND SECONDARY IN THE ECLIPSING WHITE DWARF BINARY NLTT 11748

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Agueeros, M. A.; Camilo, Fernando

    2010-10-01

    We measure the radial velocity curve of the eclipsing detached white dwarf binary NLTT 11748. The primary exhibits velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of 273 km s{sup -1} and an orbital period of 5.641 hr. We do not detect any spectral features from the secondary star or any spectral changes during the secondary eclipse. We use our composite spectrum to constrain the temperature and surface gravity of the primary to be T {sub eff} = 8690 {+-} 140 K and log g = 6.54 {+-} 0.05, which correspond to a mass of 0.18 M {sub sun}. For an inclination angle of 89.{sup 0}9 derived from the eclipse modeling, the mass function requires a 0.76 M {sub sun} companion. The merger time for the system is 7.2 Gyr. However, due to the extreme mass ratio of 0.24, the binary will most likely create an AM CVn system instead of a merger.

  9. Assessment of gas chromatography time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry for identification of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, M; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R; Sulaiman, S A; Gan, S H

    2014-11-01

    The performance of gas chromatography (GC) combined with a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system for the determination of volatile and semi-volatile compounds in honey samples is evaluated. After headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of samples, the accurate mass capabilities of the above system were evaluated for compounds identification. Accurate scan electron impact (EI) MS spectra allowed discriminating compounds displaying the same nominal masses, but having different empirical formulae. Moreover, the use of a mass window with a width of 0.005 Da provided highly specific chromatograms for selected ions, avoiding the contribution of interferences to their peak areas. Additional information derived from positive chemical ionization (PCI) MS spectra and ion product scan MS/MS spectra permitted confirming the identity of novel compounds. The above possibilities are illustrated with examples of honey aroma compounds, belonging to different chemical classes and containing different elements in their molecules. Examples of compounds whose structures could not be described are also provided. Overall, 84 compounds, from a total of 89 species, could be identified in 19 honey samples from 3 different geographic areas in the world. The suitability of responses measured for selected ions, corresponding to above species, for authentication purposes is assessed through principal components analysis. PMID:25127626

  10. Accurate mass analysis of ethanesulfonic acid degradates of acetochlor and alachlor using high-performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Parry, R.

    2002-01-01

    Degradates of acetochlor and alachlor (ethanesulfonic acids, ESAs) were analyzed in both standards and in a groundwater sample using high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The negative pseudomolecular ion of the secondary amide of acetochlor ESA and alachlor ESA gave average masses of 256.0750??0.0049 amu and 270.0786??0.0064 amu respectively. Acetochlor and alachlor ESA gave similar masses of 314.1098??0.0061 amu and 314.1153??0.0048 amu; however, they could not be distinguished by accurate mass because they have the same empirical formula. On the other hand, they may be distinguished using positive-ion electrospray because of different fragmentation spectra, which did not occur using negative-ion electrospray.

  11. MyriMatch: highly accurate tandem mass spectral peptide identification by multivariate hypergeometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, David L.; Fernando, Christopher G.; Chambers, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics experiments are dependent upon database search engines to identify peptides from tandem mass spectra. Many of these algorithms score potential identifications by evaluating the number of fragment ions matched between each peptide sequence and an observed spectrum. These systems, however, generally do not distinguish between matching an intense peak and matching a minor peak. We have developed a statistical model to score peptide matches that is based upon the multivariate hypergeometric distribution. This scorer, part of the “MyriMatch” database search engine, places greater emphasis on matching intense peaks. The probability that the best match for each spectrum has occurred by random chance can be employed to separate correct matches from random ones. We evaluated this software on data sets from three different laboratories employing three different ion trap instruments. Employing a novel system for testing discrimination, we demonstrate that stratifying peaks into multiple intensity classes improves the discrimination of scoring. We compare MyriMatch results to those of Sequest and X!Tandem, revealing that it is capable of higher discrimination than either of these algorithms. When minimal peak filtering is employed, performance plummets for a scoring model that does not stratify matched peaks by intensity. On the other hand, we find that MyriMatch discrimination improves as more peaks are retained in each spectrum. MyriMatch also scales well to tandem mass spectra from high-resolution mass analyzers. These findings may indicate limitations for existing database search scorers that count matched peaks without differentiating them by intensity. This software and source code is available under Mozilla Public License at this URL: http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/msrc/bioinformatics/. PMID:17269722

  12. Accurate mass measurements of short-lived isotopes with the MISTRAL* rf spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, C.; Audi, G.; Doubre, H.; Jacotin, M.; Henry, S.; Kepinski, J.-F.; Le Scornet, G.; Lunney, D.; Monsanglant, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Borcea, C.; Duma, M.; Lebee, G.

    1999-01-15

    The MISTRAL* experiment has measured its first masses at ISOLDE. Installed in May 1997, this radiofrequency transmission spectrometer is to concentrate on nuclides with particularly short half-lives. MISTRAL received its first stable beam in October and first radioactive beam in November 1997. These first tests, with a plasma ion source, resulted in excellent isobaric separation and reasonable transmission. Further testing and development enabled first data taking in July 1998 on neutron-rich Na isotopes having half-lives as short as 31 ms.

  13. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit .

  14. Dynamic Bayesian Network for Accurate Detection of Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Halloran, John T; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William S

    2016-08-01

    A central problem in mass spectrometry analysis involves identifying, for each observed tandem mass spectrum, the corresponding generating peptide. We present a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) toolkit that addresses this problem by using a machine learning approach. At the heart of this toolkit is a DBN for Rapid Identification (DRIP), which can be trained from collections of high-confidence peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). DRIP's score function considers fragment ion matches using Gaussians rather than fixed fragment-ion tolerances and also finds the optimal alignment between the theoretical and observed spectrum by considering all possible alignments, up to a threshold that is controlled using a beam-pruning algorithm. This function not only yields state-of-the art database search accuracy but also can be used to generate features that significantly boost the performance of the Percolator postprocessor. The DRIP software is built upon a general purpose DBN toolkit (GMTK), thereby allowing a wide variety of options for user-specific inference tasks as well as facilitating easy modifications to the DRIP model in future work. DRIP is implemented in Python and C++ and is available under Apache license at http://melodi-lab.github.io/dripToolkit . PMID:27397138

  15. Capturing Accurate and Useful Information on Medication-Related Telenursing Triage Calls.

    PubMed

    Lake, R; Li, L; Baysari, M; Byrne, M; Robinson, M; Westbrook, J I

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses providing telenursing triage and advice services record information on the medication related calls they handle. However the quality and consistency of these data were rarely examined. Our aim was to examine medication related calls made to the healthdirect advice service in November 2014, to assess their basic characteristics and how the data entry format influenced information collected and data consistency. Registered nurses selected the patient question type from a range of categories, and entered the medications involved in a free text field. Medication names were manually extracted from the free text fields. We also compared the selected patient question type with the free text description of the call, in order to gauge data consistency. Results showed that nurses provided patients with advice on medication-related queries in a timely matter (the median call duration of 9 minutes). From 1835 calls, we were able to identify and classify 2156 medications into 384 generic names. However, in 204 cases (11.2% of calls) no medication name was entered. A further 308 (15.0%) of the medication names entered were not identifiable. When we compared the selected patient question with the free text description of calls, we found that these were consistent in 63.27% of cases. Telenursing and triage advice services provide a valuable resource to the public with quick and easily accessible advice. To support nurses provide quality services and record accurate information about the queries, appropriate data entry format and design would be beneficial. PMID:27440292

  16. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverková, Lenka; Hradilová, Šárka; Milde, David; Panáček, Aleš; Skopalová, Jana; Kvítek, Libor; Petrželová, Kamila; Zbořil, Radek

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2- and AgCl32 - for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results.

  17. Accurate characterization of carcinogenic DNA adducts using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Charles A.; Chiu, Norman H. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical carcinogens and their in vivo activated metabolites react readily with genomic DNA, and form covalently bound carcinogen-DNA adducts. Clinically, carcinogen-DNA adducts have been linked to various cancer diseases. Among the current methods for DNA adduct analysis, mass spectroscopic method allows the direct measurement of unlabeled DNA adducts. The goal of this study is to explore the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to determine the identity of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Two of the known carcinogenic DNA adducts, namely N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP) and N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), were selected as our models. In MALDI-TOF MS measurements, the small matrix ion and its cluster ions did not interfere with the measurements of both selected dG adducts. To achieve a higher accuracy for the characterization of selected dG adducts, 1 keV collision energy in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was used to measure the adducts. In comparison to other MS/MS techniques with lower collision energies, more extensive precursor ion dissociations were observed. The detection of the corresponding fragment ions allowed the identities of guanine, PhIP or ABP, and the position of adduction to be confirmed. Some of the fragment ions of dG-C8-PhIP have not been reported by other MS/MS techniques.

  18. Accurate mass screening of pharmaceuticals and fungicides in water by U-HPLC-Exactive Orbitrap MS.

    PubMed

    Chitescu, Carmen Lidia; Oosterink, Efraim; de Jong, Jacob; Linda Stolker, Alida Adriana Maria

    2012-07-01

    The use of pharmaceuticals in livestock production is a potential source of surface water, groundwater and soil contamination. Possible impacts of antibiotics on the environment include toxicity and the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Monitoring programs are required to record the presence of these substances in the environment. A rapid, versatile and selective multi-method was developed and validated for screening 43 pharmaceutical and fungicides compounds, in surface and groundwater, in one single full-scan MS method, using benchtop U-HPLC-Exactive Orbitrap MS at 50,000 (FWHM) resolution. Detection was based on calculated exact masses and on retention time. Sample volume, pH conditions and solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample clean-up conditions were optimized. In the final method, 74 % of the compounds had recoveries higher than 80 %, 15 % of the compounds had recoveries between 60 % and 80 %, and 7 % of the compounds had recoveries between 40 % and 50 %. One of the compounds (itraconazole) had a recovery lower than 10 % and nystatin was not detected. The level of detection was 10 ng L(-1) for 61 % of the compounds, 50 ng L(-1) for 32 % and 100 ng L(-1) for 5%. In-house validation, based on EU guidelines, proves that the detection capability CCβ is lower than 10 ng L(-1) (for β error 5 %) for 37 % of the compounds, lower than 50 ng L(-1) for 35 % of the compounds and lower than 100 ng L(-1) for 14 % of compounds. This study demonstrates that the ultra-high resolution and reliable mass accuracy of Exactive Orbitrap MS permits the detection of pharmaceutical residues in a concentration range of 10-100 ng L(-1), applying a post target screening approach, in the multi-method conditions.

  19. Conditional mutual inclusive information enables accurate quantification of associations in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Jin-Kao; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2015-03-11

    Mutual information (MI), a quantity describing the nonlinear dependence between two random variables, has been widely used to construct gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Despite its good performance, MI cannot separate the direct regulations from indirect ones among genes. Although the conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to identify the direct regulations, it generally underestimates the regulation strength, i.e. it may result in false negatives when inferring gene regulations. In this work, to overcome the problems, we propose a novel concept, namely conditional mutual inclusive information (CMI2), to describe the regulations between genes. Furthermore, with CMI2, we develop a new approach, namely CMI2NI (CMI2-based network inference), for reverse-engineering GRNs. In CMI2NI, CMI2 is used to quantify the mutual information between two genes given a third one through calculating the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the postulated distributions of including and excluding the edge between the two genes. The benchmark results on the GRNs from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli demonstrate the superior performance of CMI2NI. Specifically, even for gene expression data with small sample size, CMI2NI can not only infer the correct topology of the regulation networks but also accurately quantify the regulation strength between genes. As a case study, CMI2NI was also used to reconstruct cancer-specific GRNs using gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). CMI2NI is freely accessible at http://www.comp-sysbio.org/cmi2ni.

  20. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    PubMed

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-06-28

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  1. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Charles W.; Simonsick, William J.; Bogusky, Michael J.; Celikay, Recep W.; Guare, James P.; Newton, Randall C.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry. PMID:27367671

  2. Purification of pharmaceutical preparations using thin-layer chromatography to obtain mass spectra with Direct Analysis in Real Time and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jessica L; Steiner, Robert R

    2011-06-01

    Forensic analysis of pharmaceutical preparations requires a comparative analysis with a standard of the suspected drug in order to identify the active ingredient. Purchasing analytical standards can be expensive or unattainable from the drug manufacturers. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) is a novel, ambient ionization technique, typically coupled with a JEOL AccuTOF™ (accurate mass) mass spectrometer. While a fast and easy technique to perform, a drawback of using DART™ is the lack of component separation of mixtures prior to ionization. Various in-house pharmaceutical preparations were purified using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectra were subsequently obtained using the AccuTOF™- DART™ technique. Utilizing TLC prior to sample introduction provides a simple, low-cost solution to acquiring mass spectra of the purified preparation. Each spectrum was compared against an in-house molecular formula list to confirm the accurate mass elemental compositions. Spectra of purified ingredients of known pharmaceuticals were added to an in-house library for use as comparators for casework samples. Resolving isomers from one another can be accomplished using collision-induced dissociation after ionization. Challenges arose when the pharmaceutical preparation required an optimized TLC solvent to achieve proper separation and purity of the standard. Purified spectra were obtained for 91 preparations and included in an in-house drug standard library. Primary standards would only need to be purchased when pharmaceutical preparations not previously encountered are submitted for comparative analysis. TLC prior to DART™ analysis demonstrates a time efficient and cost saving technique for the forensic drug analysis community. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Accurate mass determination, quantification and determination of detection limits in liquid chromatography-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: challenges and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Joos, Pieter; Demeestere, Kristof

    2013-07-30

    Uniform guidelines for the data processing and validation of qualitative and quantitative multi-residue analysis using full-spectrum high-resolution mass spectrometry are scarce. Through systematic research, optimal mass accuracy and sensitivity are obtained after refining the post-processing of the HRMS data. For qualitative analysis, transforming the raw profile spectra to centroid spectra is recommended resulting in a 2.3 fold improved precision on the accurate mass determination of spectrum peaks. However, processing centroid data for quantitative purposes could lead to signal interruption when too narrow mass windows are applied for the construction of extracted ion chromatograms. Therefore, peak integration on the raw profile data is recommended. An optimal width of the mass window of 50 ppm, which is a trade-off between sensitivity and selectivity, was obtained for a TOF instrument providing a resolving power of 20,000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM). For the validation of HRMS analytical methods, widespread concepts such as the signal-to-noise ratios for the determination of decision limits and detection capabilities have shown to be not always applicable because in some cases almost no noise can be detected anymore. A statistical methodology providing a reliable alternative is extended and applied. PMID:23856232

  4. Highly accurate isotope composition measurements by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for in situ investigations on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Heredia, B.; Neuland, M. B.; Bieler, A.; Tulej, M.; Leya, I.; Iakovleva, M.; Mezger, K.; Wurz, P.

    2013-10-01

    An experimental procedure for precise and accurate measurements of isotope abundances by a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for space research is described. The measurements were conducted on different untreated NIST standards and galena samples by applying pulsed UV laser radiation (266 nm, 3 ns and 20 Hz) for ablation, atomisation, and ionisation of the sample material. Mass spectra of released ions are measured by a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser. A computer controlled performance optimiser was used to operate the system at maximum ion transmission and mass resolution. At optimal experimental conditions, the best relative accuracy and precision achieved for Pb isotope compositions are at the per mill level and were obtained in a range of applied laser irradiances and a defined number of accumulated spectra. A similar relative accuracy and precision was achieved in the study of Pb isotope compositions in terrestrial galena samples. The results for the galena samples are similar to those obtained with a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer (TIMS). The studies of the isotope composition of other elements yielded relative accuracy and precision at the per mill level too, with characteristic instrument parameters for each element. The relative accuracy and precision of the measurements is degrading with lower element/isotope concentration in a sample. For the elements with abundances below 100 ppm these values drop to the percent level. Depending on the isotopic abundances of Pb in minerals, 207Pb/206Pb ages with accuracy in the range of tens of millions of years can be achieved.

  5. Pacific Islands Mass Communications; Selected Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richstad, Jim; McMillan, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of materials on such area of mass communications in the Pacific Islands as broadcasting, radio and television, cinema, communication research, mass media in education, Honululu Media Council, newspapers and newspapermen, and printing and satellite communication. (JEG)

  6. A Support Vector Machine model for the prediction of proteotypic peptides for accurate mass and time proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Cannon, William R.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Shah, Anuj R.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Lipton, Mary S.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2008-07-01

    Motivation: The standard approach to identifying peptides based on accurate mass and elution time (AMT) compares these profiles obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometer to a database of peptides previously identified from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) studies. It would be advantageous, with respect to both accuracy and cost, to only search for those peptides that are detectable by MS (proteotypic). Results: We present a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model that uses a simple descriptor space based on 35 properties of amino acid content, charge, hydrophilicity, and polarity for the quantitative prediction of proteotypic peptides. Using three independently derived AMT databases (Shewanella oneidensis, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia pestis) for training and validation within and across species, the SVM resulted in an average accuracy measure of ~0.8 with a standard deviation of less than 0.025. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these results are achievable with a small set of 12 variables and can achieve high proteome coverage. Availability: http://omics.pnl.gov/software/STEPP.php

  7. High resolution/accurate mass (HRMS) detection of anatoxin-a in lake water using LDTD-APCI coupled to a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Sinotte, Marc; Deblois, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A new innovative analytical method combining ultra-fast analysis time with high resolution/accurate mass detection was developed to eliminate the misidentification of anatoxin-a (ANA-a), a cyanobacterial toxin, from the natural amino acid phenylalanine (PHE). This was achieved by using the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to the Q-Exactive, a high resolution/accurate mass spectrometer (HRMS). This novel combination, the LDTD-APCI-HRMS, allowed for an ultra-fast analysis time (<15 s/sample). A comparison of two different acquisition modes (full scan and targeted ion fragmentation) was made to determine the most rigorous analytical method using the LDTD-APCI interface. Method development focused toward selectivity and sensitivity improvement to reduce the possibility of false positives and to lower detection limits. The Q-Exactive mass spectrometer operates with resolving powers between 17500 and 140000 FWHM (m/z 200). Nevertheless, a resolution of 17500FWHM is enough to dissociate ANA-a and PHE signals. Mass accuracy was satisfactory with values below 1 ppm reaching precision to the fourth decimal. Internal calibration with standard addition was achieved with the isotopically-labeled (D5) phenylalanine with good linearity (R(2)>0.999). Enhancement of signal to noise ratios relative to a standard triple-quadrupole method was demonstrated with lower detection and quantification limit values of 0.2 and 0.6 μg/L using the Q-Exactive. Accuracy and interday/intraday relative standard deviations were below 15%. The new method was applied to 8 different lake water samples with signs of cyanobacterial blooms. This work demonstrates the possibility of using an ultra-fast LDTD-APCI sample introduction system with an HRMS hybrid instrument for quantitative purposes with high selectivity in complex environmental matrices.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  9. CLASH-VLT: INSIGHTS ON THE MASS SUBSTRUCTURES IN THE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACS J0416.1–2403 THROUGH ACCURATE STRONG LENS MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, C.; Suyu, S. H.; Umetsu, K.; Rosati, P.; Caminha, G. B.; Mercurio, A.; Balestra, I.; Munari, E.; Nonino, M.; De Lucia, G.; Borgani, S.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Lombardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Zitrin, A.; Halkola, A. and others

    2015-02-10

    We present a detailed mass reconstruction and a novel study on the substructure properties in the core of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) and Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403. We show and employ our extensive spectroscopic data set taken with the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument as part of our CLASH-VLT program, to confirm spectroscopically 10 strong lensing systems and to select a sample of 175 plausible cluster members to a limiting stellar mass of log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≅ 8.6. We reproduce the measured positions of a set of 30 multiple images with a remarkable median offset of only 0.''3 by means of a comprehensive strong lensing model comprised of two cluster dark-matter halos, represented by cored elliptical pseudo-isothermal mass distributions, and the cluster member components, parameterized with dual pseudo-isothermal total mass profiles. The latter have total mass-to-light ratios increasing with the galaxy HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) luminosities. The measurement of the total enclosed mass within the Einstein radius is accurate to ∼5%, including the systematic uncertainties estimated from six distinct mass models. We emphasize that the use of multiple-image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and knowledge of cluster membership based on extensive spectroscopic information is key to constructing robust high-resolution mass maps. We also produce magnification maps over the central area that is covered with HST observations. We investigate the galaxy contribution, both in terms of total and stellar mass, to the total mass budget of the cluster. When compared with the outcomes of cosmological N-body simulations, our results point to a lack of massive subhalos in the inner regions of simulated clusters with total masses similar to that of MACS J0416.1–2403. Our findings of the location and shape of the cluster dark-matter halo density profiles and on the cluster substructures provide intriguing

  10. Metabolic profiling of yeast culture using gas chromatography coupled with orthogonal acceleration accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry: application to biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Elsuida; Marriott, Philip J; Parker, Rhiannon M; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Morrison, Paul; Adams, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Yeast and yeast cultures are frequently used as additives in diets of dairy cows. Beneficial effects from the inclusion of yeast culture in diets for dairy mammals have been reported, and the aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the accurate mass identification of the 'global' metabolites in order to differentiate a variety of yeasts at varying growth stages (Diamond V XP, Yea-Sacc and Levucell). Microwave-assisted derivatization for metabolic profiling is demonstrated through the analysis of differing yeast samples developed for cattle feed, which include a wide range of metabolites of interest covering a large range of compound classes. Accurate identification of the components was undertaken using GC-oa-ToFMS (gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration-time-of-flight mass spectrometry), followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) for data reduction and biomarker discovery. Semi-quantification (fold changes in relative peak areas) was reported for metabolites identified as possible discriminative biomarkers (p-value <0.05, fold change >2), including D-ribose (four fold decrease), myo-inositol (five fold increase), L-phenylalanine (three fold increase), glucopyranoside (two fold increase), fructose (three fold increase) and threitol (three fold increase) respectively. PMID:24356230

  11. Fast and accurate procedure for the determination of Cr(VI) in solid samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Cabello, Neus; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Castillo, Ángel; Malherbe, Julien; Roig-Navarro, Antoni F; Long, Stephen E; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2012-11-20

    We present here a new environmental measurement method for the rapid extraction and accurate quantification of Cr(VI) in solid samples. The quantitative extraction of Cr(VI) is achieved in 10 minutes by means of focused microwave assisted extraction using 50 mmol/L Ethylendiamintetraacetic acid (EDTA) at pH 10 as extractant. In addition, it enables the separation of Cr species by anion exchange chromatography using a mobile phase which is a 1:10 dilution of the extracting solution. Thus, neutralization or acidification steps which are prone to cause interconversion of Cr species are not needed. Another benefit of using EDTA is that it allows to measure Cr(III)-EDTA complex and Cr(VI) simultaneously in an alkaline extraction solution. The application of a 10 minutes focused microwave assisted extraction (5 min at 90 °C plus 5 min at 110 °C) has been shown to quantitatively extract all forms of hexavalent chromium from the standard reference materials (SRM) candidate NIST 2700 and NIST 2701. A double spike isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) procedure was employed to study chromium interconversion reactions. It was observed that the formation of a Cr(III)-EDTA complex avoided Cr(III) oxidation for these two reference materials. Thus, the use of a double spiking strategy for quantification is not required and a single spike IDMS procedure using isotopically enriched Cr(VI) provided accurate results.

  12. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  13. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    PubMed

    Minyoo, Abel B; Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul; Lankester, Felix

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere.

  14. Incentives Increase Participation in Mass Dog Rabies Vaccination Clinics and Methods of Coverage Estimation Are Assessed to Be Accurate.

    PubMed

    Minyoo, Abel B; Steinmetz, Melissa; Czupryna, Anna; Bigambo, Machunde; Mzimbiri, Imam; Powell, George; Gwakisa, Paul; Lankester, Felix

    2015-12-01

    In this study we show that incentives (dog collars and owner wristbands) are effective at increasing owner participation in mass dog rabies vaccination clinics and we conclude that household questionnaire surveys and the mark-re-sight (transect survey) method for estimating post-vaccination coverage are accurate when all dogs, including puppies, are included. Incentives were distributed during central-point rabies vaccination clinics in northern Tanzania to quantify their effect on owner participation. In villages where incentives were handed out participation increased, with an average of 34 more dogs being vaccinated. Through economies of scale, this represents a reduction in the cost-per-dog of $0.47. This represents the price-threshold under which the cost of the incentive used must fall to be economically viable. Additionally, vaccination coverage levels were determined in ten villages through the gold-standard village-wide census technique, as well as through two cheaper and quicker methods (randomized household questionnaire and the transect survey). Cost data were also collected. Both non-gold standard methods were found to be accurate when puppies were included in the calculations, although the transect survey and the household questionnaire survey over- and under-estimated the coverage respectively. Given that additional demographic data can be collected through the household questionnaire survey, and that its estimate of coverage is more conservative, we recommend this method. Despite the use of incentives the average vaccination coverage was below the 70% threshold for eliminating rabies. We discuss the reasons and suggest solutions to improve coverage. Given recent international targets to eliminate rabies, this study provides valuable and timely data to help improve mass dog vaccination programs in Africa and elsewhere. PMID:26633821

  15. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  16. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research. PMID:27571061

  17. Highly Accurate Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions via Incorporating Evolutionary Information and Physicochemical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Gui, Jie; Nie, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) occur at almost all levels of cell functions and play crucial roles in various cellular processes. Thus, identification of PPIs is critical for deciphering the molecular mechanisms and further providing insight into biological processes. Although a variety of high-throughput experimental techniques have been developed to identify PPIs, existing PPI pairs by experimental approaches only cover a small fraction of the whole PPI networks, and further, those approaches hold inherent disadvantages, such as being time-consuming, expensive, and having high false positive rate. Therefore, it is urgent and imperative to develop automatic in silico approaches to predict PPIs efficiently and accurately. In this article, we propose a novel mixture of physicochemical and evolutionary-based feature extraction method for predicting PPIs using our newly developed discriminative vector machine (DVM) classifier. The improvements of the proposed method mainly consist in introducing an effective feature extraction method that can capture discriminative features from the evolutionary-based information and physicochemical characteristics, and then a powerful and robust DVM classifier is employed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that DVM model is applied to the field of bioinformatics. When applying the proposed method to the Yeast and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) datasets, we obtain excellent prediction accuracies of 94.35% and 90.61%, respectively. The computational results indicate that our method is effective and robust for predicting PPIs, and can be taken as a useful supplementary tool to the traditional experimental methods for future proteomics research.

  18. THE EFFECT OF STARSPOTS ON ACCURATE RADIUS DETERMINATION OF THE LOW-MASS DOUBLE-LINED ECLIPSING BINARY GU Boo

    SciTech Connect

    Windmiller, G.; Orosz, J. A.; Etzel, P. B. E-mail: orosz@sciences.sdsu.ed

    2010-04-01

    GU Boo is one of only a relatively small number of well-studied double-lined eclipsing binaries that contain low-mass stars. Lopez-Morales and Ribas present a comprehensive analysis of multi-color light and radial velocity curves for this system. The GU Boo light curves presented by Lopez-Morales and Ribas had substantial asymmetries, which were attributed to large spots. In spite of the asymmetry, Lopez-Morales and Ribas derived masses and radii accurate to {approx_equal}2%. We obtained additional photometry of GU Boo using both a CCD and a single-channel photometer and modeled the light curves with the ELC software to determine if the large spots in the light curves give rise to systematic errors at the few percent level. We also modeled the original light curves from the work of Lopez-Morales and Ribas using models with and without spots. We derived a radius of the primary of 0.6329 +- 0.0026 R{sub sun}, 0.6413 +- 0.0049 R{sub sun}, and 0.6373 +- 0.0029 R{sub sun} from the CCD, photoelectric, and Lopez-Morales and Ribas data, respectively. Each of these measurements agrees with the value reported by Lopez-Morales and Ribas (R{sub 1} = 0.623 +- 0.016 R{sub sun}) at the level of {approx}2%. In addition, the spread in these values is {approx}1%-2% from the mean. For the secondary, we derive radii of 0.6074 +- 0.0035 R{sub sun}, 0.5944 +- 0.0069 R{sub sun}, and 0.5976 +- 0.0059 R{sub sun} from the three respective data sets. The Lopez-Morales and Ribas value is R{sub 2} = 0.620 +- 0.020 R{sub sun}, which is {approx}2%-3% larger than each of the three values we found. The spread in these values is {approx}2% from the mean. The systematic difference between our three determinations of the secondary radius and that of Lopez-Morales and Ribas might be attributed to differences in the modeling process and codes used. Our own fits suggest that, for GU Boo at least, using accurate spot modeling of a single set of multi-color light curves results in radii determinations

  19. Development and evaluation of a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for rapid, accurate quantitation of malondialdehyde in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, Constance A; Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Swardfager, Walter; Levitt, Anthony; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    Malondialdhyde (MDA) is a commonly used marker of lipid peroxidation in oxidative stress. To provide a sensitive analytical method that is compatible with high throughput, we developed a multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) approach using 3-nitrophenylhydrazine chemical derivatization, isotope-labeling, and liquid chromatography (LC) with electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry assay to accurately quantify MDA in human plasma. A stable isotope-labeled internal standard was used to compensate for ESI matrix effects. The assay is linear (R(2)=0.9999) over a 20,000-fold concentration range with a lower limit of quantitation of 30fmol (on-column). Intra- and inter-run coefficients of variation (CVs) were <2% and ∼10% respectively. The derivative was stable for >36h at 5°C. Standards spiked into plasma had recoveries of 92-98%. When compared to a common LC-UV method, the LC-MS method found near-identical MDA concentrations. A pilot project to quantify MDA in patient plasma samples (n=26) in a study of major depressive disorder with winter-type seasonal pattern (MDD-s) confirmed known associations between MDA concentrations and obesity (p<0.02). The LC-MS method provides high sensitivity and high reproducibility for quantifying MDA in human plasma. The simple sample preparation and rapid analysis time (5x faster than LC-UV) offers high throughput for large-scale clinical applications. PMID:27437618

  20. Highly sensitive and accurate screening of 40 dyes in soft drinks by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Zhao, Yansheng; Yong, Wei; Sun, Li; Jiang, Guibin; Chu, Xiaogang

    2011-06-15

    A method combining solid phase extraction with high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the highly sensitive and accurate screening of 40 dyes, most of which are banned in foods. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify and quantify a large number of dyes for the first time, and demonstrated greater accuracy and sensitivity than the conventional liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/visible methods. The limits of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for the dyes are 0.0001-0.01 mg/L except for Tartrazine, Amaranth, New Red and Ponceau 4R, with detection limits of 0.5, 0.25, 0.125 and 0.125 mg/L, respectively. When this method was applied to screening of dyes in soft drinks, the recoveries ranged from 91.1 to 105%. This method has been successfully applied to screening of illegal dyes in commercial soft drink samples, and it is valuable to ensure the safety of food.

  1. Accurate determination of selected pesticides in soya beans by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huertas Pérez, J F; Sejerøe-Olsen, B; Fernández Alba, A R; Schimmel, H; Dabrio, M

    2015-05-01

    A sensitive, accurate and simple liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry method for the determination of 10 selected pesticides in soya beans has been developed and validated. The method is intended for use during the characterization of selected pesticides in a reference material. In this process, high accuracy and appropriate uncertainty levels associated to the analytical measurements are of utmost importance. The analytical procedure is based on sample extraction by the use of a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe) extraction and subsequent clean-up of the extract with C18, PSA and Florisil. Analytes were separated on a C18 column using gradient elution with water-methanol/2.5 mM ammonium acetate mobile phase, and finally identified and quantified by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Reliable and accurate quantification of the analytes was achieved by means of stable isotope-labelled analogues employed as internal standards (IS) and calibration with pure substance solutions containing both, the isotopically labelled and native compounds. Exceptions were made for thiodicarb and malaoxon where the isotopically labelled congeners were not commercially available at the time of analysis. For the quantification of those compounds methomyl-(13)C2(15)N and malathion-D10 were used respectively. The method was validated according to the general principles covered by DG SANCO guidelines. However, validation criteria were set more stringently. Mean recoveries were in the range of 86-103% with RSDs lower than 8.1%. Repeatability and intermediate precision were in the range of 3.9-7.6% and 1.9-8.7% respectively. LODs were theoretically estimated and experimentally confirmed to be in the range 0.001-0.005 mg kg(-1) in the matrix, while LOQs established as the lowest spiking mass fractionation level were in the range 0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1). The method reliably identifies and quantifies the

  2. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H; Li, Li; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K(12) position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4(×12)-VT750) had a high binding affinity (~3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4(×12)-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  3. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet β-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K12 position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4×12-VT750) had a high binding affinity (∼3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4×12-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  4. The potential of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection for high-performance liquid chromatography combined with accurate mass measurement of organic pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, B O; Jörnten-Karlsson, M; Michelsen, P; Abou-Shakra, F

    2001-01-01

    Quantification of unknown components in pharmaceutical, metabolic and environmental samples is an important but difficult task. Most commonly used detectors (like UV, RI or MS) require standards of each analyte for accurate quantification. Even if the chemical structure or elemental composition is known, the response from these detectors is difficult to predict with any accuracy. In inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) compounds are atomised and ionised irrespective of the chemical structure(s) incorporating the element of interest. Liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC/ICP-MS) has been shown to provide a generic detection for structurally non-correlated compounds with common elements like phosphorus and iodine. Detection of selected elements gives a better quantification of tested 'unknowns' than UV and organic mass spectrometric detection. It was shown that the ultrasonic nebuliser did not introduce any measurable dead volume and preserves the separation efficiency of the system. ICP-MS can be used in combination with many different mobile phases ranging from 0-100% organic modifier. The dynamic range was found to exceed 2.5 orders of magnitude. The application of LC/ICP-MS to pharmaceutical drugs and formulations has shown that impurities can be quantified below the 0.1 mol-% level.

  5. Hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis with accurate-mass database and parallel reaction monitoring for high-throughput screening and quantification of multi-xenobiotics in honey.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Jinzhen; Jin, Yue; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhai, Lifei; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Yongxin; Zhou, Jinhui

    2016-01-15

    This study reports a rapid, automated screening and quantification method for the determination of multi-xenobiotic residues in honey using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) with a user-built accurate-mass database plus parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). The database contains multi-xenobiotic information including formulas, adduct types, theoretical exact mass and retention time, characteristic fragment ions, ion ratios, and mass accuracies. A simple sample preparation method was developed to reduce xenobiotic loss in the honey samples. The screening method was validated based on retention time deviation, mass accuracy via full scan-data-dependent MS/MS (full scan-ddMS2), multi-isotope ratio, characteristic ion ratio, sensitivity, and positive/negative switching performance between the spiked sample and corresponding standard solution. The quantification method based on the PRM mode is a promising new quantitative tool which we validated in terms of selectivity, linearity, recovery (accuracy), repeatability (precision), decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), matrix effects, and carry-over. The optimized methods proposed in this study enable the automated screening and quantification of 157 compounds in less than 15 min in honey. The results of this study, as they represent a convenient protocol for large-scale screening and quantification, also provide a research approach for analysis of various contaminants in other matrices.

  6. Retrospective screening of relevant pesticide metabolites in food using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry and accurate-mass databases of parent molecules and diagnostic fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Polgár, László; García-Reyes, Juan F; Fodor, Péter; Gyepes, Attila; Dernovics, Mihály; Abrankó, László; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, the detection and characterization of relevant pesticide metabolites in food is an important task in order to evaluate their formation, kinetics, stability, and toxicity. In this article, a methodology for the systematic screening of pesticides and their main metabolites in fruit and vegetable samples is described, using LC-HRMS and accurate-mass database search of parent compounds and their diagnostic fragment ions. The approach is based on (i) search for parent pesticide molecules; (ii) search for their metabolites in the positive samples, assuming common fragmentation pathways between the metabolites and parent pesticide molecules; and (iii) search for pesticide conjugates using the data from both parent species and diagnostic fragment ions. An accurate-mass database was constructed consisting of 1396 compounds (850 parent compounds, 447 fragment ions and 99 metabolites). The screening process was performed by the software in an automated fashion. The proposed methodology was evaluated with 29 incurred samples and the output obtained was compared to standard pesticide testing methods (targeted LC-MS/MS). Examples on the application of the proposed approach are shown, including the detection of several pesticide glycosides derivatives, which were found with significantly relevant intensities. Glucose-conjugated forms of parent compounds (e.g., fenhexamid-O-glucoside) and those of metabolites (e.g., despropyl-iprodione-N-glycoside) were detected. Facing the lack of standards for glycosylated pesticides, the study was completed with the synthesis of fenhexamid-O-glucoside for quantification purposes. In some cases the pesticide derivatives were found in a relatively high ratio, drawing the attention to these kinds of metabolites and showing that they should not be neglected in multi-residue methods. The global coverage obtained on the 29 analyzed samples showed the usefulness and benefits of the proposed approach and highlights the practical

  7. Accurate Mass MS/MS/MS Analysis of Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and E1 by Collision-Induced Dissociation Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, Ashley M.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2015-11-01

    Siderophores are bacterially secreted, small molecule iron chelators that facilitate the binding of insoluble iron (III) for reuptake and use in various biological processes. These compounds are classified by their iron (III) binding geometry, as dictated by subunit composition and include groups such as the trihydroxamates (hexadentate ligand) and catecholates (bidentate). Small modifications to the core structure such as acetylation, lipid tail addition, or cyclization, make facile characterization of new siderophores difficult by molecular ion detection alone (MS1). We have expanded upon previous fragmentation-directed studies using electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS/MS) and identified diagnostic MS3 features from the trihydroxamate siderophore class for ferrioxamine B and E1 by accurate mass. Diagnostic features for MS3 include C-C, C-N, amide, and oxime cleavage events with proposed losses of water and -CO from the iron (III) coordination sites. These insights will facilitate the discovery of novel trihydroxamate siderophores from complex sample matrices.

  8. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Otter, Don E; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-17

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching. PMID:27428379

  9. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Otter, Don E; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-17

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching.

  10. CLASH-VLT: Constraints on the Dark Matter Equation of State from Accurate Measurements of Galaxy Cluster Mass Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoris, Barbara; Biviano, Andrea; Rosati, Piero; Borgani, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Bartelmann, Matthias; Girardi, Marisa; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Zitrin, Adi; Balestra, Italo; Mercurio, Amata; Nonino, Mario; Postman, Marc; Czakon, Nicole; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Coe, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Merten, Julian; Annunziatella, Marianna; Benitez, Narciso; Czoske, Oliver; Donahue, Megan; Ettori, Stefano; Ford, Holland; Fritz, Alexander; Kelson, Dan; Koekemoer, Anton; Kuchner, Ulrike; Lombardi, Marco; Maier, Christian; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Munari, Emiliano; Presotto, Valentina; Scodeggio, Marco; Seitz, Stella; Tozzi, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Bodo

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being Ltc, depend solely on the gravitational potential, whereas photon trajectories reflect the contributions from the gravitational potential plus a relativistic-pressure term that depends on the cluster mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (pr + 2 pt )/(3 c 2ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc <= r <= r 200, where pr and pt are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  11. CLASH-VLT: CONSTRAINTS ON THE DARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FROM ACCURATE MEASUREMENTS OF GALAXY CLUSTER MASS PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Girardi, Marisa; Biviano, Andrea; Balestra, Italo; Nonino, Mario; Umetsu, Keiichi; Czakon, Nicole; Bartelmann, Matthias; Grillo, Claudio; Lemze, Doron; Medezinski, Elinor; Zitrin, Adi; Mercurio, Amata; Broadhurst, Tom; Melchior, Peter; and others

    2014-03-01

    A pressureless scenario for the dark matter (DM) fluid is a widely adopted hypothesis, despite the absence of direct observational evidence. According to general relativity, the total mass-energy content of a system shapes the gravitational potential well, but different test particles perceive this potential in different ways depending on their properties. Cluster galaxy velocities, being <mass. We exploit this phenomenon to constrain the equation of state (EoS) parameter of the fluid, primarily DM, contained in galaxy clusters. We use complementary information provided by the kinematic and lensing mass profiles of the galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2–0847 at z = 0.44, as obtained in an extensive imaging and spectroscopic campaign within the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. The unprecedented high quality of our data set and the properties of this cluster are well suited to determine the EoS parameter of the cluster fluid. Since baryons contribute at most 15% to the total mass in clusters and their pressure is negligible, the EoS parameter we derive describes the behavior of the DM fluid. We obtain the most stringent constraint on the DM EoS parameter to date, w = (p{sub r} + 2 p{sub t} )/(3 c {sup 2}ρ) = 0.00 ± 0.15 (stat) ± 0.08 (syst), averaged over the radial range 0.5 Mpc ≤ r ≤ r {sub 200}, where p{sub r} and p{sub t} are the radial and tangential pressure, and ρ is the density. We plan to further improve our constraint by applying the same procedure to all clusters from the ongoing Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble-Very Large Telescope program.

  12. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for accurate quantification of global DNA methylation in human sperms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Suo, Yongshan; Yin, Ruichuan; Shen, Heqing; Wang, Hailin

    2011-06-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation in human sperms has been proposed to be a possible mechanism associated with male infertility. We developed an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of global DNA methylation level in human sperms. Multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was used in MS/MS detection for accurate quantification of DNA methylation. The intra-day and inter-day precision values of this method were within 1.50-5.70%. By using 2-deoxyguanosine as an internal standard, UPLC-MS/MS method was applied for the detection of global DNA methylation levels in three cultured cell lines. DNA methyltransferases inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine can significantly reduce global DNA methylation levels in treated cell lines, showing the reliability of our method. We further examined global DNA methylation levels in human sperms, and found that global methylation values varied from 3.79% to 4.65%. The average global DNA methylation level of sperm samples washed only by PBS (4.03%) was relatively lower than that of sperm samples in which abnormal and dead sperm cells were removed by density gradient centrifugation (4.25%), indicating the possible aberrant DNA methylation level in abnormal sperm cells. Clinical application of UPLC-MS/MS method in global DNA methylation detection of human sperms will be useful in human sperm quality evaluation and the study of epigenetic mechanisms responsible for male infertility.

  13. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  14. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF₃) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  15. ALPHA, Mass Generation and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-05-01

    The generation of Planck energy 10E19 Gev/Planck time during the observable age of the universe (10E60 Planck times) would generate 10E79 Gev. 10E79 Gev approximates the energy of the baryon number, implying an increase of the baryon number by 10E19/Planck time. What is the source of energy for this mass generation? The ALPHA implicated as negative entropy in [1] must create vacuum energy. Vacuum energy is negative energy. Nature must balance negative energy by generating positive energy (mass), implying ALPHA balances the increasing entropy of the visible universe and generates baryonic mass. Additionally, the successful cloning of the sheep Dolly, and observed molecular blinking dots in biochemistry support the binary BITS of ON and OFF states in [1]. Vindicating Hermite's 1873 mathematical linkage of the base of natural logarithm to transcendentality will implicate natural log based ALPHA in [1] as connected to consciousness. [1] Goradia S: www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040v3.

  16. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures. PMID:26846813

  17. Accurate refinement of docked protein complexes using evolutionary information and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Farhoodi, Roshanak; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges for protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate native-like structures from false positives. Docking methods are often inaccurate and the results have to be refined and re-ranked to obtain native-like complexes and remove outliers. In a previous work, we introduced AccuRefiner, a machine learning based tool for refining protein-protein complexes. Given a docked complex, the refinement tool produces a small set of refined versions of the input complex, with lower root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) of atomic positions with respect to the native structure. The method employs a unique ranking tool that accurately predicts the RMSD of docked complexes with respect to the native structure. In this work, we use a deep learning network with a similar set of features and five layers. We show that a properly trained deep learning network can accurately predict the RMSD of a docked complex with 1.40 Å error margin on average, by approximating the complex relationship between a wide set of scoring function terms and the RMSD of a docked structure. The network was trained on 35000 unbound docking complexes generated by RosettaDock. We tested our method on 25 different putative docked complexes produced also by RosettaDock for five proteins that were not included in the training data. The results demonstrate that the high accuracy of the ranking tool enables AccuRefiner to consistently choose the refinement candidates with lower RMSD values compared to the coarsely docked input structures.

  18. Can Raters with Reduced Job Descriptive Information Provide Accurate Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) Ratings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Lee; Harvey, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Job-naive raters provided with job descriptive information made Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) ratings which were validated against ratings of job analysts who were also job content experts. None of the reduced job descriptive information conditions enabled job-naive raters to obtain either acceptable levels of convergent validity with…

  19. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2014-11-01

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73,570 ± 6 cm(-1) (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ((2)A2), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C(2v) symmetry through the C-N axis.

  20. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  1. 16 CFR 1101.32 - Reasonable steps to assure information is accurate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to release to the public: (1) The Commission staff or a qualified person or entity outside the... will review the information in light of the comments. The degree of review by the Commission and...

  2. An examination of information quality as a moderator of accurate personality judgment.

    PubMed

    Letzring, Tera D; Human, Lauren J

    2014-10-01

    Information quality is an important moderator of the accuracy of personality judgment, and this article describes research focusing on how specific kinds of information are related to accuracy. In this study, 228 participants (159 female, 69 male; mean age = 23.43; 86.4% Caucasian) in unacquainted dyads were assigned to discuss thoughts and feelings, discuss behaviors, or engage in behaviors. Interactions lasted 25-30 min, and participants provided ratings of their partners and themselves following the interaction on the Big Five traits, ego-control, and ego-resiliency. Next, the amount of different types of information made available by each participant was objectively coded. The accuracy criterion, composed of self- and acquaintance ratings, was used to assess distinctive and normative accuracy using the Social Accuracy Model. Participants in the discussion conditions achieved higher distinctive accuracy than participants who engaged in behaviors, but normative accuracy did not differ across conditions. Information about specific behaviors and general behaviors were among the most consistent predictors of higher distinctive accuracy. Normative accuracy was more likely to decrease than increase when higher-quality information was available. Verbal information about behaviors is the most useful for learning about how people are unique.

  3. Polyallelic structural variants can provide accurate, highly informative genetic markers focused on diagnosis and therapeutic targets: Accuracy vs. Precision.

    PubMed

    Roses, A D

    2016-02-01

    Structural variants (SVs) include all insertions, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, with several common types of nucleotide repeats including single sequence repeats, short tandem repeats, and insertion-deletion length variants. Polyallelic SVs provide highly informative markers for association studies with well-phenotyped cohorts. SVs can influence gene regulation by affecting epigenetics, transcription, splicing, and/or translation. Accurate assays of polyallelic SV loci are required to define the range and allele frequency of variable length alleles. PMID:26517180

  4. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  5. Exploratory Movement Generates Higher-Order Information That Is Sufficient for Accurate Perception of Scaled Egocentric Distance

    PubMed Central

    Mantel, Bruno; Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Campbell, Alain; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2015-01-01

    Body movement influences the structure of multiple forms of ambient energy, including optics and gravito-inertial force. Some researchers have argued that egocentric distance is derived from inferential integration of visual and non-visual stimulation. We suggest that accurate information about egocentric distance exists in perceptual stimulation as higher-order patterns that extend across optics and inertia. We formalize a pattern that specifies the egocentric distance of a stationary object across higher-order relations between optics and inertia. This higher-order parameter is created by self-generated movement of the perceiver in inertial space relative to the illuminated environment. For this reason, we placed minimal restrictions on the exploratory movements of our participants. We asked whether humans can detect and use the information available in this higher-order pattern. Participants judged whether a virtual object was within reach. We manipulated relations between body movement and the ambient structure of optics and inertia. Judgments were precise and accurate when the higher-order optical-inertial parameter was available. When only optic flow was available, judgments were poor. Our results reveal that participants perceived egocentric distance from the higher-order, optical-inertial consequences of their own exploratory activity. Analysis of participants’ movement trajectories revealed that self-selected movements were complex, and tended to optimize availability of the optical-inertial pattern that specifies egocentric distance. We argue that accurate information about egocentric distance exists in higher-order patterns of ambient energy, that self-generated movement can generate these higher-order patterns, and that these patterns can be detected and used to support perception of egocentric distance that is precise and accurate. PMID:25856410

  6. Combining Evolutionary Information and an Iterative Sampling Strategy for Accurate Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tatjana; Koehler Leman, Julia; Lange, Oliver F

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the accuracy of ab initio structure prediction can be significantly improved by integrating evolutionary information in form of intra-protein residue-residue contacts. Following this seminal result, much effort is put into the improvement of contact predictions. However, there is also a substantial need to develop structure prediction protocols tailored to the type of restraints gained by contact predictions. Here, we present a structure prediction protocol that combines evolutionary information with the resolution-adapted structural recombination approach of Rosetta, called RASREC. Compared to the classic Rosetta ab initio protocol, RASREC achieves improved sampling, better convergence and higher robustness against incorrect distance restraints, making it the ideal sampling strategy for the stated problem. To demonstrate the accuracy of our protocol, we tested the approach on a diverse set of 28 globular proteins. Our method is able to converge for 26 out of the 28 targets and improves the average TM-score of the entire benchmark set from 0.55 to 0.72 when compared to the top ranked models obtained by the EVFold web server using identical contact predictions. Using a smaller benchmark, we furthermore show that the prediction accuracy of our method is only slightly reduced when the contact prediction accuracy is comparatively low. This observation is of special interest for protein sequences that only have a limited number of homologs.

  7. Honey bees can perform accurately directed waggle dances based solely on information from a homeward trip.

    PubMed

    Edrich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Honey bees were displaced several 100 m from their hive to an unfamiliar site and provisioned with honey. After feeding, almost two-thirds of the bees flew home to their hive within a 50 min observation time. About half of these returning, bees signalled the direction of the release site in waggle dances thus demonstrating that the dance can be guided entirely by information gathered on a single homeward trip. The likely reason for the bees' enthusiastic dancing on their initial return from this new site was the highly rewarding honeycomb that they were given there. The attractive nature of the site is confirmed by many of these bees revisiting the site and continuing to forage there.

  8. Accurately decoding visual information from fMRI data obtained in a realistic virtual environment

    PubMed Central

    Floren, Andrew; Naylor, Bruce; Miikkulainen, Risto; Ress, David

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional interactive virtual environments (VEs) are a powerful tool for brain-imaging based cognitive neuroscience that are presently under-utilized. This paper presents machine-learning based methods for identifying brain states induced by realistic VEs with improved accuracy as well as the capability for mapping their spatial topography on the neocortex. VEs provide the ability to study the brain under conditions closer to the environment in which humans evolved, and thus to probe deeper into the complexities of human cognition. As a test case, we designed a stimulus to reflect a military combat situation in the Middle East, motivated by the potential of using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. Each subject experienced moving through the virtual town where they encountered 1–6 animated combatants at different locations, while fMRI data was collected. To analyze the data from what is, compared to most studies, more complex and less controlled stimuli, we employed statistical machine learning in the form of Multi-Voxel Pattern Analysis (MVPA) with special attention given to artificial Neural Networks (NN). Extensions to NN that exploit the block structure of the stimulus were developed to improve the accuracy of the classification, achieving performances from 58 to 93% (chance was 16.7%) with six subjects. This demonstrates that MVPA can decode a complex cognitive state, viewing a number of characters, in a dynamic virtual environment. To better understand the source of this information in the brain, a novel form of sensitivity analysis was developed to use NN to quantify the degree to which each voxel contributed to classification. Compared with maps produced by general linear models and the searchlight approach, these sensitivity maps revealed a more diverse pattern of information relevant to the classification of cognitive state. PMID:26106315

  9. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions.

  10. PTMSearchPlus: Software Tool for Automated Protein Identification and Post-Translational and Post-Translational Modification Characterization by Integrating Accurate Intact Protein Mass and Bottom-Up Mass Spectrometric Data Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Connelly, Heather M; Erickson, Brian K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2009-01-01

    PTMSearchPlus is a software tool for the automated integration of accurate intact protein mass (AIPM) and bottom-up (BU) mass spectra searches/data in order to both confidently identify the intact proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications (PTMs). The development of PTMSearchPlus was motivated by the desire to effectively integrate high-resolution intact protein molecular masses with bottom-up peptide MS/MS data. PTMSearchPlus requires as input both intact protein and proteolytic peptide mass spectra collected from the same protein mixture, a FASTA protein database, and a selection of possible PTMs, the types and ranges of which can be specified. The output of PTMSearchPlus is a list of intact and modified proteins matching the AIPM data concomitant with their respective peptides found by the BU search. This list also contains protein and peptide sequence coverage information, scores, etc. that can be used for further evaluation or refiltering of the results. Corresponding and annotated AIPM and BU mass spectra are also displayed for visual inspection when a listed protein or a peptide is selected. These and other controls ensure that the user can manually evaluate, modify (e.g., remove obvious false positives, low quality spectra etc.), and save the results of the automated search if necessary. Driven by the exponential growth in the number of possible peptide candidates in a BU search when multiple PTMs are probed, the advantages on search speed by limiting the total number of possible PTMs on a peptide in the BU search or by performing an AIPM predicted BU search are also discussed in addition to the integration approach. The features of PTMSearchPlus are demonstrated using both a protein standard mixture and a complex protein mixture from Escherichia coli. Experimental data revealed a unique advantage of coupling AIPM and the BU data sets that is mutually beneficial for both approaches. Namely, AIPM data can confirm that no PTM peptides

  11. PTMSearchPlus: A Software Tool for Automated Protein Identification and Post-Translational Modification Characterization by Integrating Accurate Intact Protein Mass and Bottom-Up Mass Spectrometric Data Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Connelly, Heather M; Erickson, Brian K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2009-01-01

    PTMSearchPlus is a software tool for the automated integration of accurate intact protein mass (AIPM) and bottom-up (BU) mass spectra searches/data in order to both confidently identify the intact proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications (PTMs). The development of PTMSearchPlus was motivated by the desire to effectively integrate high resolution intact protein molecular masses with bottom-up peptide MS/MS data. PTMSearchPlus requires as input both intact protein and proteolytic peptide mass spectra collected from the same protein mixture, a FASTA protein database, and a selection of possible PTMs, the types and ranges of which can be specified. The output of PTMSearchPlus is a list of intact and modified proteins matching the AIPM data concomitant with their respective peptides found by the BU search. This list also contains protein and peptide sequence coverage information, scores, etc. that can be used for further evaluation or refiltering of the results. Corresponding and annotated AIPM and BU mass spectra are also displayed for visual inspection when a listed protein or a peptide is selected. These and other controls ensure that the user can manually evaluate, modify (e.g. remove obvious false positives, low quality spectra etc.), and save the results of the automated search if necessary. Driven by the exponential growth in the number of possible peptide candidates in a BU search when multiple PTMs are probed, the advantages on search speed by limiting the total number of possible PTMs on a peptide in the BU search or by performing an AIPM predicted BU search are also discussed in addition to the integration approach. The features of PTMSearchPlus are demonstrated using both a protein standard mixture and a complex protein mixture from Escherichia coli. Experimental data revealed a unique advantage of coupling AIPM and the BU datasets that is mutually beneficial for both approaches. Namely, AIPM data can confirm that no PTM peptides

  12. Accurate determination of ultra-trace impurities, including europium, in ultra-pure barium carbonate materials through inductively coupled plasma-tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuchao; Zeng, Xiangcheng; Dai, Xuefeng; Hu, Yongping; Li, Gang; Zheng, Cunjiang

    2016-09-01

    Impurities, especially ultra-trace europium (Eu), in ultra-pure barium carbonate materials were accurately determined through inductively coupled plasma-tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). Two reaction modes, namely, mass shift (with O2 as reaction gas) and on-mass modes(with NH3/He and He as reaction gases), were extensively investigated using Eu+ as target analyte. The use of Eu+ → EuO2+, instead of Eu+ → EuO+, as ion pairs in mass shift mode eliminated polyatomic interferences based on Ba matrix ions (135Ba16O2+ on 151Eu16O+ and 137Ba16O2+ on 153Eu16O+). This procedure exhibited enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. When the ICP-MS/MS was operated in NH3 on-mass mode, Eu+ can be determined in its original mass in interference-free conditions because NH3 did not react with Eu+ but with BaO+ to form a neutral product (BaO). The two reaction modes, especially NH3 on mass mode, were validated to be accurate because their resultant isotope ratios of 153Eu/151Eu matched well with that of the natural abundance ratio. The proposed ICP-MS/MS method is a sensitive technique with a limit of detection as low as 2.0 ng L- 1 for 153Eu+. Compared with conventional single-quadrupole (SQ) ICP-MS, both NH3 on-mass mode and O2 mass shift mode in ICP-MS/MS can be used to accurately determine Eu+ in ultra-pure BaCO3 materials. The detected concentration of Eu+ was 4.0 ng L- 1 to 15 ng L- 1, with spiked recoveries ranging from 100%-110%. ICP-MS/MS was also used to eliminate polyatomic interferences, particularly Ba-based interferences, prior to measurement of Gd and Sm. Impurities, including Na, Mg, Al, K, Mn, Fe, Cr, Sr, and Cs, in ultra-pure BaCO3 materials were also determined using ICP-MS/MS in conventional SQ mode.

  13. Method for the Compound Annotation of Conjugates in Nontargeted Metabolomics Using Accurate Mass Spectrometry, Multistage Product Ion Spectra and Compound Database Searching.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Tairo; Bamba, Takeshi; Tai, Akihiro; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Owing to biotransformation, xenobiotics are often found in conjugated form in biological samples such as urine and plasma. Liquid chromatography coupled with accurate mass spectrometry with multistage collision-induced dissociation provides spectral information concerning these metabolites in complex materials. Unfortunately, compound databases typically do not contain a sufficient number of records for such conjugates. We report here on the development of a novel protocol, referred to as ChemProphet, to annotate compounds, including conjugates, using compound databases such as PubChem and ChemSpider. The annotation of conjugates involves three steps: 1. Recognition of the type and number of conjugates in the sample; 2. Compound search and annotation of the deconjugated form; and 3. In silico evaluation of the candidate conjugate. ChemProphet assigns a spectrum to each candidate by automatically exploring the substructures corresponding to the observed product ion spectrum. When finished, it annotates the candidates assigning a rank for each candidate based on the calculated score that ranks its relative likelihood. We assessed our protocol by annotating a benchmark dataset by including the product ion spectra for 102 compounds, annotating the commercially available standard for quercetin 3-glucuronide, and by conducting a model experiment using urine from mice that had been administered a green tea extract. The results show that by using the ChemProphet approach, it is possible to annotate not only the deconjugated molecules but also the conjugated molecules using an automatic interpretation method based on deconjugation that involves multistage collision-induced dissociation and in silico calculated conjugation.

  14. Preferential access to genetic information from endogenous hominin ancient DNA and accurate quantitative SNP-typing via SPEX

    PubMed Central

    Brotherton, Paul; Sanchez, Juan J.; Cooper, Alan; Endicott, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of targeted genetic loci from ancient, forensic and clinical samples is usually built upon polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-generated sequence data. However, many studies have shown that PCR amplification from poor-quality DNA templates can create sequence artefacts at significant levels. With hominin (human and other hominid) samples, the pervasive presence of highly PCR-amplifiable human DNA contaminants in the vast majority of samples can lead to the creation of recombinant hybrids and other non-authentic artefacts. The resulting PCR-generated sequences can then be difficult, if not impossible, to authenticate. In contrast, single primer extension (SPEX)-based approaches can genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms from ancient fragments of DNA as accurately as modern DNA. A single SPEX-type assay can amplify just one of the duplex DNA strands at target loci and generate a multi-fold depth-of-coverage, with non-authentic recombinant hybrids reduced to undetectable levels. Crucially, SPEX-type approaches can preferentially access genetic information from damaged and degraded endogenous ancient DNA templates over modern human DNA contaminants. The development of SPEX-type assays offers the potential for highly accurate, quantitative genotyping from ancient hominin samples. PMID:19864251

  15. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification.

  16. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  17. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Animal Species in Natural Leather Goods by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Izuchi, Yukari; Takashima, Tsuneo; Hatano, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The demand for leather goods has grown globally in recent years. Industry revenue is forecast to reach $91.2 billion by 2018. There is an ongoing labelling problem in the leather items market, in that it is currently impossible to identify the species that a given piece of leather is derived from. To address this issue, we developed a rapid and simple method for the specific identification of leather derived from cattle, horses, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer by analysing peptides produced by the trypsin-digestion of proteins contained in leather goods using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We determined species-specific amino acid sequences by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the Mascot software program and demonstrated that collagen α-1(I), collagen α-2(I), and collagen α-1(III) from the dermal layer of the skin are particularly useful in species identification. PMID:27313979

  18. Higgs mass generation from the standpoint of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieden, B. R.; Plastino, A.

    2001-01-01

    An alternative Lagrangian is derived for imparting mass to the Higgs H0, Z0 and W± bosons. The Lagrangian derives from considerations of measurement: that of the four-position of one of the bosons. (Neither the Cooper pair nor vacuum perturbation approach is taken.) The quality of the measurement can be specified by its level of Fisher information. The Lagrangian arises as a simple statement of lossless acquisition of information by the measurement process. All boson fields are regarded as probability amplitudes, and a Lagrangian variational solution is Proca equations for the Higgs Z0 and W± probability amplitudes, and a uniform amplitude function for H0. Also, the measured location of H0 is found to be quantum mechanically entangled with the mass of Z0 or W±. With ɛH the root-mean square uncertainty in the measured four-position of H0, this is as ɛHMZ⩾ℏ/2 c in a U(1) analysis, and as ɛ HM W2+0.5M Z2⩾ℏ/2c in an SU(2) analysis. MW and MZ are the masses of the W± and Z0 bosons. The mass MZ arises as if the outcome of a zero-sum game of mass acquisition played by Z0 and H0. The above inequalities are well-obeyed by currently known limiting values of ɛH, MW and MZ. They also imply an upper bound of about 206 GeV/c 2 to the mass MH of H0. The uniform nature of the probability amplitude function for H0 implies uniform mass generation over four-space and, hence, the cosmological principle of astronomy.

  19. Evaluation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the metabolic profiling of plant-fungus interaction in Aquilaria malaccensis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yong Foo; Chin, Sung-Tong; Perlmutter, Patrick; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-03-27

    To explore the possible obligate interactions between the phytopathogenic fungus and Aquilaria malaccensis which result in generation of a complex array of secondary metabolites, we describe a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) method, coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the untargeted and comprehensive metabolic profiling of essential oils from naturally infected A. malaccensis trees. A polar/non-polar column configuration was employed, offering an improved separation pattern of components when compared to other column sets. Four different grades of the oils displayed quite different metabolic patterns, suggesting the evolution of a signalling relationship between the host tree (emergence of various phytoalexins) and fungi (activation of biotransformation). In total, ca. 550 peaks/metabolites were detected, of which tentative identification of 155 of these compounds was reported, representing between 20.1% and 53.0% of the total ion count. These are distributed over the chemical families of monoterpenic and sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes (comprised of ketone, aldehyde, oxide, alcohol, lactone, keto-alcohol and diol), norterpenoids, diterpenoids, short chain glycols, carboxylic acids and others. The large number of metabolites detected, combined with the ease with which they are located in the 2D separation space, emphasises the importance of a comprehensive analytical approach for the phytochemical analysis of plant metabolomes. Furthermore, the potential of this methodology in grading agarwood oils by comparing the obtained metabolic profiles (pattern recognition for unique metabolite chemical families) is discussed. The phytocomplexity of the agarwood oils signified the production of a multitude of plant-fungus mediated secondary metabolites as chemical signals for natural ecological communication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most complete

  20. Accurate determination of ⁴¹Ca concentrations in spent resins from the nuclear industry by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bourlès, Didier; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2013-12-01

    The radiological characterisation of nuclear waste is essential for managing storage sites. Determining the concentration of Long-Lived RadioNuclides (LLRN) is fundamental for their long-term management. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (41)Ca concentrations in ions exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). (41)Ca concentrations were successfully measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) after the acid digestion of resin samples, followed by radioactive decontamination and isobaric suppression through successive hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate and final CaF2 precipitations. Measured (41)Ca concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/g, i.e. from 0.06 to 0.09 Bq/g. The (41)Ca/(60)Co activity ratios obtained were remarkably reproducible and in good agreement with the current ratio used for resins management. PMID:24144617

  1. Automated gas-phase purification for accurate, multiplexed quantification on a stand-alone ion trap mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Catherine E.; Rensvold, Jarred W.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    Isobaric tagging enables the acquisition of highly-multiplexed proteome quantification but is hindered by the pervasive problem of precursor interference. The elimination of co-isolated contaminants prior to reporter tag generation can be achieved through the use of gas-phase purification via proton transfer ion/ion reactions (QuantMode); however, the original QuantMode technique was implemented on the high resolution linear ion trap-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer enabled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Here we extend this technology to stand-alone linear ion trap systems (trapQuantMode). Facilitated by the use of inlet beam-type activation (i.e., trapHCD) for production and observation of the low mass-to-charge reporter region, this scan sequence comprises three separate events to maximize peptide identifications, minimize duty cycle requirements, and increase quantitative accuracy, precision, and dynamic range. Significant improvements in quantitative accuracy were attained over standard methods when using trapQuantMode (trapQM) to analyze an interference model system comprising tryptic peptides of yeast that we contaminated with human peptides. Finally, we demonstrate practical benefits of this method by analysis of the proteomic changes that occur during mouse skeletal muscle myoblast differentiation. While trapQM’s reduced duty cycle led to the identification of fewer proteins than conventional operation (4,050 vs. 2,964), trapQM identified more significant differences (>1.5 fold, 1,362 vs 1,132, respectively; P<0.05) between the proteomes of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiated myotubes and nearly ten-fold more differences with changes greater than 5-fold (96 vs. 12). We further show that our trapQM dataset is superior for identifying changes in protein abundance that are consistent with the metabolic and structural changes known to accompany myotube formation. PMID:23046161

  2. Utility of accurate monoisotopic mass measurements to confidently identify lambda exonuclease generated single-stranded amplicons containing 7-deaza analogs by electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Jennifer L.; Mason, Christopher J.; Muddiman, David C.

    2004-05-01

    A 53-base pair region on the long arm of chromosome 22 was amplified using PCR with 7-deaza-modified deoxynucleotides. Increased amplification efficiency was achieved by doubling the concentration of the modified deoxynucleotide triphosphates. Incorporation of 7-deaza purines has been previously shown to selectively eliminate fragmentation pathways during gas-phase sequencing of nucleic acids by sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation. However, 7-deaza analogs result in significant duplex stability precluding interrogation of the single-stranded species by tandem mass spectrometry. Herein, we demonstrate the use of lambda exonuclease to successfully overcome this problem and are able to obtain single-stranded PCR products containing 7-deaza adenine and guanine nucleobases. Mass accuracy was used as our metric to determine complete incorporation of 7-deaza residues in PCR products>15 kDa; <= 3 ppm neutral monoisotopic mass measurement accuracies were routinely achieved. High mass measurement accuracy was obtained using a dual electrospray source and subsequently, using an isotopic fitting algorithm, the best fit between the theoretical and experimental isotopic distributions was determined using a chi-square value. Theoretical isotopic distributions were generated using an average nucleotide (averatide) chemical formula developed herein which was based on the relative frequencies of AT and GC base pairs in the human genome. Single-stranded PCR products were fragmented using SORI-CID and as expected, cleavage at the 7-deaza modified sites was not observed. Collectively, this integrated approach can facilitate top-down sequencing of PCR products by a variety of tandem mass spectrometry methods.

  3. Accurate determination of ochratoxin A in Korean fermented soybean paste by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seonghee; Lee, Suyoung; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, has been frequently detected in doenjang, a traditional fermented soybean paste, when it is fermented under improper conditions. Reliable screening of OTA in traditional fermented soybean paste (doenjang) is a special food-safety issue in Korea. Our laboratory, the National Metrology Institute of Korea, established an isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) method as a higher-order reference method to be used for SI-traceable value-assignment of OTA in certified reference materials (CRMs). (13)C20-OTA was used as an internal standard. Sample preparation conditions and LC/MS measurement parameters were optimised for this purpose. The analytical method was validated by measuring samples fortified with OTA at various levels. Repeatability and reproducibility studies showed that the ID-LC/MS/MS method is reliable and reproducible within 2% relative standard deviation. The analytical method was applied to determine OTA in various commercial doenjang products and home-made doenjang products.

  4. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia - III. Accurate SB2 orbits for 10 binaries and masses of HIP 87895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, F.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Famaey, B.; Guillout, P.; Lebreton, Y.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Mazeh, T.; Salomon, J.-B.; Soubiran, C.; Tal-Or, L.

    2016-05-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries has been observed since 2010 with the Spectrographe pour l'Observation des PHénomènes des Intérieurs Stellaires et des Exoplanètes spectrograph at the Haute-Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 per cent when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. In this paper, we present the results from five years of observations of 10 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 37 to 881 d. Using the TODMOR algorithm, we computed radial velocities from the spectra, and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the components are then obtained with an accuracy better than 1.2 per cent for the 10 binaries. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 87895 with an accuracy of 0.98 and 1.2 per cent, respectively.

  5. A convenient method for calculation of ionic diffusion coefficients for accurate selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryahina, K.; Spanel, P.

    2005-07-01

    A method to calculate diffusion coefficients of ions important for the selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, is presented. The ions, on which this method is demonstrated, include the SIFT-MS precursors H3O+(H2O)0,1,2,3, NO.+(H2O)0,1,2 and O2+ and the product ions relevant to analysis of breath trace metabolites ammonia (NH3+(H2O)0,1,2, NH4+(H2O)0,1,2), acetaldehyde (C2H4OH+(H2O)0,1,2), acetone (CH3CO+, (CH3)2CO+, (CH3)2COH+(H2O)0,1, (CH3)2CO.NO+), ethanol (C2H5OHH+(H2O)0,1,2) and isoprene (C5H7+, C5H8+, C5H9+). Theoretical model of the (12, 4) potential for interaction between the ions and the helium atoms is used, with the repulsive part approximated by the mean hard-sphere cross section and the attractive part describing ion-induced dipole interactions. The reduced zero-field mobilities at 300 K are calculated using the Viehland and Mason theory [L.A. Viehland, S.L. Lin, E.A. Mason, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables, 60 (1995) 37-95], parameterised by a simple formula as a function of the mean hard-sphere cross section, and converted to diffusion coefficients using the Einstein relation. The method is tested on a set of experimental data for simple ions and cluster ions.

  6. Dual electrospray ionization source for confident generation of accurate mass tags using liquid chromatography Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno, Angelito I; Muddiman, David C; Bergen, H Robert; Craighead, James R; Burke, Michael J; Caskey, Patrick E; Allan, Jonathan A

    2003-07-15

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) has rapidly established a prominent role in proteomics because of its unparalleled resolving power, sensitivity and ability to achieve high mass measurement accuracy (MMA) simultaneously. However, space-charge effects must be quantitatively, routinely, and confidently corrected because they are known to profoundly influence MMA. We argue that the most effective way to account for space-charge effects is to introduce an internal mass calibrant (IMC) using a dual electrospray ionization (ESI) source where the IMC is added from a separate ESI emitter. The major disadvantage of our initial dual ESI source to achieve high MMA, and arguably the only one, was the time required to switch between the analyte emitter and IMC emitter (i.e., >300 ms). While this "switching time" was acceptable for direct infusion experiments, it did not lend itself to high-throughput applications or when conducting on-line liquid separations. In this report, we completely redesigned the dual ESI source and demonstrate several key attributes. First, the new design allows for facile alignment of ESI emitters, undetectable vibration, and the ability to extend to multiple emitters. Second, the switching time was reduced to <50 ms, which allowed the analyte and IMC to be accumulated "simultaneously" in the external ion reservoir and injected as a single ion packet into the ion cyclotron resonance cell, eliminating the need for a separate accumulation and ion injection event for the IMC. Third, by using a high concentration of the IMC, the residence time on this emitter could be reduced to approximately 80 ms, allowing for more time spent accumulating analyte ions of significantly lower concentration. Fourth, multiplexed on-line separations can be carried out providing increased throughput. Specifically, the new dual ESI source has demonstrated its ability to produce a stable ion current over a 45-min time period at 7 T

  7. A simple and accurate SNP scoring strategy based on typeIIS restriction endonuclease cleavage and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sun Pyo; Ji, Seung Il; Rhee, Hwanseok; Shin, Soo Kyeong; Hwang, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Soong Deok; Oh, Heung-Bum; Yoo, Wangdon; Kim, Soo-Ok

    2008-01-01

    Background We describe the development of a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) scoring strategy, termed Restriction Fragment Mass Polymorphism (RFMP) that is suitable for genotyping variations in a simple, accurate, and high-throughput manner. The assay is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and mass measurement of oligonucleotides containing a polymorphic base, to which a typeIIS restriction endonuclease recognition was introduced by PCR amplification. Enzymatic cleavage of the products leads to excision of oligonucleotide fragments representing base variation of the polymorphic site whose masses were determined by MALDI-TOF MS. Results The assay represents an improvement over previous methods because it relies on the direct mass determination of PCR products rather than on an indirect analysis, where a base-extended or fluorescent report tag is interpreted. The RFMP strategy is simple and straightforward, requiring one restriction digestion reaction following target amplification in a single vessel. With this technology, genotypes are generated with a high call rate (99.6%) and high accuracy (99.8%) as determined by independent sequencing. Conclusion The simplicity, accuracy and amenability to high-throughput screening analysis should make the RFMP assay suitable for large-scale genotype association study as well as clinical genotyping in laboratories. PMID:18538037

  8. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  9. Modelling mass casualty decontamination systems informed by field exercise data.

    PubMed

    Egan, Joseph R; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-10-16

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  10. Modelling mass casualty decontamination systems informed by field exercise data.

    PubMed

    Egan, Joseph R; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-10-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  11. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger; Granby, Kit; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Driffield, Malcolm; Højslev Petersen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries in a commercial mass spectral library for GC-MS (GC-EI-QTOF MS) analysis and an in-house built library of accurate masses for substances known to be used in P&B packaging for UHPLC-QTOF analysis. Of 75 tentatively identified substances, 15 were initially selected for further testing in vitro; however, only seven were commercially available and subsequently tested in vitro and quantified. Of these seven, the identities of three pigments found in printing inks were confirmed by UHPLC tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ MS/MS). Two pigments had entries in the database, meaning that a material relevant accurate mass database can provide a fast tentative identification. Pure standards of the seven tentatively identified substances were tested in vitro but could not explain a significant proportion of the AhR-response in the extract. Targeted analyses of dioxins and PCBs, both well-known AhR agonists, was performed. However, the dioxins could explain approximately 3% of the activity observed in the pizza box extract indicating that some very AhR active substance(s) still remain to be

  12. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger; Granby, Kit; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Driffield, Malcolm; Højslev Petersen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries in a commercial mass spectral library for GC-MS (GC-EI-QTOF MS) analysis and an in-house built library of accurate masses for substances known to be used in P&B packaging for UHPLC-QTOF analysis. Of 75 tentatively identified substances, 15 were initially selected for further testing in vitro; however, only seven were commercially available and subsequently tested in vitro and quantified. Of these seven, the identities of three pigments found in printing inks were confirmed by UHPLC tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ MS/MS). Two pigments had entries in the database, meaning that a material relevant accurate mass database can provide a fast tentative identification. Pure standards of the seven tentatively identified substances were tested in vitro but could not explain a significant proportion of the AhR-response in the extract. Targeted analyses of dioxins and PCBs, both well-known AhR agonists, was performed. However, the dioxins could explain approximately 3% of the activity observed in the pizza box extract indicating that some very AhR active substance(s) still remain to be

  13. Accurate determination of the thickness or mass per unit area of thin foils and single-crystal wafers for x-ray attenuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; de Jonge, M. D.

    2004-09-01

    The determination of the local mass per unit area m/A=∫ρdt and the thickness of a specimen is an important aspect of its characterization and is often required for material quality control in fabrication. We discuss common methods which have been used to determine the local thickness of thin specimens. We then propose an x-ray technique which is capable of determining the local thickness and the x-ray absorption profile of a foil or wafer to high accuracy. This technique provides an accurate integration of the column density which is not affected by the presence of voids and internal defects in the material. The technique is best suited to specimens with thickness substantially greater than the dimensions of the surface and void structure. We also show that the attenuation of an x-ray beam by a nonuniform specimen is significantly different from that calculated by using a simple linear average of the mass per unit area and quantify this effect. For much thinner specimens or in the presence of a very structured surface profile we propose a complementary technique capable of attaining high accuracy by the use of a secondary standard. The technique is demonstrated by absolute measurements of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient of copper and silver.

  14. Accurate determination of the thickness or mass per unit area of thin foils and single-crystal wafers for x-ray attenuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, C.Q.; Chantler, C.T.; Barnea, Z.; Jonge, M.D. de

    2004-09-01

    The determination of the local mass per unit area m/A={integral}{rho}dt and the thickness of a specimen is an important aspect of its characterization and is often required for material quality control in fabrication. We discuss common methods which have been used to determine the local thickness of thin specimens. We then propose an x-ray technique which is capable of determining the local thickness and the x-ray absorption profile of a foil or wafer to high accuracy. This technique provides an accurate integration of the column density which is not affected by the presence of voids and internal defects in the material. The technique is best suited to specimens with thickness substantially greater than the dimensions of the surface and void structure. We also show that the attenuation of an x-ray beam by a nonuniform specimen is significantly different from that calculated by using a simple linear average of the mass per unit area and quantify this effect. For much thinner specimens or in the presence of a very structured surface profile we propose a complementary technique capable of attaining high accuracy by the use of a secondary standard. The technique is demonstrated by absolute measurements of the x-ray mass attenuation coefficient of copper and silver.

  15. Metabolite identification of artemether by data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis using an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in combination with the online hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Du, Fuying; Zhu, Fanping; Xing, Jie

    2011-11-15

    Artemether (ARM), the O-methyl ether prodrug of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), is a first-line antimalarial drug used in areas of multi-drug resistance. Artemisinin drugs can be metabolized extensively in vivo and this seems related to their autoinduction pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the metabolite identification of ARM was performed by the generic data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis, using high-resolution (HR) liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in conjunction with online hydrogen (H)/deuterium (D) exchange for rapid structural characterization. The LC separation was improved allowing the separation of ARM parent drugs and their metabolites from their diastereomers. A total of 77 phase I metabolites of ARM were identified in rat liver microsomal incubates and rat urine, including dihydroartemisinin and artemisinin. In rat bile, 12 phase II metabolites were found. Accurate mass data were obtained in both full scan and HR-MS/MS mode to support assignments of metabolite structures. Online H/D exchange LC/HR-ESI-MS experiments provided additional evidence in differentiating dihydroxylated deoxy-ARM from mono-hydroxylated ARM. The results showed the main phase I metabolites of artemether are hydroxylated, dehydro, demethylated and deoxy products, and they will undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation processes. Most metabolites were reported for the first time. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with an online H/D exchange LC/HR-MS(n) technique in rapid identification of drug metabolites. PMID:22006394

  16. Sectional power-law correction for the accurate determination of lutetium by isotope dilution multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hong-Lin; Gao, Shan; Zong, Chun-Lei; Dai, Meng-Ning

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we employ a sectional power-law (SPL) correction that provides accurate and precise measurements of 176Lu/ 175Lu ratios in geological samples using multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Three independent power laws were adopted based on the 176Lu/ 176Yb ratios of samples measured after chemical chromatography. Using isotope dilution (ID) techniques and the SPL correction method, the measured lutetium contents of United States Geological Survey rock standards (BHVO-1, BHVO-2, BCR-2, AGV-1, and G-2) agree well with the recommended values. Results obtained by conventional ICP-MS and INAA are generally higher than those obtained by ID-TIMS and ID-MC-ICP-MS; this discrepancy probably reflects oxide interference and inaccurate corrections.

  17. Investigation of mass dependence effects for the accurate determination of molybdenum isotope amount ratios by MC-ICP-MS using synthetic isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Dmitry; Dunn, Philip J H; Petrov, Panayot; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Methodology for absolute Mo isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using calibration with synthetic isotope mixtures (SIMs) is presented. For the first time, synthetic isotope mixtures prepared from seven commercially available isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders ((92)Mo, (94)Mo, (95)Mo, (96)Mo, (97)Mo, (98)Mo, and (100)Mo) are used to investigate whether instrumental mass discrimination of Mo isotopes in MC-ICP-MS is consistent with mass-dependent isotope distribution. The parent materials were dissolved and mixed as solutions to obtain mixtures with accurately known isotope amount ratios. The level of elemental impurities in the isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders was quantified by ICP-MS by using both high-resolution and reaction cell instruments to completely resolve spectral interferences. The Mo isotope amount ratio values with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), determined by MC-ICP-MS for a high-purity Mo rod from Johnson Matthey, were as follows: (92)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.9235(9), (94)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.5785(8), (96)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.0503(9), (97)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6033(6), (98)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.5291(20), and (100)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6130(7). A full uncertainty budget for the measurements is presented which shows that the largest contribution to the uncertainty budget comes from correction for elemental impurities (∼51%), followed by the contribution from weighing operations (∼26 %). The atomic weight of molybdenum was calculated to be 95.947(2); the uncertainty in parentheses is expanded uncertainty with the coverage factor of 2. A particular advantage of the developed method is that calibration factors for all six Mo isotope amount ratios, involving the (95)Mo isotope, were experimentally determined. This allows avoiding any assumption on mass-dependent isotope fractions in MC-ICP-MS, inherent to the method of double spike previously used for Mo isotope amount ratio

  18. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment: Accurate ranges have given a large improvement in the lunar orbit and new selenophysical information.

    PubMed

    Bender, P L; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Alley, C O; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Eckhardt, D H; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Silverberg, E C; Williams, J G

    1973-10-19

    previously available knowledge of the distance to points on the lunar surface. Already, extremely complex structure has been observed in the lunar rotation and significant improvement has been achieved in our knowledge of lunar orbit. The selenocentric coordinates of the retroreflectors give improved reference points for use in lunar mapping, and new information on the lunar mass distribution has been obtained. Beyond the applications discussed in this article, however, the history of science shows many cases of previously unknown, phenomena discovered as a consequence of major improvements in the accuracy of measurements. It will be interesting to see whether this once again proves the case as we acquire an extended series of lunar distance observations with decimetric and then centimetric accuracy.

  19. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment: Accurate ranges have given a large improvement in the lunar orbit and new selenophysical information.

    PubMed

    Bender, P L; Currie, D G; Poultney, S K; Alley, C O; Dicke, R H; Wilkinson, D T; Eckhardt, D H; Faller, J E; Kaula, W M; Mulholland, J D; Plotkin, H H; Silverberg, E C; Williams, J G

    1973-10-19

    previously available knowledge of the distance to points on the lunar surface. Already, extremely complex structure has been observed in the lunar rotation and significant improvement has been achieved in our knowledge of lunar orbit. The selenocentric coordinates of the retroreflectors give improved reference points for use in lunar mapping, and new information on the lunar mass distribution has been obtained. Beyond the applications discussed in this article, however, the history of science shows many cases of previously unknown, phenomena discovered as a consequence of major improvements in the accuracy of measurements. It will be interesting to see whether this once again proves the case as we acquire an extended series of lunar distance observations with decimetric and then centimetric accuracy. PMID:17749298

  20. Negative chemical ionization gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and automated accurate mass data processing for determination of pesticides in fruit and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Besil, Natalia; Uclés, Samanta; Mezcúa, Milagros; Heinzen, Horacio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2015-08-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to high resolution hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-QTOF MS), operating in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode and combining full scan with MSMS experiments using accurate mass analysis, has been explored for the automated determination of pesticide residues in fruit and vegetables. Seventy compounds were included in this approach where 50 % of them are not approved by the EU legislation. A global 76 % of the analytes could be identified at 1 μg kg(-1). Recovery studies were developed at three concentration levels (1, 5, and 10 μg kg(-1)). Seventy-seven percent of the detected pesticides at the lowest level yielded recoveries within the 70 %-120 % range, whereas 94 % could be quantified at 5 μg kg(-1), and the 100 % were determined at 10 μg kg(-1). Good repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD <20 %), was obtained for all compounds. The main drawback of the method was the limited dynamic range that was observed for some analytes that can be overcome either diluting the sample or lowering the injection volume. A home-made database was developed and applied to an automatic accurate mass data processing. Measured mass accuracies of the generated ions were mainly less than 5 ppm for at least one diagnostic ion. When only one ion was obtained in the single-stage NCI-MS, a representative product ion from MSMS experiments was used as identification criterion. A total of 30 real samples were analyzed and 67 % of the samples were positive for 12 different pesticides in the range 1.0-1321.3 μg kg(-1). PMID:25694145

  1. An optimized method for the accurate determination of patulin in apple products by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seo, Miyeong; Kim, Byungjoo; Baek, Song-Yee

    2015-07-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several molds in fruits, has been frequently detected in apple products. Therefore, regulatory bodies have established recommended maximum permitted patulin concentrations for each type of apple product. Although several analytical methods have been adopted to determine patulin in food, quality control of patulin analysis is not easy, as reliable certified reference materials (CRMs) are not available. In this study, as a part of a project for developing CRMs for patulin analysis, we developed isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) as a higher-order reference method for the accurate value-assignment of CRMs. (13)C7-patulin was used as internal standard. Samples were extracted with ethyl acetate to improve recovery. For further sample cleanup with solid-phase extraction (SPE), the HLB SPE cartridge was chosen after comparing with several other types of SPE cartridges. High-performance liquid chromatography was performed on a multimode column for proper retention and separation of highly polar and water-soluble patulin from sample interferences. Sample extracts were analyzed by LC/MS/MS with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode with selected reaction monitoring of patulin and (13)C7-patulin at m/z 153→m/z 109 and m/z 160→m/z 115, respectively. The validity of the method was tested by measuring gravimetrically fortified samples of various apple products. In addition, the repeatability and the reproducibility of the method were tested to evaluate the performance of the method. The method was shown to provide accurate measurements in the 3-40 μg/kg range with a relative expanded uncertainty of around 1%.

  2. Examination of the mass media process and personal factors affecting the assessment of mass media-disseminated health information.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çakır, Tülin; Avşar, Zakir; Üzel Taş, Hanife

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the mass media and personal characteristics leading to health communication inequality as well as the role of certain factors in health communication's mass media process. Using both sociodemographic variables and Maletzke's model as a basis, we investigated the relationship between selected components of the mass communication process, the receiving of reliable health information as a result of health communication, and the condition of its use. The study involved 1853 people in Turkey and was structured in two parts. The first part dealt with questions regarding sociodemographic characteristics, the use of the mass media and the public's ability to obtain health information from it, the public's perception of the trustworthiness of health information, and the state of translating this information into health-promoting behaviours. In the second part, questions related to the mass communication process were posed using a five-point Likert scale. This section tried to establish structural equation modelling using the judgements prepared on the basis of the mass media model. Through this study, it has been observed that sociodemographic factors such as education and age affect individuals' use of and access to communication channels; individuals' trust in and selection of health information from the programme content and their changing health behaviours (as a result of the health information) are related to both their perception of the mass communication process and to sociodemographic factors, but are more strongly related to the former. PMID:25002272

  3. Examination of the mass media process and personal factors affecting the assessment of mass media-disseminated health information.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çakır, Tülin; Avşar, Zakir; Üzel Taş, Hanife

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the mass media and personal characteristics leading to health communication inequality as well as the role of certain factors in health communication's mass media process. Using both sociodemographic variables and Maletzke's model as a basis, we investigated the relationship between selected components of the mass communication process, the receiving of reliable health information as a result of health communication, and the condition of its use. The study involved 1853 people in Turkey and was structured in two parts. The first part dealt with questions regarding sociodemographic characteristics, the use of the mass media and the public's ability to obtain health information from it, the public's perception of the trustworthiness of health information, and the state of translating this information into health-promoting behaviours. In the second part, questions related to the mass communication process were posed using a five-point Likert scale. This section tried to establish structural equation modelling using the judgements prepared on the basis of the mass media model. Through this study, it has been observed that sociodemographic factors such as education and age affect individuals' use of and access to communication channels; individuals' trust in and selection of health information from the programme content and their changing health behaviours (as a result of the health information) are related to both their perception of the mass communication process and to sociodemographic factors, but are more strongly related to the former.

  4. CYP450 phenotyping and metabolite identification of quinine by accurate mass UPLC-MS analysis: a possible metabolic link to blackwater fever

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The naturally occurring alkaloid drug, quinine is commonly used for the treatment of severe malaria. Despite centuries of use, its metabolism is still not fully understood, and may play a role in the haemolytic disorders associated with the drug. Methods Incubations of quinine with CYPs 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 were conducted, and the metabolites were characterized by accurate mass UPLC-MSE analysis. Reactive oxygen species generation was also measured in human erythrocytes incubated in the presence of quinine with and without microsomes. Results The metabolites 3-hydroxyquinine, 2’-oxoquininone, and O-desmethylquinine were observed after incubation with CYPs 3A4 (3-hydroxyquinine and 2’-oxoquininone) and 2D6 (O-desmethylquinine). In addition, multiple hydroxylations were observed both on the quinoline core and the quinuclidine ring system. Of the five primary abundance CYPs tested, 3A4, 2D6, 2C9, and 2C19 all demonstrated activity toward quinine, while 1A2 did not. Further, quinine produced robust dose-dependent oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in the presence of microsomes. Conclusions Taken in context, these data suggest a CYP-mediated link between quinine metabolism and the poorly understood haemolytic condition known as blackwater fever, often associated with quinine ingestion. PMID:23800033

  5. Detection and quantitation of trace phenolphthalein (in pharmaceutical preparations and in forensic exhibits) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, a sensitive and accurate method.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kakali; Sharma, Shiba P; Lahiri, Sujit C

    2013-01-01

    Phenolphthalein, an acid-base indicator and laxative, is important as a constituent of widely used weight-reducing multicomponent food formulations. Phenolphthalein is an useful reagent in forensic science for the identification of blood stains of suspected victims and for apprehending erring officials accepting bribes in graft or trap cases. The pink-colored alkaline hand washes originating from the phenolphthalein-smeared notes can easily be determined spectrophotometrically. But in many cases, colored solution turns colorless with time, which renders the genuineness of bribe cases doubtful to the judiciary. No method is known till now for the detection and identification of phenolphthalein in colorless forensic exhibits with positive proof. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry had been found to be most sensitive, accurate method capable of detection and quantitation of trace phenolphthalein in commercial formulations and colorless forensic exhibits with positive proof. The detection limit of phenolphthalein was found to be 1.66 pg/L or ng/mL, and the calibration curve shows good linearity (r(2) = 0.9974). PMID:23106487

  6. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  7. Investigation of low-abundant in vitro metabolites of stable isotope-labelled BAL4815 by accurate mass capillary-LC-ESI-qTof-MS and MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wind, Mathias; Spickermann, Jochen; Schleimer, Michael; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Gebhardt, Klaus; Sturm-Haurany, Rima; Klauer, Dominique; Fullhardt, Pascal; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne

    2006-07-01

    The metabolic profile of BAL4815, an antifungal azole drug, was determined using in vitro rat hepatocyte incubations and subsequent analysis by capillary LC-qTof-MS and MS/MS including accurate mass determination. For the detection of the metabolites, a mixture of the drug and its deuterium-labelled analogue was used for incubations. Metabolic stability of BAL4815 was high in cultured rat hepatocytes. However, several low-abundant metabolites were detected by the use of capillary LC-qTof-MS and manual investigation of the data. The peak intensity of the most abundant metabolite was close to the limit of detection. Except for an apparent oxidation product, the masses of the other detected metabolites could not be assigned to a single and frequently occurring biotransformation. Accurate mass determination and possible elemental compositions suggested that metabolism occurred through a combination of glutathionylation and defluorination. This was verified using accurate mass MS/MS. The use of accurate mass measurements and the derived suggestions for the elemental compositions were essential to elucidate this atypical metabolic pathway. A mass accuracy better than 8 ppm could be achieved for most assigned MS and MS/MS signals with intensities less than 6 cps in the spectra.

  8. The role of cognitive switching in head-up displays. [to determine pilot ability to accurately extract information from either of two sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, E.

    1979-01-01

    The pilot's ability to accurately extract information from either one or both of two superimposed sources of information was determined. Static, aerial, color 35 mm slides of external runway environments and slides of corresponding static head-up display (HUD) symbology were used as the sources. A three channel tachistoscope was utilized to show either the HUD alone, the scene alone, or the two slides superimposed. Cognitive performance of the pilots was assessed by determining the percentage of correct answers given to two HUD related questions, two scene related questions, or one HUD and one scene related question.

  9. Development and validation of a sensitive solid phase extraction/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the accurate determination of glucosamine in dog plasma.

    PubMed

    Hubert, C; Houari, S; Lecomte, F; Houbart, V; De Bleye, C; Fillet, M; Piel, G; Rozet, E; Hubert, Ph

    2010-05-01

    A sensitive and accurate LC/MS method was developed for the monitoring of glucosamine (GLcN) dog plasmatic concentration. In this scope, relatively low plasmatic concentrations of GLcN were expected, ranging from 50 to 1000 ng/mL. Liquid chromatography coupled to simple quadrupole mass spectrometry detection (LC/MS) was selected bringing the selectivity and the sensitivity needed for this application. Additionally, a solid phase extraction (SPE) step was performed to reduce matrix and ion suppression effects. Due to the ionisable character of the compound of interest, a mixed-mode strong cation exchange (Plexa PCX) disposable extraction cartridge (DEC) was selected. The separation was carried out on a Zorbax SB-CN column (5 microm, 4.6mm i.d. x 250 mm), considering hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Indeed, the mobile phase was made of methanol and 5mM ammonium hydrogen carbonate buffer at pH 7.5 (95/5, v/v). The detection was led at m/z ratios of 180.0 and 417.0, for GLcN and IS, respectively. Reliability of the results was demonstrated through the validation of the method using an approach based on the accuracy profile allowing managing the risk associated to the use of these methods in routine analysis: it is thus guaranteed that each future result will fall in the +/-30% acceptance limits with a probability of at least 90%. Successful application of the method to a preliminary pharmacokinetic study illustrated the usefulness of the method for pre-clinical studies.

  10. Assignment of Calibration Information to Deeper Phylogenetic Nodes is More Effective in Obtaining Precise and Accurate Divergence Time Estimates.

    PubMed

    Mello, Beatriz; Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Divergence time estimation has become an essential tool for understanding macroevolutionary events. Molecular dating aims to obtain reliable inferences, which, within a statistical framework, means jointly increasing the accuracy and precision of estimates. Bayesian dating methods exhibit the propriety of a linear relationship between uncertainty and estimated divergence dates. This relationship occurs even if the number of sites approaches infinity and places a limit on the maximum precision of node ages. However, how the placement of calibration information may affect the precision of divergence time estimates remains an open question. In this study, relying on simulated and empirical data, we investigated how the location of calibration within a phylogeny affects the accuracy and precision of time estimates. We found that calibration priors set at median and deep phylogenetic nodes were associated with higher precision values compared to analyses involving calibration at the shallowest node. The results were independent of the tree symmetry. An empirical mammalian dataset produced results that were consistent with those generated by the simulated sequences. Assigning time information to the deeper nodes of a tree is crucial to guarantee the accuracy and precision of divergence times. This finding highlights the importance of the appropriate choice of outgroups in molecular dating. PMID:24855333

  11. An integrated strategy for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins and related peptides in natural blooms by liquid chromatography-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cintia; Caixach, Josep

    2015-08-14

    An integrated high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) strategy has been developed for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins (MCs) and related peptides in water blooms. The natural samples (water and algae) were filtered for independent analysis of aqueous and sestonic fractions. These fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-Orbitrap-HCD-MS. MALDI, ESI and the study of fragmentation sequences have been provided crucial structural information. The potential of combined positive and negative ionization modes, full scan and fragmentation acquisition modes (TOF/TOF and HCD) by HRMS and high resolution and accurate mass was investigated in order to allow unequivocal determination of MCs. Besides, a reliable quantitation has been possible by HRMS. This composition helped to decrease the probability of false positives and negatives, as alternative to commonly used LC-ESI-MS/MS methods. The analysis was non-target, therefore covered the possibility to analyze all MC analogs concurrently without any pre-selection of target MC. Furthermore, archived data was subjected to retrospective "post-targeted" analysis and a screening of other potential toxins and related peptides as anabaenopeptins in the samples was done. Finally, the MS protocol and identification tools suggested were applied to the analysis of characteristic water blooms from Spanish reservoirs. PMID:26141269

  12. An integrated strategy for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins and related peptides in natural blooms by liquid chromatography-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cintia; Caixach, Josep

    2015-08-14

    An integrated high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) strategy has been developed for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins (MCs) and related peptides in water blooms. The natural samples (water and algae) were filtered for independent analysis of aqueous and sestonic fractions. These fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-Orbitrap-HCD-MS. MALDI, ESI and the study of fragmentation sequences have been provided crucial structural information. The potential of combined positive and negative ionization modes, full scan and fragmentation acquisition modes (TOF/TOF and HCD) by HRMS and high resolution and accurate mass was investigated in order to allow unequivocal determination of MCs. Besides, a reliable quantitation has been possible by HRMS. This composition helped to decrease the probability of false positives and negatives, as alternative to commonly used LC-ESI-MS/MS methods. The analysis was non-target, therefore covered the possibility to analyze all MC analogs concurrently without any pre-selection of target MC. Furthermore, archived data was subjected to retrospective "post-targeted" analysis and a screening of other potential toxins and related peptides as anabaenopeptins in the samples was done. Finally, the MS protocol and identification tools suggested were applied to the analysis of characteristic water blooms from Spanish reservoirs.

  13. Selective accurate-mass-based analysis of 11 oxy-PAHs on atmospheric particulate matter by pressurized liquid extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography and magnetic sector mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walgraeve, C; Demeestere, K; De Wispelaere, P; Dewulf, J; Lintelmann, J; Fischer, K; Van Langenhove, H

    2012-02-01

    An innovative analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization magnetic sector mass spectrometry was developed and optimized to determine trace concentrations of 11 compounds belonging to the group of the seldom-analyzed oxy-PAHs (phenanthrene-9,10-dione, chrysene-5,6-dione, benzo[a]pyrene-4,5-dione, benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-dione, benzo[a]pyrene-3,6-dione, benzo[a]pyrene-6,12-dione, 4-oxa-benzo[def]chrysene-5-one, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde, benzo[de]anthracene-7-one, benzo[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, and napthacene-5,12-dione) on airborne particulate matter (PM(10)). The mass spectrometer was operated in multiple ion detection mode, allowing for selective accurate mass detection (mass resolution of 12,000 full width at half maximum) of the oxy-PAHs characteristic ions. Optimization of both the vaporizer (450 °C) and capillary temperature (350 °C) resulted into instrumental detection limits in the range between 7 (benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-dione) and 926 pg (benzo[a]anthracene-7,12-dione). The advanced pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and the more traditionally used ultrasonic extraction (USE) were compared using ethyl acetate as an extraction solvent. For both techniques, high recoveries from spiked quartz fiber filters (PLE, 82-110%; USE, 67-97%) were obtained. Recoveries obtained from real PM(10) samples were also high (76-107%), and no significant matrix effects (ME) on the ionization process (enhancement or suppression) were found (ME, 89-123%). Method limits of quantification (S/N = 10) were in the range between 2 and 336 pg/m(3). This method was used to analyze real PM samples collected at several urban and rural locations in the Antwerp area. For the first time, concentrations for Belgium are provided. Concentrations of individual oxy-PAHs are in the lower pictograms per cubic meter to 6 ng/m(3) range. High concentration differences between individual compounds are found as exemplified by the 75th percentile

  14. Consumption of Mass Communication--Construction of a Model on Information Consumption Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sepstrup, Preben

    A general conceptual model on the consumption of information is introduced. Information as the output of the mass media is treated as a product, and a model on the consumption of this product is developed by merging elements from consumer behavior theory and mass communication theory. Chapter I gives basic assumptions about the individual and the…

  15. Subjective sense of memory strength and the objective amount of information accurately remembered are related to distinct neural correlates at encoding.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaozheng; van Marle, Hein J F; Hermans, Erno J; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-06-15

    Although commonly used, the term memory strength is not well defined in humans. Besides durability, it has been conceptualized by retrieval characteristics, such as subjective confidence associated with retrieval, or objectively, by the amount of information accurately retrieved. Behaviorally, these measures are not necessarily correlated, indicating that distinct neural processes may underlie them. Thus, we aimed at disentangling neural activity at encoding associated with either a subsequent subjective sense of memory strength or with a subsequent objective amount of information remembered. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants were scanned while incidentally encoding a series of photographs of complex scenes. The next day, they underwent two memory tests, quantifying memory strength either subjectively (confidence on remembering the gist of a scene) or objectively (the number of details accurately remembered within a scene). Correlations between these measurements were mutually partialed out in subsequent memory analyses of fMRI data. Results revealed that activation in left ventral lateral prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction predicted subsequent confidence ratings. In contrast, parahippocampal and hippocampal activity predicted the number of details remembered. Our findings suggest that memory strength may reflect a functionally heterogeneous set of (at least two) phenomena. One phenomenon appears related to prefrontal and temporoparietal top-down modulations, resulting in the subjective sense of memory strength that is potentially based on gist memory. The other phenomenon is likely related to medial-temporal binding processes, determining the amount of information accurately encoded into memory. Thus, our study dissociated two distinct phenomena that are usually described as memory strength.

  16. Making Health Information Clear and Readable for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staggers, Sydney M.; Brann, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Many federal agencies rely on print materials to convey important information to the public, and many of the materials are written at a 10th-grade reading level or above, further limiting those individuals with low literacy. As such, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommends the application of existing best practices for…

  17. [Thinking on TCM literature evaluation methods and techniques based on mass information].

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Cui, Meng; Pan, Yan-li

    2007-08-01

    The necessity and feasibility of TCM literature evaluation based on mass information of TCM literature was discussed in this paper. Beginning with the description on current situation of mass TCM literature information research, the authors offered a tentative plan for evaluating scientific and technologic TCM literature, its method and technique, and systematically analyzed the key issues, such as the subjects selection, documents screening and sorting, literature analysis, and development of software analysis platform, then, the methodology and the technology for constituting the mass TCM literature information based evaluation system was systemically clarified.

  18. Evaluation of the occurrence and biodegradation of parabens and halogenated by-products in wastewater by accurate-mass liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS).

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Quintana, José Benito; Rodríguez, Isaac; Cela, Rafael

    2011-12-15

    An assessment of the sewage occurrence and biodegradability of seven parabens and three halogenated derivatives of methyl paraben (MeP) is presented. Several wastewater samples were collected at three different wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) during April and May 2010, concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). The performance of the QTOF system proved to be comparable to triple-quadrupole instruments in terms of quantitative capabilities, with good linearity (R(2) > 0.99 in the 5-500 ng mL(-1) range), repeatability (RSD < 5.6%) and LODs (0.3-4.0 ng L(-1) after SPE). MeP and n-propyl paraben (n-PrP) were the most frequently detected and the most abundant analytes in raw wastewater (0.3-10 μg L(-1)), in accordance with the data displayed in the bibliography and reflecting their wider use in cosmetic formulations. Samples were also evaluated in search for potential halogenated by-products of parabens, formed as a result of their reaction with residual chlorine contained in tap water. Monochloro- and dichloro-methyl paraben (ClMeP and Cl(2)MeP) were found and quantified in raw wastewater at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 μg L(-1). Halogenated derivatives of n-PrP could not be quantified due to the lack of standards; nevertheless, the monochlorinated species (ClPrP) was identified in several samples from its accurate precursor and product ions mass/charge ratios (m/z). Removal efficiencies of parabens and MeP chlorinated by-products in WWTPs exceeded 90%, with the lowest percentages corresponding to the latter species. This trend was confirmed by an activated sludge biodegradation batch test, where non-halogenated parabens had half-lives lower than 4 days, whereas halogenated derivatives of MeP turned out to be more persistent, with up to 10 days of half-life in the case of dihalogenated derivatives. A further stability test performed with raw wastewater

  19. Estimating parameters for generalized mass action models with connectivity information

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chih-Lung; Voit, Eberhard O; Wang, Feng-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Determining the parameters of a mathematical model from quantitative measurements is the main bottleneck of modelling biological systems. Parameter values can be estimated from steady-state data or from dynamic data. The nature of suitable data for these two types of estimation is rather different. For instance, estimations of parameter values in pathway models, such as kinetic orders, rate constants, flux control coefficients or elasticities, from steady-state data are generally based on experiments that measure how a biochemical system responds to small perturbations around the steady state. In contrast, parameter estimation from dynamic data requires time series measurements for all dependent variables. Almost no literature has so far discussed the combined use of both steady-state and transient data for estimating parameter values of biochemical systems. Results In this study we introduce a constrained optimization method for estimating parameter values of biochemical pathway models using steady-state information and transient measurements. The constraints are derived from the flux connectivity relationships of the system at the steady state. Two case studies demonstrate the estimation results with and without flux connectivity constraints. The unconstrained optimal estimates from dynamic data may fit the experiments well, but they do not necessarily maintain the connectivity relationships. As a consequence, individual fluxes may be misrepresented, which may cause problems in later extrapolations. By contrast, the constrained estimation accounting for flux connectivity information reduces this misrepresentation and thereby yields improved model parameters. Conclusion The method combines transient metabolic profiles and steady-state information and leads to the formulation of an inverse parameter estimation task as a constrained optimization problem. Parameter estimation and model selection are simultaneously carried out on the constrained

  20. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  1. Seeking Information after the 2010 Haiti Earthquake: A Case Study in Mass-Fatality Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 earthquake in Haiti, which killed an estimated 316,000 people, offered many lessons in mass-fatality management (MFM). The dissertation defined MFM in seeking information and in recovery, preservation, identification, and disposition of human remains. Specifically, it examined how mass fatalities were managed in Haiti, how affected…

  2. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry can accurately differentiate Aeromonas dhakensis from A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Tai-Fen; Wu, Chi-Jung; Teng, Shih-Hua; Teng, Lee-Jene; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-07-01

    Among 217 Aeromonas isolates identified by sequencing analysis of their rpoB genes, the accuracy rates of identification of A. dhakensis, A. hydrophila, A. veronii, and A. caviae were 96.7%, 90.0%, 96.7%, and 100.0%, respectively, by the cluster analysis of spectra generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

  3. A Comprehensive Review of School-Based Body Mass Index Screening Programs and Their Implications for School Health: Do the Controversies Accurately Reflect the Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Dominique G.; Bass, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whereas legislation for body mass index (BMI) surveillance and screening programs has passed in 25 states, the programs are often subject to ethical debates about confidentiality and privacy, school-to-parent communication, and safety and self-esteem issues for students. Despite this debate, no comprehensive analysis has been completed…

  4. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  5. Body Mass Index and the Use of the Internet for Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Smit, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Individuals who experience or anticipate negative interactions from medical providers related to conditions such as obesity may preferentially use the Internet for health information. Our objectives in this study were to (1) examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and Internet health information-seeking and (2) examine…

  6. IrisPlex: a sensitive DNA tool for accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour in the absence of ancestry information.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Susan; Liu, Fan; Ballantyne, Kaye N; van Oven, Mannis; Lao, Oscar; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-06-01

    A new era of 'DNA intelligence' is arriving in forensic biology, due to the impending ability to predict externally visible characteristics (EVCs) from biological material such as those found at crime scenes. EVC prediction from forensic samples, or from body parts, is expected to help concentrate police investigations towards finding unknown individuals, at times when conventional DNA profiling fails to provide informative leads. Here we present a robust and sensitive tool, termed IrisPlex, for the accurate prediction of blue and brown eye colour from DNA in future forensic applications. We used the six currently most eye colour-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that previously revealed prevalence-adjusted prediction accuracies of over 90% for blue and brown eye colour in 6168 Dutch Europeans. The single multiplex assay, based on SNaPshot chemistry and capillary electrophoresis, both widely used in forensic laboratories, displays high levels of genotyping sensitivity with complete profiles generated from as little as 31pg of DNA, approximately six human diploid cell equivalents. We also present a prediction model to correctly classify an individual's eye colour, via probability estimation solely based on DNA data, and illustrate the accuracy of the developed prediction test on 40 individuals from various geographic origins. Moreover, we obtained insights into the worldwide allele distribution of these six SNPs using the HGDP-CEPH samples of 51 populations. Eye colour prediction analyses from HGDP-CEPH samples provide evidence that the test and model presented here perform reliably without prior ancestry information, although future worldwide genotype and phenotype data shall confirm this notion. As our IrisPlex eye colour prediction test is capable of immediate implementation in forensic casework, it represents one of the first steps forward in the creation of a fully individualised EVC prediction system for future use in forensic DNA intelligence.

  7. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in biofluids and tissues based on accurate mass high resolution LC-FT-MS: compound class targeting in a metabolomics workflow.

    PubMed

    Bobeldijk, Ivana; Hekman, Maarten; de Vries-van der Weij, Jitske; Coulier, Leon; Ramaker, Raymond; Kleemann, Robert; Kooistra, Teake; Rubingh, Carina; Freidig, Andreas; Verheij, Elwin

    2008-08-15

    We report a sensitive, generic method for quantitative profiling of bile acids and other endogenous metabolites in small quantities of various biological fluids and tissues. The method is based on a straightforward sample preparation, separation by reversed-phase high performance liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) and electrospray ionisation in the negative ionisation mode (ESI-). Detection is performed in full scan using the linear ion trap Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LTQ-FTMS) generating data for many (endogenous) metabolites, not only bile acids. A validation of the method in urine, plasma and liver was performed for 17 bile acids including their taurine, sulfate and glycine conjugates. The method is linear in the 0.01-1 microM range. The accuracy in human plasma ranges from 74 to 113%, in human urine 77 to 104% and in mouse liver 79 to 140%. The precision ranges from 2 to 20% for pooled samples even in studies with large number of samples (n>250). The method was successfully applied to a multi-compartmental APOE*3-Leiden mouse study, the main goal of which was to analyze the effect of increasing dietary cholesterol concentrations on hepatic cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Serum and liver samples from different treatment groups were profiled with the new method. Statistically significant differences between the diet groups were observed regarding total as well as individual bile acid concentrations.

  8. Accurate determination of ¹²⁹I concentrations and ¹²⁹I/¹³⁷Cs ratios in spent nuclear resins by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bourlès, Didier; Arnold, Maurice; Bertaux, Maité

    2014-04-01

    Determining long-lived radionuclide concentrations in radioactive waste has fundamental implications for the long-term management of storage sites. This paper focuses on the measurement of low (129)I contents in ion exchange resins used for primary fluid purification in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR). Iodine-129 concentrations were successfully determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) following a chemical procedure which included (1) acid digestion of resin samples in HNO3/HClO4, (2) radioactive decontamination by selective iodine extraction using a new chromatographic resin (CL Resin), and (3) AgI precipitation. Measured (129)I concentrations ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g, i.e. from 0.03 to 0.08 Bq/g. The calculation of (129)I/(137)Cs activity ratios used for routine waste management produced values in agreement with the few available data for PWR resin samples. PMID:24525301

  9. Development of a Rapid and Accurate Identification Method for Citrobacter Species Isolated from Pork Products Using a Matrix-Assisted Laser-Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hye-Lim; Han, Sun-Kyung; Park, Sunghoon; Park, Si Hong; Shim, Jae-Yong; Oh, Mihwa; Ricke, Steven C; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2015-09-01

    Previous detection methods for Citrobacter are considered time consuming and laborious. In this study, we have developed a rapid and accurate detection method for Citrobacter species in pork products, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 35 Citrobacter strains were isolated from 30 pork products and identified by both MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA gene sequencing approaches. All isolates were identified to the species level by the MALDI-TOF MS, while 16S rRNA gene sequencing results could not discriminate them clearly. These results confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS is a more accurate and rapid detection method for the identification of Citrobacter species.

  10. [How much can we trust health related information provided by mass media in Argentina?].

    PubMed

    Izcovich, Ariel; Criniti, Juan Martín; Popoff, Federico; González Malla, Carlos; Catalano, Hugo N

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the certainty and accuracy of the healthcare information provided by the mass media in Argentina, a group of senior medical students, blind to the study objectives, identified healthcare related statements transmitted through mass media. These findings were challenged against the recommendations of a group of physicians trained in evidence-based decision making (EBDM). We compared the strength and direction of the mass media recommendations with those of experts on EBDM. Eighty one recommendations/questions were identified and answered by the experts on EBDM, 15 with high, 18 with moderate, 30 with low and 18 with very low quality of evidence. Only 53% (CI95% 42-64%) of the mass media recommendations agreed with the expert recommendation in direction (for or against) and 28% (CI95% 18-39%) were classified as inappropriate (significant discrepancies both in direction and strength). Subgroup analysis revealed that 71% (CI95% 56-86%) of there commendations made by professionals in mass media agreed with experts in direction and 17% (IC95% 6-33%) were classified as inappropriate, OR = 0.35 (CI95% 0.1-1.1) compared to recommendations in mass media by non-professionals. We conclude that the healthcare information provided by mass media in Argentina is unreliable; this fact can probably have a negative impact in the health system performance and physician-patient relationship. PMID:27135843

  11. [How much can we trust health related information provided by mass media in Argentina?].

    PubMed

    Izcovich, Ariel; Criniti, Juan Martín; Popoff, Federico; González Malla, Carlos; Catalano, Hugo N

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the certainty and accuracy of the healthcare information provided by the mass media in Argentina, a group of senior medical students, blind to the study objectives, identified healthcare related statements transmitted through mass media. These findings were challenged against the recommendations of a group of physicians trained in evidence-based decision making (EBDM). We compared the strength and direction of the mass media recommendations with those of experts on EBDM. Eighty one recommendations/questions were identified and answered by the experts on EBDM, 15 with high, 18 with moderate, 30 with low and 18 with very low quality of evidence. Only 53% (CI95% 42-64%) of the mass media recommendations agreed with the expert recommendation in direction (for or against) and 28% (CI95% 18-39%) were classified as inappropriate (significant discrepancies both in direction and strength). Subgroup analysis revealed that 71% (CI95% 56-86%) of there commendations made by professionals in mass media agreed with experts in direction and 17% (IC95% 6-33%) were classified as inappropriate, OR = 0.35 (CI95% 0.1-1.1) compared to recommendations in mass media by non-professionals. We conclude that the healthcare information provided by mass media in Argentina is unreliable; this fact can probably have a negative impact in the health system performance and physician-patient relationship.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Indole and Oxindole Alkaloids from Leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth Using Liquid Chromatography-Accurate QToF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Sagi, Satyanarayanaraju; Wang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Mei; Ali, Zulfiqar; Smillie, Troy J; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    Alkaloids have been reported to be the major physiologically active constituents in Mitragyna. An analytical method was developed to provide an alternative, fast method for characterization of alkaloids from various M. speciosa samples. The separation was achieved using an RP octylsilyl (C8) column, MS detection, and a water-acetonitrile with formic acid gradient as the mobile phase. Ultra-HPLC/quadrupole time-of-flight MS analysis and characterization were performed on 12 corynanthe-type indole/oxindole alkaloids obtained from the leaves of M. speciosa Korth. The indoles and oxindoles had an open E ring with or without substitution occurring at the C9 position. The full single mass spectrum of alkaloids showed a strong signal for the protonated molecule [M+H]+. The product ion spectrum of mitragynine type of alkaloids showed strong response at m/z=174.0901 suggestive of an ion containing an odd number of nitrogen atoms corresponding to formula C11H12NO, which is characteristic of indole alkaloids. A multivariate statistical analysis technique, principal component analysis, was used to show discrimination between the M. speciosa samples. The results indicated that the analytical method is suitable for QC testing of various Mitragyna commercial samples and can be used to evaluate market products purported to contain M. speciosa. PMID:25857873

  13. Identification and Characterization of Indole and Oxindole Alkaloids from Leaves of Mitragyna speciosa Korth Using Liquid Chromatography-Accurate QToF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Sagi, Satyanarayanaraju; Wang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Mei; Ali, Zulfiqar; Smillie, Troy J; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    Alkaloids have been reported to be the major physiologically active constituents in Mitragyna. An analytical method was developed to provide an alternative, fast method for characterization of alkaloids from various M. speciosa samples. The separation was achieved using an RP octylsilyl (C8) column, MS detection, and a water-acetonitrile with formic acid gradient as the mobile phase. Ultra-HPLC/quadrupole time-of-flight MS analysis and characterization were performed on 12 corynanthe-type indole/oxindole alkaloids obtained from the leaves of M. speciosa Korth. The indoles and oxindoles had an open E ring with or without substitution occurring at the C9 position. The full single mass spectrum of alkaloids showed a strong signal for the protonated molecule [M+H]+. The product ion spectrum of mitragynine type of alkaloids showed strong response at m/z=174.0901 suggestive of an ion containing an odd number of nitrogen atoms corresponding to formula C11H12NO, which is characteristic of indole alkaloids. A multivariate statistical analysis technique, principal component analysis, was used to show discrimination between the M. speciosa samples. The results indicated that the analytical method is suitable for QC testing of various Mitragyna commercial samples and can be used to evaluate market products purported to contain M. speciosa.

  14. Toward Mass Customization in the Age of Information: The Case for Open Engineering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Lautenschlager, Uwe; Mistree, Farrokh

    1997-01-01

    In the Industrial Era, manufacturers used "dedicated" engineering systems to mass produce their products. In today's increasingly competitive markets, the trend is toward mass customization, something that becomes increasingly feasible when modern information technologies are used to create open engineering systems. Our focus is on how designers can provide enhanced product flexibility and variety (if not fully customized products) through the development of open engineering systems. After presenting several industrial examples, we anchor our new systems philosophy with two real engineering applications. We believe that manufacturers who adopt open systems will achieve competitive advantage in the Information Age.

  15. Relating information entropy and mass variance to measure bias and non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    We relate the information entropy and the mass variance of any distribution in the regime of small fluctuations. We use a set of Monte Carlo simulations of different homogeneous and inhomogeneous distributions to verify the relation and also test it in a set of cosmological N-body simulations. We find that the relation is in excellent agreement with the simulations and is independent of number density and the nature of the distributions. We show that the relation between information entropy and mass variance can be used to determine the linear bias on large scales and detect the signatures of non-Gaussianity on small scales in galaxy distributions.

  16. An Automated High-Throughput Metabolic Stability Assay Using an Integrated High-Resolution Accurate Mass Method and Automated Data Analysis Software.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Kerns, Edward; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Obach, R Scott; Wang, Amy Q; Zakharov, Alexey; McKew, John; Simeonov, Anton; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Xu, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Advancement of in silico tools would be enabled by the availability of data for metabolic reaction rates and intrinsic clearance (CLint) of a diverse compound structure data set by specific metabolic enzymes. Our goal is to measure CLint for a large set of compounds with each major human cytochrome P450 (P450) isozyme. To achieve our goal, it is of utmost importance to develop an automated, robust, sensitive, high-throughput metabolic stability assay that can efficiently handle a large volume of compound sets. The substrate depletion method [in vitro half-life (t1/2) method] was chosen to determine CLint The assay (384-well format) consisted of three parts: 1) a robotic system for incubation and sample cleanup; 2) two different integrated, ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) platforms to determine the percent remaining of parent compound, and 3) an automated data analysis system. The CYP3A4 assay was evaluated using two long t1/2 compounds, carbamazepine and antipyrine (t1/2 > 30 minutes); one moderate t1/2 compound, ketoconazole (10 < t1/2 < 30 minutes); and two short t1/2 compounds, loperamide and buspirone (t½ < 10 minutes). Interday and intraday precision and accuracy of the assay were within acceptable range (∼12%) for the linear range observed. Using this assay, CYP3A4 CLint and t1/2 values for more than 3000 compounds were measured. This high-throughput, automated, and robust assay allows for rapid metabolic stability screening of large compound sets and enables advanced computational modeling for individual human P450 isozymes. PMID:27417180

  17. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  18. An Automated High-Throughput Metabolic Stability Assay Using an Integrated High-Resolution Accurate Mass Method and Automated Data Analysis Software

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pranav; Kerns, Edward; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Obach, R. Scott; Wang, Amy Q.; Zakharov, Alexey; McKew, John; Simeonov, Anton; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement of in silico tools would be enabled by the availability of data for metabolic reaction rates and intrinsic clearance (CLint) of a diverse compound structure data set by specific metabolic enzymes. Our goal is to measure CLint for a large set of compounds with each major human cytochrome P450 (P450) isozyme. To achieve our goal, it is of utmost importance to develop an automated, robust, sensitive, high-throughput metabolic stability assay that can efficiently handle a large volume of compound sets. The substrate depletion method [in vitro half-life (t1/2) method] was chosen to determine CLint. The assay (384-well format) consisted of three parts: 1) a robotic system for incubation and sample cleanup; 2) two different integrated, ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) platforms to determine the percent remaining of parent compound, and 3) an automated data analysis system. The CYP3A4 assay was evaluated using two long t1/2 compounds, carbamazepine and antipyrine (t1/2 > 30 minutes); one moderate t1/2 compound, ketoconazole (10 < t1/2 < 30 minutes); and two short t1/2 compounds, loperamide and buspirone (t½ < 10 minutes). Interday and intraday precision and accuracy of the assay were within acceptable range (∼12%) for the linear range observed. Using this assay, CYP3A4 CLint and t1/2 values for more than 3000 compounds were measured. This high-throughput, automated, and robust assay allows for rapid metabolic stability screening of large compound sets and enables advanced computational modeling for individual human P450 isozymes. PMID:27417180

  19. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2).

  20. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). PMID:24704185

  1. Feasibility of ultra-high performance liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for accurate determination of primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Calvarro, Sagrario; Fernández, Mario A; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates (PAEs) are ubiquitous toxic chemical compounds. During the last few years, some phthalate metabolites (MPAEs) have been proposed as appropriate biomarkers in human urine samples to determine PAE human intake and exposure. So, it is necessary to have fast, easy, robust and validated analytical methods to determine selected MPAEs in urine human samples. Two different instrumental methods based on gas (GC) and ultra-high performance liquid (UHPLC) chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) have been optimized, characterized and validated for the simultaneous determination of nine primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples. Both instrumental methods have similar sensitivity (detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 8.89 pg μL(-1) and from 0.06 to 0.49 pg μL(-1) in GC-MS and UHPLC-MS(2), respectively), precision (repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, which was lower than 8.4% in both systems, except for 5OH-MEHP in the case of GC-MS) and accuracy. But some advantages of the UHPLC-MS(2) method, such as more selectivity and lower time in the chromatographic runs (6.8 min vs. 28.5 min), have caused the UHPLC-MS(2) method to be chosen to analyze the twenty one human urine samples from the general Spanish population. Regarding these samples, MEP showed the highest median concentration (68.6 μg L(-1)), followed by MiBP (23.3 μg L(-1)), 5cx-MEPP (22.5 μg L(-1)) and MBP (19.3μgL(-1)). MMP (6.99 μg L(-1)), 5oxo-MEHP (6.15 μg L(-1)), 5OH-MEHP (5.30 μg L(-1)) and MEHP (4.40 μg L(-1)) showed intermediate levels. Finally, the lowest levels were found for MBzP (2.55 μg L(-1)). These data are within the same order of magnitude as those found in other similar populations. PMID:25467512

  2. Feasibility of ultra-high performance liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for accurate determination of primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Calvarro, Sagrario; Fernández, Mario A; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo; González, María José; Gómara, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates (PAEs) are ubiquitous toxic chemical compounds. During the last few years, some phthalate metabolites (MPAEs) have been proposed as appropriate biomarkers in human urine samples to determine PAE human intake and exposure. So, it is necessary to have fast, easy, robust and validated analytical methods to determine selected MPAEs in urine human samples. Two different instrumental methods based on gas (GC) and ultra-high performance liquid (UHPLC) chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) have been optimized, characterized and validated for the simultaneous determination of nine primary and secondary phthalate metabolites in urine samples. Both instrumental methods have similar sensitivity (detection limits ranged from 0.03 to 8.89 pg μL(-1) and from 0.06 to 0.49 pg μL(-1) in GC-MS and UHPLC-MS(2), respectively), precision (repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, which was lower than 8.4% in both systems, except for 5OH-MEHP in the case of GC-MS) and accuracy. But some advantages of the UHPLC-MS(2) method, such as more selectivity and lower time in the chromatographic runs (6.8 min vs. 28.5 min), have caused the UHPLC-MS(2) method to be chosen to analyze the twenty one human urine samples from the general Spanish population. Regarding these samples, MEP showed the highest median concentration (68.6 μg L(-1)), followed by MiBP (23.3 μg L(-1)), 5cx-MEPP (22.5 μg L(-1)) and MBP (19.3μgL(-1)). MMP (6.99 μg L(-1)), 5oxo-MEHP (6.15 μg L(-1)), 5OH-MEHP (5.30 μg L(-1)) and MEHP (4.40 μg L(-1)) showed intermediate levels. Finally, the lowest levels were found for MBzP (2.55 μg L(-1)). These data are within the same order of magnitude as those found in other similar populations.

  3. Size and concentration determination of (functionalised) fullerenes in surface and sewage water matrices using field flow fractionation coupled to an online accurate mass spectrometer: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Pol; Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Emke, Erik; Marcé, Rosa M; de Voogt, Pim

    2015-04-29

    In order to assess the environmental risks of a compound it is imperative to have suitable and reliable techniques for its determination in environmental matrices. In this paper, we focused on a method development for the recently introduced online coupling of a field flow fractionation (FFF) system to an Orbitrap-HRMS, that allows the simultaneous size and concentration determination of different aqueous fullerene aggregates and their concentrations in different size fractions. A 0.05% NH4OH solution in water was identified as the best carrier liquid for the analysis of the three different aqueous fullerene suspensions (C60 [60], [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester ([60]PCBM) and [6,6]-(bis)phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester ([60]bisPCBM)). The multi-angle light scattering (MALS) data received after employing the ammonia solution was consistent with both the theory and calibration using well defined Au and latex particles. The LODs obtained using Orbitrap HRMS detection were 0.1 μg L(-1) for an injection volume of 100 μL which are significantly better than the LODs obtained by using UV (20 μg L(-1)) and MALS detectors (5 μg L(-1)). However, these LODs can be further improved as in theory there is no limit to the amount of sample that can be injected into the FFF. Environmental samples (river and sewage water) were spiked with fullerenes and the fractograms obtained for these samples revealed that the matrix does affect the size of fullerene aggregates. Information on the size distribution can be useful for the risk assessment of these particles.

  4. Intuitive Physics of Free Fall: An Information Integration Approach to the Mass-Speed Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicovaro, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the intuitive physics of free fall was explored using Information Integration Theory and Functional Measurement. The participants had to rate the speed of objects differing in mass and height of release at the end of an imagined free fall. According to physics, falling speed increases with height of release but it is substantially…

  5. Mass Media and the Ego-Centric Predicament/The Trivialization of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambus, John

    The discussion in this paper is based on three conclusions drawn from a professional lifetime in the media: that limited to a choice from among information, persuasion, or entertainment, the purpose of the mass media is entertainment; that given a choice between technology and content, technology such as cable TV predominates; and that faced with…

  6. A national system for disseminating information on victims during mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Adini, Bruria; Peleg, Kobi; Cohen, Robert; Laor, Danny

    2010-04-01

    Immediate provision of information to the public is vital during mass casualty incidents (MCIs). Failure to implement rapidly a communication response system may result in the public overwhelming hospitals. This paper shares Israel's experience in developing and maintaining a national system for supplying information on the location and identification of casualties. ADAM interfaces online with hospitals' patient registration systems, and allows for immediate electronic transfer of designated data. The system permits information centres to access information on which hospital has admitted identified and unidentified casualties. The latter are photographed at the entrance to the hospital and the picture is stored in ADAM. The system enables hospitals and municipalities to ensure immediate availability and accessibility of information and thus (in our belief) mitigate the concerns of family and friends. Use of such an interface system is recommended as an integral element of emergency preparedness. PMID:20002707

  7. Surface mass variation monitoring from orbit information of GPS-tracked low-Earth orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, O.; Weigelt, M. L. B.; Zehentner, N.; Mayer-Gürr, T.; van Dam, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE inter-satellite observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for environmental studies. In order to bridge the likely gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects, we investigate the potential of gravity field information derived from orbit analysis for surface mass variation detection. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in the absence of GRACE. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the appropriate orbit characteristics for such an endeavour. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. In a first study, we assess the stand-alone capability of the Swarm mission for mass variation detection in a real-case environment. For this purpose, we ''approximate'' the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP constellation. In a second study, we incorporate tracking observations from a series of additional satellites (e.g., GOCE, MetOp, TanDEM-X, Swarm) and extend the length of the time series according to data availability. We will demonstrate to what extent these measures improve the inference of time-variable features from orbit information. For both studies, in the first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GPS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined time-variable gravity fields. Finally, we infer mass variation in selected areas from the gravity signal. These results are compared to the findings obtained from mass variation detection exploiting CSR-RL05 gravity fields (the latter serve as ''benchmark solutions'').

  8. DO QUASAR BROAD-LINE VELOCITY WIDTHS ADD ANY INFORMATION TO VIRIAL BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Croom, Scott M.

    2011-08-01

    We examine how much information measured broad-line widths add to virial black hole (BH) mass estimates for flux-limited samples of quasars. We do this by comparing the BH mass estimates to those derived by randomly reassigning the quasar broad-line widths to different objects and re-calculating the BH mass. For 9000 BH masses derived from the H{beta} line we find that the distributions of original and randomized BH masses in the M{sub BH}-redshift plane and the M{sub BH}-luminosity plane are formally identical. A two-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test does not find a difference at >90% confidence. For the Mg II line (32,000 quasars) we do find very significant differences between the randomized and original BH masses, but the amplitude of the difference is still small. The difference for the C IV line (14,000 quasars) is 2{sigma}-3{sigma} and again the amplitude of the difference is small. Subdividing the data into redshift and luminosity bins we find that the median absolute difference in BH mass between the original and randomized data is 0.025, 0.01, and 0.04 dex for H{beta}, Mg II, and C IV, respectively. The maximum absolute difference is always {<=}0.1 dex. We investigate whether our results are sensitive to corrections to Mg II virial masses, such as those suggested by Onken and Kollmeier. These corrections do not influence our results, other than to reduce the significance of the difference between original and randomized BH masses to only 1{sigma}-2{sigma} for Mg II. Moreover, we demonstrate that the correlation between mass residuals and Eddington ratio discussed by Onken and Kollmeier is more directly attributable to the slope of the relation between H{beta} and Mg II line width. The implication is that the measured quasar broad-line velocity widths provide little extra information, after allowing for the mean velocity width. In this case virial estimates are equivalent to M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sup {alpha}}, with L/L{sub Edd

  9. Fisher information for the position-dependent mass Schrödinger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, B. J.; Serrano, F. A.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the Fisher information for the position-dependent mass Schrödinger equation with hyperbolic potential V (x) = -V0csch2 (ax). The analysis of the quantum-mechanical probability for the ground and exited states (n = 0, 1, 2) has been obtained via the Fisher information. This controls both chemical and physical properties of some molecular systems. The Fisher information is considered only for x > 0 due to the singular point at x = 0. We found that Fisher-information-based uncertainty relation and the Cramer-Rao inequality holds. Some relevant numerical results are presented. The results presented show that the Cramer-Rao and the Heisenberg products in both spaces provide a natural measure for anharmonicity of -V0csch2 (ax).

  10. Boosting framework for mammographic mass classification with combination of CC and MLO view information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Hoe; Choi, Jae Young; Ro, Yong Man

    2013-02-01

    In breast cancer screening practice, radiologists compare multiple views during the interpretation of mammograms to detect breast cancers. Hence, it is natural that information derived from multiple mammograms can be used for computer-aided detection (CAD) system to obtain better sensitivity and/or specificity. However, similarity features derived from the combination of cranio-caudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views are weak for classifying masses, because a breast is elastic and deformable. In this study, therefore, a new mass classification with boosting algorithm is proposed, aiming to reduce FPs by combining the information of CC and MLO view mammograms. The proposed method has been developed under the following facts: (1) classifiers trained using similarity features are rather weak classifier; (2) boosting technique generates a single strong classifier by combining multiple weak classifiers. By combining the classifier ensemble framework with similarity features, we are able to improve mass classification performance in two-view analysis. In this study, 192 mammogram cases were collected from the public DDSM database (DB) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in terms of improving mass classification. Results show that our proposed classifier ensemble method can improve an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.7479, compared to the best single support vector machine (SVM) classifier using feature-level fusion (AUC of 0.7123). In addition, the weakness of similarity features is experimentally found to prove the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Neutrino mass limits: Robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Antonio J.; Niro, Viviana; Verde, Licia

    2016-09-01

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.37 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses is 0.38 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a ΛCDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.13 eV (0.14 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence on the power spectrum used. We also quantify the dependence of neutrino mass limit reported here on the CMB lensing information. The tighter upper limit (0.13 eV) obtained with SDSS-DR7 LRG is very close to that recently obtained using Lyman-alpha clustering data, yet uses a completely different probe and redshift range, further supporting the robustness of the constraint. This constraint puts under some pressure the inverted mass hierarchy and favours the normal hierarchy.

  12. The Boston Marathon Bombings Mass Casualty Incident: One Emergency Department's Information Systems Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam; Teich, Jonathan M; Pruitt, Peter; Moore, Samantha E; Theriault, Jennifer; Dorisca, Elizabeth; Harris, Sheila; Crim, Heidi; Lurie, Nicole; Goralnick, Eric

    2015-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) information systems are designed to support efficient and safe emergency care. These same systems often play a critical role in disasters to facilitate real-time situation awareness, information management, and communication. In this article, we describe one ED's experiences with ED information systems during the April 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. During postevent debriefings, staff shared that our ED information systems and workflow did not optimally support this incident; we found challenges with our unidentified patient naming convention, real-time situational awareness of patient location, and documentation of assessments, orders, and procedures. As a result, before our next mass gathering event, we changed our unidentified patient naming convention to more clearly distinguish multiple, simultaneous, unidentified patients. We also made changes to the disaster registration workflow and enhanced roles and responsibilities for updating electronic systems. Health systems should conduct disaster drills using their ED information systems to identify inefficiencies before an actual incident. ED information systems may require enhancements to better support disasters. Newer technologies, such as radiofrequency identification, could further improve disaster information management and communication but require careful evaluation and implementation into daily ED workflow.

  13. Accurate Optical Reference Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2006-08-01

    Current and near future all-sky astrometric catalogs on the ICRF are reviewed with the emphasis on reference star data at optical wavelengths for user applications. The standard error of a Hipparcos Catalogue star position is now about 15 mas per coordinate. For the Tycho-2 data it is typically 20 to 100 mas, depending on magnitude. The USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) observing program was completed in 2004 and reductions toward the final UCAC3 release are in progress. This all-sky reference catalogue will have positional errors of 15 to 70 mas for stars in the 10 to 16 mag range, with a high degree of completeness. Proper motions for the about 60 million UCAC stars will be derived by combining UCAC astrometry with available early epoch data, including yet unpublished scans of the complete set of AGK2, Hamburg Zone astrograph and USNO Black Birch programs. Accurate positional and proper motion data are combined in the Naval Observatory Merged Astrometric Dataset (NOMAD) which includes Hipparcos, Tycho-2, UCAC2, USNO-B1, NPM+SPM plate scan data for astrometry, and is supplemented by multi-band optical photometry as well as 2MASS near infrared photometry. The Milli-Arcsecond Pathfinder Survey (MAPS) mission is currently being planned at USNO. This is a micro-satellite to obtain 1 mas positions, parallaxes, and 1 mas/yr proper motions for all bright stars down to about 15th magnitude. This program will be supplemented by a ground-based program to reach 18th magnitude on the 5 mas level.

  14. Quantum information entropies for position-dependent mass Schrödinger problem

    SciTech Connect

    Yañez-Navarro, G.; Sun, Guo-Hua; Dytrych, T.; Launey, K.D.; Dong, Shi-Hai; Draayer, J.P.

    2014-09-15

    The Shannon entropy for the position-dependent Schrödinger equation for a particle with a nonuniform solitonic mass density is evaluated in the case of a trivial null potential. The position S{sub x} and momentum S{sub p} information entropies for the three lowest-lying states are calculated. In particular, for these states, we are able to derive analytical solutions for the S{sub x} entropy as well as for the Fourier transformed wave functions, while the S{sub p} quantity is calculated numerically. We notice the behavior of the S{sub x} entropy, namely, it decreases as the mass barrier width narrows and becomes negative beyond a particular width. The negative Shannon entropy exists for the probability densities that are highly localized. The mass barrier determines the stability of the system. The dependence of S{sub p} on the width is contrary to the one for S{sub x}. Some interesting features of the information entropy densities ρ{sub s}(x) and ρ{sub s}(p) are demonstrated. In addition, the Bialynicki-Birula–Mycielski (BBM) inequality is tested for a number of states and found to hold for all the cases.

  15. Importance of including small body spin effects in the modelling of intermediate mass-ratio inspirals. II. Accurate parameter extraction of strong sources using higher-order spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Brown, Duncan A.

    2012-03-01

    We improve the numerical kludge waveform model introduced in Huerta and Gair (2011) [E. A. Huerta and J. R. Gair, Phys. Rev. D 84, 064023 (2011).PRVDAQ1550-799810.1103/PhysRevD.84.064023] in two ways. We extend the equations of motion for spinning black hole binaries derived by Saijo et al. [M. Saijo, K. Maeda, M. Shibata, and Y. Mino, Phys. Rev. D 58, 064005 (1998).PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.58.064005] using spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings taken from perturbative and post-Newtonian (PN) calculations at the highest order available. We also include first-order conservative self-force corrections for spin-orbit and spin-spin couplings, which are derived by comparison to PN results. We generate the inspiral evolution using fluxes that include the most recent calculations of small body spin corrections, spin-spin, and spin-orbit couplings and higher-order fits to solutions of the Teukolsky equation. Using a simplified version of this model in [E. A. Huerta and J. R. Gair, Phys. Rev. D 84, 064023 (2011).PRVDAQ1550-799810.1103/PhysRevD.84.064023], we found that small body spin effects could be measured through gravitational-wave observations from intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) with mass ratio η≳10-3, when both binary components are rapidly rotating. In this paper, we present results of Monte Carlo simulations of parameter-estimation errors to study in detail how the spin of the small/big body affects parameter measurement using a variety of mass and spin combinations for typical IMRI sources. We have found that for IMRI events involving a moderately rotating intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) of mass 104M⊙ and a rapidly rotating central supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass 106M⊙, gravitational wave observations made with LISA at a signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 should be able to determine the inspiralling IMBH mass, the central SMBH mass, the SMBH spin magnitude, and the IMBH spin magnitude to within fractional errors of ˜10-3, 10-3, 10

  16. Mobile DIORAMA-II: infrastructure less information collection system for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Aura; Schafer, James M; Yang, Zhuorui; Yi, Jun; Lord, Graydon; Ciottone, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce DIORAMA-II system that provides real time information collection in mass casualty incidents. Using a mobile platform that includes active RFID tags and readers as well as Smartphones, the system can determine the location of victims and responders. The system provides user friendly multi dimensional user interfaces as well as collaboration tools between the responders and the incident commander. We conducted two simulated mass casualty incidents with 50 victims each and professional responders. DIORAMA-II significantly reduces the evacuation time by up to 43% when compared to paper based triage systems. All responders that participated in all trials were very satisfied. They felt in control of the incident and mentioned that the system significantly reduced their stress level during the incident. They all mentioned that they would use the system in an actual incident.

  17. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry Using the Vitek MS System for Rapid and Accurate Identification of Dermatophytes on Solid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Monnin, Valérie; Girard, Victoria; Welker, Martin; Arsac, Maud; Cellière, Béatrice; Durand, Géraldine; Bosshard, Philipp P.; Farina, Claudio; Passera, Marco; Van Belkum, Alex; Petrini, Orlando; Tonolla, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to extend the Vitek MS fungal knowledge base version 2.0.0 to allow the robust identification of clinically relevant dermatophytes, using a variety of strains, incubation times, and growth conditions. First, we established a quick and reliable method for sample preparation to obtain a reliable and reproducible identification independently of the growth conditions. The Vitek MS V2.0.0 fungal knowledge base was then expanded using 134 well-characterized strains belonging to 17 species in the genera Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. Cluster analysis based on mass spectrum similarity indicated good species discrimination independently of the culture conditions. We achieved a good separation of the subpopulations of the Trichophyton anamorph of Arthroderma benhamiae and of anthropophilic and zoophilic strains of Trichophyton interdigitale. Overall, the 1,130 mass spectra obtained for dermatophytes gave an estimated identification performance of 98.4%. The expanded fungal knowledge base was then validated using 131 clinical isolates of dermatophytes belonging to 13 taxa. For 8 taxa all strains were correctly identified, and for 3 the rate of successful identification was >90%; 75% (6/8) of the M. gypseum strains were correctly identified, whereas only 47% (18/38) of the African T. rubrum population (also called T. soudanense) were recognized accurately, with a large quantity of strains misidentified as T. violaceum, demonstrating the close relationship of these two taxa. The method of sample preparation was fast and efficient and the expanded Vitek MS fungal knowledge base reliable and robust, allowing reproducible dermatophyte identifications in the routine laboratory. PMID:25297329

  18. An optimized method for neurotransmitters and their metabolites analysis in mouse hypothalamus by high performance liquid chromatography-Q Exactive hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Lin; Li, Hui; Wang, Bing; Liu, Shu-Ying

    2016-02-15

    Neurotransmitters (NTs) and their metabolites are known to play an essential role in maintaining various physiological functions in nervous system. However, there are many difficulties in the detection of NTs together with their metabolites in biological samples. A new method for NTs and their metabolites detection by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q Exactive hybrid quadruple-orbitrap high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) was established in this paper. This method was a great development of the applying of Q Exactive MS in the quantitative analysis. This method enabled a rapid quantification of ten compounds within 18min. Good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient above 0.99. The concentration range of the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) level were 0.0008-0.05nmol/mL and 0.002-25.0nmol/mL respectively. Precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD) of this method were at 0.36-12.70%. Recovery ranges were between 81.83% and 118.04%. Concentrations of these compounds in mouse hypothalamus were detected by Q Exactive LC-MS technology with this method.

  19. Is mass media beneficial or not for the information of the general public?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.; Mosoia, C.

    2005-11-01

    The International Year of Physics reminds us, among other things, of the way in which Einstein became famous. In spite of all his remarkable scientific results, without the contribution of the press he would not have become so well known in the entire world as he was and continues to be after a century. And he is not the unique example of celebrity due to mass media (see Carl Sagan or Stephen Hawking). In 1969 the first man stepped on the Moon. It was maybe the first cosmic event, which became famous due to a live TV broadcast. Others followed, if we are to mention only the total solar eclipse of 1999 or Venus's transit of last year. Consequently, mass media can make a scientist famous, can also make an event understood and admired and can attract hundreds or maybe millions of people to science. The same mass media can also destroy a personality or an event. We shall give only two examples: the distrust of many people concerning the same Moon landing or the manipulation of millions of people by means of astrology. All this urges us to make a very thorough analysis of the way in which scientific information is communicated to the general public: well done, it can be beneficial; otherwise it may drive the new generations away from research, the understanding of the phenomena, the neglect of the environment and finally from the neglect and the destruction of our own planet.

  20. Student Information Systems Demystified: The Increasing Demand for Accurate, Timely Data Means Schools and Districts Are Relying Heavily on SIS Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Student information systems, one of the first applications of computer technology in education, are undergoing a significant transition yet again. The first major shift in SIS technologies occurred about 15 years ago when they evolved from mainframe programs to client-server solutions. Now, vendors across the board are offering centralized…

  1. Breast mass detection in tomosynthesis projection images using information-theoretic similarity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Swatee; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to study Computer Aided Detection (CADe) of breast masses for digital tomosynthesis. It is believed that tomosynthesis will show improvement over conventional mammography in detection and characterization of breast masses by removing overlapping dense fibroglandular tissue. This study used the 60 human subject cases collected as part of on-going clinical trials at Duke University. Raw projections images were used to identify suspicious regions in the algorithm's high-sensitivity, low-specificity stage using a Difference of Gaussian (DoG) filter. The filtered images were thresholded to yield initial CADe hits that were then shifted and added to yield a 3D distribution of suspicious regions. These were further summed in the depth direction to yield a flattened probability map of suspicious hits for ease of scoring. To reduce false positives, we developed an algorithm based on information theory where similarity metrics were calculated using knowledge databases consisting of tomosynthesis regions of interest (ROIs) obtained from projection images. We evaluated 5 similarity metrics to test the false positive reduction performance of our algorithm, specifically joint entropy, mutual information, Jensen difference divergence, symmetric Kullback-Liebler divergence, and conditional entropy. The best performance was achieved using the joint entropy similarity metric, resulting in ROC A z of 0.87 +/- 0.01. As a whole, the CADe system can detect breast masses in this data set with 79% sensitivity and 6.8 false positives per scan. In comparison, the original radiologists performed with only 65% sensitivity when using mammography alone, and 91% sensitivity when using tomosynthesis alone.

  2. Incorporating peak grouping information for alignment of multiple liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry datasets

    PubMed Central

    Wandy, Joe; Daly, Rónán; Breitling, Rainer; Rogers, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been widely used for large-scale comparative studies in systems biology, including proteomics, glycomics and metabolomics. In almost all experimental design, it is necessary to compare chromatograms across biological or technical replicates and across sample groups. Central to this is the peak alignment step, which is one of the most important but challenging preprocessing steps. Existing alignment tools do not take into account the structural dependencies between related peaks that coelute and are derived from the same metabolite or peptide. We propose a direct matching peak alignment method for LC/MS data that incorporates related peaks information (within each LC/MS run) and investigate its effect on alignment performance (across runs). The groupings of related peaks necessary for our method can be obtained from any peak clustering method and are built into a pair-wise peak similarity score function. The similarity score matrix produced is used by an approximation algorithm for the weighted matching problem to produce the actual alignment result. Results: We demonstrate that related peak information can improve alignment performance. The performance is evaluated on a set of benchmark datasets, where our method performs competitively compared to other popular alignment tools. Availability: The proposed alignment method has been implemented as a stand-alone application in Python, available for download at http://github.com/joewandy/peak-grouping-alignment. Contact: Simon.Rogers@glasgow.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25649621

  3. Use of Ga for mass bias correction for the accurate determination of copper isotope ratio in the NIST SRM 3114 Cu standard and geological samples by MC-ICP MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Zhou, L.; Tong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The absolute determination of the Cu isotope ratio in NIST SRM 3114 based on a regression mass bias correction model is performed for the first time with NIST SRM 944 Ga as the calibrant. A value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for the 65Cu/63Cu ratio was obtained with a value of +0.18±0.04 ‰ (2SD, n=5) for δ65Cu relative to NIST 976.The availability of the NIST SRM 3114 material, now with the absolute value of the 65Cu/63Cu ratio and a δ65Cu value relative to NIST 976 makes it suitable as a new candidate reference material for Cu isotope studies. In addition, a protocol is described for the accurate and precise determination of δ65Cu values of geological reference materials. Purification of Cu from the sample matrix was performed using the AG MP-1M Bio-Rad resin. The column recovery for geological samples was found to be 100±2% (2SD, n=15).A modified method of standard-sample bracketing with internal normalization for mass bias correction was employed by adding natural Ga to both the sample and the solution of NIST SRM 3114, which was used as the bracketing standard. An absolute value of 0.4471±0.0013 (2SD, n=37) for 65Cu/63Cu quantified in this study was used to calibrate the 69Ga/71Ga ratio in the two adjacent bracketing standards of SRM 3114,their average value of 69Ga/71Ga was then used to correct the 65Cu/63Cu ratio in the sample. Measured δ65Cu values of 0.18±0.04‰ (2SD, n=20),0.13±0.04‰ (2SD, n=9),0.08±0.03‰ (2SD, n=6),0.01±0.06‰(2SD, n=4) and 0.26±0.04‰ (2SD, n=7) were obtained for five geological reference materials of BCR-2,BHVO-2,AGV-2,BIR-1a,and GSP-2,respectively,in agreement with values obtained in previous studies.

  4. Accurate quantification of mercapturic acids of styrene (PHEMAs) in human urine with direct sample injection using automated column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reska, M; Ochsmann, E; Kraus, T; Schettgen, T

    2010-08-01

    Styrene is one of the most important industrial chemicals, with an enormously high production volume worldwide. The urinary mercapturic acids of its metabolite styrene-7,8-oxide, namely N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl)-L-cysteine (PHEMA 1) and N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)-L-cysteine (PHEMA 2), are specific biomarkers for the determination of individual internal exposure to this highly reactive intermediate of styrene. We have developed and validated a fast, specific and very sensitive method for the accurate determination of the sum of phenylhydroxyethyl mercapturic acids (PHEMAs) in human urine with an automated multidimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using (13)C(6)-labelled PHEMAs as internal standards. Analytes were stripped from the urinary matrix by online extraction on a restricted access material, transferred to the analytical column and subsequently determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification (LOQ) for the sum of PHEMAs was 0.3 microg/L urine and allowed us to quantify the background exposure of the (smoking) general population. Precision within series and between series ranged from 1.5 to 6.8% at three concentrations ranging from 3 to 30 microg/L urine; the mean accuracy was between 104 and 110%. We applied the method to spot urine samples from 40 subjects of the general population with no known occupational exposure to styrene. The median levels (range) for the sum of PHEMAs in urine of non-smokers (n = 22) were less than 0.3 microg/L (less than 0.3 to 1.1 microg/L), whereas in urine of smokers (n = 18), the median levels were 0.46 microg/L (less than 0.3 to 2.8 microg/L). Smokers showed a significantly higher excretion of the sum of PHEMAs (p = 0.02). Owing to its automation and high sensitivity, our method is well suited for application in occupational or environmental studies.

  5. Chemical profiling and quantification of monacolins and citrinin in red yeast rice commercial raw materials and dietary supplements using liquid chromatography-accurate QToF mass spectrometry: Chemometrics application.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Cohen, Pieter A; Wang, Yan-Hong; Sagi, Satyanarayanaraju; Feng, Wei; Wang, Mei; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Shuangcheng, Ma; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-11-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR) is prepared by fermenting rice with various strains of the yeast Monascus spp of the Aspergillaceae family. Depending on the Monascus strains and the fermentation conditions, the products may contain monacolins, pigments and citrinin as secondary metabolites. Authentic and commercial RYR samples were analyzed using UHPLC-DAD-QToF-MS for monacolins, pigments and citrinin. A separation by UHPLC was achieved using a reversed-phase column and a gradient of water/acetonitrile each containing formic acid as the mobile phase. Accurate mass QToF spectrometry was used to distinguish isobaric monacolins. Principle component analysis (PCA), a chemometric technique was used to discriminate between authentic RYR, commercial RYR raw materials and dietary supplements. Three authentic RYR samples, 31 commercial RYR raw materials and 14 RYR dietary supplements were analyzed. Monacolin K content in 600mg of authentic RYR samples ranged from 1.2mg to 1.38mg. Amounts of monacolin K in dietary supplements labeled as containing 600mg of RYR varied more than 40-fold from 0.03mg to 2.18mg. Monacolin K content of dietary supplements labeled as containing 1200mg RYR varied more than 20-fold from 0.22mg to 5.23mg. In addition to large variations in quantity of monacolin K found in dietary supplements, RYR dietary supplements contained ratios of monacolins that differed significantly from authentic samples. The results indicated that RYR commercial products are of variable quality and the analytical method is suitable for quality control testing of a variety of RYR products.

  6. Surrogate markers of visceral adiposity in young adults: waist circumference and body mass index are more accurate than waist hip ratio, model of adipose distribution and visceral adiposity index.

    PubMed

    Borruel, Susana; Moltó, José F; Alpañés, Macarena; Fernández-Durán, Elena; Álvarez-Blasco, Francisco; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2014-01-01

    Surrogate indexes of visceral adiposity, a major risk factor for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, are routinely used in clinical practice because objective measurements of visceral adiposity are expensive, may involve exposure to radiation, and their availability is limited. We compared several surrogate indexes of visceral adiposity with ultrasound assessment of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue depots in 99 young Caucasian adults, including 20 women without androgen excess, 53 women with polycystic ovary syndrome, and 26 men. Obesity was present in 7, 21, and 7 subjects, respectively. We obtained body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), model of adipose distribution (MOAD), visceral adiposity index (VAI), and ultrasound measurements of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue depots and hepatic steatosis. WC and BMI showed the strongest correlations with ultrasound measurements of visceral adiposity. Only WHR correlated with sex hormones. Linear stepwise regression models including VAI were only slightly stronger than models including BMI or WC in explaining the variability in the insulin sensitivity index (yet BMI and WC had higher individual standardized coefficients of regression), and these models were superior to those including WHR and MOAD. WC showed 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.88-0.99) and BMI showed 0.91 (0.85-0.98) probability of identifying the presence of hepatic steatosis according to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. In conclusion, WC and BMI not only the simplest to obtain, but are also the most accurate surrogate markers of visceral adiposity in young adults, and are good indicators of insulin resistance and powerful predictors of the presence of hepatic steatosis.

  7. Mass Customization Production Planning System by Advance Demand Information Based on Unfulfilled-order-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Masaya; Okuhara, Koji

    In this paper, we try to model for ‘Naiji System’ which is a unique corporation between a maker and suppliers in Japan. We propose Mass Customization Production Planning & Management System (MCPS) based on unfulfilled-order-rate by using Advance Demand Information, which is called ‘Naiji’. This model is formulated as a nonlinear stochastic programming problem which minimizes the sum of production cost and inventory holding cost subject to the set of probabilistic constraint and some linear production constraints. We propose the new upper bound SOn (ρmin) to estimate the unfulfilled-order-rate more strictly. The procedure to find a good solution is developed by solving the linear programming problem repeatedly on the basic solution strategy that is ‘relaxation’. A computational load to obtain a solution by the proposed indicator is shown to be very small. Finally, an availability of the procedure is shown.

  8. New information technology tools for a medical command system for mass decontamination.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Akira; Okumura, Tetsu; Hagiwara, Jun; Tanabe, Tomohide; Fukuda, Reo; Masuno, Tomohiko; Mimura, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kaname; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    In a mass decontamination during a nuclear, biological, or chemical (NBC) response, the capability to command, control, and communicate is crucial for the proper flow of casualties at the scene and their subsequent evacuation to definitive medical facilities. Information Technology (IT) tools can be used to strengthen medical control, command, and communication during such a response. Novel IT tools comprise a vehicle-based, remote video camera and communication network systems. During an on-site verification event, an image from a remote video camera system attached to the personal protective garment of a medical responder working in the warm zone was transmitted to the on-site Medical Commander for aid in decision making. Similarly, a communication network system was used for personnel at the following points: (1) the on-site Medical Headquarters; (2) the decontamination hot zone; (3) an on-site coordination office; and (4) a remote medical headquarters of a local government office. A specially equipped, dedicated vehicle was used for the on-site medical headquarters, and facilitated the coordination with other agencies. The use of these IT tools proved effective in assisting with the medical command and control of medical resources and patient transport decisions during a mass-decontamination exercise, but improvements are required to overcome transmission delays and camera direction settings, as well as network limitations in certain areas.

  9. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    PubMed

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  10. PROGRESS OF THE AVNG SYSTEM - ATTRIBUTE VERIFICATION SYSTEM WITH INFORMATION BARRIERS FOR MASS AND ISOTOPICS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Budnikov, D; Bulatov, M; Jarikhine, I; Lebedev, B; Livke, A; Modenov, A; Morkin, A; Razinkov, S; Safronov, S; Tsaregorodtsev, D; Vlokh, A; Yakovleva, S; Elmont, T; Langner, D; MacArthur, D; Mayo, D; Smith, M; Luke, S J

    2005-05-27

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency {at} 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC{sup PLUS}. The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 {sup 3}He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  11. Progress of the AVNG System - Attribute Verification System with Information Barriers for Mass Isotopics Measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Budnikov, D.; Bulatov, M.; Jarikhine, I.; Lebedev, B.; Livke, A.; Modenov, A.; Morkin, A.; Razinkov, S.; Tsaregorodtsev, D.; Vlokh, A.; Yakovleva, S.; Elmont, T. H.; Langner, D. C.; MacArthur, D. W.; Mayo, D. R.; Smith, M. K.; Luke, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency @ 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC{sup PLUS}. The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 {sup 3}He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  12. The Mass of Graviton and Its Relation to the Number of Information according to the Holographic Principle

    PubMed Central

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relation of the mass of the graviton to the number of information N in a flat universe. As a result we find that the mass of the graviton scales as mgr∝1/N. Furthermore, we find that the number of gravitons contained inside the observable horizon is directly proportional to the number of information N; that is, Ngr ∝ N. Similarly, the total mass of gravitons that exist in the universe is proportional to the number of information N; that is, Mgr∝N. In an effort to establish a relation between the graviton mass and the basic parameters of the universe, we find that the mass of the graviton is simply twice the Hubble mass mH as it is defined by Gerstein et al. (2003), times the square root of the quantity q − 1/2, where q is the deceleration parameter of the universe. In relation to the geometry of the universe we find that the mass of the graviton varies according to the relation mgr∝Rsc, and therefore mgr obviously controls the geometry of the space time through a deviation of the geodesic spheres from the spheres of Euclidean metric. PMID:27433513

  13. The Mass of Graviton and Its Relation to the Number of Information according to the Holographic Principle.

    PubMed

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relation of the mass of the graviton to the number of information N in a flat universe. As a result we find that the mass of the graviton scales as [Formula: see text]. Furthermore, we find that the number of gravitons contained inside the observable horizon is directly proportional to the number of information N; that is, N gr ∝ N. Similarly, the total mass of gravitons that exist in the universe is proportional to the number of information N; that is, [Formula: see text]. In an effort to establish a relation between the graviton mass and the basic parameters of the universe, we find that the mass of the graviton is simply twice the Hubble mass m H as it is defined by Gerstein et al. (2003), times the square root of the quantity q - 1/2, where q is the deceleration parameter of the universe. In relation to the geometry of the universe we find that the mass of the graviton varies according to the relation [Formula: see text], and therefore m gr obviously controls the geometry of the space time through a deviation of the geodesic spheres from the spheres of Euclidean metric. PMID:27433513

  14. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  15. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  16. Variation in social information use: the influences of information reliability and mass on decision making in a group-living fish Gambusia affinis.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, E R; Hamilton, I M

    2013-06-01

    The effect of the reliability of available social information was assessed by examining whether the age of social information changes its effects on a foraging decision in a group-living fish Gambusia affinis. Individuals switched their patch preference when faced with social information that conflicted with personal information in general; the age of the social information, however, did not significantly influence preference for feeding patch. The mass of decision makers was positively correlated with their use of available social information, with heavier individuals exhibiting a greater difference in patch preference than lighter individuals, suggesting that large and small G. affinis trade-off the benefits of information acquisition and the costs of competition from conspecifics differently.

  17. Estimation of volcanic ash emissions with satellite data: The inclusion of mass loading and plume height information in modified 4D-Var

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Sha; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Fu, Guangliang

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic ash forecasting is a critical tool in hazard assessment and operational volcano monitoring. Emission parameters such as injection height, total emission mass and vertical distribution of the emission plume rate are essential and important in the implementation of volcanic ash models. Satellite instrument is a powerful tool to monitor volcanic aerosol evolution and satellite total-column data has been integrated in the modeling process to achieve a better initial condition for the forecasting. However, the use of total-column data,which has no vertical resolution, usually leads to an ill-conditioned problem and ineffective estimation of emission parameters. Fortunately, techniques to retrieve the information of total ash mass loading and injection height from satellite data has been developed recently. It provides a new possibility to increase the accuracy of estimation results by integrating them into data assimilation systems. In this work we propose a modified 4D-Var approach which seek the vertical emission distribution by observing ash cloud transport patterns from satellite total-ash-columns data, and two ways of including the information of mass loading and plume height in the assimilation process. The modified 4D-Var based on trajectory statistics forms a reformulated cost function which computes the total difference between observed ash columns and a linear combination of simulated ensemble columns coupled with a priori emission knowledge ('background' term). The ensembles are generated by a volcanic ash transport model with the tracer released form different layers. Experiment shows such straightforward method does not always guarantee the identification of injection height with a short assimilation time window, and additional information of injection height is needed to correct the solution. We propose two tricks to incorporate the information: 1. add extra terms containing the information to the cost function as restriction term; 2. generate a

  18. Mass Customization Production Planning System by Advance Demand Information Based on Unfulfilled-order-rate II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Nobuyuki; Kadomoto, Kiyotaka; Okuhara, Koji

    In the previous paper, we proposed Mass Customization Production Planning & Management System (MCPS) based on unfulfilled-order-rate by using Advance Demand Information which is called ‘Naiji System’ as an unique corporation between a maker and suppliers in Japan, and 3 indicators to estimate the unfulfilled-order-rate. Applying these indicators to the model, we investigated the behavior of unfulfilled-order-rate at the final period in the planning horizon. In this paper, we propose a new model for purchasing, and investigate the unfulfilled-order-rate at each period and the impact to the total inventory. We find that the total inventories become 5.9%-20.0% decreases by using SOn rather than by using SOn(0). And we enhance a base-stock policy to a new one with multi-period. We prove that the MCPS model for purchasing by using SOn(0) is equivalent to the base-stock policy with multi-period under the specified condition. Under this condition, the proposed model by using SOn decreases inventories more than the base-stock policy with multi-period.

  19. A Novel and Intuitive Method of Displaying and Interacting with Mass Difference Information: Application to Oligonucleotide Drug Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussis, Stilianos G.

    2015-07-01

    A new method is presented for determining relationships between components in complex analytical systems. The method uses the mass differences between peaks in high resolution electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra. It relates peaks that share common mass differences. The method is based on the fundamental assumption that peaks in the spectra having the same exact mass difference are related by the same chemical moiety/substructure. Moreover, the presence (or absence/loss) of the same chemical moiety from a series of molecules may reflect similarities in the mechanisms of formation of each molecule. The determined mass differences in the spectra are used to automatically differentiate the types of components in the samples. Contour plots and summary plots of the summed total ion signal as a function of the mass difference are generated, which form powerful tools for the rapid and automated determination of the components in the samples and for comparisons with other samples. For the first time, in this work a unique profile contour plot has been developed that permits the interactive interrogation of the mass range by mass difference data matrix to obtain valuable information about components that share a common mechanism of formation, and all possible mechanisms of formation linked to a selected precursor molecule. The method can be used as an additional and complementary method to the existing analytical methods to determine relationships between components in complex chemical systems.

  20. Global surface density of water mass variations by using a two-step inversion by cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frédéric; Seoane, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission, these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrological mass changes is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources is composed of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics lower than 2). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~100,000 km x km (or equivalently 330 km by 330 km) are defined to be of equal areas over the terrestrial sphere. However they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of improving time and space resolutions for ocean and land studies that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  1. Accurate quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    An important goal of quantum chemical calculations is to provide an understanding of chemical bonding and molecular electronic structure. A second goal, the prediction of energy differences to chemical accuracy, has been much harder to attain. First, the computational resources required to achieve such accuracy are very large, and second, it is not straightforward to demonstrate that an apparently accurate result, in terms of agreement with experiment, does not result from a cancellation of errors. Recent advances in electronic structure methodology, coupled with the power of vector supercomputers, have made it possible to solve a number of electronic structure problems exactly using the full configuration interaction (FCI) method within a subspace of the complete Hilbert space. These exact results can be used to benchmark approximate techniques that are applicable to a wider range of chemical and physical problems. The methodology of many-electron quantum chemistry is reviewed. Methods are considered in detail for performing FCI calculations. The application of FCI methods to several three-electron problems in molecular physics are discussed. A number of benchmark applications of FCI wave functions are described. Atomic basis sets and the development of improved methods for handling very large basis sets are discussed: these are then applied to a number of chemical and spectroscopic problems; to transition metals; and to problems involving potential energy surfaces. Although the experiences described give considerable grounds for optimism about the general ability to perform accurate calculations, there are several problems that have proved less tractable, at least with current computer resources, and these and possible solutions are discussed.

  2. Achievement of Specificational Information Usage with True and False Feedback in Learning a Visual Relative-Mass Discrimination Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runeson, Sverker; Andersson, Isabell E. K.

    2007-01-01

    Participants' usage of informational variables in learning visual relative-mass discrimination in collisions was tracked by means of PROBIT correlations. Four groups received feedback that was true or accorded with either of three nonspecificational cue variables. A majority in each group adopted the feedback, but several participants defied the…

  3. Global surface mass time variations by using a two-step inversion for cumulating daily satellite gravity information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, Guillaume; Frappart, Frappart; Seoane, Lucia

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method to produce time series of global maps of surface mass variations by progressive integration of daily geopotential variations measured by orbiting satellites. In the case of the GRACE mission (2002 - 2012), these geopotential variations can be determined from very accurate inter-satellite K-Band Range Rate (KBRR) measurements of 5-second daily orbits. In particular, the along-track gravity contribution of hydrology is extracted by removing de-aliasing models for static field, atmosphere, oceans mass variations (including periodical tides), as well as polar movements. Our determination of surface mass sources consists of two successive dependent Kalman filter stages. The first one consists of reducing the satellite-based potential anomalies by adjusting the longest spatial wavelengths (i.e., low-degree spherical harmonics less than 5-6). In the second stage, the residual potential anomalies from the previous stage are used to recover surface mass density changes - in terms of Equivalent-Water Height (EWH) - over a global network of juxtaposed triangular elements. These surface tiles of ~40,000 km x km are imposed to be identical and homogeneously-distributed over the terrestrial sphere, however they can be adapted to the local geometry of the surface mass. Our global approach was tested by inverting simulated hydrology-related geopotential data, and successfully applied to estimate time-varying surface mass densities from real GRACE-based residuals. This strategy of combined Kalman filter-type inversions can also be useful for exploring the possibility of reaching better time and space resolutions for hydrology, that would be hopefully brought by future low altitude geodetic missions.

  4. Accurate and Accidental Empathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Michael

    The author offers two controversial criticisms of what are rapidly becoming standard assessment procedures for the measurement of empathic skill. First, he asserts that assessment procedures which attend exclusively to the accuracy with which subjects are able to characterize other people's feelings provide little or no useful information about…

  5. AIDS-related information exposure in the mass media and discussion within social networks among married women in Bombay, India.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, N

    1999-08-01

    Married women are at high risk of acquiring HIV infection in India and health education remains the most feasible preventive tool in their context. In a survey conducted among 350 married women in Bombay, it was found that a majority had acquired information about AIDS from the mass media, especially television. Although 87% of women who knew of AIDS had been exposed to AIDS-related information in the mass media in the past four weeks, only 57% had discussed it within their social networks. Those with more exposure to AIDS information in the mass media were significantly more likely to discuss AIDS within social networks. The women were most likely to discuss AIDS with their husbands as a general social issue, followed by friends and family members and least likely to talk to husbands about AIDS as a personal issue relating to their sexual relationship. Increased frequency and duration of AIDS messages on television will have a positive influence on AIDS knowledge in this group.

  6. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793,...

  7. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793,...

  8. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793,...

  9. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793,...

  10. 26 CFR 1.168(f)(8)-1T - Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe-harbor lease information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). 1.168(f)(8)-1T Section 1.168(f)(8)-1T Internal Revenue... information returns concerning qualified mass commuting vehicles (temporary). In general. Form 6793,...

  11. Processing of Mass/Count Information in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taler, Vanessa; Jarema, Gonia

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the processing of a specific linguistic distinction, the mass/count distinction, in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fourteen AD and 10 MCI subjects were tested using a sentence grammaticality judgement task where grammaticality violations were caused by determiner--noun…

  12. Differential Patterns of Information Acquisition from the Mass Media: The Effects of Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genova, B.K.L.

    The purpose of this study was to compare subjects' degree of interest with educational level to determine the better predictor of knowledge acquired from the mass media. Interest in and knowledge about two topics (impeachment and the National Football League strike) were determined from a 1974 survey of 253 adults. Knowledge was measured in terms…

  13. High-Precision Tungsten Isotopic Analysis by Multicollection Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Based on Simultaneous Measurement of W and (18)O/(16)O Isotope Ratios for Accurate Fractionation Correction.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne; Touboul, Mathieu; Walker, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Determination of the (182)W/(184)W ratio to a precision of ± 5 ppm (2σ) is desirable for constraining the timing of core formation and other early planetary differentiation processes. However, WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry normally results in a residual correlation between the instrumental-mass-fractionation-corrected (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W ratios that is attributed to mass-dependent variability of O isotopes over the course of an analysis and between different analyses. A second-order correction using the (183)W/(184)W ratio relies on the assumption that this ratio is constant in nature. This may prove invalid, as has already been realized for other isotope systems. The present study utilizes simultaneous monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O and W isotope ratios to correct oxide interferences on a per-integration basis and thus avoid the need for a double normalization of W isotopes. After normalization of W isotope ratios to a pair of W isotopes, following the exponential law, no residual W-O isotope correlation is observed. However, there is a nonideal mass bias residual correlation between (182)W/(i)W and (183)W/(i)W with time. Without double normalization of W isotopes and on the basis of three or four duplicate analyses, the external reproducibility per session of (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W normalized to (186)W/(183)W is 5-6 ppm (2σ, 1-3 μg loads). The combined uncertainty per session is less than 4 ppm for (183)W/(184)W and less than 6 ppm for (182)W/(184)W (2σm) for loads between 3000 and 50 ng.

  14. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-10-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  15. Accurate maser positions for MALT-45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2013-04-01

    MALT-45 is an untargeted survey, mapping the Galactic plane in CS (1-0), Class I methanol masers, SiO masers and thermal emission, and high frequency continuum emission. After obtaining images from the survey, a number of masers were detected, but without accurate positions. This project seeks to resolve each maser and its environment, with the ultimate goal of placing the Class I methanol maser into a timeline of high mass star formation.

  16. Acquiring Structural Information on Virus Particles with Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keifer, David Z.; Motwani, Tina; Teschke, Carolyn M.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2016-06-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is a single-molecule technique particularly well-suited to measuring the mass and charge distributions of heterogeneous, MDa-sized ions. In this work, CDMS has been used to analyze the assembly products of two coat protein variants of bacteriophage P22. The assembly products show broad mass distributions extending from 5 to 15 MDa for A285Y and 5 to 25 MDa for A285T coat protein variants. Because the charge of large ions generated by electrospray ionization depends on their size, the charge can be used to distinguish hollow shells from more compact structures. A285T was found to form T = 4 and T = 7 procapsids, and A285Y makes a small number of T = 3 and T = 4 procapsids. Owing to the decreased stability of the A285Y and A285T particles, chemical cross-linking was required to stabilize them for electrospray CDMS. Graphical Abstract[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Binomial probability distribution model-based protein identification algorithm for tandem mass spectrometry utilizing peak intensity information.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chuan-Le; Chen, Xiao-Zhou; Du, Yang-Li; Sun, Xuesong; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become one of the most important technologies in proteomic analysis. Tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a major tool for the analysis of peptide mixtures from protein samples. The key step of MS data processing is the identification of peptides from experimental spectra by searching public sequence databases. Although a number of algorithms to identify peptides from MS/MS data have been already proposed, e.g. Sequest, OMSSA, X!Tandem, Mascot, etc., they are mainly based on statistical models considering only peak-matches between experimental and theoretical spectra, but not peak intensity information. Moreover, different algorithms gave different results from the same MS data, implying their probable incompleteness and questionable reproducibility. We developed a novel peptide identification algorithm, ProVerB, based on a binomial probability distribution model of protein tandem mass spectrometry combined with a new scoring function, making full use of peak intensity information and, thus, enhancing the ability of identification. Compared with Mascot, Sequest, and SQID, ProVerB identified significantly more peptides from LC-MS/MS data sets than the current algorithms at 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) and provided more confident peptide identifications. ProVerB is also compatible with various platforms and experimental data sets, showing its robustness and versatility. The open-source program ProVerB is available at http://bioinformatics.jnu.edu.cn/software/proverb/ .

  18. Accurately Mapping M31's Microlensing Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2004-07-01

    We propose to augment an existing microlensing survey of M31 with source identifications provided by a modest amount of ACS {and WFPC2 parallel} observations to yield an accurate measurement of the masses responsible for microlensing in M31, and presumably much of its dark matter. The main benefit of these data is the determination of the physical {or "einstein"} timescale of each microlensing event, rather than an effective {"FWHM"} timescale, allowing masses to be determined more than twice as accurately as without HST data. The einstein timescale is the ratio of the lensing cross-sectional radius and relative velocities. Velocities are known from kinematics, and the cross-section is directly proportional to the {unknown} lensing mass. We cannot easily measure these quantities without knowing the amplification, hence the baseline magnitude, which requires the resolution of HST to find the source star. This makes a crucial difference because M31 lens m ass determinations can be more accurate than those towards the Magellanic Clouds through our Galaxy's halo {for the same number of microlensing events} due to the better constrained geometry in the M31 microlensing situation. Furthermore, our larger survey, just completed, should yield at least 100 M31 microlensing events, more than any Magellanic survey. A small amount of ACS+WFPC2 imaging will deliver the potential of this large database {about 350 nights}. For the whole survey {and a delta-function mass distribution} the mass error should approach only about 15%, or about 6% error in slope for a power-law distribution. These results will better allow us to pinpoint the lens halo fraction, and the shape of the halo lens spatial distribution, and allow generalization/comparison of the nature of halo dark matter in spiral galaxies. In addition, we will be able to establish the baseline magnitude for about 50, 000 variable stars, as well as measure an unprecedentedly deta iled color-magnitude diagram and luminosity

  19. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data.

  20. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data. PMID:23710630

  1. Photodissociation dynamics of ethanethiol in clusters: complementary information from velocity map imaging, mass spectrometry and calculations.

    PubMed

    Svrčková, Pavla; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Poterya, Viktoriya; Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2015-10-21

    We investigate the solvent effects on photodissociation dynamics of the S-H bond in ethanethiol CH3CH2SH (EtSH). The H fragment images are recorded by velocity map imaging (VMI) at 243 nm in various expansion regimes ranging from isolated molecules to clusters of different sizes and compositions. The VMI experiment is accompanied by electron ionization mass spectrometry using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS). The experimental data are interpreted using ab initio calculations. The direct S-H bond fission results in a peak of fast fragments at Ekin(H) ≈ 1.25 eV with a partly resolved structure corresponding to vibrational levels of the CH3CH2S cofragment. Clusters of different nature ranging from dimers to large (EtSH)N, N ≥ 10, clusters and to ethanethiol clusters embedded in larger argon "snowballs" are investigated. In the clusters a sharp peak of near-zero kinetic energy fragments occurs due to the caging. The dynamics of the fragment caging is pictured theoretically, using multi-reference ab initio theory for the ethanethiol dimer. The larger cluster character is revealed by the simultaneous analysis of the VMI and RTOFMS experiments; none of these tools alone can provide the complete picture. PMID:25743944

  2. INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2012-11-10

    The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

  3. Fast and accurate determination of sites along the FUT2 in vitro transcript that are accessible to antisense oligonucleotides by application of secondary structure predictions and RNase H in combination with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Angelika; Krebs, Stefan; Seichter, Doris; Förster, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Alteration of gene expression by use of antisense oligonucleotides has considerable potential for therapeutic purposes and scientific studies. Although applied for almost 25 years, this technique is still associated with difficulties in finding antisense-effective regions along the target mRNA. This is mainly due to strong secondary structures preventing binding of antisense oligonucleotides and RNase H, playing a major role in antisense-mediated degradation of the mRNA. These difficulties make empirical testing of a large number of sequences complementary to various sites in the target mRNA a very lengthy and troublesome procedure. To overcome this problem, more recent strategies to find efficient antisense sites are based on secondary structure prediction and RNase H-dependent mechanisms. We were the first who directly combined these two strategies; antisense oligonucleotides complementary to predicted unpaired target mRNA regions were designed and hybridized to the corresponding RNAs. Incubation with RNase H led to cleavage of the RNA at the respective hybridization sites. Analysis of the RNA fragments by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, which has not been used in this context before, allowed exact determination of the cleavage site. Thus the technique described here is very promising when searching for effective antisense sites. PMID:12888531

  4. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-28

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  5. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-01

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  6. Application of Peptide LC Retention Time Information in a Discriminant Function for Peptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, Eric F.; Kangas, Lars J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Mottaz, Heather M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-09

    We describe the application of a peptide retention time reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) prediction model previously reported (Petritis et al. Anal. Chem. 99, 2002, 11049) for improved peptide identification. The model uses peptide sequence information to generate a theoretical (predicted) elution time that can be compared with the observed elution time. Using data from a set of known proteins, the retention time parameter was incorporated into a discriminant function for use with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data analyzed with the peptide/protein identification program SEQUEST. For singly charged ions, the number of identifications increased by 12% when the elution time metric is included compared to when mass spectral data is the sole source of information in the context of a Drosophila melanogaster database. A 3-4% improvement was obtained for doubly and triply charged ions for the same biological system. Application to the larger Rattus norvegicus (rat) and human proteome databases resulted in an 8-9% overall increase in the number of identifications, when both the discriminant function and elution time are used. The effect of adding “runner-up” hits (peptide matches that are not the highest scoring for a spectra) from SEQUEST is also explored, and we find that the number of confident identifications is further increased when these hits are also considered. Finally, application of the discriminant functions derived in this work with ~2.2 million spectra from 330 LC-MS/MS analyses of peptides from human plasma protein resulted in a 19% increase in confident peptide identifications (9551 vs 8049) using elution time information. Further improvements from the use of elution time information can be expected as both the experimental control of elution time reproducibility and the predictive capability are improved.

  7. The mass-luminosity relation for stars of mass 1.0 to 0.08 solar mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Todd J.; Mccarthy, Donald W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mass-luminosity relations determined at IR wavelengths are presented for stars with masses 1.0 to 0.08 solar mass. Using IR speckle imaging techniques on a sample of nearby binaries, we have been able to concentrate on the lower main sequence, for which an accurate mass-luminosity calibration has remained problematic. In addition, the mass-visual luminosity relation for stars with 2.0-0.08 solar mass is produced by implementing new photometric relations linking V to JHK wavelengths for the nearby stars, supplemented with eclipsing binary information. These relations predict that objects with masses of about 0.08 solar mass have M(K) of about 10 and M(V) of about 18.

  8. NNLOPS accurate associated HW production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astill, William; Bizon, Wojciech; Re, Emanuele; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    We present a next-to-next-to-leading order accurate description of associated HW production consistently matched to a parton shower. The method is based on reweighting events obtained with the HW plus one jet NLO accurate calculation implemented in POWHEG, extended with the MiNLO procedure, to reproduce NNLO accurate Born distributions. Since the Born kinematics is more complex than the cases treated before, we use a parametrization of the Collins-Soper angles to reduce the number of variables required for the reweighting. We present phenomenological results at 13 TeV, with cuts suggested by the Higgs Cross section Working Group.

  9. Differences in the perception of a mass media information campaign on drug and alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The two-month mass media campaign in Belgium on drug and alcohol consumption "Alcohol and other drugs. The facts and fictions" initiated in January 2008 has been evaluated shortly after by a phone survey. This article reports some indicators on the public awareness of the campaign, and the differences in the perception according to age groups and education levels. About 1,000 respondents (n = 1,002) accepted to participate in the campaign evaluation. Response rate is 37.1%. Global perception of the campaign - measured by the capacity to identify the campaign adequately - is 18.8%. This perception varies between age groups and education levels: 30% of the youngest age group (14-35 yrs) have seen the campaign, 13% of people aged 56 and over (p<0.001). The lower the education level, the lower the probability to have seen the campaign (11% in the lowest group, 25% in the highest one, p<0.001). Among the respondents who have seen the campaign, newspapers are the most often cited media for the oldest age groups. Inversely, young people have mainly identified the campaign on street boards or on post cards. The privileged type of media is also function of the education level. People belonging to the lowest educational level report more often to have seen the campaign on TV (85% vs 51% in the highest group, p<0.01), while the reverse is true for seeing the campaign via the newspapers or the street boards. The results indicate that there are socio-economic variations in the perception of the campaign. In health promotion, reaching lower socio-economic groups still remains a real challenge. Channels for such campaigns have to be carefully chosen to reach their target groups and ask to be complemented with community based interventions.

  10. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  11. The high cost of accurate knowledge.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Kathleen M; Weber, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Many business thinkers believe it's the role of senior managers to scan the external environment to monitor contingencies and constraints, and to use that precise knowledge to modify the company's strategy and design. As these thinkers see it, managers need accurate and abundant information to carry out that role. According to that logic, it makes sense to invest heavily in systems for collecting and organizing competitive information. Another school of pundits contends that, since today's complex information often isn't precise anyway, it's not worth going overboard with such investments. In other words, it's not the accuracy and abundance of information that should matter most to top executives--rather, it's how that information is interpreted. After all, the role of senior managers isn't just to make decisions; it's to set direction and motivate others in the face of ambiguities and conflicting demands. Top executives must interpret information and communicate those interpretations--they must manage meaning more than they must manage information. So which of these competing views is the right one? Research conducted by academics Sutcliffe and Weber found that how accurate senior executives are about their competitive environments is indeed less important for strategy and corresponding organizational changes than the way in which they interpret information about their environments. Investments in shaping those interpretations, therefore, may create a more durable competitive advantage than investments in obtaining and organizing more information. And what kinds of interpretations are most closely linked with high performance? Their research suggests that high performers respond positively to opportunities, yet they aren't overconfident in their abilities to take advantage of those opportunities.

  12. Simulation study of the correlation (Xmaxμ, Nμ) in view of obtaining information on primary mass of the UHECRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, Nicusor; Sima, Octavian; Haungs, Andreas; Rebel, Heinigerd

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the possibility to discriminate the mass of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) by combining information obtained from the maximum Xmaxμ of the muon production rate longitudinal profile of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) and the number of muons, Nμ, which hit an array of detectors located in the horizontal plane. We investigate the sensitivity of the 2D distribution Xmaxμ versus Nμ to the mass of the primary particle generating the air shower. To this purpose we analyze a set of CORSIKA showers induced by protons and iron nuclei at energies of 1019 eV and 1020 eV, at five angles of incidence, 0°, 37°, 48°, 55° and 60°. Using the simulations we obtain the 2D Probability Functions Prob(Xmaxμ, Nμ | p) and Prob(Xmaxμ, Nμ | Fe) which give the probability that a shower induced by a proton or iron nucleus contributes to a specific point on the plane (Xmaxμ, Nμ). Then we construct the probability functions Prob(p | Xmaxμ, Nμ) and Prob(Fe | Xmaxμ, Nμ) which give the probability that a certain point on the plane (Xmaxμ, Nμ) corresponds to a shower initiated by a proton or an iron nucleus, respectively. Finally, a test of this procedure using a Bayesian approach, confirms an improved accuracy of the primary mass estimation in comparison with the results obtained using only the Xmaxμ distributions.

  13. Selective use of visual information signaling objects' center of mass for anticipatory control of manipulative fingertip forces.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Iran; Frazier, Wendy; Reilmann, Ralf; Gordon, Andrew M

    2003-05-01

    The present study examines whether visual information indicating the center of mass (CM) of an object can be used for the appropriate scaling of fingertip forces at each digit during precision grip. In separate experiments subjects lifted an object with various types of visual cues concerning the CM location several times and then rotated and lifted it again to determine whether the visual cues signaling the new location of the CM could be used to appropriately scale the fingertip forces. Specifically, subjects had either no visual cues, visual instructional cues (i.e., an indicator) or visual geometric cues where the longer axis of the object indicated the CM. When no visual cues were provided, subjects were unable to appropriately scale the load forces at each digit following rotation despite their knowledge of the new weight distribution. When visual cues regarding the CM location were provided, the nature of the visual cues determined their effectiveness in retrieval of internal representations underlying the anticipatory scaling of fingertip forces. Specifically, when subjects were provided with visual instructional information, they were unable to appropriately scale the forces. More appropriate scaling of the load forces occurred when the visual cues were ecologically meaningful, i.e., when the shape of the object indicated the CM location. We suggest that visual instructional cues do not have access to the implicit processes underlying dynamic force control, whereas visual geometric cues can be used for the retrieval of the internal representation related to CM for appropriate partitioning of the forces in each digit.

  14. Effective Temperatures of Selected Main-Sequence Stars with the Most Accurate Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soydugan, F.; Eker, Z.; Soydugan, E.; Bilir, S.; Gökçe, E. Y.; Steer, I.; Tüysüz, M.; Šenyüz, T.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we investigate the distributions of the properties of detached double-lined binaries (DBs) in the mass-luminosity, mass-radius, and mass-effective temperature diagrams. We have improved the classical mass-luminosity relation based on the database of DBs by Eker et al. (2014a). Based on the accurate observational data available to us we propose a method for improving the effective temperatures of eclipsing binaries with accurate mass and radius determinations.

  15. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models. PMID:27111139

  16. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  17. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R; Holmes, William M

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  18. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant.

  19. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  20. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material. PMID:11366835

  1. Using mass-media communications to increase population usage of Australia’s Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Global obesity prevalence is increasing and population health programs are required to support changes to modifiable lifestyle risk factors. Such interventions benefit from mass-communications to promote their use. The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service ® (GHS) utilised mass-reach media advertising to recruit participants to an Australian state-wide program. Methods A stand alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge and behavioural variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544; August -September 2010), during (n = 1,500; February - March 2011) and after the advertising period (n = 1,500; June-July 2011). GHS usage data (n = 6,375) was collated during July 2010 – June 2011. Results The results showed that television-lead mass-media significantly increased unprompted awareness (0% to 31.8%, p < 0.001); prompted awareness (2.5% to 23.7%, p < 0.001); and understanding (10.2% to 32.2%, p < 0.001). Mass-media (television, print and mail out information) was more often cited as the source of referral by males, those aged 18 – 49 years, employed, and from the lowest socio-economic groups. During the weeks when mass-media advertising was present, 4 and 2.5 times more information and coaching participants respectively registered than when there was no advertising present. Participants who cited television and print were less likely to enrol in GHS coaching, but this was not the case for mail out information and secondary referral sources. Conclusions GHS mass-communications campaigns are effective at increasing awareness and usage of the GHS, especially among hard-to-reach population groups. Television advertising provides universal reach, but should be supplemented by health professional referrals and targeted mail-out information to recruit participants to the intensive GHS coaching program. PMID:22967230

  2. Accurate documentation and wound measurement.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    This article, part 4 in a series on wound management, addresses the sometimes routine yet crucial task of documentation. Clear and accurate records of a wound enable its progress to be determined so the appropriate treatment can be applied. Thorough records mean any practitioner picking up a patient's notes will know when the wound was last checked, how it looked and what dressing and/or treatment was applied, ensuring continuity of care. Documenting every assessment also has legal implications, demonstrating due consideration and care of the patient and the rationale for any treatment carried out. Part 5 in the series discusses wound dressing characteristics and selection.

  3. Accurate calculation of the absolute free energy of binding for drug molecules† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02678d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Aldeghi, Matteo; Heifetz, Alexander; Bodkin, Michael J.; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of binding affinities has been a central goal of computational chemistry for decades, yet remains elusive. Despite good progress, the required accuracy for use in a drug-discovery context has not been consistently achieved for drug-like molecules. Here, we perform absolute free energy calculations based on a thermodynamic cycle for a set of diverse inhibitors binding to bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) and demonstrate that a mean absolute error of 0.6 kcal mol–1 can be achieved. We also show a similar level of accuracy (1.0 kcal mol–1) can be achieved in pseudo prospective approach. Bromodomains are epigenetic mark readers that recognize acetylation motifs and regulate gene transcription, and are currently being investigated as therapeutic targets for cancer and inflammation. The unprecedented accuracy offers the exciting prospect that the binding free energy of drug-like compounds can be predicted for pharmacologically relevant targets. PMID:26798447

  4. Body Mass Index, Disordered Eating Behavior, and Acquisition of Health Information: Examining Ethnicity and Weight-Related Issues in a College Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Shannon S.; Thomas, Christina R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: To investigate ethnic differences related to weight, the authors assessed body mass index, dysfunctional eating, receipt of health information, and perceived obstacles to healthy lifestyles of 210 ethnically diverse college women. Methods: The authors used the Eating Attitudes Test to assess dieting, food preoccupation,…

  5. Normalization to specific gravity prior to analysis improves information recovery from high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomic profiles of human urine.

    PubMed

    Edmands, William M B; Ferrari, Pietro; Scalbert, Augustin

    2014-11-01

    Extraction of meaningful biological information from urinary metabolomic profiles obtained by liquid-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) necessitates the control of unwanted sources of variability associated with large differences in urine sample concentrations. Different methods of normalization either before analysis (preacquisition normalization) through dilution of urine samples to the lowest specific gravity measured by refractometry, or after analysis (postacquisition normalization) to urine volume, specific gravity and median fold change are compared for their capacity to recover lead metabolites for a potential future use as dietary biomarkers. Twenty-four urine samples of 19 subjects from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort were selected based on their high and low/nonconsumption of six polyphenol-rich foods as assessed with a 24 h dietary recall. MS features selected on the basis of minimum discriminant selection criteria were related to each dietary item by means of orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis models. Normalization methods ranked in the following decreasing order when comparing the number of total discriminant MS features recovered to that obtained in the absence of normalization: preacquisition normalization to specific gravity (4.2-fold), postacquisition normalization to specific gravity (2.3-fold), postacquisition median fold change normalization (1.8-fold increase), postacquisition normalization to urinary volume (0.79-fold). A preventative preacquisition normalization based on urine specific gravity was found to be superior to all curative postacquisition normalization methods tested for discovery of MS features discriminant of dietary intake in these urinary metabolomic datasets.

  6. An integrated mass wasting susceptibility assesment by geographical information systems and remote sensing applications: Example from North Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgün, Aykut

    2016-04-01

    The Northern part of Turkey have been suffering from both landslides and snow avalanches due to the steep topography and climatological characteristics triggering the processes. In order to manage these natural hazard phenomenons, regional hazards assessments are both crucial and essential for the region. In this context, an integrated hazard assesment including landslide and snow avalanche was carried out for a selected area at North Turkey. Caykara (Trabzon) district was one of the most suitable areas for such a purpose, because several landslide and snow avalanche cases occured in the area during the last two decades. To inspect the landslide and snow avalanche susceptibility of the area, geographical information systems and remote sensing based assessments were applied to the area. To produce a landslide susceptibility map, logistic regression model was used by using lithological, topographical and environmental data set. To obtain a snow avalanche susceptibility map, topograhical data such as slope gradient, slope aspect and slope curvature, environmental data such as normaliazed vegetation index (NDVI), snow accumlation areas and landcover were taken into account, and these data set were analyzed by a 2D modelling tool, called as CONEFALL. By obtaining the landslide and snow avalanche susceptibility maps, five susceptibility classes from very low to very high were differentiated in the area. The both susceptibility maps were also verified by the actual field data as well, and it was determined that the obtained maps were successful. Then, the both susceptibility maps were overlaid, and finally an integrated mass wasting susceptibility map was created. In this final map, total susceptible areas to both landslide and snow avalanche occurrence were determined. The final susceptibility map is believed and expected to be used by the govermental and local authorities as a decision makers to mitigate the landslide and snow avalanche based hazards in the area.

  7. Improving positive predictive value in computer-aided diagnosis using mammographic mass and microcalcification confidence score fusion based on co-location information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Dae Hoe; Choi, Jae Young; Ro, Yong Man

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a novel fusion framework has been developed to combine the detection of both breast masses and microcalcifications (MCs), aiming to improve positive predictive value (PPV) in Computer-aided Diagnosis (CADx). Clinically, it has been widely accepted that a mass associated with MC is a useful indicator of predicting the malignancy of the mass. In light of this fact, given that a mass and MCs are co-located each other (i.e., they are at the same location), the proposed fusion framework combines confidence scores of the mass and MCs for the purpose of improving the probability that the mass is malignant. To this end, the popular Bayesian network model is applied to effectively combine the detection confidence scores and to achieve higher accuracy for malignant mass classification. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fusion framework, 31 mammograms were collected from the public DDSM database. The proposed fusion framework can increase the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) from 0.7939 to 0.8806, and the partial area index (PAUC) above the sensitivity of 0.9 from 0.1270 to 0.2280, compared to the CADx system without exploiting co-location information with MCs. Based on these results, it can be expected that the proposed fusion framework can be readily applied for realizing CADx systems with the higher PPV.

  8. SPLASH: Accurate OH maser positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Andrew; Gomez, Jose F.; Jones, Paul; Cunningham, Maria; Green, James; Dawson, Joanne; Ellingsen, Simon; Breen, Shari; Imai, Hiroshi; Lowe, Vicki; Jones, Courtney

    2013-10-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) 18 cm lines are powerful and versatile probes of diffuse molecular gas, that may trace a largely unstudied component of the Galactic ISM. SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a large, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of OH emission, absorption and masers in the Galactic Plane that will achieve sensitivities an order of magnitude better than previous work. In this proposal, we request ATCA time to follow up OH maser candidates. This will give us accurate (~10") positions of the masers, which can be compared to other maser positions from HOPS, MMB and MALT-45 and will provide full polarisation measurements towards a sample of OH masers that have not been observed in MAGMO.

  9. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  10. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  11. Accurate Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopic Growth over a Wide Range in Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Grazia; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Clegg, Simon L

    2016-06-30

    Using a comparative evaporation kinetics approach, we describe a new and accurate method for determining the equilibrium hygroscopic growth of aerosol droplets. The time-evolving size of an aqueous droplet, as it evaporates to a steady size and composition that is in equilibrium with the gas phase relative humidity, is used to determine the time-dependent mass flux of water, yielding information on the vapor pressure of water above the droplet surface at every instant in time. Accurate characterization of the gas phase relative humidity is provided from a control measurement of the evaporation profile of a droplet of know equilibrium properties, either a pure water droplet or a sodium chloride droplet. In combination, and by comparison with simulations that account for both the heat and mass transport governing the droplet evaporation kinetics, these measurements allow accurate retrieval of the equilibrium properties of the solution droplet (i.e., the variations with water activity in the mass fraction of solute, diameter growth factor, osmotic coefficient or number of water molecules per solute molecule). Hygroscopicity measurements can be made over a wide range in water activity (from >0.99 to, in principle, <0.05) on time scales of <10 s for droplets containing involatile or volatile solutes. The approach is benchmarked for binary and ternary inorganic solution aerosols with typical uncertainties in water activity of <±0.2% at water activities >0.9 and ∼±1% below 80% RH, and maximum uncertainties in diameter growth factor of ±0.7%. For all of the inorganic systems examined, the time-dependent data are consistent with large values of the mass accommodation (or evaporation) coefficient (>0.1). PMID:27285052

  12. A Reconceptualization of Some Factors in Mass Media - Interpersonal Communication for Disseminating Technological Information in Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fett, John H.; Bostian, Lloyd R.

    Five propositions, to be considered topics for further cross-cultural research, are discussed. It is recommended that questions of who has information and what causes information to flow should be examined before studying the operative value of any particular flow pattern in a setting. The propositions are: (1) the flow of information (two-step or…

  13. Precise and accurate isotopic measurements using multiple-collector ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarède, F.; Telouk, Philippe; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Boyet, Maud; Agranier, Arnaud; Nelson, Bruce

    2004-06-01

    New techniques of isotopic measurements by a new generation of mass spectrometers equipped with an inductively-coupled-plasma source, a magnetic mass filter, and multiple collection (MC-ICPMS) are quickly developing. These techniques are valuable because of (1) the ability of ICP sources to ionize virtually every element in the periodic table, and (2) the large sample throughout. However, because of the complex trajectories of multiple ion beams produced in the plasma source whether from the same or different elements, the acquisition of precise and accurate isotopic data with this type of instrument still requires a good understanding of instrumental fractionation processes, both mass-dependent and mass-independent. Although physical processes responsible for the instrumental mass bias are still to be understood more fully, we here present a theoretical framework that allows for most of the analytical limitations to high precision and accuracy to be overcome. After a presentation of unifying phenomenological theory for mass-dependent fractionation in mass spectrometers, we show how this theory accounts for the techniques of standard bracketing and of isotopic normalization by a ratio of either the same or a different element, such as the use of Tl to correct mass bias on Pb. Accuracy is discussed with reference to the concept of cup efficiencies. Although these can be simply calibrated by analyzing standards, we derive a straightforward, very general method to calculate accurate isotopic ratios from dynamic measurements. In this study, we successfully applied the dynamic method to Nd and Pb as examples. We confirm that the assumption of identical mass bias for neighboring elements (notably Pb and Tl, and Yb and Lu) is both unnecessary and incorrect. We further discuss the dangers of straightforward standard-sample bracketing when chemical purification of the element to be analyzed is imperfect. Pooling runs to improve precision is acceptable provided the pooled

  14. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: A Technique to Access the Information beyond the Molecular Weight of the Analyte

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-01-01

    The Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique extensively used for production of gas phase ions (without fragmentation) of thermally labile large supramolecules. In the present review we have described the development of Electrospray Ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) during the last 25 years in the study of various properties of different types of biological molecules. There have been extensive studies on the mechanism of formation of charged gaseous species by the ESI. Several groups have investigated the origin and implications of the multiple charge states of proteins observed in the ESI-mass spectra of the proteins. The charged analytes produced by ESI can be fragmented by activating them in the gas-phase, and thus tandem mass spectrometry has been developed, which provides very important insights on the structural properties of the molecule. The review will highlight recent developments and emerging directions in this fascinating area of research. PMID:22611397

  15. The Singular Spectrum Analysis Approach in the Analysis of Weekly GRACE and Hydrology Models Water Mass Anomalies Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelova, E.; Kim, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    We use the method of singular spectrum analysis to extract short- and long-term periodic water mass anomaly signals from a time series of the recently publicly available GFZ weekly GRACE solutions. We analyze time- lagged continuous time series (from February 2004 to May 2008) of GRACE spherical harmonic coefficients of maximum degree and order 30. One of the main advantages of performing the analysis in the spectral domain instead of in the spatial domain is the reduction of the computational load because a much smaller number of coefficients than spatial pixels are analyzed. Furthermore, no de-striping and isotropic smoothing filters are necessary because our filtering technique is able to smooth significantly the GRACE random errors and to reduce largely the correlated errors besides extracting all significant periodic signals. Moreover, the removal of part of geophysical signals together with the correlated GRACE errors and the reduction of the GRACE-derived water mass anomaly amplitudes are avoided. We demonstrate that our filtering technique effectively reduces the average RMS of water mass variability over the oceans when all but annual, semi-annual and long-term global variations in the spherical harmonic coefficients are filtered out. On land, we compare the filtered weekly GRACE-derived water mass anomalies with the weekly-averaged GLDAS mass anomalies for Amazon, Congo, Ob and Mississippi basins. The GRACE-derived trends agree well with the GLDAS model trends in all of the studied basins. Our results also demonstrate that the singular spectrum analysis approach is a powerful tool for extracting any short- and long-term signals as well as phase shifts and amplitude variations of the periodic water mass anomalies.

  16. Primary mass standard based on atomic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter; Gläser, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The paper summarises the activities of several national and international Metrology Institutes in replacing the kilogram artefact, the unit of mass, by the mass of a certain number of atoms, in particular the atomic masses of silicon or bismuth. This task is based on two different experiments: a very accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, measuring the density and lattice parameter of an enriched silicon-28 crystal, and the accumulation of decelerated bismuth-209 ions by using a mass separator. The relative measurement uncertainties reached so far are in the first case 2 parts in 107, and in the latter several part in 104. The bismuth experiment is still in an early state of the work. The ratios between the masses of 28Si or 209Bi, respectively, and the present atomic mass standard, the mass of 12C, can be determined with an accuracy now approaching 10-10 using high precision Penning traps mass spectrometers.

  17. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  18. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  19. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  20. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  1. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  2. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  3. Accurate On-Line Intervention Practices for Efficient Improvement of Reading Skills in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Minda B.

    2016-01-01

    Lifelong learning is the only way to sustain proficient learning in a rapidly changing world. Knowledge and information are exploding across the globe. We need accurate ways to facilitate the process of drawing external factual information into an internal perceptive advantage from which to interpret and argue new information. Accurate and…

  4. The importance of accurate atmospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Dylan; Schroeder, John; Liang, Pang

    2014-11-01

    This paper will focus on the effect of atmospheric conditions on EO sensor performance using computer models. We have shown the importance of accurately modeling atmospheric effects for predicting the performance of an EO sensor. A simple example will demonstrated how real conditions for several sites in China will significantly impact on image correction, hyperspectral imaging, and remote sensing. The current state-of-the-art model for computing atmospheric transmission and radiance is, MODTRAN® 5, developed by the US Air Force Research Laboratory and Spectral Science, Inc. Research by the US Air Force, Navy and Army resulted in the public release of LOWTRAN 2 in the early 1970's. Subsequent releases of LOWTRAN and MODTRAN® have continued until the present. Please verify that (1) all pages are present, (2) all figures are correct, (3) all fonts and special characters are correct, and (4) all text and figures fit within the red margin lines shown on this review document. Complete formatting information is available at http://SPIE.org/manuscripts Return to the Manage Active Submissions page at http://spie.org/submissions/tasks.aspx and approve or disapprove this submission. Your manuscript will not be published without this approval. Please contact author_help@spie.org with any questions or concerns. The paper will demonstrate the importance of using validated models and local measured meteorological, atmospheric and aerosol conditions to accurately simulate the atmospheric transmission and radiance. Frequently default conditions are used which can produce errors of as much as 75% in these values. This can have significant impact on remote sensing applications.

  5. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  6. Reduction in database search space by utilization of amino acid composition information from electron transfer dissociation and higher-energy collisional dissociation mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thomas A; Kryuchkov, Fedor; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2012-08-01

    With high-mass accuracy and consecutively obtained electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), reliable (≥97%) and sensitive fragment ions have been extracted for identification of specific amino acid residues in peptide sequences. The analytical benefit of these specific amino acid composition (AAC) ions is to restrict the database search space and provide identification of peptides with higher confidence and reduced false negative rates. The 6706 uniquely identified peptide sequences determined with a conservative Mascot score of >30 were used to characterize the AAC ions. The loss of amino acid side chains (small neutral losses, SNLs) from the charge reduced peptide radical cations was studied using ETD. Complementary AAC information from HCD spectra was provided by immonium ions. From the ETD/HCD mass spectra, 5162 and 6720 reliable SNLs and immonium ions were successfully extracted, respectively. Automated application of the AAC information during database searching resulted in an average 3.5-fold higher confidence level of peptide identification. In addition, 4% and 28% more peptides were identified above the significance level in a standard and extended search space, respectively.

  7. Imaging MS Methodology for More Chemical Information in Less Data Acquisition Time Utilizing a Hybrid Linear Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D. C.; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-11-15

    A novel mass spectrometric imaging method is developed to reduce the data acquisition time and provide rich chemical information using a hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. In this method, the linear ion trap and orbitrap are used in tandem to reduce the acquisition time by incorporating multiple linear ion trap scans during an orbitrap scan utilizing a spiral raster step plate movement. The data acquisition time was decreased by 43-49% in the current experiment compared to that of orbitrap-only scans; however, 75% or more time could be saved for higher mass resolution and with a higher repetition rate laser. Using this approach, a high spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m was maintained at ion trap imaging, while orbitrap spectra were acquired at a lower spatial resolution, 20-40 {micro}m, all with far less data acquisition time. Furthermore, various MS imaging methods were developed by interspersing MS/MS and MSn ion trap scans during orbitrap scans to provide more analytical information on the sample. This method was applied to differentiate and localize structural isomers of several flavonol glycosides from an Arabidopsis flower petal in which MS/MS, MSn, ion trap, and orbitrap images were all acquired in a single data acquisition.

  8. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program. PMID:24662895

  9. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program.

  10. Measuring Fisher information accurately in correlated neural populations.

    PubMed

    Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kohn, Adam; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Neural responses are known to be variable. In order to understand how this neural variability constrains behavioral performance, we need to be able to measure the reliability with which a sensory stimulus is encoded in a given population. However, such measures are challenging for two reasons: First, they must take into account noise correlations which can have a large influence on reliability. Second, they need to be as efficient as possible, since the number of trials available in a set of neural recording is usually limited by experimental constraints. Traditionally, cross-validated decoding has been used as a reliability measure, but it only provides a lower bound on reliability and underestimates reliability substantially in small datasets. We show that, if the number of trials per condition is larger than the number of neurons, there is an alternative, direct estimate of reliability which consistently leads to smaller errors and is much faster to compute. The superior performance of the direct estimator is evident both for simulated data and for neuronal population recordings from macaque primary visual cortex. Furthermore we propose generalizations of the direct estimator which measure changes in stimulus encoding across conditions and the impact of correlations on encoding and decoding, typically denoted by Ishuffle and Idiag respectively.

  11. Crisis and Emergency Risk Messaging in Mass Media News Stories: Is the Public Getting the Information They Need to Protect Their Health?

    PubMed

    Parmer, John; Baur, Cynthia; Eroglu, Dogan; Lubell, Keri; Prue, Christine; Reynolds, Barbara; Weaver, James

    2016-10-01

    The mass media provide an important channel for delivering crisis and emergency risk information to the public. We conducted a content analysis of 369 newspaper and television broadcast stories covering natural disaster and foodborne outbreak events and coded for seven best practices in crisis and emergency risk messaging. On average, slightly less than two (1.86) of the seven best practices were included in each story. The proportion of stories including individual best practices ranged from 4.6% for "expressing empathy" to 83.7% for "explaining what is known" about the event's impact to human health. Each of the other five best practices appeared in less than 25% of stories. These results suggest much of the risk messaging the public receives via mass media does not follow best practices for effective crisis and emergency communication, potentially compromising public understanding and actions in response to events.

  12. Crisis and Emergency Risk Messaging in Mass Media News Stories: Is the Public Getting the Information They Need to Protect Their Health?

    PubMed

    Parmer, John; Baur, Cynthia; Eroglu, Dogan; Lubell, Keri; Prue, Christine; Reynolds, Barbara; Weaver, James

    2016-10-01

    The mass media provide an important channel for delivering crisis and emergency risk information to the public. We conducted a content analysis of 369 newspaper and television broadcast stories covering natural disaster and foodborne outbreak events and coded for seven best practices in crisis and emergency risk messaging. On average, slightly less than two (1.86) of the seven best practices were included in each story. The proportion of stories including individual best practices ranged from 4.6% for "expressing empathy" to 83.7% for "explaining what is known" about the event's impact to human health. Each of the other five best practices appeared in less than 25% of stories. These results suggest much of the risk messaging the public receives via mass media does not follow best practices for effective crisis and emergency communication, potentially compromising public understanding and actions in response to events. PMID:26940247

  13. Material interactions with the low earth orbital environment Accurate reaction rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, J. T.; Leger, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between spacecraft surfaces and atomic oxygen within the low earth orbital (LEO) environment have been observed and measured during Space Shuttle flights over the past 3 yr. The results of these experiments have demonstrated that interaction rates for many materials proposed for spacecraft applications are high and that protective coatings must be developed to enable long-lived operation of spacecraft structures in the LEO environment. A flight experiment discussed herein uses the Space Shuttle as an orbiting exposure laboratory to obtain accurate reaction rate measurements for materials typically used in spacecraft construction. An ion-neutral mass spectrometer, installed in the Orbiter cargo bay, will measure diurnal ambient oxygen densities while material samples are exposed at low altitude (222 km) to the orbital environment. From in situ atomic oxygen density information and postflight material recession measurements, accurate reaction rates can be derived to update the Space Station materials interaction data base. Additionally, gases evolved from a limited number of material surfaces subjected to direct oxygen impingement will be identified using the mass spectrometer. These measurements will aid in mechanistic definitions of chemical reactions which cause atom-surface interactions and in validating results of upcoming degradation studies conducted in ground-based neutral beam laboratories.

  14. MetaMapp: mapping and visualizing metabolomic data by integrating information from biochemical pathways and chemical and mass spectral similarity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) leads to higher rates of pulmonary diseases and infections in children. To study the biochemical changes that may precede lung diseases, metabolomic effects on fetal and maternal lungs and plasma from rats exposed to ETS were compared to filtered air control animals. Genome- reconstructed metabolic pathways may be used to map and interpret dysregulation in metabolic networks. However, mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics datasets often comprise many metabolites for which links to enzymatic reactions have not yet been reported. Hence, network visualizations that rely on current biochemical databases are incomplete and also fail to visualize novel, structurally unidentified metabolites. Results We present a novel approach to integrate biochemical pathway and chemical relationships to map all detected metabolites in network graphs (MetaMapp) using KEGG reactant pair database, Tanimoto chemical and NIST mass spectral similarity scores. In fetal and maternal lungs, and in maternal blood plasma from pregnant rats exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), 459 unique metabolites comprising 179 structurally identified compounds were detected by gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) and BinBase data processing. MetaMapp graphs in Cytoscape showed much clearer metabolic modularity and complete content visualization compared to conventional biochemical mapping approaches. Cytoscape visualization of differential statistics results using these graphs showed that overall, fetal lung metabolism was more impaired than lungs and blood metabolism in dams. Fetuses from ETS-exposed dams expressed lower lipid and nucleotide levels and higher amounts of energy metabolism intermediates than control animals, indicating lower biosynthetic rates of metabolites for cell division, structural proteins and lipids that are critical for in lung development. Conclusions MetaMapp graphs efficiently

  15. Important Nearby Galaxies without Accurate Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) and its offspring programs (e.g., THINGS, HERACLES, KINGFISH) have resulted in a fundamental change in our view of star formation and the ISM in galaxies, and together they represent the most complete multi-wavelength data set yet assembled for a large sample of nearby galaxies. These great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the goal of understanding the interstellar medium, the star formation process, and, more generally, galactic evolution at the present epoch. Nearby galaxies provide the basis for which we interpret the distant universe, and the SINGS sample represents the best studied nearby galaxies.Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of galaxies. Surprisingly, many of the SINGS spiral galaxies have numerous distance estimates resulting in confusion. We can rectify this situation for 8 of the SINGS spiral galaxies within 10 Mpc at a very low cost through measurements of the tip of the red giant branch. The proposed observations will provide an accuracy of better than 0.1 in distance modulus. Our sample includes such well known galaxies as M51 (the Whirlpool), M63 (the Sunflower), M104 (the Sombrero), and M74 (the archetypal grand design spiral).We are also proposing coordinated parallel WFC3 UV observations of the central regions of the galaxies, rich with high-mass UV-bright stars. As a secondary science goal we will compare the resolved UV stellar populations with integrated UV emission measurements used in calibrating star formation rates. Our observations will complement the growing HST UV atlas of high resolution images of nearby galaxies.

  16. On the capability of Swarm for surface mass variation monitoring: Quantitative assessment based on orbit information from CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, Oliver; Weigelt, Matthias; Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Jäggi, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, temporal variations of the gravity field from GRACE observations have become one of the most ubiquitous and valuable sources of information for geophysical and environmental studies. In the context of global climate change, mass balance of the Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets gained particular attention. Because GRACE has outlived its predicted lifetime by several years already, it is very likely that a gap between GRACE and its successor GRACE follow-on (supposed to be launched in 2017, at the earliest) occurs. The Swarm mission - launched on November 22, 2013 - is the most promising candidate to bridge this potential gap, i.e., to directly acquire large-scale mass variation information on the Earth's surface in case of a gap between the present GRACE and the upcoming GRACE follow-on projects. Although the magnetometry mission Swarm has not been designed for gravity field purposes, its three satellites have the characteristics for such an endeavor: (i) low, near-circular and near-polar orbits, (ii) precise positioning with high-quality GNSS receivers, (iii) on-board accelerometers to measure the influence of non-gravitational forces. Hence, from an orbit analysis point of view the Swarm satellites are comparable to the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE spacecraft. Indeed and as data analysis from CHAMP has been shown, the detection of annual signals and trends from orbit analysis is possible for long-wavelength features of the gravity field, although the accuracy associated with the inter-satellite GRACE measurements cannot be reached. We assess the capability of the (non-dedicated) mission Swarm for mass variation detection in a real-case environment (opposed to simulation studies). For this purpose, we "approximate" the Swarm scenario by the GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE+GOCE constellations. In a first step, kinematic orbits of the individual satellites are derived from GNSS observations. From these orbits, we compute monthly combined GRACE+CHAMP and GRACE

  17. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  18. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Deigan, Katherine E.; Li, Tian W.; Mathews, David H.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all RNAs can fold to form extensive base-paired secondary structures. Many of these structures then modulate numerous fundamental elements of gene expression. Deducing these structure–function relationships requires that it be possible to predict RNA secondary structures accurately. However, RNA secondary structure prediction for large RNAs, such that a single predicted structure for a single sequence reliably represents the correct structure, has remained an unsolved problem. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative, nucleotide-resolution information from a SHAPE experiment can be interpreted as a pseudo-free energy change term and used to determine RNA secondary structure with high accuracy. Free energy minimization, by using SHAPE pseudo-free energies, in conjunction with nearest neighbor parameters, predicts the secondary structure of deproteinized Escherichia coli 16S rRNA (>1,300 nt) and a set of smaller RNAs (75–155 nt) with accuracies of up to 96–100%, which are comparable to the best accuracies achievable by comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19109441

  19. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  20. Analysis of psychoactive substances in water by information dependent acquisition on a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Costa, María Jesús; Andreu, Vicente; Picó, Yolanda

    2016-08-26

    Emerging drugs of abuse, belonging to many different chemical classes, are attracting users with promises of "legal" highs and easy access via internet. Prevalence of their consumption and abuse through wastewater-based epidemiology can only be realized if a suitable analytical screening procedure exists to detect and quantify them in water. Solid-phase extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqTOF-MS/MS) was applied for rapid suspect screening as well as for the quantitative determination of 42 illicit drugs and metabolites in water. Using this platform, we were able to identify amphetamines, tryptamines, piperazines, pyrrolidinophenones, arylcyclohexylamines, cocainics, opioids and cannabinoids. Additionally, paracetamol, carbamazepine, ibersartan, valsartan, sulfamethoxazole, terbumeton, diuron, etc. (including degradation products as 3-hydroxy carbamazepine or deethylterbuthylazine) were detected. This method encompasses easy sample preparation and rapid identification of psychoactive drugs against a database that cover more than 2000 compounds that ionized in positive mode, and possibility to identify metabolites and degradation products as well as unknown compounds. The method for river water, influent and effluents samples was fully validated for the target psychoactive substances including assessment of matrix effects (-88-67.8%), recovery (42-115%), precision (<19%) and limits of quantification (1-100ngL(-1)). Method efficiency was thoroughly investigated for a wide range of waste and surface waters. Robust and repeatable functioning of this platform in the screening, identification and quantification of traditional and new psychoactive drugs biomarkers and other water contaminants is demonstrated. PMID:27481402

  1. [A methodological approach to assessing the quality of medical health information on its way from science to the mass media].

    PubMed

    Serong, Julia; Anhäuser, Marcus; Wormer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    A current research project deals with the question of how the quality of medical health information changes on its way from the academic journal via press releases to the news media. In an exploratory study a sample of 30 news items has been selected stage-by-stage from an adjusted total sample of 1,695 journalistic news items on medical research in 2013. Using a multidimensional set of criteria the news items as well as the corresponding academic articles, abstracts and press releases are examined by science journalists and medical experts. Together with a content analysis of the expert assessments, it will be verified to what extent established quality standards for medical journalism can be applied to medical health communication and public relations or even to studies and abstracts as well.

  2. Improving Collision Induced Dissociation (CID), High Energy Collision Dissociation (HCD), and Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) Fourier Transform MS/MS Degradome-Peptidome Identifications Using High Accuracy Mass Information

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-02-03

    Identification of peptides through analysis of peptide ion fragmentation mass spectra is key to proteomic/peptidomic studies. Advanced mass spectrometry has enabled measurement of peptide fragments with {approx}ppm mass error levels; however, mass accuracy has not been widely utilized in broad aspects of peptide identification. In this work we describe how peptide high-precision fragments measured with Fourier transform mass spectrometry can provide a powerful discriminative capability to distinguish true peptide 'hits' from possible incorrect peptides. For identification of peptides having multiple termini and carrying multiple charges, we show that the simple utilization of high-precision mass fragments information results in improved peptide analysis coverage and consistency, with coverage of >95% peptides identified totally from different spectral scoring and peptide statistic probability methods developed for moderate accuracy mass spectral peptide identification.

  3. Retention Projection Enables Accurate Calculation of Liquid Chromatographic Retention Times Across Labs and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Freund, Dana M.; Ma, Yan; Simón-Manso, Yamil; Hollender, Juliane; Broeckling, Corey D.; Huhman, David V.; Krokhin, Oleg V.; Stoll, Dwight R.; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Kind, Tobias; Fiehn, Oliver; Schymanski, Emma L.; Prenni, Jessica E.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Boswell, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of small molecules by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) can be greatly improved if the chromatographic retention information is used along with mass spectral information to narrow down the lists of candidates. Linear retention indexing remains the standard for sharing retention data across labs, but it is unreliable because it cannot properly account for differences in the experimental conditions used by various labs, even when the differences are relatively small and unintentional. On the other hand, an approach called “retention projection” properly accounts for many intentional differences in experimental conditions, and when combined with a “back-calculation” methodology described recently, it also accounts for unintentional differences. In this study, the accuracy of this methodology is compared with linear retention indexing across eight different labs. When each lab ran a test mixture under a range of multi-segment gradients and flow rates they selected independently, retention projections averaged 22-fold more accurate for uncharged compounds because they properly accounted for these intentional differences, which were more pronounced in steep gradients. When each lab ran the test mixture under nominally the same conditions, which is the ideal situation to reproduce linear retention indices, retention projections still averaged 2-fold more accurate because they properly accounted for many unintentional differences between the LC systems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most successful study to date aiming to calculate (or even just to reproduce) LC gradient retention across labs, and it is the only study in which retention was reliably calculated under various multi-segment gradients and flow rates chosen independently by labs. PMID:26292625

  4. Performance optimisation of a new-generation orthogonal-acceleration quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Tony; Constantine, Jill; Harrison, Mark; Cavoit, Fabien

    2008-04-01

    Orthogonal-acceleration quadrupole time-of-flight (oa-QTOF) mass spectrometers, employed for accurate mass measurement, have been commercially available for well over a decade. A limitation of the early instruments of this type was the narrow ion abundance range over which accurate mass measurements could be made with a high degree of certainty. Recently, a new generation of oa-QTOF mass spectrometers has been developed and these allow accurate mass measurements to be recorded over a much greater range of ion abundances. This development has resulted from new ion detection technology and improved electronic stability or by accurate control of the number of ions reaching the detector. In this report we describe the results from experiments performed to evaluate the mass measurement performance of the Bruker micrOTOF-Q, a member of the new-generation oa-QTOFs. The relationship between mass accuracy and ion abundance has been extensively evaluated and mass measurement accuracy remained stable (+/-1.5 m m/z units) over approximately 3-4 orders of magnitude of ion abundance. The second feature of the Bruker micrOTOF-Q that was evaluated was the SigmaFit function of the software. This isotope pattern-matching algorithm provides an exact numerical comparison of the theoretical and measured isotope patterns as an additional identification tool to accurate mass measurement. The smaller the value, the closer the match between theoretical and measured isotope patterns. This information is then employed to reduce the number of potential elemental formulae produced from the mass measurements. A relationship between the SigmaFit value and ion abundance has been established. The results from the study for both mass accuracy and SigmaFit were employed to define the performance criteria for the micrOTOF-Q. This provided increased confidence in the selection of elemental formulae resulting from accurate mass measurements.

  5. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  6. Online friends, offline loved ones, and full-time media: young adult "mass personal" use of communication resources for informational and emotional support.

    PubMed

    Love, Brad; Donovan, Erin E

    2014-06-01

    As Web 2.0 technologies proliferate, patient education is changing dramatically. Information about prevention and survivorship arrives from a mix of sources. The present manuscript describes a study to shed light on how young adults (YAs) affected by cancer manage the digital world. Our investigation was guided by a research question asking how young adults affected by cancer engage in communication work in an environment of mass personal communication. The sample for this research consisted of 500 posts comprising 50 complete threads from an online support community for young adults affected by cancer. Threads were purposively sampled in a multi-stage process. Researchers used constant comparison to define themes, examining text in increments. Individuals harnessed assets of various communication tools for the purposes of message preparation and credibility checking. YAs demonstrated the multi-channel way they move between channels for different purposes, driven by preparation for future interactions. The result is a process that allows co-creation of knowledge in a trusted community. Findings indicate that completing communication work through multiple channels in a deliberate and savvy way is normal for YAs, particularly for message preparation and credibility checking. The multidirectional nature of digital tools plays an important role for YAs, as interactive resources appear to be the first or second stop for information after key events in the cancer trajectory. Results from this study are important as guidance to help manage the volume and depth of information common to the cancer experience in the Web 2.0 world.

  7. A fast and accurate method for echocardiography strain rate imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima; Hajebi, Nima; Nambakhsh, Mohammad Saleh

    2009-02-01

    Recently Strain and strain rate imaging have proved their superiority with respect to classical motion estimation methods in myocardial evaluation as a novel technique for quantitative analysis of myocardial function. Here in this paper, we propose a novel strain rate imaging algorithm using a new optical flow technique which is more rapid and accurate than the previous correlation-based methods. The new method presumes a spatiotemporal constancy of intensity and Magnitude of the image. Moreover the method makes use of the spline moment in a multiresolution approach. Moreover cardiac central point is obtained using a combination of center of mass and endocardial tracking. It is proved that the proposed method helps overcome the intensity variations of ultrasound texture while preserving the ability of motion estimation technique for different motions and orientations. Evaluation is performed on simulated, phantom (a contractile rubber balloon) and real sequences and proves that this technique is more accurate and faster than the previous methods.

  8. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shell nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.

  9. Accurate nuclear radii and binding energies from a chiral interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Ekstrom, Jan A.; Jansen, G. R.; Wendt, Kyle A.; Hagen, Gaute; Papenbrock, Thomas F.; Carlsson, Boris; Forssen, Christian; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Navratil, Petr; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-05-01

    With the goal of developing predictive ab initio capability for light and medium-mass nuclei, two-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory are optimized simultaneously to low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering data, as well as binding energies and radii of few-nucleon systems and selected isotopes of carbon and oxygen. Coupled-cluster calculations based on this interaction, named NNLOsat, yield accurate binding energies and radii of nuclei up to 40Ca, and are consistent with the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. In addition, the low-lying collective Jπ=3- states in 16O and 40Ca are described accurately, while spectra for selected p- and sd-shellmore » nuclei are in reasonable agreement with experiment.« less

  10. Fixed-Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle for Accurate Corridor Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehak, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present a Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) equipped with precise position and attitude sensors that together with a pre-calibrated camera enables accurate corridor mapping. The design of the platform is based on widely available model components to which we integrate an open-source autopilot, customized mass-market camera and navigation sensors. We adapt the concepts of system calibration from larger mapping platforms to MAV and evaluate them practically for their achievable accuracy. We present case studies for accurate mapping without ground control points: first for a block configuration, later for a narrow corridor. We evaluate the mapping accuracy with respect to checkpoints and digital terrain model. We show that while it is possible to achieve pixel (3-5 cm) mapping accuracy in both cases, precise aerial position control is sufficient for block configuration, the precise position and attitude control is required for corridor mapping.

  11. Selecting accurate statements from the cognitive interview using confidence ratings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Wayne T; Higham, Philip A

    2002-03-01

    Participants viewed a videotape of a simulated murder, and their recall (and confidence) was tested 1 week later with the cognitive interview. Results indicated that (a) the subset of statements assigned high confidence was more accurate than the full set of statements; (b) the accuracy benefit was limited to information that forensic experts considered relevant to an investigation, whereas peripheral information showed the opposite pattern; (c) the confidence-accuracy relationship was higher for relevant than for peripheral information; (d) the focused-retrieval phase was associated with a greater proportion of peripheral and a lesser proportion of relevant information than the other phases; and (e) only about 50% of the relevant information was elicited, and most of this was elicited in Phase 1.

  12. Ecological information and water mass properties in the Mediterranean recorded by stable isotope ratios in Pinna nobilis shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA-March, Jose Rafael; Surge, Donna; Lees, Jonathan M.; Kersting, Diego K.

    2011-06-01

    Sclerochronologic and stable isotope records in Pinna nobilis shells potentially record ecological and oceanographic information. P. nobilis is a subtidal bivalve adapted to live in a variety of environments in the Mediterranean. We hypothesized that stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ13C) and growth increment patterns from individuals living in different environments serve as ecological indicators. Using a new methodology for calcite sampling, we (1) identified annual growth features (nacre tongues) and (2) compared monthly resolved variations in δ18O and δ13C values and calcification temperatures recorded in animals located above and below the thermocline (16 and 30 m depth). The specimens from 16 m showed more negative δ18O values than the specimen from 30 m, likely reflecting differences in salinity. The specimens from 30 m recorded δ13C values less positive than the specimens from 16 m, which we interpreted as an ontogenetic effect observed in previous studies. Estimated calcification temperatures were offset relative to measured water temperature by ˜6.1°C (˜1.4‰). This finding is evident in earlier proxy studies of P. nobilis, although it was not discussed in those studies. Using the seasonal pattern of δ18O and δ13C values, we demonstrated that nacre tongues are deposited annually and that their formation is independent of temperature. Food availability rather than temperature may control nacre tongue formation. An alternative explanation for nacre tongue formation is gonad maturation during spring. Our findings support the idea that sclerochronology in P. nobilis can be used to reconstruct environmental, ecological, and climate archives of the Mediterranean.

  13. Covariance Matrix Evaluations for Independent Mass Fission Yields

    SciTech Connect

    Terranova, N.; Serot, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.

    2015-01-15

    Recent needs for more accurate fission product yields include covariance information to allow improved uncertainty estimations of the parameters used by design codes. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility to generate more reliable and complete uncertainty information on independent mass fission yields. Mass yields covariances are estimated through a convolution between the multi-Gaussian empirical model based on Brosa's fission modes, which describe the pre-neutron mass yields, and the average prompt neutron multiplicity curve. The covariance generation task has been approached using the Bayesian generalized least squared method through the CONRAD code. Preliminary results on mass yields variance-covariance matrix will be presented and discussed from physical grounds in the case of {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f) reactions.

  14. Covariance Matrix Evaluations for Independent Mass Fission Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, N.; Serot, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.; Sumini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent needs for more accurate fission product yields include covariance information to allow improved uncertainty estimations of the parameters used by design codes. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility to generate more reliable and complete uncertainty information on independent mass fission yields. Mass yields covariances are estimated through a convolution between the multi-Gaussian empirical model based on Brosa's fission modes, which describe the pre-neutron mass yields, and the average prompt neutron multiplicity curve. The covariance generation task has been approached using the Bayesian generalized least squared method through the CONRAD code. Preliminary results on mass yields variance-covariance matrix will be presented and discussed from physical grounds in the case of 235U(nth, f) and 239Pu(nth, f) reactions.

  15. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  16. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    French, Deborah; Terrazas, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS) has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX™ × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code) into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a “pre-processor” by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available. PMID:23599901

  17. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  18. Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes by Prepregnancy Body Mass Index: A Population-Based Study to Inform Prepregnancy Weight Loss Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Schummers, Laura; Hutcheon, Jennifer A.; Bodnar, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Ellice; Himes, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the absolute risks of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes based on small differences in prepregnancy body mass (eg, 10% of body mass or 10-20 lbs). Methods This population-based cohort study (n=226,958) was drawn from all singleton pregnancies in British Columbia (Canada) from 2004-2012. The relationships between prepregnancy BMI (as a continuous, non-linear variable) and adverse pregnancy outcomes were examined using logistic regression models. Analyses were adjusted for maternal age, height, parity, and smoking in pregnancy. Adjusted absolute risks of each outcome are reported according to incremental differences in prepregnancy BMI and weight in pounds. Results A 10% difference in prepregnancy BMI was associated with at least a 10% lower risk of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, indicated preterm delivery, macrosomia, and stillbirth. In contrast, larger differences in prepregnancy BMI (20-30% differences in BMI) were necessary to meaningfully reduce risks of cesarean delivery, shoulder dystocia, NICU stay ≥48 hours, and in-hospital newborn mortality. Prepregnancy BMI was not associated with risk of postpartum hemorrhage requiring intervention, severe maternal morbidity or maternal mortality, or spontaneous preterm delivery before 32 weeks of gestation. Conclusion These results can inform prepregnancy weight loss counseling by defining achievable weight loss goals for patients that may reduce their risk of poor perinatal outcomes. PMID:25560115

  19. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-09-22

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain.

  20. Leveraging Two Kinect Sensors for Accurate Full-Body Motion Capture

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion capture plays an important role in sports analysis, the medical field and virtual reality. Current methods for motion capture often suffer from occlusions, which limits the accuracy of their pose estimation. In this paper, we propose a complete system to measure the pose parameters of the human body accurately. Different from previous monocular depth camera systems, we leverage two Kinect sensors to acquire more information about human movements, which ensures that we can still get an accurate estimation even when significant occlusion occurs. Because human motion is temporally constant, we adopt a learning analysis to mine the temporal information across the posture variations. Using this information, we estimate human pose parameters accurately, regardless of rapid movement. Our experimental results show that our system can perform an accurate pose estimation of the human body with the constraint of information from the temporal domain. PMID:26402681

  1. Decreased Body Mass Index in Schoolchildren After Yearlong Information Sessions With Parents Reinforced With Web and Mobile Phone Resources: Community Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vilchis-Gil, Jenny; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel; Duque, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Background The obesity pandemic has now reached children, and households should change their lifestyles to prevent it. Objective The objective was to assess the effect of a comprehensive intervention on body mass index z-score (BMIZ) in schoolchildren. Methods A yearlong study was conducted at 4 elementary schools in Mexico City. Intervention group (IG) and control group (CG) were split equally between governmental and private schools. Three educational in-person parents and children sessions were held at 2-month intervals to promote healthy eating habits and exercise. To reinforce the information, a website provided extensive discussion on a new topic every 2 weeks, including school snack menus and tools to calculate body mass index in children and adults. Text messages were sent to parents’ mobile phones reinforcing the information provided. The IG contained 226 children and CG 181 children. We measured their weight and height and calculated BMIZ at 0, 6, and 12 months. Results The CG children showed a change of +0.06 (95% CI 0.01, 0.11) and +0.05 (95% CI 0.01, 0.10) in their BMIZ at 6 and 12 months, respectively. The BMIZ of IG children decreased by -0.13 (95% CI -0.19 to -0.06) and -0.10 (95% CI -0.16 to -0.03), respectively, and the effect was greater in children with obesity. Conclusions The comprehensive intervention tested had beneficial effects, preserved the BMIZ of normal weight children, and reduced the BMIZ of children with obesity. PMID:27342650

  2. Data requirements for protein identification using chemically-assisted fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, Kenton D; Swift, Dionne D; Lacey, Martin P; Correa, Paul E; Keough, Thomas W

    2005-01-01

    Many laboratories identify proteins by searching tandem mass spectrometry data against genomic or protein sequence databases. These database searches typically use the measured peptide masses or the derived peptide sequence and, in this paper, we focus on the latter. We study the minimum peptide sequence data requirements for definitive protein identification from protein sequence databases. Accurate mass measurements are not needed for definitive protein identification, even when a limited amount of sequence data is available for searching. This information has implications for the mass spectrometry performance (and cost), data base search strategies and proteomics research.

  3. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater. PMID:26551801

  4. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-01

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  5. The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project: improving the standards for reporting mass-spectrometry-based glycoanalytic data.

    PubMed

    Kolarich, Daniel; Rapp, Erdmann; Struwe, Weston B; Haslam, Stuart M; Zaia, Joseph; McBride, Ryan; Agravat, Sanjay; Campbell, Matthew P; Kato, Masaki; Ranzinger, Rene; Kettner, Carsten; York, William S

    2013-04-01

    The MIRAGE guidelines are being developed in response to a critical need in the glycobiology community to clarify glycoanalytic results so that they are more readily evaluated (in terms of their scope and depth) and to facilitate the reproduction of important results in the laboratory. The molecular and biological complexity of the glycosylation process makes thorough reporting of the results of a glycomics experiment a highly challenging endeavor. The resulting data specify the identity and quantity of complex structures, the precise molecular features of which are sometimes inferred using prior knowledge, such as familiarity with a particular biosynthetic mechanism. Specifying the exact methods and assumptions that were used to assign and quantify reported structures allows the interested scientist to appreciate the scope and depth of the analysis. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most widely used tool for glycomics experiments. The interpretation and reproducibility of MS-based glycomics data depend on comprehensive meta-data describing the instrumentation, instrument setup, and data acquisition protocols. The MIRAGE guidelines for MS-based glycomics have been designed to facilitate the collection and sharing of this critical information in order to assist the glycoanalyst in generating data sets with maximum information content and biological relevance. PMID:23378518

  6. The Minimum Information Required for a Glycomics Experiment (MIRAGE) Project: Improving the Standards for Reporting Mass-spectrometry-based Glycoanalytic Data

    PubMed Central

    Kolarich, Daniel; Rapp, Erdmann; Struwe, Weston B.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Zaia, Joseph; McBride, Ryan; Agravat, Sanjay; Campbell, Matthew P.; Kato, Masaki; Ranzinger, Rene; Kettner, Carsten; York, William S.

    2013-01-01

    The MIRAGE guidelines are being developed in response to a critical need in the glycobiology community to clarify glycoanalytic results so that they are more readily evaluated (in terms of their scope and depth) and to facilitate the reproduction of important results in the laboratory. The molecular and biological complexity of the glycosylation process makes thorough reporting of the results of a glycomics experiment a highly challenging endeavor. The resulting data specify the identity and quantity of complex structures, the precise molecular features of which are sometimes inferred using prior knowledge, such as familiarity with a particular biosynthetic mechanism. Specifying the exact methods and assumptions that were used to assign and quantify reported structures allows the interested scientist to appreciate the scope and depth of the analysis. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most widely used tool for glycomics experiments. The interpretation and reproducibility of MS-based glycomics data depend on comprehensive meta-data describing the instrumentation, instrument setup, and data acquisition protocols. The MIRAGE guidelines for MS-based glycomics have been designed to facilitate the collection and sharing of this critical information in order to assist the glycoanalyst in generating data sets with maximum information content and biological relevance. PMID:23378518

  7. Environmental Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Albert T.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental mass spectrometry is an important branch of science because it provides many of the data that underlie policy decisions that can directly influence the health of people and ecosystems. Environmental mass spectrometry is currently undergoing rapid development. Among the most relevant directions are a significant broadening of the lists of formally targeted compounds; a parallel interest in nontarget chemicals; an increase in the reliability of analyses involving accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, and isotopically labeled standards; and a shift toward faster high-throughput analysis, with minimal sample preparation, involving various approaches, including ambient ionization techniques and miniature instruments. A real revolution in analytical chemistry could be triggered with the appearance of robust, simple, and sensitive portable mass spectrometers that can utilize ambient ionization techniques. If the cost of such instruments is reduced to a reasonable level, mass spectrometers could become valuable household devices.

  8. Modified chemiluminescent NO analyzer accurately measures NOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Installation of molybdenum nitric oxide (NO)-to-higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) converter in chemiluminescent gas analyzer and use of air purge allow accurate measurements of NOx in exhaust gases containing as much as thirty percent carbon monoxide (CO). Measurements using conventional analyzer are highly inaccurate for NOx if as little as five percent CO is present. In modified analyzer, molybdenum has high tolerance to CO, and air purge substantially quenches NOx destruction. In test, modified chemiluminescent analyzer accurately measured NO and NOx concentrations for over 4 months with no denegration in performance.

  9. Towards accurate observation and modelling of Antarctic glacial isostatic adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M.

    2012-04-01

    The response of the solid Earth to glacial mass changes, known as glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), has received renewed attention in the recent decade thanks to the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. GRACE measures Earth's gravity field every 30 days, but cannot partition surface mass changes, such as present-day cryospheric or hydrological change, from changes within the solid Earth, notably due to GIA. If GIA cannot be accurately modelled in a particular region the accuracy of GRACE estimates of ice mass balance for that region is compromised. This lecture will focus on Antarctica, where models of GIA are hugely uncertain due to weak constraints on ice loading history and Earth structure. Over the last years, however, there has been a step-change in our ability to measure GIA uplift with the Global Positioning System (GPS), including widespread deployments of permanent GPS receivers as part of the International Polar Year (IPY) POLENET project. I will particularly focus on the Antarctic GPS velocity field and the confounding effect of elastic rebound due to present-day ice mass changes, and then describe the construction and calibration of a new Antarctic GIA model for application to GRACE data, as well as highlighting areas where further critical developments are required.

  10. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  11. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response. The key to this new method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in msot cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacement are used to approximate bending stresses.

  12. 5D model for accurate representation and visualization of dynamic cardiac structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-te; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Accurate cardiac modeling is challenging due to the intricate structure and complex contraction patterns of myocardial tissues. Fast imaging techniques can provide 4D structural information acquired as a sequence of 3D images throughout the cardiac cycle. To mode. The beating heart, we created a physics-based surface model that deforms between successive time point in the cardiac cycle. 3D images of canine hearts were acquired during one complete cardiac cycle using the DSR and the EBCT. The left ventricle of the first time point is reconstructed as a triangular mesh. A mass-spring physics-based deformable mode,, which can expand and shrink with local contraction and stretching forces distributed in an anatomically accurate simulation of cardiac motion, is applied to the initial mesh and allows the initial mesh to deform to fit the left ventricle in successive time increments of the sequence. The resulting 4D model can be interactively transformed and displayed with associated regional electrical activity mapped onto anatomic surfaces, producing a 5D model, which faithfully exhibits regional cardiac contraction and relaxation patterns over the entire heart. The model faithfully represents structural changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Such models provide the framework for minimizing the number of time points required to usefully depict regional motion of myocardium and allow quantitative assessment of regional myocardial motion. The electrical activation mapping provides spatial and temporal correlation within the cardiac cycle. In procedures which as intra-cardiac catheter ablation, visualization of the dynamic model can be used to accurately localize the foci of myocardial arrhythmias and guide positioning of catheters for optimal ablation.

  13. Can Appraisers Rate Work Performance Accurately?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedge, Jerry W.; Laue, Frances J.

    The ability of individuals to make accurate judgments about others is examined and literature on this subject is reviewed. A wide variety of situational factors affects the appraisal of performance. It is generally accepted that the purpose of the appraisal influences the accuracy of the appraiser. The instrumentation, or tools, available to the…

  14. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  15. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into "unsaturated" and "saturated" category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  16. A catalog of isolated galaxy pairs with accurate radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamaraux, P.; Nottale, L.

    2016-07-01

    The present paper is devoted to the construction of a catalog of isolated galaxy pairs from the Uppsala Galaxy Catalog (UGC), using accurate radial velocities. The UGC lists 12 921 galaxies to δ > -2°30' and is complete to an apparent diameter of 1'. The criteria used to define the isolated galaxy pairs are based on velocity, interdistance, reciprocity and isolation information. A peculiar investigation has allowed to gather very accurate radial velocities for pair members, from high quality HI and optical measurements (median uncertainty on velocity differences 10 kms-1). Our final catalog contains 1005 galaxy pairs with ρ > 2.5, of which 509 have ρ > 5 (50% of the pairs, i.e. 8%of the UGC galaxies) and 273 are highly isolated with ρ > 10 (27% of the pairs, i.e. 4% of the UGC galaxies). Some global properties of the pair catalog are given.

  17. Methods for accurate homology modeling by global optimization.

    PubMed

    Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Jooyoung

    2012-01-01

    High accuracy protein modeling from its sequence information is an important step toward revealing the sequence-structure-function relationship of proteins and nowadays it becomes increasingly more useful for practical purposes such as in drug discovery and in protein design. We have developed a protocol for protein structure prediction that can generate highly accurate protein models in terms of backbone structure, side-chain orientation, hydrogen bonding, and binding sites of ligands. To obtain accurate protein models, we have combined a powerful global optimization method with traditional homology modeling procedures such as multiple sequence alignment, chain building, and side-chain remodeling. We have built a series of specific score functions for these steps, and optimized them by utilizing conformational space annealing, which is one of the most successful combinatorial optimization algorithms currently available.

  18. Accurate Development of Thermal Neutron Scattering Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman; Dunn, Michael

    2014-06-10

    The objective of this project is to develop a holistic (fundamental and accurate) approach for generating thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries for a collection of important enutron moderators and reflectors. The primary components of this approach are the physcial accuracy and completeness of the generated data libraries. Consequently, for the first time, thermal neutron scattering cross section data libraries will be generated that are based on accurate theoretical models, that are carefully benchmarked against experimental and computational data, and that contain complete covariance information that can be used in propagating the data uncertainties through the various components of the nuclear design and execution process. To achieve this objective, computational and experimental investigations will be performed on a carefully selected subset of materials that play a key role in all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  19. Light Field Imaging Based Accurate Image Specular Highlight Removal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haoqian; Xu, Chenxue; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhang, Yongbing; Peng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Specular reflection removal is indispensable to many computer vision tasks. However, most existing methods fail or degrade in complex real scenarios for their individual drawbacks. Benefiting from the light field imaging technology, this paper proposes a novel and accurate approach to remove specularity and improve image quality. We first capture images with specularity by the light field camera (Lytro ILLUM). After accurately estimating the image depth, a simple and concise threshold strategy is adopted to cluster the specular pixels into “unsaturated” and “saturated” category. Finally, a color variance analysis of multiple views and a local color refinement are individually conducted on the two categories to recover diffuse color information. Experimental evaluation by comparison with existed methods based on our light field dataset together with Stanford light field archive verifies the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:27253083

  20. Information filtering via preferential diffusion.

    PubMed

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  1. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  2. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  3. Accurate object tracking system by integrating texture and depth cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ju-Chin; Lin, Yu-Hang

    2016-03-01

    A robust object tracking system that is invariant to object appearance variations and background clutter is proposed. Multiple instance learning with a boosting algorithm is applied to select discriminant texture information between the object and background data. Additionally, depth information, which is important to distinguish the object from a complicated background, is integrated. We propose two depth-based models that can compensate texture information to cope with both appearance variants and background clutter. Moreover, in order to reduce the risk of drifting problem increased for the textureless depth templates, an update mechanism is proposed to select more precise tracking results to avoid incorrect model updates. In the experiments, the robustness of the proposed system is evaluated and quantitative results are provided for performance analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed system can provide the best success rate and has more accurate tracking results than other well-known algorithms.

  4. Efficient and Accurate Indoor Localization Using Landmark Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, F.; Kealy, A.; Khoshelham, K.; Shang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor localization is important for a variety of applications such as location-based services, mobile social networks, and emergency response. Fusing spatial information is an effective way to achieve accurate indoor localization with little or with no need for extra hardware. However, existing indoor localization methods that make use of spatial information are either too computationally expensive or too sensitive to the completeness of landmark detection. In this paper, we solve this problem by using the proposed landmark graph. The landmark graph is a directed graph where nodes are landmarks (e.g., doors, staircases, and turns) and edges are accessible paths with heading information. We compared the proposed method with two common Dead Reckoning (DR)-based methods (namely, Compass + Accelerometer + Landmarks and Gyroscope + Accelerometer + Landmarks) by a series of experiments. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 73% accuracy with a positioning error less than 2.5 meters, which outperforms the other two DR-based methods.

  5. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  6. Two highly accurate methods for pitch calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, K.; Härtig, F.; Osawa, S.; Sato, O.

    2009-11-01

    Among profiles, helix and tooth thickness pitch is one of the most important parameters of an involute gear measurement evaluation. In principle, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and CNC-controlled gear measuring machines as a variant of a CMM are suited for these kinds of gear measurements. Now the Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (NMIJ/AIST) and the German national metrology institute the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have each developed independently highly accurate pitch calibration methods applicable to CMM or gear measuring machines. Both calibration methods are based on the so-called closure technique which allows the separation of the systematic errors of the measurement device and the errors of the gear. For the verification of both calibration methods, NMIJ/AIST and PTB performed measurements on a specially designed pitch artifact. The comparison of the results shows that both methods can be used for highly accurate calibrations of pitch standards.

  7. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  8. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  9. Preparation and accurate measurement of pure ozone.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Christof; Simone, Daniela; Guinet, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    Preparation of high purity ozone as well as precise and accurate measurement of its pressure are metrological requirements that are difficult to meet due to ozone decomposition occurring in pressure sensors. The most stable and precise transducer heads are heated and, therefore, prone to accelerated ozone decomposition, limiting measurement accuracy and compromising purity. Here, we describe a vacuum system and a method for ozone production, suitable to accurately determine the pressure of pure ozone by avoiding the problem of decomposition. We use an inert gas in a particularly designed buffer volume and can thus achieve high measurement accuracy and negligible degradation of ozone with purities of 99.8% or better. The high degree of purity is ensured by comprehensive compositional analyses of ozone samples. The method may also be applied to other reactive gases. PMID:21456766

  10. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  11. Accurate modeling of parallel scientific computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Townsend, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Scientific codes are usually parallelized by partitioning a grid among processors. To achieve top performance it is necessary to partition the grid so as to balance workload and minimize communication/synchronization costs. This problem is particularly acute when the grid is irregular, changes over the course of the computation, and is not known until load time. Critical mapping and remapping decisions rest on the ability to accurately predict performance, given a description of a grid and its partition. This paper discusses one approach to this problem, and illustrates its use on a one-dimensional fluids code. The models constructed are shown to be accurate, and are used to find optimal remapping schedules.

  12. Line gas sampling system ensures accurate analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Tremendous changes in the natural gas business have resulted in new approaches to the way natural gas is measured. Electronic flow measurement has altered the business forever, with developments in instrumentation and a new sensitivity to the importance of proper natural gas sampling techniques. This paper reports that YZ Industries Inc., Snyder, Texas, combined its 40 years of sampling experience with the latest in microprocessor-based technology to develop the KynaPak 2000 series, the first on-line natural gas sampling system that is both compact and extremely accurate. This means the composition of the sampled gas must be representative of the whole and related to flow. If so, relative measurement and sampling techniques are married, gas volumes are accurately accounted for and adjustments to composition can be made.

  13. Estimate of regional groundwater recharge rate in the Central Haouz Plain, Morocco, using the chloride mass balance method and a geographical information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait El Mekki, Ouassil; Laftouhi, Nour-Eddine; Hanich, Lahoucine

    2015-09-01

    Located in the extreme northwest of Africa, the Kingdom of Morocco is increasingly affected by drought. Much of the country is characterised by an arid to semi-arid climate and the demand for water is considerably higher than the supply, particularly on the Haouz Plain in the centre of the country. The expansion of agriculture and tourism, in addition to industrial development and mining, have exacerbated the stress on water supplies resulting in drought. It is therefore necessary to adopt careful management practices to preserve the sustainability of the water resources in this region. The aquifer recharge rate in the piedmont region that links the High Atlas and the Central Haouz Plain was estimated using the chloride mass balance hydrochemical method, which is based on the relationship between the chloride concentrations in groundwater and rainwater. The addition of a geographical information system made it possible to estimate the recharge rate over the whole 400 km2 of the study area. The results are presented in the form of a map showing the spatialized recharge rate, which ranges from 13 to 100 mm/year and the recharge percentage of the total rainfall varies from 3 to 25 % for the hydrological year 2011-2012. This approach will enable the validation of empirical models covering areas >6200 km2, such as the Haouz nappe.

  14. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  15. A fast experimental beam hardening correction method for accurate bone mineral measurements in 3D μCT imaging system.

    PubMed

    Koubar, Khodor; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Bone mineral density plays an important role in the determination of bone strength and fracture risks. Consequently, it is very important to obtain accurate bone mineral density measurements. The microcomputerized tomography system provides 3D information about the architectural properties of bone. Quantitative analysis accuracy is decreased by the presence of artefacts in the reconstructed images, mainly due to beam hardening artefacts (such as cupping artefacts). In this paper, we introduced a new beam hardening correction method based on a postreconstruction technique performed with the use of off-line water and bone linearization curves experimentally calculated aiming to take into account the nonhomogeneity in the scanned animal. In order to evaluate the mass correction rate, calibration line has been carried out to convert the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient into bone masses. The presented correction method was then applied on a multimaterial cylindrical phantom and on mouse skeleton images. Mass correction rate up to 18% between uncorrected and corrected images were obtained as well as a remarkable improvement of a calculated mouse femur mass has been noticed. Results were also compared to those obtained when using the simple water linearization technique which does not take into account the nonhomogeneity in the object.

  16. Mass Spectrometry as a Powerful Analytical Technique for the Structural Characterization of Synthesized and Natural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Massoui, Mohamed; Banoub, Joseph

    Mass spectrometry is an important tool for the identification and structural elucidation of natural and synthesized compounds. Its high sensitivity and the possibility of coupling liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection make it a technique of choice for the investigation of complex mixtures like raw natural extracts. The mass spectrometer is a universal detector that can achieve very high sensitivity and provide information on the molecular mass. More detailed information can be subsequently obtained by resorting to collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS). In this review, the application of mass spectrometric techniques for the identification of natural and synthetic compounds is presented. The gas-phase fragmentation patterns of a series of four natural flavonoid glycosides, three synthesized benzodiazepines and two synthesized quinoxalinone derivatives were investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry techniques. Exact accurate masses were measured using a modorate resolution quadrupole orthogonal time-of-flight QqTOF-MS/MS hybrid mass spectrometer instrument. Confirmation of the molecular masses and the chemical structures of the studied compounds were achieved by exploring the gas-phase breakdown routes of the ionized molecules. This was rationalized by conducting low-energy collision CID-MS/MS analyses (product ion- and precursor ion scans) using a conventional quadrupole hexapole-quadrupole (QhQ) tandem mass spectrometer.

  17. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  18. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  19. Can blind persons accurately assess body size from the voice?

    PubMed

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Oleszkiewicz, Anna; Sorokowska, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    Vocal tract resonances provide reliable information about a speaker's body size that human listeners use for biosocial judgements as well as speech recognition. Although humans can accurately assess men's relative body size from the voice alone, how this ability is acquired remains unknown. In this study, we test the prediction that accurate voice-based size estimation is possible without prior audiovisual experience linking low frequencies to large bodies. Ninety-one healthy congenitally or early blind, late blind and sighted adults (aged 20-65) participated in the study. On the basis of vowel sounds alone, participants assessed the relative body sizes of male pairs of varying heights. Accuracy of voice-based body size assessments significantly exceeded chance and did not differ among participants who were sighted, or congenitally blind or who had lost their sight later in life. Accuracy increased significantly with relative differences in physical height between men, suggesting that both blind and sighted participants used reliable vocal cues to size (i.e. vocal tract resonances). Our findings demonstrate that prior visual experience is not necessary for accurate body size estimation. This capacity, integral to both nonverbal communication and speech perception, may be present at birth or may generalize from broader cross-modal correspondences. PMID:27095264

  20. Accurate whole human genome sequencing using reversible terminator chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bentley, David R; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Swerdlow, Harold P; Smith, Geoffrey P; Milton, John; Brown, Clive G; Hall, Kevin P; Evers, Dirk J; Barnes, Colin L; Bignell, Helen R; Boutell, Jonathan M; Bryant, Jason; Carter, Richard J; Keira Cheetham, R; Cox, Anthony J; Ellis, Darren J; Flatbush, Michael R; Gormley, Niall A; Humphray, Sean J; Irving, Leslie J; Karbelashvili, Mirian S; Kirk, Scott M; Li, Heng; Liu, Xiaohai; Maisinger, Klaus S; Murray, Lisa J; Obradovic, Bojan; Ost, Tobias; Parkinson, Michael L; Pratt, Mark R; Rasolonjatovo, Isabelle M J; Reed, Mark T; Rigatti, Roberto; Rodighiero, Chiara; Ross, Mark T; Sabot, Andrea; Sankar, Subramanian V; Scally, Aylwyn; Schroth, Gary P; Smith, Mark E; Smith, Vincent P; Spiridou, Anastassia; Torrance, Peta E; Tzonev, Svilen S; Vermaas, Eric H; Walter, Klaudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Lu; Alam, Mohammed D; Anastasi, Carole; Aniebo, Ify C; Bailey, David M D; Bancarz, Iain R; Banerjee, Saibal; Barbour, Selena G; Baybayan, Primo A; Benoit, Vincent A; Benson, Kevin F; Bevis, Claire; Black, Phillip J; Boodhun, Asha; Brennan, Joe S; Bridgham, John A; Brown, Rob C; Brown, Andrew A; Buermann, Dale H; Bundu, Abass A; Burrows, James C; Carter, Nigel P; Castillo, Nestor; Chiara E Catenazzi, Maria; Chang, Simon; Neil Cooley, R; Crake, Natasha R; Dada, Olubunmi O; Diakoumakos, Konstantinos D; Dominguez-Fernandez, Belen; Earnshaw, David J; Egbujor, Ugonna C; Elmore, David W; Etchin, Sergey S; Ewan, Mark R; Fedurco, Milan; Fraser, Louise J; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin V; Scott Furey, W; George, David; Gietzen, Kimberley J; Goddard, Colin P; Golda, George S; Granieri, Philip A; Green, David E; Gustafson, David L; Hansen, Nancy F; Harnish, Kevin; Haudenschild, Christian D; Heyer, Narinder I; Hims, Matthew M; Ho, Johnny T; Horgan, Adrian M; Hoschler, Katya; Hurwitz, Steve; Ivanov, Denis V; Johnson, Maria Q; James, Terena; Huw Jones, T A; Kang, Gyoung-Dong; Kerelska, Tzvetana H; Kersey, Alan D; Khrebtukova, Irina; Kindwall, Alex P; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kokko-Gonzales, Paula I; Kumar, Anil; Laurent, Marc A; Lawley, Cynthia T; Lee, Sarah E; Lee, Xavier; Liao, Arnold K; Loch, Jennifer A; Lok, Mitch; Luo, Shujun; Mammen, Radhika M; Martin, John W; McCauley, Patrick G; McNitt, Paul; Mehta, Parul; Moon, Keith W; Mullens, Joe W; Newington, Taksina; Ning, Zemin; Ling Ng, Bee; Novo, Sonia M; O'Neill, Michael J; Osborne, Mark A; Osnowski, Andrew; Ostadan, Omead; Paraschos, Lambros L; Pickering, Lea; Pike, Andrew C; Pike, Alger C; Chris Pinkard, D; Pliskin, Daniel P; Podhasky, Joe; Quijano, Victor J; Raczy, Come; Rae, Vicki H; Rawlings, Stephen R; Chiva Rodriguez, Ana; Roe, Phyllida M; Rogers, John; Rogert Bacigalupo, Maria C; Romanov, Nikolai; Romieu, Anthony; Roth, Rithy K; Rourke, Natalie J; Ruediger, Silke T; Rusman, Eli; Sanches-Kuiper, Raquel M; Schenker, Martin R; Seoane, Josefina M; Shaw, Richard J; Shiver, Mitch K; Short, Steven W; Sizto, Ning L; Sluis, Johannes P; Smith, Melanie A; Ernest Sohna Sohna, Jean; Spence, Eric J; Stevens, Kim; Sutton, Neil; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Tregidgo, Carolyn L; Turcatti, Gerardo; Vandevondele, Stephanie; Verhovsky, Yuli; Virk, Selene M; Wakelin, Suzanne; Walcott, Gregory C; Wang, Jingwen; Worsley, Graham J; Yan, Juying; Yau, Ling; Zuerlein, Mike; Rogers, Jane; Mullikin, James C; Hurles, Matthew E; McCooke, Nick J; West, John S; Oaks, Frank L; Lundberg, Peter L; Klenerman, David; Durbin, Richard; Smith, Anthony J

    2008-11-01

    DNA sequence information underpins genetic research, enabling discoveries of important biological or medical benefit. Sequencing projects have traditionally used long (400-800 base pair) reads, but the existence of reference sequences for the human and many other genomes makes it possible to develop new, fast approaches to re-sequencing, whereby shorter reads are compared to a reference to identify intraspecies genetic variation. Here we report an approach that generates several billion bases of accurate nucleotide sequence per experiment at low cost. Single molecules of DNA are attached to a flat surface, amplified in situ and used as templates for synthetic sequencing with fluorescent reversible terminator deoxyribonucleotides. Images of the surface are analysed to generate high-quality sequence. We demonstrate application of this approach to human genome sequencing on flow-sorted X chromosomes and then scale the approach to determine the genome sequence of a male Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria. We build an accurate consensus sequence from >30x average depth of paired 35-base reads. We characterize four million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and four hundred thousand structural variants, many of which were previously unknown. Our approach is effective for accurate, rapid and economical whole-genome re-sequencing and many other biomedical applications.

  1. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  2. Specific MALDI-MSI: Tag-Mass.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Jonathan; Ayed, Mohamed El; Wisztorski, Maxence; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    MALDI imaging as a molecular mass spectrometry imaging technique (MSI) can provide accurate information about molecular composition on a surface. The last decade of MSI development has brought the technology to clinical and biomedical applications as a complementary technique of MRI and other molecular imaging. Then, this IMS technique is used for endogenous and exogenous molecule detection in pharmaceutical and biomedical fields. However, some limitations still exist due to physical and chemical aspects, and sensitivity of certain compounds is very low. Thus, we developed a multiplex technique for fast detection of different compound natures. The multiplex MALDI imaging technique uses a photocleavable group that can be detect easily by MALDI instrument. These techniques of targeted imaging using Tag-Mass molecules allow the multiplex detection of compounds like antibodies or oligonucleotides. Here, we describe how we used this technique to detect huge proteins and mRNA by MALDI imaging in rat brain and in a model for regeneration; the leech. PMID:20680601

  3. Mass Resolution and Mass Accuracy: How Much Is Enough?

    PubMed Central

    G. Marshall, Alan; T. Blakney, Greg; Chen, Tong; K. Kaiser, Nathan; M. McKenna, Amy; P. Rodgers, Ryan; M. Ruddy, Brian; Xian, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mass measurement requires the highest possible mass resolution, to ensure that only a single elemental composition contributes to the mass spectral peak in question. Although mass resolution is conventionally defined as the closest distinguishable separation between two peaks of equal height and width, the required mass resolving power can be ∼10× higher for equal width peaks whose peak height ratio is 100 : 1. Ergo, minimum resolving power requires specification of maximum dynamic range, and is thus 10–100× higher than the conventional definition. Mass resolving power also depends on mass-to-charge ratio. Mass accuracy depends on mass spectral signal-to-noise ratio and digital resolution. Finally, the reliability of elemental composition assignment can be improved by resolution of isotopic fine structure. Thus, the answer to the question of “how much is enough mass resolving power” requires that one first specify S/N ratio, dynamic range, digital resolution, mass-to-charge ratio, and (if available) isotopic fine structure. The highest available broadband mass resolving power and mass accuracy is from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Over the past five years, FT-ICR MS mass accuracy has improved by about an order of magnitude, based on higher magnetic field strength, conditional averaging of time-domain transients, better mass calibration (spectral segmentation; inclusion of a space charge term); radially dispersed excitation; phase correction to yield absorption-mode display; and new ICR cell segmentation designs. PMID:24349928

  4. Accurate upwind methods for the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of piecewise linear methods for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations of gas dynamics is presented. These methods are uniformly second-order accurate, and can be considered as extensions of Godunov's scheme. With an appropriate definition of monotonicity preservation for the case of linear convection, it can be shown that they preserve monotonicity. Similar to Van Leer's MUSCL scheme, they consist of two key steps: a reconstruction step followed by an upwind step. For the reconstruction step, a monotonicity constraint that preserves uniform second-order accuracy is introduced. Computational efficiency is enhanced by devising a criterion that detects the 'smooth' part of the data where the constraint is redundant. The concept and coding of the constraint are simplified by the use of the median function. A slope steepening technique, which has no effect at smooth regions and can resolve a contact discontinuity in four cells, is described. As for the upwind step, existing and new methods are applied in a manner slightly different from those in the literature. These methods are derived by approximating the Euler equations via linearization and diagonalization. At a 'smooth' interface, Harten, Lax, and Van Leer's one intermediate state model is employed. A modification for this model that can resolve contact discontinuities is presented. Near a discontinuity, either this modified model or a more accurate one, namely, Roe's flux-difference splitting. is used. The current presentation of Roe's method, via the conceptually simple flux-vector splitting, not only establishes a connection between the two splittings, but also leads to an admissibility correction with no conditional statement, and an efficient approximation to Osher's approximate Riemann solver. These reconstruction and upwind steps result in schemes that are uniformly second-order accurate and economical at smooth regions, and yield high resolution at discontinuities.

  5. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  6. The first accurate description of an aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-12-01

    As technology has advanced, the scientific study of auroral phenomena has increased by leaps and bounds. A look back at the earliest descriptions of aurorae offers an interesting look into how medieval scholars viewed the subjects that we study.Although there are earlier fragmentary references in the literature, the first accurate description of the aurora borealis appears to be that published by the German Catholic scholar Konrad von Megenberg (1309-1374) in his book Das Buch der Natur (The Book of Nature). The book was written between 1349 and 1350.

  7. Accurate density functional thermochemistry for larger molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Stefanov, B. B.; Curtiss, L. A.; Lucent Tech.

    1997-06-20

    Density functional methods are combined with isodesmic bond separation reaction energies to yield accurate thermochemistry for larger molecules. Seven different density functionals are assessed for the evaluation of heats of formation, Delta H 0 (298 K), for a test set of 40 molecules composed of H, C, O and N. The use of bond separation energies results in a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of all the density functionals. The B3-LYP functional has the smallest mean absolute deviation from experiment (1.5 kcal mol/f).

  8. Universality: Accurate Checks in Dyson's Hierarchical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina, J. J.; Meurice, Y.; Oktay, M. B.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk we present high-accuracy calculations of the susceptibility near βc for Dyson's hierarchical model in D = 3. Using linear fitting, we estimate the leading (γ) and subleading (Δ) exponents. Independent estimates are obtained by calculating the first two eigenvalues of the linearized renormalization group transformation. We found γ = 1.29914073 ± 10 -8 and, Δ = 0.4259469 ± 10-7 independently of the choice of local integration measure (Ising or Landau-Ginzburg). After a suitable rescaling, the approximate fixed points for a large class of local measure coincide accurately with a fixed point constructed by Koch and Wittwer.

  9. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research's focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  10. Accurate measure by weight of liquids in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.R.

    1992-12-12

    This research`s focus was to build a prototype of a computerized liquid dispensing system. This liquid metering system is based on the concept of altering the representative volume to account for temperature changes in the liquid to be dispensed. This is actualized by using a measuring tank and a temperature compensating displacement plunger. By constantly monitoring the temperature of the liquid, the plunger can be used to increase or decrease the specified volume to more accurately dispense liquid with a specified mass. In order to put the device being developed into proper engineering perspective, an extensive literature review was undertaken on all areas of industrial metering of liquids with an emphasis on gravimetric methods.

  11. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  12. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  13. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  14. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  15. Accurate Stellar Parameters for Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John Michael; Fischer, Debra; Basu, Sarbani; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2015-01-01

    A large impedement to our understanding of planet formation is obtaining a clear picture of planet radii and densities. Although determining precise ratios between planet and stellar host are relatively easy, determining accurate stellar parameters is still a difficult and costly undertaking. High resolution spectral analysis has traditionally yielded precise values for some stellar parameters but stars in common between catalogs from different authors or analyzed using different techniques often show offsets far in excess of their uncertainties. Most analyses now use some external constraint, when available, to break observed degeneracies between surface gravity, effective temperature, and metallicity which can otherwise lead to correlated errors in results. However, these external constraints are impossible to obtain for all stars and can require more costly observations than the initial high resolution spectra. We demonstrate that these discrepencies can be mitigated by use of a larger line list that has carefully tuned atomic line data. We use an iterative modeling technique that does not require external constraints. We compare the surface gravity obtained with our spectral synthesis modeling to asteroseismically determined values for 42 Kepler stars. Our analysis agrees well with only a 0.048 dex offset and an rms scatter of 0.05 dex. Such accurate stellar gravities can reduce the primary source of uncertainty in radii by almost an order of magnitude over unconstrained spectral analysis.

  16. Accurate photometric redshift probability density estimation - method comparison and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Brimioulle, Fabrice; Frank, Eibe; Friedrich, Oliver; Gruen, Daniel; Hoyle, Ben

    2015-10-01

    We introduce an ordinal classification algorithm for photometric redshift estimation, which significantly improves the reconstruction of photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs) for individual galaxies and galaxy samples. As a use case we apply our method to CFHTLS galaxies. The ordinal classification algorithm treats distinct redshift bins as ordered values, which improves the quality of photometric redshift PDFs, compared with non-ordinal classification architectures. We also propose a new single value point estimate of the galaxy redshift, which can be used to estimate the full redshift PDF of a galaxy sample. This method is competitive in terms of accuracy with contemporary algorithms, which stack the full redshift PDFs of all galaxies in the sample, but requires orders of magnitude less storage space. The methods described in this paper greatly improve the log-likelihood of individual object redshift PDFs, when compared with a popular neural network code (ANNZ). In our use case, this improvement reaches 50 per cent for high-redshift objects (z ≥ 0.75). We show that using these more accurate photometric redshift PDFs will lead to a reduction in the systematic biases by up to a factor of 4, when compared with less accurate PDFs obtained from commonly used methods. The cosmological analyses we examine and find improvement upon are the following: gravitational lensing cluster mass estimates, modelling of angular correlation functions and modelling of cosmic shear correlation functions.

  17. Accurate and precise determination of isotopic ratios by MC-ICP-MS: a review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu

    2009-01-01

    For many decades the accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios has remained a very strong interest to many researchers due to its important applications in earth, environmental, biological, archeological, and medical sciences. Traditionally, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has been the technique of choice for achieving the highest accuracy and precision. However, recent developments in multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) have brought a new dimension to this field. In addition to its simple and robust sample introduction, high sample throughput, and high mass resolution, the flat-topped peaks generated by this technique provide for accurate and precise determination of isotope ratios with precision reaching 0.001%, comparable to that achieved with TIMS. These features, in combination with the ability of the ICP source to ionize nearly all elements in the periodic table, have resulted in an increased use of MC-ICP-MS for such measurements in various sample matrices. To determine accurate and precise isotope ratios with MC-ICP-MS, utmost care must be exercised during sample preparation, optimization of the instrument, and mass bias corrections. Unfortunately, there are inconsistencies and errors evident in many MC-ICP-MS publications, including errors in mass bias correction models. This review examines "state-of-the-art" methodologies presented in the literature for achievement of precise and accurate determinations of isotope ratios by MC-ICP-MS. Some general rules for such accurate and precise measurements are suggested, and calculations of combined uncertainty of the data using a few common mass bias correction models are outlined.

  18. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their accurate locations and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect location, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and

  19. Imaging of uncommon retroperitoneal masses.

    PubMed

    Rajiah, Prabhakar; Sinha, Rakesh; Cuevas, Carlos; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Bush, William H; Kolokythas, Orpheus

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal masses not arising from major solid organs are uncommon. Although there is no simple method of classifying retroperitoneal masses, a reasonable approach is to consider the masses as predominantly solid or cystic and to subdivide these into neoplastic and nonneoplastic masses. Because the treatment options vary, it is useful to be able to differentiate these masses by using imaging criteria. Although the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses can be narrowed down to a certain extent on the basis of imaging characteristics, patterns of involvement, and demographics, there is still a considerable overlap of imaging findings for these masses, and histologic examination is often required for definitive diagnosis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging play an important role in characterization and in the assessment of the extent of the disease and involvement of adjacent and distant structures. Familiarity with the CT and MR imaging features of various retroperitoneal masses will facilitate accurate diagnosis and staging for aggressive lesions.

  20. Highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-30

    Disclosed is a highly accurate articulated coordinate measuring machine, comprising a revolute joint, comprising a circular encoder wheel, having an axis of rotation; a plurality of marks disposed around at least a portion of the circumference of the encoder wheel; bearing means for supporting the encoder wheel, while permitting free rotation of the encoder wheel about the wheel's axis of rotation; and a sensor, rigidly attached to the bearing means, for detecting the motion of at least some of the marks as the encoder wheel rotates; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the encoder wheel, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the sensor, for converting the output of the sensor into a set of cylindrical coordinates representing the position of the probe tip relative to a reference cylindrical coordinate system.

  1. Practical aspects of spatially high accurate methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Andrew G.; Mitchell, Curtis R.; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    The computational qualities of high order spatially accurate methods for the finite volume solution of the Euler equations are presented. Two dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), k-exact, and 'dimension by dimension' ENO reconstruction operators are discussed and compared in terms of reconstruction and solution accuracy, computational cost and oscillatory behavior in supersonic flows with shocks. Inherent steady state convergence difficulties are demonstrated for adaptive stencil algorithms. An exact solution to the heat equation is used to determine reconstruction error, and the computational intensity is reflected in operation counts. Standard MUSCL differencing is included for comparison. Numerical experiments presented include the Ringleb flow for numerical accuracy and a shock reflection problem. A vortex-shock interaction demonstrates the ability of the ENO scheme to excel in simulating unsteady high-frequency flow physics.

  2. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  3. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  4. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  5. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  6. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception.

  7. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2003-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  8. Accurate Thermal Stresses for Beams: Normal Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Pilkey, Walter D.

    2002-01-01

    Formulations for a general theory of thermoelasticity to generate accurate thermal stresses for structural members of aeronautical vehicles were developed in 1954 by Boley. The formulation also provides three normal stresses and a shear stress along the entire length of the beam. The Poisson effect of the lateral and transverse normal stresses on a thermally loaded beam is taken into account in this theory by employing an Airy stress function. The Airy stress function enables the reduction of the three-dimensional thermal stress problem to a two-dimensional one. Numerical results from the general theory of thermoelasticity are compared to those obtained from strength of materials. It is concluded that the theory of thermoelasticity for prismatic beams proposed in this paper can be used instead of strength of materials when precise stress results are desired.

  9. Accurate metacognition for visual sensory memory representations.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Annelinde R E; Sligte, Ilja G; Barrett, Adam B; Seth, Anil K; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-04-01

    The capacity to attend to multiple objects in the visual field is limited. However, introspectively, people feel that they see the whole visual world at once. Some scholars suggest that this introspective feeling is based on short-lived sensory memory representations, whereas others argue that the feeling of seeing more than can be attended to is illusory. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by combining objective memory performance with subjective confidence ratings during a change-detection task. This allowed us to compute a measure of metacognition--the degree of knowledge that subjects have about the correctness of their decisions--for different stages of memory. We show that subjects store more objects in sensory memory than they can attend to but, at the same time, have similar metacognition for sensory memory and working memory representations. This suggests that these subjective impressions are not an illusion but accurate reflections of the richness of visual perception. PMID:24549293

  10. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  11. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  12. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  13. Buoyancy contribution to uncertainty of mass, conventional mass and force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malengo, Andrea; Bich, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The conventional mass is a useful concept introduced to reduce the impact of the buoyancy correction in everyday mass measurements, thus avoiding in most cases its accurate determination, necessary in measurements of ‘true’ mass. Although usage of conventional mass is universal and standardized, the concept is considered as a sort of second-choice tool, to be avoided in high-accuracy applications. In this paper we show that this is a false belief, by elucidating the role played by covariances between volume and mass and between volume and conventional mass at the various stages of the dissemination chain and in the relationship between the uncertainties of mass and conventional mass. We arrive at somewhat counter-intuitive results: the volume of the transfer standard plays a comparatively minor role in the uncertainty budget of the standard under calibration. In addition, conventional mass is preferable to mass in normal, in-air operation, as its uncertainty is smaller than that of mass, if covariance terms are properly taken into account, and the uncertainty over-stating (typically) resulting from neglecting them is less severe than that (always) occurring with mass. The same considerations hold for force. In this respect, we show that the associated uncertainty is the same using mass or conventional mass, and, again, that the latter is preferable if covariance terms are neglected.

  14. Metabolic rate of carrying added mass: a function of walking speed, carried mass and mass location.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2014-11-01

    The effort of carrying additional mass at different body locations is important in ergonomics and in designing wearable robotics. We investigate the metabolic rate of carrying a load as a function of its mass, its location on the body and the subject's walking speed. Novel metabolic rate prediction equations for walking while carrying loads at the ankle, knees and back were developed based on experiments where subjects walked on a treadmill at 4, 5 or 6km/h bearing different amounts of added mass (up to 2kg per leg and 22kg for back). Compared to previously reported equations, ours are 7-69% more accurate. Results also show that relative cost for carrying a mass at a distal versus a proximal location changes with speed and mass. Contrary to mass carried on the back, mass attached to the leg cannot be modeled as an increase in body mass. PMID:24793822

  15. Radio Astronomers Set New Standard for Accurate Cosmic Distance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    the distance to NGC 4258 as either 27 or 29 million light-years, depending on assumptions about the characteristics of this type of star in that galaxy. Other Cepheid-based galaxy distances were used to calculate the expansion rate of the universe, called the Hubble Constant, announced by a team of HST observers last week. "This difference could mean that there may be more uncertainty in Cepheid-determined distances than people have realized," said Moran. "Providing this directly-determined distance to one galaxy -- a distance that can serve as a milestone -- should be helpful in determining distances to other galaxies, and thus the Hubble Constant and the size and age of the universe" The VLBA is a system of ten radio-telescope antennas, each 25 meters (82 feet) in diameter, stretching some 5,000 miles from Mauna Kea in Hawaii to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Operated from NRAO's Array Operations Center in Socorro, NM, the VLBA offers astronomers the greatest resolving power of any telescope anywhere. The NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Background information: Determining Cosmic Distances Determining cosmic distances obviously is vital to understanding the size of the universe. In turn, knowing the size of the universe is an important step in determining its age. "The size puts a limit on how much expansion could have occurred since the Big Bang, and thus tells us something about the age," said Moran. However, determining cosmic distances has proven to be a particularly thorny problem for astronomers. In the third century, B.C., the Greek astronomer Aristarchus devised a method of using trigonometry to determine the relative distances of the Moon and Sun, but in practice his method was difficult to use. Though a great first step, he missed the mark by a factor of 20. It wasn't until 1761 that trigonometric methods produced a relatively accurate distance to Venus, thus

  16. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  17. Atomic mass evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2012-11-12

    The atomic masses are important input parameters for nuclear astrophysics calculations. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) is the most reliable source for comprehensive information related to atomic masses. The latest AME was published in 2003. A new version, which will include the impact of a wealth of new, high-precision experimental data, will be published in December 2012. In this paper we will give the current status of AME2012. The mass surface has been changed significantly compared to AME2003, and the impact on astrophysics calculations is discussed.

  18. A highly accurate heuristic algorithm for the haplotype assembly problem

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common form of genetic variation in human DNA. The sequence of SNPs in each of the two copies of a given chromosome in a diploid organism is referred to as a haplotype. Haplotype information has many applications such as gene disease diagnoses, drug design, etc. The haplotype assembly problem is defined as follows: Given a set of fragments sequenced from the two copies of a chromosome of a single individual, and their locations in the chromosome, which can be pre-determined by aligning the fragments to a reference DNA sequence, the goal here is to reconstruct two haplotypes (h1, h2) from the input fragments. Existing algorithms do not work well when the error rate of fragments is high. Here we design an algorithm that can give accurate solutions, even if the error rate of fragments is high. Results We first give a dynamic programming algorithm that can give exact solutions to the haplotype assembly problem. The time complexity of the algorithm is O(n × 2t × t), where n is the number of SNPs, and t is the maximum coverage of a SNP site. The algorithm is slow when t is large. To solve the problem when t is large, we further propose a heuristic algorithm on the basis of the dynamic programming algorithm. Experiments show that our heuristic algorithm can give very accurate solutions. Conclusions We have tested our algorithm on a set of benchmark datasets. Experiments show that our algorithm can give very accurate solutions. It outperforms most of the existing programs when the error rate of the input fragments is high. PMID:23445458

  19. Accurate free energy calculation along optimized paths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    The path-based methods of free energy calculation, such as thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation, are simple in theory, but difficult in practice because in most cases smooth paths do not exist, especially for large molecules. In this article, we present a novel method to build the transition path of a peptide. We use harmonic potentials to restrain its nonhydrogen atom dihedrals in the initial state and set the equilibrium angles of the potentials as those in the final state. Through a series of steps of geometrical optimization, we can construct a smooth and short path from the initial state to the final state. This path can be used to calculate free energy difference. To validate this method, we apply it to a small 10-ALA peptide and find that the calculated free energy changes in helix-helix and helix-hairpin transitions are both self-convergent and cross-convergent. We also calculate the free energy differences between different stable states of beta-hairpin trpzip2, and the results show that this method is more efficient than the conventional molecular dynamics method in accurate free energy calculation.

  20. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  1. Fast and Provably Accurate Bilateral Filtering.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Dabhade, Swapnil D

    2016-06-01

    The bilateral filter is a non-linear filter that uses a range filter along with a spatial filter to perform edge-preserving smoothing of images. A direct computation of the bilateral filter requires O(S) operations per pixel, where S is the size of the support of the spatial filter. In this paper, we present a fast and provably accurate algorithm for approximating the bilateral filter when the range kernel is Gaussian. In particular, for box and Gaussian spatial filters, the proposed algorithm can cut down the complexity to O(1) per pixel for any arbitrary S . The algorithm has a simple implementation involving N+1 spatial filterings, where N is the approximation order. We give a detailed analysis of the filtering accuracy that can be achieved by the proposed approximation in relation to the target bilateral filter. This allows us to estimate the order N required to obtain a given accuracy. We also present comprehensive numerical results to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed and accuracy. PMID:27093722

  2. Accurate, reliable prototype earth horizon sensor head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F.; Cohen, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design and performance is described of an accurate and reliable prototype earth sensor head (ARPESH). The ARPESH employs a detection logic 'locator' concept and horizon sensor mechanization which should lead to high accuracy horizon sensing that is minimally degraded by spatial or temporal variations in sensing attitude from a satellite in orbit around the earth at altitudes in the 500 km environ 1,2. An accuracy of horizon location to within 0.7 km has been predicted, independent of meteorological conditions. This corresponds to an error of 0.015 deg-at 500 km altitude. Laboratory evaluation of the sensor indicates that this accuracy is achieved. First, the basic operating principles of ARPESH are described; next, detailed design and construction data is presented and then performance of the sensor under laboratory conditions in which the sensor is installed in a simulator that permits it to scan over a blackbody source against background representing the earth space interface for various equivalent plant temperatures.

  3. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Steven F.; Mudalel, Matthew L.; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations. PMID:24962141

  4. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  5. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10(-12) at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10(-7) cm(-1), which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels. PMID:25494728

  6. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  7. SNP-microarrays can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex forensic DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Lev; Ayers, Sheri B; LeFebvre, Aaron K; Darvasi, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Common forensic and mass disaster scenarios present DNA evidence that comprises a mixture of several contributors. Identifying the presence of an individual in such mixtures has proven difficult. In the current study, we evaluate the practical usefulness of currently available "off-the-shelf" SNP microarrays for such purposes. We found that a set of 3000 SNPs specifically selected for this purpose can accurately identify the presence of an individual in complex DNA mixtures of various compositions. For example, individuals contributing as little as 5% to a complex DNA mixture can be robustly identified even if the starting DNA amount was as little as 5.0ng and had undergone whole-genome amplification (WGA) prior to SNP analysis. The work presented in this study represents proof-of-principle that our previously proposed approach, can work with real "forensic-type" samples. Furthermore, in the absence of a low-density focused forensic SNP microarray, the use of standard, currently available high-density SNP microarrays can be similarly used and even increase statistical power due to the larger amount of available information.

  8. Specific glycoforms of MUC5AC and endorepellin accurately distinguish mucinous from nonmucinous pancreatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Maupin, Kevin; Curnutte, Bryan; Fallon, Brian; Feasley, Christa L; Brouhard, Elizabeth; Kwon, Richard; West, Christopher M; Cunningham, John; Brand, Randall; Castelli, Paola; Crippa, Stefano; Feng, Ziding; Allen, Peter; Simeone, Diane M; Haab, Brian B

    2013-10-01

    Specific protein glycoforms may be uniquely informative about the pathological state of a cyst and may serve as accurate biomarkers. Here we tested that hypothesis using antibody-lectin sandwich arrays in broad screens of protein glycoforms and in targeted studies of candidate markers. We profiled 16 different glycoforms of proteins captured by 72 different antibodies in cyst fluid from mucinous and nonmucinous cysts (n = 22), and we then tested a three-marker panel in 22 addition samples and 22 blinded samples. Glycan alterations were not widespread among the proteins and were mainly confined to MUC5AC and endorepellin. Specific glycoforms of these proteins, defined by reactivity with wheat germ agglutinin and a blood group H antibody, were significantly elevated in mucinous cysts, whereas the core protein levels were not significantly elevated. A three-marker panel based on these glycoforms distinguished mucinous from nonmucinous cysts with 93% accuracy (89% sensitivity, 100% specificity) in a prevalidation sample set (n = 44) and with 91% accuracy (87% sensitivity, 100% specificity) in independent, blinded samples (n = 22). Targeted lectin measurements and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the higher wheat germ agglutinin and blood group H reactivity was due to oligosaccharides terminating in GlcNAc or N-acetyl-lactosamine with occasional α1,2-linked fucose. The results show that MUC5AC and endorepellin glycoforms may be highly specific and sensitive biomarkers for the differentiation of mucinous from nonmucinous pancreatic cysts.

  9. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  10. Accurate eye center location through invariant isocentric patterns.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Roberto; Gevers, Theo

    2012-09-01

    Locating the center of the eyes allows for valuable information to be captured and used in a wide range of applications. Accurate eye center location can be determined using commercial eye-gaze trackers, but additional constraints and expensive hardware make these existing solutions unattractive and impossible to use on standard (i.e., visible wavelength), low-resolution images of eyes. Systems based solely on appearance are proposed in the literature, but their accuracy does not allow us to accurately locate and distinguish eye centers movements in these low-resolution settings. Our aim is to bridge this gap by locating the center of the eye within the area of the pupil on low-resolution images taken from a webcam or a similar device. The proposed method makes use of isophote properties to gain invariance to linear lighting changes (contrast and brightness), to achieve in-plane rotational invariance, and to keep low-computational costs. To further gain scale invariance, the approach is applied to a scale space pyramid. In this paper, we extensively test our approach for its robustness to changes in illumination, head pose, scale, occlusion, and eye rotation. We demonstrate that our system can achieve a significant improvement in accuracy over state-of-the-art techniques for eye center location in standard low-resolution imagery. PMID:22813958

  11. Mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Leo

    1987-01-01

    Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

  12. DNA sequence analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Kirpekar, F; Nordhoff, E; Larsen, L K; Kristiansen, K; Roepstorff, P; Hillenkamp, F

    1998-01-01

    Conventional DNA sequencing is based on gel electrophoretic separation of the sequencing products. Gel casting and electrophoresis are the time limiting steps, and the gel separation is occasionally imperfect due to aberrant mobility of certain fragments, leading to erroneous sequence determination. Furthermore, illegitimately terminated products frequently cannot be distinguished from correctly terminated ones, a phenomenon that also obscures data interpretation. In the present work the use of MALDI mass spectrometry for sequencing of DNA amplified from clinical samples is implemented. The unambiguous and fast identification of deletions and substitutions in DNA amplified from heterozygous carriers realistically suggest MALDI mass spectrometry as a future alternative to conventional sequencing procedures for high throughput screening for mutations. Unique features of the method are demonstrated by sequencing a DNA fragment that could not be sequenced conventionally because of gel electrophoretic band compression and the presence of multiple non-specific termination products. Taking advantage of the accurate mass information provided by MALDI mass spectrometry, the sequence was deduced, and the nature of the non-specific termination could be determined. The method described here increases the fidelity in DNA sequencing, is fast, compatible with standard DNA sequencing procedures, and amenable to automation. PMID:9592136

  13. The central mass and mass-to-light profile of the Galactic globular cluster M15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Brok, Mark; van de Ven, Glenn; van den Bosch, Remco; Watkins, Laura

    2014-02-01

    We analyse line-of-sight velocity and proper motion data of stars in the Galactic globular cluster M15 using a new method to fit dynamical models to discrete kinematic data. Our fitting method maximizes the likelihood for individual stars and, as such, does not suffer the same loss of spatial and velocity information incurred when spatially binning data or measuring velocity moments. In this paper, we show that the radial variation in M15 of the mass-to-light ratio is consistent with previous estimates and theoretical predictions, which verifies our method. Our best-fitting axisymmetric Jeans models do include a central dark mass of ˜2 ± 1 × 103 M⊙, which can be explained by a high concentration of stellar remnants at the cluster centre. This paper shows that, from a technical point of view and with current computing power, spatial binning of data is no longer necessary. This not only leads to more accurate fits, but also avoids biased mass estimates due to the loss of resolution. Furthermore, we find that the mass concentration in M15 is significantly higher than previously measured, and is in close agreement with theoretical predictions for core-collapsed globular clusters without a central intermediate-mass black hole.

  14. The Clinical Impact of Accurate Cystine Calculi Characterization Using Dual-Energy Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Haley, William E; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Qu, Mingliang; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Goldfarb, David S; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has recently been suggested as the imaging modality of choice for kidney stones due to its ability to provide information on stone composition. Standard postprocessing of the dual-energy images accurately identifies uric acid stones, but not other types. Cystine stones can be identified from DECT images when analyzed with advanced postprocessing. This case report describes clinical implications of accurate diagnosis of cystine stones using DECT.

  15. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  16. Fast and accurate determination of modularity and its effect size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, Santiago, III; Nyberg, Amy; Del Genio, Charo I.; Bassler, Kevin E.

    2015-02-01

    We present a fast spectral algorithm for community detection in complex networks. Our method searches for the partition with the maximum value of the modularity via the interplay of several refinement steps that include both agglomeration and division. We validate the accuracy of the algorithm by applying it to several real-world benchmark networks. On all these, our algorithm performs as well or better than any other known polynomial scheme. This allows us to extensively study the modularity distribution in ensembles of Erdős-Rényi networks, producing theoretical predictions for means and variances inclusive of finite-size corrections. Our work provides a way to accurately estimate the effect size of modularity, providing a z-score measure of it and enabling a more informative comparison of networks with different numbers of nodes and links.

  17. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Simon David

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  18. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  19. Accurate Thermal Conductivities from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbogno, Christian

    2015-03-01

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity at high temperatures has remained elusive. On the one hand, Boltzmann transport techniques that include anharmonic effects in the nuclear dynamics only perturbatively become inaccurate or inapplicable under such conditions. On the other hand, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) methods suffer from enormous finite-size artifacts in the computationally feasible supercells, which prevent an accurate extrapolation to the bulk limit of the thermal conductivity. In this work, we overcome this limitation by performing ab initio MD simulations in thermodynamic equilibrium that account for all orders of anharmonicity. The thermal conductivity is then assessed from the auto-correlation function of the heat flux using the Green-Kubo formalism. Foremost, we discuss the fundamental theory underlying a first-principles definition of the heat flux using the virial theorem. We validate our approach and in particular the techniques developed to overcome finite time and size effects, e.g., by inspecting silicon, the thermal conductivity of which is particularly challenging to converge. Furthermore, we use this framework to investigate the thermal conductivity of ZrO2, which is known for its high degree of anharmonicity. Our calculations shed light on the heat resistance mechanism active in this material, which eventually allows us to discuss how the thermal conductivity can be controlled by doping and co-doping. This work has been performed in collaboration with R. Ramprasad (University of Connecticut), C. G. Levi and C. G. Van de Walle (University of California Santa Barbara).

  20. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  1. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  2. Chewing simulation with a physically accurate deformable model.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Andra Maria; Ruge, Sebastian; Hauth, Steffen; Kordaß, Bernd; Linsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, CAD/CAM software is being used to compute the optimal shape and position of a new tooth model meant for a patient. With this possible future application in mind, we present in this article an independent and stand-alone interactive application that simulates the human chewing process and the deformation it produces in the food substrate. Chewing motion sensors are used to produce an accurate representation of the jaw movement. The substrate is represented by a deformable elastic model based on the finite linear elements method, which preserves physical accuracy. Collision detection based on spatial partitioning is used to calculate the forces that are acting on the deformable model. Based on the calculated information, geometry elements are added to the scene to enhance the information available for the user. The goal of the simulation is to present a complete scene to the dentist, highlighting the points where the teeth came into contact with the substrate and giving information about how much force acted at these points, which therefore makes it possible to indicate whether the tooth is being used incorrectly in the mastication process. Real-time interactivity is desired and achieved within limits, depending on the complexity of the employed geometric models. The presented simulation is a first step towards the overall project goal of interactively optimizing tooth position and shape under the investigation of a virtual chewing process using real patient data (Fig 1). PMID:26389135

  3. In situ studies on controlling an atomically-accurate formation process of gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Cheng, Hao; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Ting; Bao, Jie; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Zheng; Ma, Jingyuan; Sun, Fanfei; Liu, Qinghua; Yao, Tao; Deng, Huijuan; Wang, Shuxin; Zhu, Manzhou; Wei, Shiqiang

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the molecular formation mechanism of metal nanoclusters is essential for developing chemistry for accurate control over their synthesis. Herein, the ``top-down'' synthetic process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters via HCl etching of polydisperse Aun clusters (15 <= n <= 65) is traced by a combination of in situ X-ray/UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent mass spectrometry. It is revealed experimentally that the HCl-induced synthesis of Au13 is achieved by accurately controlling the etching process with two distinctive steps, in sharp contrast to the traditional thiol-etching mechanism through release of the Au(i) complex. The first step involves the direct fragmentation of the initial larger Aun clusters into metastable intermediate Au8-Au13 smaller clusters. This is a critical step, which allows for the secondary size-growth step of the intermediates toward the atomically monodisperse Au13 clusters via incorporating the reactive Au(i)-Cl species in the solution. Such a secondary-growth pathway is further confirmed by the successful growth of Au13 through reaction of isolated Au11 clusters with AuClPPh3 in the HCl environment. This work addresses the importance of reaction intermediates in guiding the way towards controllable synthesis of metal nanoclusters.Knowledge of the molecular formation mechanism of metal nanoclusters is essential for developing chemistry for accurate control over their synthesis. Herein, the ``top-down'' synthetic process of monodisperse Au13 nanoclusters via HCl etching of polydisperse Aun clusters (15 <= n <= 65) is traced by a combination of in situ X-ray/UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent mass spectrometry. It is revealed experimentally that the HCl-induced synthesis of Au13 is achieved by accurately controlling the etching process with two distinctive steps, in sharp contrast to the traditional thiol-etching mechanism through release of the Au(i) complex. The first step involves the direct

  4. Photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate ultrasonic transducer responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiwei; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  5. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Mass in the abdomen ... care provider make a diagnosis. For example, the abdomen can be divided into four areas: Right-upper ... pain or masses include: Epigastric -- center of the abdomen just below the rib cage Periumbilical -- area around ...

  6. Accurate body composition measures from whole-body silhouettes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bowen; Avila, Jesus I.; Ng, Bennett K.; Fan, Bo; Loo, Victoria; Gilsanz, Vicente; Hangartner, Thomas; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Lappe, Joan; Oberfield, Sharon; Winer, Karen; Zemel, Babette; Shepherd, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Obesity and its consequences, such as diabetes, are global health issues that burden about 171 × 106 adult individuals worldwide. Fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2), fat-free mass index (FFMI, kg/m2), and percent fat mass may be useful to evaluate under- and overnutrition and muscle development in a clinical or research environment. This proof-of-concept study tested whether frontal whole-body silhouettes could be used to accurately measure body composition parameters using active shape modeling (ASM) techniques. Methods: Binary shape images (silhouettes) were generated from the skin outline of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scans of 200 healthy children of ages from 6 to 16 yr. The silhouette shape variation from the average was described using an ASM, which computed principal components for unique modes of shape. Predictive models were derived from the modes for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat using stepwise linear regression. The models were compared to simple models using demographics alone [age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index z-scores (BMIZ)]. Results: The authors found that 95% of the shape variation of the sampled population could be explained using 26 modes. In most cases, the body composition variables could be predicted similarly between demographics-only and shape-only models. However, the combination of shape with demographics improved all estimates of boys and girls compared to the demographics-only model. The best prediction models for FMI, FFMI, and percent fat agreed with the actual measures with R2 adj. (the coefficient of determination adjusted for the number of parameters used in the model equation) values of 0.86, 0.95, and 0.75 for boys and 0.90, 0.89, and 0.69 for girls, respectively. Conclusions: Whole-body silhouettes in children may be useful to derive estimates of body composition including FMI, FFMI, and percent fat. These results support the feasibility of measuring body composition variables from simple

  7. Spectroscopic Determination of Masses (and Implied Ages) for Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, M.; Hogg, David W.; Rix, H.-W.; Martig, M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Ho, A. Y. Q.

    2016-06-01

    The mass of a star is arguably its most fundamental parameter. For red giant stars, tracers luminous enough to be observed across the Galaxy, mass implies a stellar evolution age. It has proven to be extremely difficult to infer ages and masses directly from red giant spectra using existing methods. From the Kepler and apogee surveys, samples of several thousand stars exist with high-quality spectra and asteroseismic masses. Here we show that from these data we can build a data-driven spectral model using The Cannon, which can determine stellar masses to ˜0.07 dex from apogee dr12 spectra of red giants; these imply age estimates accurate to ˜0.2 dex (40%). We show that The Cannon constrains these ages foremost from spectral regions with CN absorption lines, elements whose surface abundances reflect mass-dependent dredge-up. We deliver an unprecedented catalog of 70,000 giants (including 20,000 red clump stars) with mass and age estimates, spanning the entire disk (from the Galactic center to R˜ 20 kpc). We show that the age information in the spectra is not simply a corollary of the birth-material abundances {{[Fe/H]}} and [α /{Fe}], and that, even within a monoabundance population of stars, there are age variations that vary sensibly with Galactic position. Such stellar age constraints across the Milky Way open up new avenues in Galactic archeology.

  8. Accurate theoretical chemistry with coupled pair models.

    PubMed

    Neese, Frank; Hansen, Andreas; Wennmohs, Frank; Grimme, Stefan

    2009-05-19

    Quantum chemistry has found its way into the everyday work of many experimental chemists. Calculations can predict the outcome of chemical reactions, afford insight into reaction mechanisms, and be used to interpret structure and bonding in molecules. Thus, contemporary theory offers tremendous opportunities in experimental chemical research. However, even with present-day computers and algorithms, we cannot solve the many particle Schrodinger equation exactly; inevitably some error is introduced in approximating the solutions of this equation. Thus, the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations is of critical importance. The affordable accuracy depends on molecular size and particularly on the total number of atoms: for orientation, ethanol has 9 atoms, aspirin 21 atoms, morphine 40 atoms, sildenafil 63 atoms, paclitaxel 113 atoms, insulin nearly 800 atoms, and quaternary hemoglobin almost 12,000 atoms. Currently, molecules with up to approximately 10 atoms can be very accurately studied by coupled cluster (CC) theory, approximately 100 atoms with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), approximately 1000 atoms with density functional theory (DFT), and beyond that number with semiempirical quantum chemistry and force-field methods. The overwhelming majority of present-day calculations in the 100-atom range use DFT. Although these methods have been very successful in quantum chemistry, they do not offer a well-defined hierarchy of calculations that allows one to systematically converge to the correct answer. Recently a number of rather spectacular failures of DFT methods have been found-even for seemingly simple systems such as hydrocarbons, fueling renewed interest in wave function-based methods that incorporate the relevant physics of electron correlation in a more systematic way. Thus, it would be highly desirable to fill the gap between 10 and 100 atoms with highly correlated ab initio methods. We have found that one of the earliest (and now

  9. First Results from the CARIBU Facility: Mass Measurements on the r-Process Path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Schelt, J.; Lascar, D.; Savard, G.; Clark, J. A.; Bertone, P. F.; Caldwell, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Morgan, G. E.; Orford, R.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.

    2013-08-01

    The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has made mass measurements of 33 neutron-rich nuclides provided by the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The studied region includes the Sn132 double shell closure and ranges in Z from In to Cs, with Sn isotopes measured out to A=135, and the typical measurement precision is at the 100 ppb level or better. The region encompasses a possible major waiting point of the astrophysical r process, and the impact of the masses on the r process is shown through a series of simulations. These first-ever simulations with direct mass information on this waiting point show significant increases in waiting time at Sn and Sb in comparison with commonly used mass models, demonstrating the inadequacy of existing models for accurate r-process calculations.

  10. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  11. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-D heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.

  12. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-Dmore » heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.« less

  13. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  14. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems.

  15. Accurate transition rates for intercombination lines of singly ionized nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.

    2011-01-15

    The transition energies and rates for the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sub 1,2}-2s2p{sup 3} {sup 5}S{sub 2}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s-2s{sup 2}2p3p intercombination transitions have been calculated using term-dependent nonorthogonal orbitals in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach. Several sets of spectroscopic and correlation nonorthogonal functions have been chosen to describe adequately term dependence of wave functions and various correlation corrections. Special attention has been focused on the accurate representation of strong interactions between the 2s2p{sup 3} {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o} and 2s{sup 2}2p3s {sup 1,3}P{sub 1}{sup o}levels. The relativistic corrections are included through the one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit operators and two-body spin-other-orbit and spin-spin operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The importance of core-valence correlation effects has been examined. The accuracy of present transition rates is evaluated by the agreement between the length and velocity formulations combined with the agreement between the calculated and measured transition energies. The present results for transition probabilities, branching fraction, and lifetimes have been compared with previous calculations and experiments.

  16. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  17. Nanoparticle counting: towards accurate determination of the molar concentration.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Gao, Xiaohu

    2014-11-01

    Innovations in nanotechnology have brought tremendous opportunities for the advancement of many research frontiers, ranging from electronics, photonics, energy, to medicine. To maximize the benefits of nano-scaled materials in different devices and systems, precise control of their concentration is a prerequisite. While concentrations of nanoparticles have been provided in other forms (e.g., mass), accurate determination of molar concentration, arguably the most useful one for chemical reactions and applications, has been a major challenge (especially for nanoparticles smaller than 30 nm). Towards this significant yet chronic problem, a variety of strategies are currently under development. Most of these strategies are applicable to a specialized group of nanoparticles due to their restrictions on the composition and size range of nanoparticles. As research and uses of nanomaterials are being explored in an unprecedented speed, it is necessary to develop universal strategies that are easy to use and are compatible with nanoparticles of different sizes, compositions, and shapes. This review outlines the theories and applications of current strategies to measure nanoparticle molar concentration, discusses the advantages and limitations of these methods, and provides insights into future directions.

  18. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  19. 77 FR 3800 - Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... COMMISSION Accurate NDE & Inspection, LLC; Confirmatory Order In the Matter of Accurate NDE & Docket: 150... request ADR with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, on August 9, 2011, Accurate NDE requested ADR to resolve this matter with the NRC. On September 28,...

  20. Learning accurate very fast decision trees from uncertain data streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chunquan; Zhang, Yang; Shi, Peng; Hu, Zhengguo

    2015-12-01

    Most existing works on data stream classification assume the streaming data is precise and definite. Such assumption, however, does not always hold in practice, since data uncertainty is ubiquitous in data stream applications due to imprecise measurement, missing values, privacy protection, etc. The goal of this paper is to learn accurate decision tree models from uncertain data streams for classification analysis. On the basis of very fast decision tree (VFDT) algorithms, we proposed an algorithm for constructing an uncertain VFDT tree with classifiers at tree leaves (uVFDTc). The uVFDTc algorithm can exploit uncertain information effectively and efficiently in both the learning and the classification phases. In the learning phase, it uses Hoeffding bound theory to learn from uncertain data streams and yield fast and reasonable decision trees. In the classification phase, at tree leaves it uses uncertain naive Bayes (UNB) classifiers to improve the classification performance. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-life datasets demonstrate the strong ability of uVFDTc to classify uncertain data streams. The use of UNB at tree leaves has improved the performance of uVFDTc, especially the any-time property, the benefit of exploiting uncertain information, and the robustness against uncertainty.

  1. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  2. Personalized Orthodontic Accurate Tooth Arrangement System with Complete Teeth Model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Dai, Ning; Liu, Yi; Fan, Qilei; Hou, Yulin; Jiang, Xiaotong

    2015-09-01

    The accuracy, validity and lack of relation information between dental root and jaw in tooth arrangement are key problems in tooth arrangement technology. This paper aims to describe a newly developed virtual, personalized and accurate tooth arrangement system based on complete information about dental root and skull. Firstly, a feature constraint database of a 3D teeth model is established. Secondly, for computed simulation of tooth movement, the reference planes and lines are defined by the anatomical reference points. The matching mathematical model of teeth pattern and the principle of the specific pose transformation of rigid body are fully utilized. The relation of position between dental root and alveolar bone is considered during the design process. Finally, the relative pose relationships among various teeth are optimized using the object mover, and a personalized therapeutic schedule is formulated. Experimental results show that the virtual tooth arrangement system can arrange abnormal teeth very well and is sufficiently flexible. The relation of position between root and jaw is favorable. This newly developed system is characterized by high-speed processing and quantitative evaluation of the amount of 3D movement of an individual tooth.

  3. Retinal Connectomics: Towards Complete, Accurate Networks

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Robert E.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Anderson, James R.; Sigulinsky, Crystal; Lauritzen, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Connectomics is a strategy for mapping complex neural networks based on high-speed automated electron optical imaging, computational assembly of neural data volumes, web-based navigational tools to explore 1012–1015 byte (terabyte to petabyte) image volumes, and annotation and markup tools to convert images into rich networks with cellular metadata. These collections of network data and associated metadata, analyzed using tools from graph theory and classification theory, can be merged with classical systems theory, giving a more completely parameterized view of how biologic information processing systems are implemented in retina and brain. Networks have two separable features: topology and connection attributes. The first findings from connectomics strongly validate the idea that the topologies complete retinal networks are far more complex than the simple schematics that emerged from classical anatomy. In particular, connectomics has permitted an aggressive refactoring of the retinal inner plexiform layer, demonstrating that network function cannot be simply inferred from stratification; exposing the complex geometric rules for inserting different cells into a shared network; revealing unexpected bidirectional signaling pathways between mammalian rod and cone systems; documenting selective feedforward systems, novel candidate signaling architectures, new coupling motifs, and the highly complex architecture of the mammalian AII amacrine cell. This is but the beginning, as the underlying principles of connectomics are readily transferrable to non-neural cell complexes and provide new contexts for assessing intercellular communication. PMID:24016532

  4. Chromatin States Accurately Classify Cell Differentiation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Jessica L.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the concerted interactions between transcription factors and chromatin regulators. While recent studies have identified global chromatin state changes across cell-types, it remains unclear to what extent these changes are co-regulated during cell-differentiation. Here we present a comprehensive computational analysis by assembling a large dataset containing genome-wide occupancy information of 5 histone modifications in 27 human cell lines (including 24 normal and 3 cancer cell lines) obtained from the public domain, followed by independent analysis at three different representations. We classified the differentiation stage of a cell-type based on its genome-wide pattern of chromatin states, and found that our method was able to identify normal cell lines with nearly 100% accuracy. We then applied our model to classify the cancer cell lines and found that each can be unequivocally classified as differentiated cells. The differences can be in part explained by the differential activities of three regulatory modules associated with embryonic stem cells. We also found that the “hotspot” genes, whose chromatin states change dynamically in accordance to the differentiation stage, are not randomly distributed across the genome but tend to be embedded in multi-gene chromatin domains, and that specialized gene clusters tend to be embedded in stably occupied domains. PMID:22363642

  5. Retinal connectomics: towards complete, accurate networks.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Anderson, James R; Sigulinsky, Crystal; Lauritzen, Scott

    2013-11-01

    Connectomics is a strategy for mapping complex neural networks based on high-speed automated electron optical imaging, computational assembly of neural data volumes, web-based navigational tools to explore 10(12)-10(15) byte (terabyte to petabyte) image volumes, and annotation and markup tools to convert images into rich networks with cellular metadata. These collections of network data and associated metadata, analyzed using tools from graph theory and classification theory, can be merged with classical systems theory, giving a more completely parameterized view of how biologic information processing systems are implemented in retina and brain. Networks have two separable features: topology and connection attributes. The first findings from connectomics strongly validate the idea that the topologies of complete retinal networks are far more complex than the simple schematics that emerged from classical anatomy. In particular, connectomics has permitted an aggressive refactoring of the retinal inner plexiform layer, demonstrating that network function cannot be simply inferred from stratification; exposing the complex geometric rules for inserting different cells into a shared network; revealing unexpected bidirectional signaling pathways between mammalian rod and cone systems; documenting selective feedforward systems, novel candidate signaling architectures, new coupling motifs, and the highly complex architecture of the mammalian AII amacrine cell. This is but the beginning, as the underlying principles of connectomics are readily transferrable to non-neural cell complexes and provide new contexts for assessing intercellular communication. PMID:24016532

  6. Accurate, Fully-Automated NMR Spectral Profiling for Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjordahl, Trent C.; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R.; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person’s biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person’s “metabolic profile"—i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person’s metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the “signatures” of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively—with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications

  7. Accurate, fully-automated NMR spectral profiling for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ravanbakhsh, Siamak; Liu, Philip; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Bjordahl, Trent C; Mandal, Rupasri; Grant, Jason R; Wilson, Michael; Eisner, Roman; Sinelnikov, Igor; Hu, Xiaoyu; Luchinat, Claudio; Greiner, Russell; Wishart, David S

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause significant changes to the concentrations of small molecules (a.k.a. metabolites) that appear in a person's biofluids, which means such diseases can often be readily detected from a person's "metabolic profile"-i.e., the list of concentrations of those metabolites. This information can be extracted from a biofluids Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. However, due to its complexity, NMR spectral profiling has remained manual, resulting in slow, expensive and error-prone procedures that have hindered clinical and industrial adoption of metabolomics via NMR. This paper presents a system, BAYESIL, which can quickly, accurately, and autonomously produce a person's metabolic profile. Given a 1D 1H NMR spectrum of a complex biofluid (specifically serum or cerebrospinal fluid), BAYESIL can automatically determine the metabolic profile. This requires first performing several spectral processing steps, then matching the resulting spectrum against a reference compound library, which contains the "signatures" of each relevant metabolite. BAYESIL views spectral matching as an inference problem within a probabilistic graphical model that rapidly approximates the most probable metabolic profile. Our extensive studies on a diverse set of complex mixtures including real biological samples (serum and CSF), defined mixtures and realistic computer generated spectra; involving > 50 compounds, show that BAYESIL can autonomously find the concentration of NMR-detectable metabolites accurately (~ 90% correct identification and ~ 10% quantification error), in less than 5 minutes on a single CPU. These results demonstrate that BAYESIL is the first fully-automatic publicly-accessible system that provides quantitative NMR spectral profiling effectively-with an accuracy on these biofluids that meets or exceeds the performance of trained experts. We anticipate this tool will usher in high-throughput metabolomics and enable a wealth of new applications of NMR in

  8. Neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.

    1994-04-01

    The existence of a finite neutrino mass would have important consequences in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Experimental sensitivities have continued to be pushed down without any confirmed evidence for a finite neutrino mass. Yet there are several observations of discrepancies between theoretical predictions and observations which might be possible indications of a finite neutrino mass. Thus, extensive theoretical and experimental work is underway to resolve these issues.

  9. Non-targeted screening of house dust samples using accurate mass TOFMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    House dust exists as an environmental repository of chemicals to which we are exposed in our homes. A growing number of studies have targeted select persistent organic and inorganic pollutants found in house dust. Many have concluded that dust exists as an important human expos...

  10. Accurate Alpha Abundance and C/O of Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyette, Mark; Muirhead, Philip; Mann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate methods for measuring elemental abundances in M dwarf stars from high resolution (R>25,000), near-infrared spectra. With synthetic spectra from the BT-Settl model atmosphere library, we identify NIR features sensitive to enhancement of alpha elements (C, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Ti) in M dwarfs. We also describe a method for measuring the amount of oxygen not bound in CO from molecular and atomic features in the NIR Y-band that, when combined with recently published methods of measuring carbon abundance in M dwarfs from K-band spectra, provides the ratio of carbon to oxygen (C/O). The ratio of carbon to oxygen is an important parameter for determining interior structures of exoplanets and processes that drive planet formation as evidenced by recent studies of the super Earth 55 Cnc e. We outline a potential observing program to empirically calibrate these methods via a sample of M dwarfs with widely-separated (5''-1500''), but associated, F, G or K-type binary companions. Once calibrated, we will apply these methods to a survey of nearby M dwarfs, including many stars that will be observed by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).

  11. An improved method for accurate prediction of mass flows through combustor liner holes

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, R.C.; Gueroui, D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a simple approach to the solution of flow through combustor liner holes which can be used by practicing combustor engineers as well as providing the specialist modeler with a convenient boundary condition. For modeling, suppose that all relevant details of the incoming jets can be readily predicted, then the computational boundary can be limited to the inner wall of the liner and to the jets themselves. The scope of this paper is limited to the derivation of a simple analysis, the development of a reliable test technique, and to the correlation of data for plane holes having a diameter which is large when compared to the liner wall thickness. The effect of internal liner flow on the performance of the holes is neglected; this is considered to be justifiable because the analysis terminates at a short distance downstream of the hole and the significantly lower velocities inside the combustor have had little opportunity to have taken any effect. It is intended to extend the procedure to more complex hole forms and flow configurations in later papers.

  12. Accurate nuclear masses from a three parameter Kohn-Sham DFT approach (BCPM)

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Schuck, P.; Vinas, X.

    2012-10-20

    Given the promising features of the recently proposed Barcelona-Catania-Paris (BCP) functional [1], it is the purpose of this work to still improve on it. It is, for instance, shown that the number of open parameters can be reduced from 4-5 to 2-3, i.e. by practically a factor of two without deteriorating the results.

  13. How Accurate Is the Science News We Receive from the Mass Media?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molitor, Fred

    One day before a health study appeared in the "New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM)" the study was reported media. A content analysis of the top 5 national newspapers examined the accuracy of this news reporting. The NEJM study found that men who took aspirin had 50% fewer heart attacks than men who received a placebo. Analysis of the original…

  14. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  15. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  16. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  17. Dialing Up Telecommunications Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Mary Ellen

    1993-01-01

    Describes how to find accurate, current information about telecommunications industries, products and services, rates and tariffs, and regulatory information using electronic information resources available from the private and public sectors. A sidebar article provides contact information for producers and service providers. (KRN)

  18. K{sub e4} decay as a source of information about the σ-particle mass and about the nature of spin-1 mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Shabalin, E. P.

    2014-12-15

    Data on the form factors for K{sub e4} decay make it possible to fix the value of a parameter that is not determined by the theory itself and which is contained in the Lagrangian for the system formed by 0{sup +} and 0{sup −} mesons. This makes it possible to find the mass of the lightest σ meson: mσ = 663 MeV. As for the nature of spin-1 mesons, which also contribute to the form factors for K{sub e4} decay, data on them give no way to interpret spin-1 mesons as gauge bosons of chiral theory.

  19. Inertial Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    The inertial balance is one device that can help students to quantify the quality of inertia--a body's resistance to a change in movement--in more generally understood terms of mass. In this hands-on activity, students use the inertial balance to develop a more quantitative idea of what mass means in an inertial sense. The activity also helps…

  20. Gas Chromatic Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen

    1995-01-01

    Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) used to measure and identify combustion species present in trace concentration. Advanced extractive diagnostic method measures to parts per billion (PPB), as well as differentiates between different types of hydrocarbons. Applicable for petrochemical, waste incinerator, diesel transporation, and electric utility companies in accurately monitoring types of hydrocarbon emissions generated by fuel combustion, in order to meet stricter environmental requirements. Other potential applications include manufacturing processes requiring precise detection of toxic gaseous chemicals, biomedical applications requiring precise identification of accumulative gaseous species, and gas utilit